Placenta News and Research RSS Feed - Placenta News and Research

UTHealth researchers demonstrate new way to reduce preterm birth

UTHealth researchers demonstrate new way to reduce preterm birth

Using nanoparticles to engineer a special drug, a team of researchers from McGovern Medical School at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston has demonstrated in pre-clinical trials a new way to both reduce preterm birth and avoid the risks of medication in pregnancy to unborn babies. [More]
Prenatal stress affects babies' health in war-torn areas

Prenatal stress affects babies' health in war-torn areas

Children from war-torn areas of the globe are affected by trauma even before they are born, according to a new University of Florida study. [More]
Researchers demonstrate new way to reduce preterm birth using nanoparticles

Researchers demonstrate new way to reduce preterm birth using nanoparticles

Using nanoparticles to engineer a special drug, a team of researchers has demonstrated in mice a new way to both reduce preterm birth and avoid the risks of medication in pregnancy to unborn babies. [More]
Bile acid enables foetus to produce blood stem cells

Bile acid enables foetus to produce blood stem cells

A research group at Lund University in Sweden has been able to show that bile acid is transferred from the mother to the foetus via the placenta to enable the foetus to produce blood stem cells. [More]
UI researchers remind US doctors to watch for two diseases that could be passed from mother to child

UI researchers remind US doctors to watch for two diseases that could be passed from mother to child

While world health leaders race to contain the spread of the mosquito-borne Zika virus in the Americas, researchers at the University of Iowa are reminding doctors in the United States to be on the lookout for two other vector-borne and potentially life-threatening diseases that can be passed from mother to child through the placenta. [More]
Simple blood test could help predict emergence of pre-eclampsia in pregnant women

Simple blood test could help predict emergence of pre-eclampsia in pregnant women

Pre-eclampsia is a serious illness associated with pregnancy, which develops after twenty weeks and is associated with defective ingrowing of the placenta within the mother. The dangerous illness is both the second most frequent cause of death in pregnant women, and the reason for severe complications for mother and child, especially during premature births. [More]
Depression in expectant parents during pregnancy increases risk of premature birth

Depression in expectant parents during pregnancy increases risk of premature birth

Depression in both expectant mothers and fathers increases the risk of premature birth, finds a study published in BJOG: an International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology (BJOG). [More]
New mechanism of differentiation may offer novel therapeutic approaches to blood malignancies, solid tumors

New mechanism of differentiation may offer novel therapeutic approaches to blood malignancies, solid tumors

In humans the differentiation of stem cells into hundreds of specialized cell types is vital. Differentiation drives development from fertilized egg to a newborn, and it underlies the continuous replacement of the 5 billion cells that die every hour in an adult. On the downside, mutations in differentiation pathways of different cell types can be drivers of cancers. [More]
New blood test could predict women at higher risk of preeclampsia

New blood test could predict women at higher risk of preeclampsia

The causes of preeclampsia, a multi-system disorder that affects women in pregnancy, have not been fully elucidated. The condition, which is typically associated with high blood pressure and an increased amount of protein in the urine, affects 2 to 5 percent of pregnant women, and is one of the main reasons for complications during the second half of pregnancy. Preeclampsia is frequently diagnosed too late and, in the most severe cases, can be fatal for both mother and child. [More]
MiMedx Group agrees to buy Stability Biologics

MiMedx Group agrees to buy Stability Biologics

MiMedx Group, Inc., the leading regenerative medicine company utilizing human amniotic tissue and patent-protected processes to develop and market advanced products and therapies for the Wound Care, Surgical, Orthopedic, Spine, Sports Medicine, Ophthalmic, and Dental sectors of healthcare, announced today that it has signed a definitive agreement to acquire Stability Inc., d/b/a Stability Biologics, a provider of human tissue products to surgeons, facilities and distributors serving the surgical, spine and orthopedics sectors of the healthcare industry. [More]
Commonly used diabetes drug may have potential to prevent, treat preeclampsia

Commonly used diabetes drug may have potential to prevent, treat preeclampsia

An article published today in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology reports that a commonly-used drug for the treatment of diabetes, metformin, may have the potential to prevent and treat preeclampsia. Metformin has long been used to treat diabetes in both non-pregnant and pregnant patients, and is considered safe during pregnancy. [More]
Early life exposures to toxic chemicals reduce infants' response to TB vaccine

Early life exposures to toxic chemicals reduce infants' response to TB vaccine

Early life exposures to toxic chemicals such as PCBs and DDT dampen an infant's response to the tuberculosis vaccine, according to a new study from the University of Rochester Environmental Health Sciences Center. [More]
Taking estriol along with conventional medications helps RRMS patients avoid relapses

Taking estriol along with conventional medications helps RRMS patients avoid relapses

Taking the pregnancy hormone estriol along with their conventional medications helped patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) avoid relapses, according to results of a Phase II randomized, placebo-controlled study led by UCLA researchers. [More]
Experts to gather at DOHaD congress to address challenges that impact health of children, adolescents

Experts to gather at DOHaD congress to address challenges that impact health of children, adolescents

Over 600 experts from around the world will meet to address the many challenges that currently impact the health of mothers, babies in the womb, infants, children and adolescents at the Society for the Developmental Origins of Health and Disease congress, which will be held in Africa for the first time. [More]
Yale physician scientist develops new app that aims to decrease pregnancy loss

Yale physician scientist develops new app that aims to decrease pregnancy loss

One of the greatest joys for parents is the birth of their child -- and one of the greatest tragedies is the loss of that child. Now, Yale physician scientist Harvey J. Kliman, M.D., has developed an iPhone app that helps women contribute to research that aims to decrease the chance of pregnancy loss due to an undersized placenta, the fetal organ that provides nourishment to the fetus. [More]
UTMB researchers find mechanisms to determine when pregnant women go into labor

UTMB researchers find mechanisms to determine when pregnant women go into labor

During the last few weeks of a woman's pregnancy, many keep an overnight bag ready to go at a moment's notice in case they begin to go into labor. They do this because there is no clear signal that labor is about to begin - before the body makes it abundantly clear that this process has started. Understanding the mechanisms that initiate this process is especially important when treating women at risk of going into labor early. [More]
DNA testing for Down's syndrome could potentially save lives of unborn babies

DNA testing for Down's syndrome could potentially save lives of unborn babies

Offering pregnant women a DNA test for Down's syndrome on the NHS would reduce the dependency on invasive tests and potentially save the lives of unborn babies, a study shows. [More]
Eating a light meal during labor may benefit most healthy women

Eating a light meal during labor may benefit most healthy women

Most healthy women can skip the fasting and, in fact, would benefit from eating a light meal during labor, suggests research being presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY 2015 annual meeting. Improvements in anesthesia care have made pain control during labor safer, reducing risks related to eating, researchers note. [More]
Incidences of preeclampsia dramatically increase in the U.S.

Incidences of preeclampsia dramatically increase in the U.S.

A study published recently in the American Journal of Perinatology reports a dramatic increase in the incidence of preeclampsia in the United States. Preeclampsia and early onset preeclampsia have grown 67 percent and 140 percent respectively over the past two decades. [More]
First primate model can help researchers to study mother-to-fetus CMV infections

First primate model can help researchers to study mother-to-fetus CMV infections

Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is the leading infectious cause of birth defects worldwide, but scientists have been frustrated in their efforts to develop a vaccine to protect against infections. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement