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Pneumonia is a leading cause of death and hospitalization, costing health care systems billions of dollars and an estimated 600,000 adult deaths worldwide each year. Pneumococcal disease is caused by the bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae and the term describes a group of illnesses, including invasive infections, such as bacteremia/sepsis and meningitis, as well as pneumonia and upper respiratory tract infections. Although all age groups may be affected, the highest rate of pneumococcal disease occurs in young children and older adults. In addition, persons suffering from a wide range of chronic conditions (eg, diabetes, cardiovascular disease) and immune deficiencies are at increased risk.
Study shows link between liver-produced molecules, pneumonia susceptibility during sepsis

Study shows link between liver-produced molecules, pneumonia susceptibility during sepsis

New evidence highlights the importance of the liver in immunity against bacterial pneumonia. The study is the first of its kind to directly show such a link between liver-produced molecules and pneumonia susceptibility during sepsis. [More]
Hospitals penalized in HAC Reduction program may not reflect poor quality of care, shows study

Hospitals penalized in HAC Reduction program may not reflect poor quality of care, shows study

Hospitals that were penalized more frequently in the Hospital-Acquired Condition (HAC) Reduction Program offered advanced services, were major teaching institutions and had better performance on other publicly reported process-of-care and outcome measures, according to a study in the July 28 issue of JAMA, a theme issue on Medicare and Medicaid at 50. [More]
New white paper provides overview of factors that drive vaccination underutilization in older adults

New white paper provides overview of factors that drive vaccination underutilization in older adults

Today the nonprofit Alliance for Aging Research released a white paper, Our Best Shot: Expanding Prevention through Vaccination in Older Adults, that provides a comprehensive overview of the factors that drive vaccination underutilization in seniors and offers recommendations on how industry, government, and health care experts can improve patient compliance. [More]
Researchers uncover groundbreaking evidence for developing vaccine to prevent middle ear infections

Researchers uncover groundbreaking evidence for developing vaccine to prevent middle ear infections

Researchers from Griffith University's Institute for Glycomics, together with the Nationwide Children's Hospital in Ohio, have uncovered groundbreaking evidence to help vaccine developers prevent middle ear infections. [More]
Two-step regimen of experimental MERS vaccines show promise in mice

Two-step regimen of experimental MERS vaccines show promise in mice

A two-step regimen of experimental vaccines against Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) prompted immune responses in mice and rhesus macaques, report National Institutes of Health scientists who designed the vaccines. Vaccinated mice produced broadly neutralizing antibodies against multiple strains of the MERS coronavirus (MERS-CoV), while vaccinated macaques were protected from severe lung damage when later exposed to MERS-CoV. [More]
Less invasive endovascular aortic repair benefits most patients, provides quick recovery

Less invasive endovascular aortic repair benefits most patients, provides quick recovery

Each year, nearly 40,000 Americans undergo elective surgery to repair an abdominal aortic aneurysm with the goal of preventing a life-threatening rupture of this potentially dangerous cardiovascular condition. [More]
Amgen announces submission of supplemental New Drug Application to FDA for Kyprolis (carfilzomib)

Amgen announces submission of supplemental New Drug Application to FDA for Kyprolis (carfilzomib)

Amgen today announced the submission of a supplemental New Drug Application (sNDA) to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for Kyprolis (carfilzomib) for Injection to seek an expanded indication for the treatment of patients with a form of blood cancer, relapsed multiple myeloma, who have received at least one prior therapy. [More]
Southampton scientists set to analyse investments into infectious disease research

Southampton scientists set to analyse investments into infectious disease research

Scientists at the University of Southampton are set to analyse research investments into infectious disease research, particularly pneumonia and maternal and neonatal infections, after receiving over £370,000 in funding from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. [More]
Retail meat harbors disease-causing Klebsiella pneumoniae, shows new study

Retail meat harbors disease-causing Klebsiella pneumoniae, shows new study

Chicken, turkey and pork sold in grocery stores harbors disease-causing bacteria known as Klebsiella pneumoniae, according to a new study. The research, which was published online today in the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases, shows that contaminated meat may be an important source of human exposure to Klebsiella. [More]
C2N-8E12 (ABBV-8E12) gets orphan drug designation from FDA for PSP treatment

C2N-8E12 (ABBV-8E12) gets orphan drug designation from FDA for PSP treatment

C2N Diagnostics and AbbVie today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has granted their investigational recombinant humanized anti-tau antibody, C2N-8E12 (ABBV-8E12), an orphan drug designation for the treatment of progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). [More]

UK investment lacking for pneumonia research

UK investment in pneumonia research is lacking when compared to spending on influenza and tuberculosis, according to a new study by the University of Southampton and University College London. [More]
Scientists discover new variant of streptococcal bacteria that contributes to severe infections

Scientists discover new variant of streptococcal bacteria that contributes to severe infections

Scientists have discovered a new variant of streptococcal bacteria that has contributed to a rise in disease cases in the UK over the last 17 years. [More]
New study highlights burden of community-acquired pneumonia hospitalizations among U.S. adults

New study highlights burden of community-acquired pneumonia hospitalizations among U.S. adults

Viruses, not bacteria, are the most commonly detected respiratory pathogens in U.S. adults hospitalized with pneumonia, according to a New England Journal of Medicine study released today and conducted by researchers at Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and hospitals in Chicago and Nashville, including Vanderbilt University Medical Center. [More]
IMBRUVICA (ibrutinib) approved in Europe for treatment of Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia

IMBRUVICA (ibrutinib) approved in Europe for treatment of Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia

Today AbbVie announced the European Commission granted marketing authorization for IMBRUVICA (ibrutinib) as the first treatment option available in all 28 member states of the European Union for the treatment of Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia (WM), a rare, slow growing blood cancer, in adult patients who have received at least one prior therapy, or in first line treatment for patients unsuitable for chemo-immunotherapy. [More]
Janssen-sponsored Phase 2b trial shows guselkumab effective in treating moderate to severe plaque psoriasis

Janssen-sponsored Phase 2b trial shows guselkumab effective in treating moderate to severe plaque psoriasis

Results published today in The New England Journal of Medicine from a Janssen Research & Development, LLC (Janssen)-sponsored Phase 2b trial showed up to 86 percent of patients with moderate to severe plaque psoriasis receiving guselkumab (CNTO 1959) achieved a Physician's Global Assessment (PGA) score of cleared psoriasis or minimal psoriasis at week 16, the study's primary endpoint. [More]
Surgery delays for elderly patients with traumatic spinal cord injury

Surgery delays for elderly patients with traumatic spinal cord injury

Older patients with traumatic spinal cord injury experience significant delays in being transferred to a specialist treatment centre and receiving surgery, compared with younger patients, study findings show. [More]
Aridis expands, accelerates current AR-301 Phase 2a study for treatment of acute pneumonia in the U.S.

Aridis expands, accelerates current AR-301 Phase 2a study for treatment of acute pneumonia in the U.S.

Aridis Pharmaceuticals, Inc., a biopharmaceutical company applying proprietary technologies to produce novel anti-infectives and immunotherapies for infectious diseases, announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has accepted its Investigational New Drug (IND) application for AR-301, also referred to as Salvecin, the company's fully human anti-Staphylococcal α-toxin IgG1 monoclonal antibody being developed for the treatment of hospital-acquired and ventilator-associated pneumonia (HAP and VAP) caused by Staphylococcus aureus, including multi-drug resistant 'MRSA' strains. [More]
Sepsis readmissions have significant impact on health care expenditures in California

Sepsis readmissions have significant impact on health care expenditures in California

The Affordable Care Act created several national initiatives aimed at reducing hospital readmission rates for heart attacks, congestive heart failure and other common high-risk conditions. But there is still no national program intended to address sepsis, a potentially life-threatening illness caused by infection. [More]

Older patients with traumatic spinal cord injury less likely to get surgical treatment compared with younger patients

Older patients with traumatic spinal cord injury are less likely than younger patients to receive surgical treatment and experience a significant lag between injury and surgery, according to new research in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). [More]
Researchers awarded grant from British Council to reduce burden of infectious disease in Malaysia

Researchers awarded grant from British Council to reduce burden of infectious disease in Malaysia

A group of collaborators led by the University of Southampton have been awarded a British Council Newton Fund Institutional Links Grant to support ground-breaking research towards reducing the burden of infectious disease in Malaysia. [More]
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