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Pneumonia is a leading cause of death and hospitalization, costing health care systems billions of dollars and an estimated 600,000 adult deaths worldwide each year. Pneumococcal disease is caused by the bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae and the term describes a group of illnesses, including invasive infections, such as bacteremia/sepsis and meningitis, as well as pneumonia and upper respiratory tract infections. Although all age groups may be affected, the highest rate of pneumococcal disease occurs in young children and older adults. In addition, persons suffering from a wide range of chronic conditions (eg, diabetes, cardiovascular disease) and immune deficiencies are at increased risk.
‘Concerning’ rise in pneumococcus risk factors

‘Concerning’ rise in pneumococcus risk factors

Researchers report that the incidence of Streptococcus pneumoniae infection has fallen significantly in the USA in the past decade but describe a “concerning trend” whereby the baseline health status of those with serious pneumococcal disease has worsened. [More]
New blood test provides fast, accurate diagnosis of tuberculosis in children

New blood test provides fast, accurate diagnosis of tuberculosis in children

A new blood test provides a fast and accurate tool to diagnose tuberculosis in children, a new proof-of-concept study shows. The newly developed test (TAM-TB assay) is the first reliable immunodiagnostic assay to detect active tuberculosis in children. [More]
Wockhardt receives coveted QIDP status from FDA for WCK 771 and WCK 2349 drugs

Wockhardt receives coveted QIDP status from FDA for WCK 771 and WCK 2349 drugs

Wockhardt Limited today announces a major boost to the New Drug Discovery program in Anti-Infective research when two of its drugs, WCK 771 and WCK 2349, received the coveted Qualified Infectious Disease Product (QIDP) status from U.S. Food & Drug Administration. [More]
Researchers reveal transmission rate of MERS coronavirus

Researchers reveal transmission rate of MERS coronavirus

The MERS coronavirus has caused disease outbreaks across the Arabian Peninsula and spread to Europe several times. The severe pneumonia virus has claimed the lives of several hundred people since its discovery in 2012. [More]
CHLA ECMO program honored with prestigious Award for Excellence in Life Support

CHLA ECMO program honored with prestigious Award for Excellence in Life Support

The Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation program at Children's Hospital Los Angeles has been honored for the third time with the prestigious Award for Excellence in Life Support by the Extracorporeal Life Support Organization, an international group of health care professionals and scientists who evaluate hospital treatment therapies for patients fighting complex cardiac disease and respiratory failure. [More]
Bacteremia linked to worse in-hospital course, outcomes in patients with pneumonia

Bacteremia linked to worse in-hospital course, outcomes in patients with pneumonia

The presence of bacteremia in patients with pneumonia is associated with a worse in-hospital course of illness and poorer patient outcomes, show Spanish findings. [More]
Implantating DBS devices poses no greater risk of complications to older Parkinson's patients

Implantating DBS devices poses no greater risk of complications to older Parkinson's patients

Implantating deep brain stimulation devices poses no greater risk of complications to older patients than it does to younger patients with Parkinson's disease, researchers at Duke Medicine report. [More]
Recommendation by physician could halve racial disparity in who gets flu shot

Recommendation by physician could halve racial disparity in who gets flu shot

Doctors should make a point of offering a flu vaccine to their patients. A simple reminder could considerably reduce the number of racial and ethnic minorities who currently do not vaccinate themselves against this common contagious respiratory illness. [More]
UAB scientist receives R01 grant to study transmission of deadly bacteria from mothers to infants

UAB scientist receives R01 grant to study transmission of deadly bacteria from mothers to infants

New research from the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Optometry will study the transmission of a bacteria that up to 40 percent of healthy women carry, which becomes deadly when passed on to infants during birth. [More]
Study links gum disease to lung disease, cancer and heart failure

Study links gum disease to lung disease, cancer and heart failure

Most people are very familiar with the reality that, if they don't practice regular brushing and overall good dental hygiene, they are at risk for developing gum disease. Less well known is the full extent of the potential harm caused by gum disease. [More]
New CAPS video emphasizes the importance of clean cookstoves to prevent pneumonia

New CAPS video emphasizes the importance of clean cookstoves to prevent pneumonia

As the Cooking and Pneumonia Study (CAPS) continues to reach significant milestones in terms of recruitment, the team have released a video filmed in Malawi explaining the main aims of the study and highlighting the potential importance of clean cookstoves in relation to preventing pneumonia in children under the age of five. [More]
Aging Japanese population driving high CAP burden

Aging Japanese population driving high CAP burden

There is a high incidence of community-acquired pneumonia in Kochi City in western Japan, which is primarily explained by the large proportion of elderly inhabitants, researchers report. [More]
61% of U.S. adults unaware of the importance of high dose flu vaccine in flu prevention for older adults

61% of U.S. adults unaware of the importance of high dose flu vaccine in flu prevention for older adults

A new survey from CVS/pharmacy released today found that three in five U.S. adults (61 percent) are unaware of the importance of the high dose flu vaccine in flu prevention for adults 65 years and older. [More]
Study finds link between common respiratory diseases and increased risk of lung cancer

Study finds link between common respiratory diseases and increased risk of lung cancer

Links between a number of common respiratory diseases and an increased risk of developing lung cancer have been found in a large pooled analysis of seven studies involving more than 25,000 individuals. [More]
Medical advisory panel recommends new pneumonia vaccine for seniors

Medical advisory panel recommends new pneumonia vaccine for seniors

The experts expressed concern, however, that Medicare rules may hamper some people from getting the new vaccine if they have already had an older version. Also in drug issues, some patient advocates report that insurers are balking at paying for a costly drug to treat hepatitis C if the patients are in drug treatment programs. [More]
High-dose influenza vaccine 24% more effective in older adults

High-dose influenza vaccine 24% more effective in older adults

High-dose influenza vaccine is 24 percent more effective than the standard-dose vaccine in protecting persons ages 65 and over against influenza illness and its complications, according to a Vanderbilt-led study published today in the New England Journal of Medicine. [More]
Measurement of respiratory rate is underutilized in diagnosis of pneumonia

Measurement of respiratory rate is underutilized in diagnosis of pneumonia

Pneumonia - a severe lung infection - is the most common disease calling for hospital admission. More than one out of ten pneumonia patients die of the disease. [More]
Researchers identify predictors of early rehospitalization among patients with COPD

Researchers identify predictors of early rehospitalization among patients with COPD

Researchers at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston have identified predictors of early rehospitalization among patients hospitalized for complications of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. This study was recently published in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society. [More]
Black and Hispanic SLE patients are more likely to be readmitted than white patients

Black and Hispanic SLE patients are more likely to be readmitted than white patients

A new study reveals that one in six patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is readmitted to the hospital within 30 days of being discharged. [More]

New questions arise about hospice companies as rates of discharge increase

When so many patients leave a hospice alive, it could signal problems such as inadequate care or companies seeking financial gains by enrolling people who should not have been considered hospice patients, The Washington Post reports. [More]