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PHA, MBUSA and five Let's Move! Active Schools partners commit to improve health of youth

PHA, MBUSA and five Let's Move! Active Schools partners commit to improve health of youth

Today at its fourth annual Building a Healthier Future Summit, the Partnership for a Healthier America announced that its first automotive partner, as well as five new Let's Move! Active Schools partners, committed to making healthier choices easier for busy parents and families. [More]
Study: Persistent insomnia increases mortality risk

Study: Persistent insomnia increases mortality risk

A connection between persistent insomnia and increased inflammation and mortality has been identified by a group of researchers from the University of Arizona. Their study, published in The American Journal of Medicine, found that people who suffer from persistent insomnia are at greater risk than those who experience intermittent insomnia. [More]
Children watching TV for more than two hours a day at greater risk of blood pressure

Children watching TV for more than two hours a day at greater risk of blood pressure

A study on European children concludes that spending more than two hours a day in front of a screen increases the probability of high blood pressure by 30%. The article also points out that doing no daily physical activity or doing less than an hour a day increases this risk by 50%. [More]
Sleeping more than eight hours a night could increase risk of stroke

Sleeping more than eight hours a night could increase risk of stroke

People who sleep more than eight hours a night may have an increased risk of stroke, according to a new study published in the February 25, 2015, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Patients with symptoms of mental illness less likely to receive advice from health care providers

Patients with symptoms of mental illness less likely to receive advice from health care providers

More than half of patients with symptoms of mental illness - and nearly one-third of those who also had diabetes - said their health care providers had never told them to exercise or reduce their intake of dietary fat, according to a new study published in Diabetes Educator. [More]
DPP-4 inhibitors effective against low blood sugar levels

DPP-4 inhibitors effective against low blood sugar levels

DPP-4 inhibitors are a group of drugs used to treat type 2 diabetes that lower high blood sugar levels by stimulating insulin production in the body. Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have now discovered that DPP-4 inhibitors are also effective against low blood sugar levels. [More]
Researchers demonstrate clinical efficacy of gallopamil in severe asthma patients

Researchers demonstrate clinical efficacy of gallopamil in severe asthma patients

A team of Inserm researchers from the Cardio-Thoracic Research Centre of Bordeaux (Inserm/University of Bordeaux and Bordeaux University Hospital) has demonstrated the clinical efficacy of gallopamil in 31 patients with severe asthma. This chronic disease is characterised by remodelling of the bronchi, which exacerbates the obstruction of the airways already seen in "classic" asthma. [More]
MD Anderson, CATCH Global Foundation partner to lower cancer risk in children

MD Anderson, CATCH Global Foundation partner to lower cancer risk in children

Cancer prevention experts at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have allied with the CATCH Global Foundation, whose comprehensive child health program reaches children and their families in more than 10,000 educational settings nationwide, to promote behavior that will lower children's lifelong risk of developing cancer. [More]
High-impact exercise improves patellar cartilage quality of postmenopausal women at risk of osteoporosis

High-impact exercise improves patellar cartilage quality of postmenopausal women at risk of osteoporosis

Progressive high-impact training improved the patellar cartilage quality of the postmenopausal women who may be at risk of osteoporosis (bone loss) as well as at risk of osteoarthritis. [More]

Football injuries more frequent in competition matches than during training sessions

The risk of injury during competition matches is twelve times higher than during training sessions in players of the Professional Football League. The most common ones are muscular injuries and those resulting from overexertion, which imply recovery periods of around one week. [More]
Primary care nurse-led intervention improves physical activity among older adults

Primary care nurse-led intervention improves physical activity among older adults

A primary care nurse-delivered intervention can lead to sustained increases in physical activity (PA) among older adults, according to an article published by Tess Harris of St George's University of London, and colleagues in this week's PLOS Medicine. The trial was funded by the National Institute for Health Research. [More]
Researchers say that cancer experience can lead to healthy lifestyle in survivors and family members

Researchers say that cancer experience can lead to healthy lifestyle in survivors and family members

After studying cancer survivors and their family caregivers, researchers at Case Western Reserve University conclude that the period between the final cancer treatment and first post-treatment checkup may be an ideal time for the entire household to jumpstart a healthy lifestyle. [More]
Active middle-aged women have lower risk of stroke, heart disease, blood clots

Active middle-aged women have lower risk of stroke, heart disease, blood clots

Middle-aged women who are physically active a few times per week have lower risks of heart disease, stroke and blood clots than inactive women, according to research in the American Heart Association journal Circulation. [More]
Study: Most risk calculators used by clinicians overestimate risk of heart attack

Study: Most risk calculators used by clinicians overestimate risk of heart attack

Most "risk calculators" used by clinicians to gauge a patient's chances of suffering a heart attack and guide treatment decisions appear to significantly overestimate the likelihood of a heart attack, according to results of a study by investigators at Johns Hopkins and other institutions. [More]
Large majority of coronary patients fail to meet lifestyle, risk factor targets

Large majority of coronary patients fail to meet lifestyle, risk factor targets

The large majority of coronary patients in Europe are failing to achieve their lifestyle, risk factor and therapeutic targets as set out in the latest prevention guidelines. [More]
Widely used clinical calculators overrate heart attack risk

Widely used clinical calculators overrate heart attack risk

Most "risk calculators" used by clinicians to gauge a patient's chances of suffering a heart attack and guide treatment decisions appear to significantly overestimate the likelihood of a heart attack, according to results of a study by investigators at Johns Hopkins and other institutions. [More]
Vanderbilt's Stacey Kendrick suggests nine simple steps for healthier heart

Vanderbilt's Stacey Kendrick suggests nine simple steps for healthier heart

In observance of Heart Month in February, Vanderbilt health educator Stacey Kendrick has compiled a list of steps everyone can take for a healthier heart. [More]
Design of built environment impacts level of physical activity in Chinese cities, shows study

Design of built environment impacts level of physical activity in Chinese cities, shows study

Chinese cities are different from many Western cities in relation to urban design, and far more densely populated. [More]
Study shows link between low vitamin D levels in childhood and occurrence of atherosclerosis in adulthood

Study shows link between low vitamin D levels in childhood and occurrence of atherosclerosis in adulthood

Low levels of 25-OH vitamin D in childhood were associated with subclinical atherosclerosis over 25 years later in adulthood, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. [More]
Treadmill Desks Offer Limited Benefits, Pose Challenges In The Workplace, Study Shows

Treadmill Desks Offer Limited Benefits, Pose Challenges In The Workplace, Study Shows

Treadmill desks can help overweight or obese office workers get out of their chairs and get moving, but a 12-week study by an Oregon State University researcher found that the increase in physical activity was small and did not help workers meet public health guidelines for daily exercise. [More]