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Fortified dairy products increase serum vitamin D level in primary school children

Fortified dairy products increase serum vitamin D level in primary school children

Sufficient intake of fortified dairy products is of significant importance for the serum vitamin D level in primary school children, shows a new study from the University of Eastern Finland. Children who drink at least three glasses of milk per day had a higher serum vitamin D level than their peers who drink milk in lesser amounts. [More]
Vacations may lead to extra weight

Vacations may lead to extra weight

A week's vacation may leave many adults with a heavier midsection--extra weight that can hang around even six weeks post-vacation. [More]
Strong link found between incarceration of family members during childhood and heart attacks in men

Strong link found between incarceration of family members during childhood and heart attacks in men

A parent's incarceration has immediate, devastating effects on a family. Now, Virginia Tech and University of Toronto researchers say there may be a longer term risk: Men who as children experienced a family member's incarceration are approximately twice as likely to have a heart attack in later adulthood in comparison with men who were not exposed to such a childhood trauma. [More]
One million serious medical complications could be avoided with improvements in blood glucose levels in diabetics

One million serious medical complications could be avoided with improvements in blood glucose levels in diabetics

Sanofi, Diabetes UK and JDRF today announce the publication of IMPACT 2 in the journal Diabetic Medicine. This new study shows that, if sustained, even modest improvement in blood glucose levels can provide significantly improved outcomes for the 3.5 million people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK. [More]
Higher aerobic fitness levels may improve chances of survival after first heart attack

Higher aerobic fitness levels may improve chances of survival after first heart attack

People who are fit are more likely to survive their first heart attack, according to a study of nearly 70,000 patients of Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit. [More]
Early puberty may increase risk of developing gestational diabetes

Early puberty may increase risk of developing gestational diabetes

Women who began having menstrual cycles at a younger age are at greater risk of developing gestational diabetes, a disease affecting up to 7 percent of pregnant women that can cause babies to develop type 2 diabetes and other complications, new research shows. [More]
Second-hand smoke exposure linked to larger waist, poorer cognition in children

Second-hand smoke exposure linked to larger waist, poorer cognition in children

Exposure to second-hand smoke is associated with a larger waist and poorer cognition in children, researchers say. [More]
Diet rich in fiber may reduce risk of developing lung disease

Diet rich in fiber may reduce risk of developing lung disease

A diet rich in fiber may not only protect against diabetes and heart disease, it may reduce the risk of developing lung disease, according to new research published online, ahead of print in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society. [More]
Opioid medication does not improve physical function in patients with neuropathic pain

Opioid medication does not improve physical function in patients with neuropathic pain

Opioids such as morphine, codeine and Tylenol 3 can be effective for treating pain, however, a new University of Alberta study finds that patients with neuropathic pain taking opioids report no improvements in physical functioning compared to those who were not prescribed opioids. [More]
Physiotherapy ‘should be targeted’ in Parkinson’s disease

Physiotherapy ‘should be targeted’ in Parkinson’s disease

Physical and occupational therapy does not deliver quality of life benefits for patients with mild to moderate Parkinson’s disease, a randomised trial shows. [More]
First national PSA campaign launched with strong message: No one is excused from prediabetes

First national PSA campaign launched with strong message: No one is excused from prediabetes

Losing weight and being healthier are at the top of everyone’s New Year’s resolutions. But, despite the best intentions, work, kids, and social events often push lifestyle changes to the bottom of the list. [More]
People suffering from chronic stress, anxiety may be at increased risk for depression and dementia

People suffering from chronic stress, anxiety may be at increased risk for depression and dementia

A scientific review paper warns that people need to find ways to reduce chronic stress and anxiety in their lives or they may be at increased risk for developing depression and even dementia. [More]
Parental support programmes could promote healthy eating behaviours in obese children

Parental support programmes could promote healthy eating behaviours in obese children

Parental support programmes in areas with the greatest needs can have a positive effect on the consumption of unhealthy food and drink and on weight increases in obese children. This according to a randomised study conducted by Karolinska Institutet and the Stockholm County Council, Sweden, published in the International Journal of Behavioural Nutrition and Physical Activity. [More]
Half of British schoolgirls avoid sport because of breasts, study finds

Half of British schoolgirls avoid sport because of breasts, study finds

About half of all girls at UK secondary schools might be avoiding sport because of embarrassment or pain caused by their breasts, according to new research. [More]
Short bursts of intensive exercise could be more effective in preventing Type 2 diabetes

Short bursts of intensive exercise could be more effective in preventing Type 2 diabetes

Short bursts of intensive exercise provide a more "time-efficient" and realistic way of preventing, delaying and managing Type 2 diabetes and also losing weight, a study has found. [More]
Physiotherapy and occupational therapy not effective in patients with Parkinson's disease

Physiotherapy and occupational therapy not effective in patients with Parkinson's disease

New research from the University of Birmingham has shown that physiotherapy and occupational therapy do not produce improvements in quality of life for patients with mild to moderate Parkinson's disease. [More]
Genetics play vital role in knee pain sensitivity

Genetics play vital role in knee pain sensitivity

Genetics play a key role in knee pain sensitivity, according to a team of researchers studying knee osteoarthritis patients. [More]
Regular physical activity improves cardiovascular health, lowers mortality risk

Regular physical activity improves cardiovascular health, lowers mortality risk

The majority of citizens in developed countries should not be concerned by potential harm from exercise but rather by the lack of exercise in their lives, according to a clinical perspective published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology from the ACC Sports and Exercise Cardiology Leadership Council. [More]
Mount Sinai Heart starts TANSNIP-PESA study to determine how workplace-based lifestyle intervention reduces CV risk

Mount Sinai Heart starts TANSNIP-PESA study to determine how workplace-based lifestyle intervention reduces CV risk

World-renowned cardiologist Valentin Fuster, MD, PhD, Director of Mount Sinai Heart and Physician-in-Chief of The Mount Sinai Hospital, is undertaking a three-year study, known as the TANSNIP-PESA study, to determine whether a workplace-based lifestyle intervention, accompanied by imaging data, will lead to a reduction in the prevalence of cardiovascular (CV) disease risk factors related to lifestyle. [More]
New report reveals striking variation in cancer burden within AANHPI population

New report reveals striking variation in cancer burden within AANHPI population

A new report describes cancer among Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians, and Pacific Islanders (AANHPIs), and reports striking variation in the cancer burden within this population, reflecting vast differences in exposure to cancer risk factors. [More]
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