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Delayed umbilical cord clamping is effective even when newborn is placed on mother's abdomen

A recent study has shown that a newborn benefits from delayed cord clamping even when placed immediately on the mother's abdomen. [More]

Scientists develop new resuscitation protocols for birth asphyxia seizures

During birth, the baby has to stop depending on the placenta and start breathing on his or her own. If there are problems during the birth process, the baby may spend a period of time in the pathological condition of asphyxia, where the oxygen levels in the blood are much lower and carbon dioxide levels are much higher than expected. [More]

rEVO Biologics commences ATryn Phase 3 clinical program for treatment of preeclampsia in pregnant women

rEVO Biologics Inc., a subsidiary of LFB SA, today announced the initiation of the Phase 3 clinical program for ATryn for the treatment of preeclampsia in pregnant women during the 24th to 28th week of pregnancy. [More]
MIT biological engineers trying to adapt MRI to visualize gene activity inside the brains of living animals

MIT biological engineers trying to adapt MRI to visualize gene activity inside the brains of living animals

Doctors commonly use magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to diagnose tumors, damage from stroke, and many other medical conditions. Neuroscientists also rely on it as a research tool for identifying parts of the brain that carry out different cognitive functions. [More]
Children with prenatal methamphetamine exposure 2.8 times more likely to have cognitive problem

Children with prenatal methamphetamine exposure 2.8 times more likely to have cognitive problem

In the only long-term, National Institutes of Health-funded study of prenatal methamphetamine exposure and child outcome, researchers found youngsters exposed to the potent illegal drug before birth had increased cognitive problems at age 7.5 years, highlighting the need for early intervention to improve academic outcomes and reduce the potential for negative behaviors, according to the study published online by The Journal of Pediatrics. [More]

Over 40% of pregnant low-income women after diagnosis of false labor do not want to be sent home

More than 40 percent of pregnant low-income women discharged from the hospital after a diagnosis of false or early labor did not want to be sent home, with the most common reasons being that they were in too much pain or lived too far away, according to a study by Baylor University's Louise Herrington School of Nursing (LHSON) and Parkland Health & Hospital System. [More]
Study: Identifying biomarkers could lead to earlier detection of preeclampsia

Study: Identifying biomarkers could lead to earlier detection of preeclampsia

Identifying biomarkers could lead to earlier detection of preeclampsia, which in turn can lead to healthier mothers and children, according to a collaborative study from the Centre of Molecular Inflammation Research (CEMIR) and the MR Cancer Group at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU). [More]
Adherent stromal cells derived from human placenta improve tendon healing, shows study

Adherent stromal cells derived from human placenta improve tendon healing, shows study

According to Dr. Scott Rodeo of New York's Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS), although the findings of a recent study should be considered preliminary, adherent stromal cells derived from human placenta appear promising as a readily available cell source to aid tendon healing and regeneration. [More]

Researchers explore how genetics affects causes and prevalence of preterm birth

​More than 450,000 babies are born too soon each year in the U.S. Preterm birth is a serious health problem that costs the nation more than $26 billion annually, according to the Institute of Medicine, and is the leading cause of newborn death. [More]
Women who drink alcohol during early stages of pregnancy might affect development of placenta

Women who drink alcohol during early stages of pregnancy might affect development of placenta

Women who drink alcohol at moderate or heavy levels in the early stages of their pregnancy might damage the growth and function of their placenta - the organ responsible for supplying everything that a developing infant needs until birth - research at The University of Manchester shows. [More]
Childhood brain cancer (ETMR/ETANTR): an interview with Dr. Nada Jabado, Department of Pediatrics at McGill University

Childhood brain cancer (ETMR/ETANTR): an interview with Dr. Nada Jabado, Department of Pediatrics at McGill University

Embryonal tumours with multilayered rosettes (ETMR) are rare, deadly brain tumours that affect mainly children below the age of 4 years. There are 300 cases reported but probably there are many more as this tumour is often misdiagnosed. [More]
BioTime subsidiary releases version 1.5 of LifeMap Discovery

BioTime subsidiary releases version 1.5 of LifeMap Discovery

LifeMap Sciences, Inc., a subsidiary of BioTime, Inc., announced today the release of LifeMap Discovery version 1.5. LifeMap Discovery is a state-of-the-art roadmap of embryonic development and stem cell biology. [More]
Researchers receive $8M grant to expand research in arsenic toxicity in children, pregnant women

Researchers receive $8M grant to expand research in arsenic toxicity in children, pregnant women

​The Children's Environmental Health and Disease Prevention Research Center at Dartmouth and its partner universities have received an $8 million grant to expand their research into arsenic toxicity in children and pregnant women. [More]
Longer reads: Connecting with patients; obesity origins; children with chronic disease

Longer reads: Connecting with patients; obesity origins; children with chronic disease

I'd never [before] been encouraged to sit at a patient's bedside -; to stop hurrying for even a moment. Our medical teachers put a premium on accuracy and efficiency, which became conflated with speed. [More]
Prenatal exposure to maternal stress hormones predicts nicotine dependence for daughters

Prenatal exposure to maternal stress hormones predicts nicotine dependence for daughters

Tobacco smoking by pregnant women has long been viewed as a public health risk because of smoking's adverse effects on the development of a fetus. [More]
State roundup: 'Hope' for Texas' mental health system; rural farmers staying out of health exchanges; Oregon's medical error law

State roundup: 'Hope' for Texas' mental health system; rural farmers staying out of health exchanges; Oregon's medical error law

A selection of health policy news from Oregon, Texas, Maryland, California, Georgia and Wisconsin. [More]

First Edition: Jan. 2, 2014

The early morning highlights from the major news organizations, including reports about what to expect of the health law in 2014. [More]
Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition beneficial to cardiac regeneration

Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition beneficial to cardiac regeneration

Cell-based therapies have been shown to enhance cardiac regeneration, but autologous (patient self-donated) cells have produced only "modest results." In an effort to improve myocardial regeneration through cell transplantation, a research team from Germany has taken epithelial cells from placenta (amniotic epithelial cells, or AECs) and converted them into mesenchymal cells. After transplanting the transitioned cells into mice modelling a myocardial infarction, the researchers found that the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition was beneficial to cardiac regeneration by lowering infarct size. [More]

New methods reduce mother-to-child transmission of HIV from 23.9% to 2.4% in Gipuzkoa

Miren Apilánez, researcher in the Department of Paediatrics of the UPV/EHU-University of the Basque Country, has studied the evolution that took place between 1984 and 2011 in paediatric HIV infection in Gipuzkoa. The development of methods to diagnose the disease coupled with increasingly more effective treatments have made it possible to reduce mother-to-child transmission (vertical transmission) from 23.9% to 2.4%, thus virtually eradicating infection in children. [More]
Cedars-Sinai researchers design new procedure to treat stem cell-related corneal blindness

Cedars-Sinai researchers design new procedure to treat stem cell-related corneal blindness

​Researchers in the Cedars-Sinai Regenerative Medicine Institute have designed and tested a novel, minute-long procedure to prepare human amniotic membrane for use as a scaffold for specialized stem cells that may be used to treat some corneal diseases. [More]