Placenta News and Research RSS Feed - Placenta News and Research

Skilled midwives in world's poorest nations save lives of women and babies

Skilled midwives in world's poorest nations save lives of women and babies

A modest increase in the number of skilled midwives in the world's poorest nations could save the lives of a substantial number of women and their babies, according to new analyses by researchers from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. [More]
Using placental cells to repair damaged tissues: an interview with Zami Aberman, CEO, Pluristem Therapeutics

Using placental cells to repair damaged tissues: an interview with Zami Aberman, CEO, Pluristem Therapeutics

We start with birth and we collect the cells after C-section. The reason for that is we have to have the mother sign a consent letter that she is donating the placenta and, on top of that, we have to have a blood sample from the mother to test for any viral contamination. [More]
Batu Biologics reports FDA development plans for cancer immunotherapeutic vaccine ValloVax

Batu Biologics reports FDA development plans for cancer immunotherapeutic vaccine ValloVax

Batu Biologics announced today FDA development plans for its patent-pending lead product, ValloVax, a cancer immunotherapeutic "vaccine" that specifically targets the tumor blood vessels (endothelium). [More]
Resveratrol supplements during pregnancy linked to developmental abnormalities in fetal pancreas

Resveratrol supplements during pregnancy linked to developmental abnormalities in fetal pancreas

New research in The FASEB Journal suggests that although resveratrol improved blood flow through the placenta of macaque monkeys and protected against harmful aspects of obesity, resveratrol injured the fetal pancreas. [More]
Study warns against use of resveratrol supplements by pregnant women

Study warns against use of resveratrol supplements by pregnant women

A widely available dietary supplement that had been considered safe - and that some claim provides anti-aging and other health benefits - caused significant developmental abnormalities in the pancreas of offspring of pregnant monkeys who were given the supplement, according to a study published today in the FASEB Journal, from the Federation of American Societies of Experimental Biology. [More]
Female mice deprived of dietary zinc before conception experience fertility problems

Female mice deprived of dietary zinc before conception experience fertility problems

Female mice deprived of dietary zinc for a relatively short time before conception experienced fertility and pregnancy problems and had smaller, less-developed fetuses than mice that ingested zinc during the same times, according to researchers in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences. [More]
New approach provides a viable way to culture hESCs for clinical purposes

New approach provides a viable way to culture hESCs for clinical purposes

To be suitable for medical transplantation, one idea is that human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) need to remain "undifferentiated" i.e. they are not changing into other cell types. [More]
Researchers study why male babies generally have worse outcomes than females

Researchers study why male babies generally have worse outcomes than females

Sexual inequality between boys and girls starts as early as in the mother's womb - but how and why this occurs could be a key to preventing higher rates of preterm birth, stillbirth and neonatal death among boys. [More]
Fetal membranes exposed to oxidative stress can trigger premature aging of placenta

Fetal membranes exposed to oxidative stress can trigger premature aging of placenta

A new study by researchers at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston is the first to show that premature aging of the placenta due to oxidative stress is the cause of many preterm births. The study appears today in the American Journal of Pathology. [More]
People with longevity gene have improved brain skills

People with longevity gene have improved brain skills

Scientists showed that people who have a variant of a longevity gene, called KLOTHO, have improved brain skills such as thinking, learning and memory regardless of their age, sex, or whether they have a genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease. [More]
Researchers discover genetic risk factor for premature birth

Researchers discover genetic risk factor for premature birth

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have discovered a genetic risk factor for premature birth. [More]
Study: Genetics as well as environment in womb play important roles in development of baby

Study: Genetics as well as environment in womb play important roles in development of baby

A recent study led by A*STAR's Singapore Institute for Clinical Sciences (SICS) found that genetics as well as the environment in the womb play important roles in the development of the baby. [More]
Delayed umbilical cord clamping is effective even when newborn is placed on mother's abdomen

Delayed umbilical cord clamping is effective even when newborn is placed on mother's abdomen

A recent study has shown that a newborn benefits from delayed cord clamping even when placed immediately on the mother's abdomen. [More]

Scientists develop new resuscitation protocols for birth asphyxia seizures

During birth, the baby has to stop depending on the placenta and start breathing on his or her own. If there are problems during the birth process, the baby may spend a period of time in the pathological condition of asphyxia, where the oxygen levels in the blood are much lower and carbon dioxide levels are much higher than expected. [More]
rEVO Biologics commences ATryn Phase 3 clinical program for treatment of preeclampsia in pregnant women

rEVO Biologics commences ATryn Phase 3 clinical program for treatment of preeclampsia in pregnant women

rEVO Biologics Inc., a subsidiary of LFB SA, today announced the initiation of the Phase 3 clinical program for ATryn for the treatment of preeclampsia in pregnant women during the 24th to 28th week of pregnancy. [More]
MIT biological engineers trying to adapt MRI to visualize gene activity inside the brains of living animals

MIT biological engineers trying to adapt MRI to visualize gene activity inside the brains of living animals

Doctors commonly use magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to diagnose tumors, damage from stroke, and many other medical conditions. Neuroscientists also rely on it as a research tool for identifying parts of the brain that carry out different cognitive functions. [More]
Children with prenatal methamphetamine exposure 2.8 times more likely to have cognitive problem

Children with prenatal methamphetamine exposure 2.8 times more likely to have cognitive problem

In the only long-term, National Institutes of Health-funded study of prenatal methamphetamine exposure and child outcome, researchers found youngsters exposed to the potent illegal drug before birth had increased cognitive problems at age 7.5 years, highlighting the need for early intervention to improve academic outcomes and reduce the potential for negative behaviors, according to the study published online by The Journal of Pediatrics. [More]
Over 40% of pregnant low-income women after diagnosis of false labor do not want to be sent home

Over 40% of pregnant low-income women after diagnosis of false labor do not want to be sent home

More than 40 percent of pregnant low-income women discharged from the hospital after a diagnosis of false or early labor did not want to be sent home, with the most common reasons being that they were in too much pain or lived too far away, according to a study by Baylor University's Louise Herrington School of Nursing (LHSON) and Parkland Health & Hospital System. [More]
Study: Identifying biomarkers could lead to earlier detection of preeclampsia

Study: Identifying biomarkers could lead to earlier detection of preeclampsia

Identifying biomarkers could lead to earlier detection of preeclampsia, which in turn can lead to healthier mothers and children, according to a collaborative study from the Centre of Molecular Inflammation Research (CEMIR) and the MR Cancer Group at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU). [More]
Adherent stromal cells derived from human placenta improve tendon healing, shows study

Adherent stromal cells derived from human placenta improve tendon healing, shows study

According to Dr. Scott Rodeo of New York's Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS), although the findings of a recent study should be considered preliminary, adherent stromal cells derived from human placenta appear promising as a readily available cell source to aid tendon healing and regeneration. [More]