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Pneumonia is a leading cause of death and hospitalization, costing health care systems billions of dollars and an estimated 600,000 adult deaths worldwide each year. Pneumococcal disease is caused by the bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae and the term describes a group of illnesses, including invasive infections, such as bacteremia/sepsis and meningitis, as well as pneumonia and upper respiratory tract infections. Although all age groups may be affected, the highest rate of pneumococcal disease occurs in young children and older adults. In addition, persons suffering from a wide range of chronic conditions (eg, diabetes, cardiovascular disease) and immune deficiencies are at increased risk.
Study outlines how unique pathogen uses the release of ROS as signal to infect healthy people

Study outlines how unique pathogen uses the release of ROS as signal to infect healthy people

New research into a rare pathogen has shown how a unique evolutionary trait allows it to infect even the healthiest of hosts through a smart solution to the body's immune response against it. [More]
Females' natural resistance to bacterial pneumonia is linked to NOS3 enzyme

Females' natural resistance to bacterial pneumonia is linked to NOS3 enzyme

Researchers have linked increased resistance to bacterial pneumonia in female mice to an enzyme activated by the female sex hormone estrogen. [More]
Myths, misconceptions about seasonal flu and flu vaccine

Myths, misconceptions about seasonal flu and flu vaccine

It's that time of year again. As days shorten, evenings become chilly and the trees start a showy display of color, it's time to roll up your sleeve and get your annual flu vaccine. [More]
Foreign-born residents with low vaccination rates face greater risk of exposure to diseases

Foreign-born residents with low vaccination rates face greater risk of exposure to diseases

Foreign-born residents with low vaccination rates and their relatives in the U.S. are at greater risk of exposure to several vaccine-preventable diseases, e.g. influenza; pneumococcal diseases; tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis; hepatitis A; hepatitis B; shingles; and HPV, the human papilloma virus, which can lead to some types of cancer. [More]
UCSF study: Smoking takes $18.1 billion toll in California

UCSF study: Smoking takes $18.1 billion toll in California

Smoking took an $18.1 billion toll in California – $487 for each resident – and was responsible for more than one in seven deaths in the state, more than from AIDS, influenza, diabetes or many other causes, according to the first comprehensive analysis in more than a decade on the financial and health impacts of tobacco. [More]
Boehringer Ingelheim's OFEV (nintedanib) capsules receive FDA approval for IPF treatment

Boehringer Ingelheim's OFEV (nintedanib) capsules receive FDA approval for IPF treatment

Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved OFEV (nintedanib) capsules for oral use for the treatment of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). [More]
New study on global burden of venous thromboembolism

New study on global burden of venous thromboembolism

A study on the global burden of venous thromboembolism—when a dangerous clot forms in a blood vessel—found that annual incidences range from 0.75 to 2.69 per 1,000 individuals in the population. [More]
Pneumococcal vaccine prevents illness, reduces severe antibiotic-resistant infections in young children

Pneumococcal vaccine prevents illness, reduces severe antibiotic-resistant infections in young children

The pneumococcal vaccine recommended for young children not only prevents illness and death, but also has dramatically reduced severe antibiotic-resistant infections, suggests nationwide research being presented at IDWeek 2014. [More]
Study suggests that college athletes who play contact sports more likely to carry MRSA

Study suggests that college athletes who play contact sports more likely to carry MRSA

Even if they don't show signs of infection, college athletes who play football, soccer and other contact sports are more likely to carry the superbug methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), suggests a study on MRSA and athletes, which is being presented at IDWeek 2014-. [More]
Columbia Nursing researcher suggests ways to prevent nursing home infections

Columbia Nursing researcher suggests ways to prevent nursing home infections

Nursing home infection rates are on the rise, a study from Columbia University School of Nursing found, suggesting that more must be done to protect residents of these facilities from preventable complications. The study, which examined infections in U.S. nursing homes over a five-year period, found increased infection rates for pneumonia, urinary tract infections (UTIs), viral hepatitis, septicemia, wound infections, and multiple drug-resistant organisms (MDROs). [More]
U-M researchers propose new ways to fight sepsis

U-M researchers propose new ways to fight sepsis

A decade ago, America's health care community took on heart attacks with gusto, harnessing the power of research and data to make sure that every patient got the best possible care. [More]
FDA grants QIDP and Fast Track designation to Nabriva's lefamulin for treatment of CABP, ABSSSI

FDA grants QIDP and Fast Track designation to Nabriva's lefamulin for treatment of CABP, ABSSSI

Nabriva Therapeutics AG, a biotechnology company focused on developing pleuromutilins, a new class of antibiotics for the treatment of serious infections caused by resistant Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogens, announced today that the United States Food and Drug Administration has granted Qualified Infectious Disease Product (QIDP) as well as Fast Track status designation to Nabriva's lead product lefamulin, for the treatment of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP) and acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI). [More]
Sleeping with dentures increases pneumonia risk in elderly

Sleeping with dentures increases pneumonia risk in elderly

Poor oral health and hygiene are increasingly recognized as major risk factors for pneumonia among the elderly. To identify modifiable oral health-related risk factors, lead researcher Toshimitsu Iinuma, Nihon University School of Dentistry, Japan, and a team of researchers prospectively investigated associations between a constellation of oral health behaviors and incidences of pneumonia in the community-living of elders 85 years of age or older. [More]
Two randomized trials examine new vaccination strategies for avian influenza

Two randomized trials examine new vaccination strategies for avian influenza

Two randomized trials in the October 8 issue of JAMA examine new vaccination strategies for the prevention and control of avian influenza, often referred to as "bird flu." This is a theme issue on infectious disease. [More]
Medac Pharma launches Rasuvo (methotrexate) injection for patients with RA, pJIA and psoriasis

Medac Pharma launches Rasuvo (methotrexate) injection for patients with RA, pJIA and psoriasis

Medac Pharma, Inc., a privately held pharmaceutical company, has announced the launch of its lead product Rasuvo (methotrexate) injection for patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), poly-articular-course juvenile idiopathic arthritis (pJIA) and psoriasis in the U.S. [More]
Care lags for people who have stroke in hospital, study finds

Care lags for people who have stroke in hospital, study finds

At the first sign of a stroke, time is of the essence. For every minute of delay in treatment, people typically lose almost two million brain cells. Yet a new study presented at the Canadian Stroke Congress reveals that those delays - in getting the right tests and the right drugs - can be longer when people experience a stroke in a hospital. [More]
Study: Benzodiazepine sedatives may increase death risk in patients receiving mechanical ventilation

Study: Benzodiazepine sedatives may increase death risk in patients receiving mechanical ventilation

Sedation is frequently required for mechanically ventilated intensive care unit (ICU) patients to reduce anxiety, provide comfort, and assist in providing optimal respiratory support. [More]
Three institutions collaborate to develop vaccine to treat pneumonia

Three institutions collaborate to develop vaccine to treat pneumonia

The long-observed association between pneumonia and heart failure now has more physical evidence, thanks to research in the School of Medicine at The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio. [More]
DNA sequencing may lead to greater care for patients with ventilator-associated pneumonia

DNA sequencing may lead to greater care for patients with ventilator-associated pneumonia

A patient survives life-threatening trauma, is intubated in the intensive care unit (ICU) to support his or her affected vital functions, starts to recover, and then develops pneumonia. [More]
Poll: Canadians support initiatives to save lives of children, mothers in developing countries

Poll: Canadians support initiatives to save lives of children, mothers in developing countries

As Prime Minister Harper and other world leaders gather this week at the United Nations General Assembly, a new poll shows Canadians care deeply about Canada's efforts to save the lives children and mothers in developing countries who are dying of preventable causes. [More]