Pneumonia News and Research RSS Feed - Pneumonia News and Research

Pneumonia is a leading cause of death and hospitalization, costing health care systems billions of dollars and an estimated 600,000 adult deaths worldwide each year. Pneumococcal disease is caused by the bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae and the term describes a group of illnesses, including invasive infections, such as bacteremia/sepsis and meningitis, as well as pneumonia and upper respiratory tract infections. Although all age groups may be affected, the highest rate of pneumococcal disease occurs in young children and older adults. In addition, persons suffering from a wide range of chronic conditions (eg, diabetes, cardiovascular disease) and immune deficiencies are at increased risk.
Study links gum disease to lung disease, cancer and heart failure

Study links gum disease to lung disease, cancer and heart failure

Most people are very familiar with the reality that, if they don't practice regular brushing and overall good dental hygiene, they are at risk for developing gum disease. Less well known is the full extent of the potential harm caused by gum disease. [More]
New CAPS video emphasizes the importance of clean cookstoves to prevent pneumonia

New CAPS video emphasizes the importance of clean cookstoves to prevent pneumonia

As the Cooking and Pneumonia Study (CAPS) continues to reach significant milestones in terms of recruitment, the team have released a video filmed in Malawi explaining the main aims of the study and highlighting the potential importance of clean cookstoves in relation to preventing pneumonia in children under the age of five. [More]
Aging Japanese population driving high CAP burden

Aging Japanese population driving high CAP burden

There is a high incidence of community-acquired pneumonia in Kochi City in western Japan, which is primarily explained by the large proportion of elderly inhabitants, researchers report. [More]
61% of U.S. adults unaware of the importance of high dose flu vaccine in flu prevention for older adults

61% of U.S. adults unaware of the importance of high dose flu vaccine in flu prevention for older adults

A new survey from CVS/pharmacy released today found that three in five U.S. adults (61 percent) are unaware of the importance of the high dose flu vaccine in flu prevention for adults 65 years and older. [More]
Study finds link between common respiratory diseases and increased risk of lung cancer

Study finds link between common respiratory diseases and increased risk of lung cancer

Links between a number of common respiratory diseases and an increased risk of developing lung cancer have been found in a large pooled analysis of seven studies involving more than 25,000 individuals. [More]
Medical advisory panel recommends new pneumonia vaccine for seniors

Medical advisory panel recommends new pneumonia vaccine for seniors

The experts expressed concern, however, that Medicare rules may hamper some people from getting the new vaccine if they have already had an older version. Also in drug issues, some patient advocates report that insurers are balking at paying for a costly drug to treat hepatitis C if the patients are in drug treatment programs. [More]
High-dose influenza vaccine 24% more effective in older adults

High-dose influenza vaccine 24% more effective in older adults

High-dose influenza vaccine is 24 percent more effective than the standard-dose vaccine in protecting persons ages 65 and over against influenza illness and its complications, according to a Vanderbilt-led study published today in the New England Journal of Medicine. [More]
Measurement of respiratory rate is underutilized in diagnosis of pneumonia

Measurement of respiratory rate is underutilized in diagnosis of pneumonia

Pneumonia - a severe lung infection - is the most common disease calling for hospital admission. More than one out of ten pneumonia patients die of the disease. [More]
Researchers identify predictors of early rehospitalization among patients with COPD

Researchers identify predictors of early rehospitalization among patients with COPD

Researchers at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston have identified predictors of early rehospitalization among patients hospitalized for complications of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. This study was recently published in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society. [More]
Black and Hispanic SLE patients are more likely to be readmitted than white patients

Black and Hispanic SLE patients are more likely to be readmitted than white patients

A new study reveals that one in six patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is readmitted to the hospital within 30 days of being discharged. [More]
New questions arise about hospice companies as rates of discharge increase

New questions arise about hospice companies as rates of discharge increase

When so many patients leave a hospice alive, it could signal problems such as inadequate care or companies seeking financial gains by enrolling people who should not have been considered hospice patients, The Washington Post reports. [More]
First MinuteClinic walk-in medical clinics in Nebraska

First MinuteClinic walk-in medical clinics in Nebraska

The first MinuteClinic walk-in medical clinics in Nebraska are opening this week inside select CVS/pharmacy stores. Two clinics opened yesterday in Lincoln and one is opening today in Omaha. A third clinic in Lincoln and three more clinics in the Omaha area will open later this month. [More]
Pay-for-performance schemes only reduce patient death rates in the short term, finds new research

Pay-for-performance schemes only reduce patient death rates in the short term, finds new research

Pay-for-performance schemes - which reward hospitals financially for improving the quality of care provided to patients - only reduce patient death rates in the short term, according to new research by The University of Manchester. [More]
First Edition: August 7, 2014

First Edition: August 7, 2014

Today's headlines include stories about how uninsured people fare with the health law's exemptions. [More]
Cancer fighter may also help patients survive pneumonia

Cancer fighter may also help patients survive pneumonia

The tip of an immune molecule known for its skill at fighting cancer may also help patients survive pneumonia, scientists report. [More]
Research shows how bacteria in airways can help each other replenish vital iron

Research shows how bacteria in airways can help each other replenish vital iron

The body's assailants are cleverer than previously thought. New research from Lund University in Sweden shows for the first time how bacteria in the airways can help each other replenish vital iron. [More]
Research report on global market for respiratory devices

Research report on global market for respiratory devices

The worldwide respiratory device market continues to grow despite economic downturns mainly due to the aging of the world population and increasing incidence of COPD. [More]
NSAID use may mask early pneumonia symptoms

NSAID use may mask early pneumonia symptoms

People with pneumococcal pneumonia who are taking nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs at the point of diagnosis tend to develop more severe disease despite being younger and healthier than those not using these drugs, shows research. [More]
Phase 3 ASPIRE clinical trial meets primary endpoint of progression-free survival

Phase 3 ASPIRE clinical trial meets primary endpoint of progression-free survival

Amgen and its subsidiary, Onyx Pharmaceuticals, Inc., today announced that a planned interim analysis demonstrated that the Phase 3 clinical trial ASPIRE (CArfilzomib, Lenalidomide, and DexamethaSone versus Lenalidomide and Dexamethasone for the treatment of PatIents with Relapsed Multiple MyEloma) met its primary endpoint of progression-free survival (PFS). [More]
Household income plays key role in avoidable hospital visits across New Jersey

Household income plays key role in avoidable hospital visits across New Jersey

The household income of its residents is the most important factor in whether a community has high or low rates of avoidable hospital visits - conditions that could be better managed in a doctor's office or other health care settings if treated at an early stage, according to a report released today by the Rutgers Center for State Health Policy (CSHP). [More]