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Sociable strolls key to achieve improved health

Sociable strolls key to achieve improved health

A study by Sheffield Hallam University into short health walks has found that their success primarily hinges on social factors. The research shows that being able to socialise and enjoy company are key ways to achieve long-term behaviour change and improved health. [More]
Athletes need to drink when thirsty to avoid exercise-associated hyponatremia

Athletes need to drink when thirsty to avoid exercise-associated hyponatremia

For hikers, football players, endurance athletes, and a growing range of elite and recreational exercisers, the best approach to preventing potentially serious reductions in blood sodium level is to drink when thirsty, according to an updated consensus statement on exercise-associated hyponatremia (EAH). [More]
Neighborhood physical and social environments may affect type 2 diabetes risk

Neighborhood physical and social environments may affect type 2 diabetes risk

Neighborhood resources to support greater physical activity and, to a lesser extent, healthy diets appear to be associated with a lower incidence of type 2 diabetes, although the results vary by the method of measurement used, according to an article published online by JAMA Internal Medicine. [More]
Researchers discover gene locations affecting wrist bones in children

Researchers discover gene locations affecting wrist bones in children

Pediatric researchers have discovered gene locations affecting bone strength in wrist bones, the most common site for fractures in children. Children who have those genetic variants may be at higher-than-average risk of wrist fractures, and could especially benefit from activities and diets that promote bone strength. [More]
University of Leicester collaborates with Youth Sport Trust to make adolescent girls stay active

University of Leicester collaborates with Youth Sport Trust to make adolescent girls stay active

Researchers from the University of Leicester are working with the Youth Sport Trust to determine whether a school-based physical activity programme could help provide the key to encouraging adolescent girls to be active and stay active. [More]
UC Riverside researchers explore effects of early-life exercise

UC Riverside researchers explore effects of early-life exercise

More than one in three adults in the United States is considered to be obese. What impact can exercise done early in life have on the propensity for exercising during the adult years? A team of researchers at the University of California, Riverside did experiments on mice in the lab to find out. Specifically, they evaluated the effects of early exercise on adult physical activity, body mass, food consumption and circulating leptin levels. [More]
Nutrition experts offer tips to employees working in sedentary environment

Nutrition experts offer tips to employees working in sedentary environment

When it comes to taking a physical activity break at work, it's more about the frequency than duration. That's advice Kansas State University experts in human nutrition and kinesiology are offering to employees working in a sedentary environment who are looking to improve their health. [More]
'Fitness' foods encourage people to eat more, exercise less

'Fitness' foods encourage people to eat more, exercise less

Weight-conscious consumers are often drawn to foods such as Clif Bars and Wheaties, whose packaging suggests that they promote fitness. But according to a new study in the Journal of Marketing Research, such "fitness branding" encourages consumers to eat more of those foods and to exercise less, potentially undermining their efforts to lose or control their weight. [More]
Child fitness levels falling at faster rate than feared

Child fitness levels falling at faster rate than feared

Child fitness levels are falling at an even faster rate than first feared - and this time there is evidence it has nothing to do with obesity. [More]
ViaSat named one of 2015 San Diego Business Journal 'Healthiest Companies'

ViaSat named one of 2015 San Diego Business Journal 'Healthiest Companies'

ViaSat Inc., an innovator in broadband and communication technologies and services, is proud to announce it was recognized as one of the 2015 San Diego Business Journal 'Healthiest Companies' in the mega company category. This announcement comes as the Company holds its annual Wellness Week, with opportunities designed to educate and engage employees on healthy lifestyle choices. [More]
New study analyses how policy actions affect tobacco consumption among Spanish women

New study analyses how policy actions affect tobacco consumption among Spanish women

Cigarette prices and images on cigarette packets have an impact on women in terms of continuing to smoke or quitting. In fact, less educated women are more responsive to pictorial labels on cigarette packets, as revealed by a study that has analysed, for the first time, the generation differences among female smokers, a group which, despite policy measures, has not stopped growing. [More]
VLP, Special Olympics Florida partner to bring Healthy Community program for adults with disabilities

VLP, Special Olympics Florida partner to bring Healthy Community program for adults with disabilities

The Center for Disease Control reports that adults with disabilities are three times more likely to have heart disease, diabetes, cancer or other chronic diseases than adults without disabilities. Taking a pro-active approach to keep their clients as healthy as possible, Victory Living Programs (VLP) has partnered with Special Olympics Florida to bring the Healthy Community program to VLP. [More]

QUT-led workplace intervention program helps truckies eat healthier

A Queensland University of Technology-led workplace intervention program which saw a 15 per cent drop in drivers self-reporting their BMI as obese, has helped truckies eat healthier, exercise more and lose weight. [More]

Active video games can be a source of physical activity, shows UT study

The increasing use of video games is often blamed for children's lack of interest in physical activity, but a study by the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, recently published in the Games for Health Journal suggests that active video games may actually be a source of moderate or intense physical activity in children five to eight years old. [More]
Recurrent major depression may increase osteoporosis risk in men

Recurrent major depression may increase osteoporosis risk in men

A recent study from the University of Eastern Finland in collaboration with Deakin University, Australia, shows that recurrent major depressive disorder (MDD) in men is associated with lower bone density. The use of antidepressants was also associated with lower bone mineral density (BMD), but this association was dependent on the person's weight and site of bone measurement. [More]
New UNC Charlotte technology to help hospitals organize, analyze patient statistics

New UNC Charlotte technology to help hospitals organize, analyze patient statistics

UNC Charlotte and a major healthcare data company have launched new technology that will help hospitals organize and analyze patient statistics. [More]
Adding high salt to high-fat diet prevents weight gain in mice

Adding high salt to high-fat diet prevents weight gain in mice

In a study that seems to defy conventional dietary wisdom, University of Iowa scientists have found that adding high salt to a high-fat diet actually prevents weight gain in mice. [More]
Physical activities may not protect against underlying markers for Alzheimer's disease

Physical activities may not protect against underlying markers for Alzheimer's disease

While participating in physical activities such as bike riding, dancing, walking and gardening and mentally stimulating activities such as crosswords and reading may reduce the risk of Alzheimer's disease, they may not do so by affecting the underlying markers for the disease, according to a study published in the June 10, 2015, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Light exercise provides significant health benefits for older adults

Light exercise provides significant health benefits for older adults

An easy walk, slow dancing, leisurely sports such as table tennis, household chores and other light-intensity exercise may be nearly as effective as moderate or vigorous exercise for older adults - if they get enough of that type of activity. [More]
New research shows that risky outdoor play good for children's health

New research shows that risky outdoor play good for children's health

New research from UBC and the Child & Family Research Institute at BC Children's Hospital shows that risky outdoor play is not only good for children's health but also encourages creativity, social skills and resilience. [More]
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