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Pneumonia is a leading cause of death and hospitalization, costing health care systems billions of dollars and an estimated 600,000 adult deaths worldwide each year. Pneumococcal disease is caused by the bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae and the term describes a group of illnesses, including invasive infections, such as bacteremia/sepsis and meningitis, as well as pneumonia and upper respiratory tract infections. Although all age groups may be affected, the highest rate of pneumococcal disease occurs in young children and older adults. In addition, persons suffering from a wide range of chronic conditions (eg, diabetes, cardiovascular disease) and immune deficiencies are at increased risk.
New data visualization platform identifies shortfalls in vaccine introduction and coverage

New data visualization platform identifies shortfalls in vaccine introduction and coverage

As the 69th World Health Assembly discusses progress on the Global Vaccine Action Plan, a new data visualization platform--from the International Vaccine Access Center at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health--provides stark numbers on where shortfalls exist in vaccine introduction and coverage. [More]
Care-related infection measurements not followed up in hospitals, study finds

Care-related infection measurements not followed up in hospitals, study finds

Suffering from an infection during a hospital stay is a common care-related injury. To prevent spreading and to work preventively, all hospitals measure the occurrence of care-related infections. [More]
Heart failure patients who receive influenza vaccine less likely to develop dementia

Heart failure patients who receive influenza vaccine less likely to develop dementia

Influenza vaccination is associated with a lower risk of dementia in patients with heart failure, according to a study in more than 20 000 patients presented today at Heart Failure 2016 and the 3rd World Congress on Acute Heart Failure by Dr Ju-Chi Liu, director of the Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Medicine, Taipei Medical University - Shuang Ho Hospital, in New Taipei City, Taiwan. [More]
Children treated at stand-alone Level I PTC have better outcomes following motor vehicle accident

Children treated at stand-alone Level I PTC have better outcomes following motor vehicle accident

Children and adolescents injured in motor vehicle accidents have better outcomes when treated at a stand-alone Level I pediatric trauma center (PTC) than at general adult trauma centers (ATC) or adult trauma centers with added Level I pediatric qualifications (ATC+PTC), according to a new study to be published in the Journal of Pediatric Surgery by researchers from Children's Minnesota. [More]
Study finds that ACS NSQIP Surgical Risk Calculator has excellent calibration

Study finds that ACS NSQIP Surgical Risk Calculator has excellent calibration

The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program Surgical Risk Calculator accurately estimates the chance of a patient experiencing postoperative complications, and its performance can improve with recalibration of the tool according to research findings appearing online in the Journal of the American College of Surgeons in advance of print publication. [More]
Natural product darwinolide may help combat fatal MRSA infection

Natural product darwinolide may help combat fatal MRSA infection

A serious and sometimes fatal bacterial infection, known as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), may soon be beatable thanks to the efforts of University of South Florida scientists who have isolated and tested an extract from a sponge found in Antarctica. [More]
ICS users may be at greater risk for nontuberculous mycobacteria pulmonary disease

ICS users may be at greater risk for nontuberculous mycobacteria pulmonary disease

Patients with obstructive lung disease who take inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) may be at greater risk for nontuberculous mycobacteria pulmonary disease (NTM PD), according to new research presented at the ATS 2016 International Conference. [More]
Rural hospitals may work well for straightforward surgeries in relatively healthy patients

Rural hospitals may work well for straightforward surgeries in relatively healthy patients

They may be in small towns. They may only have a couple of surgeons. But for common operations, they may be safer and less expensive than their larger cousins, a new study finds. [More]
Risk factors for hospital readmission after pediatric neurosurgical procedures

Risk factors for hospital readmission after pediatric neurosurgical procedures

Researchers at The University of Alabama at Birmingham have determined specific risk factors associated with hospital readmission following pediatric neurosurgery. [More]
Researchers investigate effects of new steroid treatment on children with ARDS

Researchers investigate effects of new steroid treatment on children with ARDS

Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) affects hundreds of thousands of people each year, many of them children. Those with this life threatening condition have severely injured and wet lungs, and are treated with mechanical ventilation. [More]
Doctor’s access to vaccination data can improve pediatric immunization coverage

Doctor’s access to vaccination data can improve pediatric immunization coverage

Exchange of immunization data between a centralized city immunization registry and provider electronic health records led to significant improvements in pediatric immunization coverage, a reduction in over-immunization for adolescents, and increased completeness of immunization records, according to a study conducted at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University Medical Center, NewYork-Presbyterian, and the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene's Citywide Immunization Registry. [More]
Study shows syringe-like device acts as traffic cop directing bacteria to carry out infection

Study shows syringe-like device acts as traffic cop directing bacteria to carry out infection

A study has found that a syringe-like device used to invade intestinal cells also acts as a traffic cop -- directing bacteria where to go and thereby enabling them to efficiently carry out infection. [More]
Study identifies shortfall in uptake of influenza, pneumococcal vaccination among RA patients

Study identifies shortfall in uptake of influenza, pneumococcal vaccination among RA patients

Research from The University of Manchester has found a shortfall in the uptake of influenza and pneumococcal vaccinations among those diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), potentially increasing their infection risk. [More]
Series of routine tests may not be beneficial to patients with age-related disorder

Series of routine tests may not be beneficial to patients with age-related disorder

A series of tests physicians routinely order to help diagnose and follow their patients with an elevated antibody level that is a marker for cancer risk, often do not benefit the patient but do increase health care costs, pathologists report. [More]
Administering flu vaccinations in the morning could induce greater antibody responses

Administering flu vaccinations in the morning could induce greater antibody responses

New research from the University of Birmingham has shown that flu vaccinations are more effective when administered in the morning. [More]
Scientists develop new drug for life-threatening lung disease treatment

Scientists develop new drug for life-threatening lung disease treatment

Researchers are developing a new drug to treat life-threatening lung damage and breathing problems in people with severe infections like pneumonia, those undergoing certain cancer treatments and premature infants with underdeveloped, injury prone lungs. [More]
Scientists identify underlying cause of immune suppression in people with high level spinal cord injuries

Scientists identify underlying cause of immune suppression in people with high level spinal cord injuries

Scientists report in Nature Neuroscience they have identified an underlying cause of dangerous immune suppression in people with high level spinal cord injuries and they propose a possible treatment. [More]
Tackling superbugs with antibiotic resistance breakers: an interview with Professor Colin Garner, Chief Executive, Antibiotic Research UK

Tackling superbugs with antibiotic resistance breakers: an interview with Professor Colin Garner, Chief Executive, Antibiotic Research UK

Superbugs – or to give them their correct name, antibiotic resistant bacteria – arise on repeated exposure to antibiotics. In any population of bacteria there will be a few that are antibiotic resistant (approximately 1 in 100 million bacteria). If these bacteria are allowed to grow and multiply, an antibiotic resistant infection results. [More]
Lung ultrasound may be highly effective, safe for diagnosing pneumonia in children

Lung ultrasound may be highly effective, safe for diagnosing pneumonia in children

Lung ultrasound has been shown to be highly effective and safe for diagnosing pneumonia in children and a potential substitute for chest X-ray, according to a study conducted at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. Results are currently published in the medical journal Chest. [More]
Spending less than $5 per person could save millions of maternal, child lives every year

Spending less than $5 per person could save millions of maternal, child lives every year

By spending less than $5 per person on essential health care services such as contraception, medication for serious illnesses and nutritional supplements, millions of maternal and child lives could be saved every year, according to a new analysis led by the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. [More]
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