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Personalized music playlists increase adherence to cardiac rehab by 70%

Personalized music playlists increase adherence to cardiac rehab by 70%

The use of personalized music playlists with tempo-pace synchronization increases adherence to cardiac rehab by almost 70 per cent--according to a study published in Sports Medicine -Open. [More]
New study shows safe levels of exercise differ for men and women with Atrial Firbrillation

New study shows safe levels of exercise differ for men and women with Atrial Firbrillation

Data from nearly 380,000 patients presented at Heart Rhythm 2015 reveals that moderate exercise is beneficial, yet vigorous exercise can increase the risk of AF for men [More]
Handshakes better than your blood pressure at assessing your health

Handshakes better than your blood pressure at assessing your health

The firmness of your hand grip is better than your blood pressure at assessing your health, Hamilton researchers have found, and reduced muscular strength, measured by your grip, is consistently linked with early death, disability and illness. [More]
Regular exercise reduces mortality risk in elderly men

Regular exercise reduces mortality risk in elderly men

The results of a long-term trial show that regular exercise reduces the all-cause death rate in elderly men by 40%... [More]
New study explores use of mobility devices among older adults in U.S.

New study explores use of mobility devices among older adults in U.S.

America's population of senior citizens is growing, and with it, a reliance on canes, wheelchairs and scooters. The use of walking aids has increased by 50 percent in the past decade, according to a new study, and should continue to increase as the number of seniors is expected to double by 2050. [More]
Study finds extremely high levels of cardiovascular risk factors in people with psychosis

Study finds extremely high levels of cardiovascular risk factors in people with psychosis

Extremely high levels of cardiovascular risk factors have been found in people with established psychosis, with central obesity evident in over 80 per cent of participants, in a study by researchers from the NIHR Biomedical Research Centre at the South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust and King's College London. [More]
Walnut-enriched diet may slow colorectal tumor growth

Walnut-enriched diet may slow colorectal tumor growth

A new animal study from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, led by Dr. Christos Mantzoros, indicates that a diet containing walnuts may slow colorectal tumor growth by causing beneficial changes in cancer genes. [More]
Gynecologic oncologist awarded grant to improve quality of life for women with endometrial cancer

Gynecologic oncologist awarded grant to improve quality of life for women with endometrial cancer

The Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute Board of Governors recently awarded more than $2.7 million in contracted funding to Katina Robison, MD, a gynecologic oncologist with the Program in Women's Oncology at Women & Infants Hospital of Rhode Island, a Care New England hospital, for the study "Cancer of the Uterus and Treatment of Stress Incontinence." [More]
Study: Walking and cycling to work could help reduce BMI

Study: Walking and cycling to work could help reduce BMI

Leaving your car at home could help shed pounds - according to new research from the University of East Anglia and the Centre for Diet and Activity Research. New research shows that making a change from driving to work to using public transport, cycling or walking could help reduce BMI over two years. [More]
Orexigen Therapeutics provides update on business and financial results for Q1 2015

Orexigen Therapeutics provides update on business and financial results for Q1 2015

Orexigen Therapeutics, Inc. today announced business and financial results for the first quarter ended March 31, 2015. [More]
Using mobile app to track intake of vitamin D and calcium

Using mobile app to track intake of vitamin D and calcium

Vitamin D is essential for the maintenance of bone health and may be implicated in other chronic diseases, as well as immunity, but adults in Canada are consistently deficient in dietary vitamin D, by nearly 400 international units per day (IU/d) on average. [More]
Women who gain excessive weight during pregnancy more likely to have overweight children

Women who gain excessive weight during pregnancy more likely to have overweight children

A new study conducted in collaboration between The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston and Harokopio University has found that when an expecting mother gains more weight than recommended, does not exercise or smokes during pregnancy, the probability that her child will be overweight or obese at the age of eight sharply increases. [More]
CEO Council, BPC call on U.S. companies to improve employee and community health

CEO Council, BPC call on U.S. companies to improve employee and community health

Today, the CEO Council on Health and Innovation and the Bipartisan Policy Center invited U.S. companies to join them in improving the health of employees through physical activity. Called the "Building Better Health: Physical Activity Challenge", the effort is aimed at improving the health of individuals nationwide. [More]
Type 2 diabetics can eat more protein at breakfast to reduce glucose spikes at breakfast and lunch

Type 2 diabetics can eat more protein at breakfast to reduce glucose spikes at breakfast and lunch

Individuals with Type 2 Diabetes have difficulty regulating their glucose -- or blood sugar -- levels, particularly after meals. Now, University of Missouri researchers have found that Type 2 diabetics can eat more protein at breakfast to help reduce glucose spikes at both breakfast and lunch. [More]
Polygamous marriage can increase heart disease risk in men by four times

Polygamous marriage can increase heart disease risk in men by four times

Polygamy increases the risk of heart disease by more than 4-fold, reveals research presented at the Asian Pacific Society of Cardiology Congress 2015 (APSC 2015) by Dr Amin Daoulah, a cardiologist at the King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. The risk and severity of heart disease increased with the number of wives. [More]
Researchers say that lack of safety at school, poverty associated with childhood obesity

Researchers say that lack of safety at school, poverty associated with childhood obesity

A lack of safety at school is one of the correlates of childhood obesity, say researchers at the University of Montreal and its affiliated Research Centre at CHU Sainte Justine children's hospital. [More]
Teen-LABS research study reveals musculoskeletal disease outcomes among obese adolescents

Teen-LABS research study reveals musculoskeletal disease outcomes among obese adolescents

Outcomes regarding musculoskeletal disease among severely obese adolescents participating in the "Teen Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery" (Teen-LABS) study were published this week in JAMA Pediatrics. Teen-LABS is a multi-center clinical study funded by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases at the National Institutes of Health that is examining the safety and health effects of surgical weight loss procedures. [More]
New study suggests that exercise type may be less important in fight against obesity

New study suggests that exercise type may be less important in fight against obesity

Medical experts widely recommended a combined program of diet and fitness to fight obesity. But when it comes to the type of exercise most effective a reducing weight and body mass—strength training, endurance exercise or a combination of both—opinions vary widely on which exercise regimen is best. [More]
Students with standing desks more attentive than seated counterparts, Texas A&M study finds

Students with standing desks more attentive than seated counterparts, Texas A&M study finds

A study from the Texas A&M Health Science Center School of Public Health finds students with standing desks are more attentive than their seated counterparts. In fact, preliminary results show 12 percent greater on-task engagement in classrooms with standing desks, which equates to an extra seven minutes per hour of engaged instruction time. [More]
New research shows how fat controls energy levels in the brain

New research shows how fat controls energy levels in the brain

An enzyme secreted by the body's fat tissue controls energy levels in the brain, according to new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. The findings, in mice, underscore a role for the body's fat tissue in controlling the brain's response to food scarcity, and suggest there is an optimal amount of body fat for maximizing health and longevity. [More]
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