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Pneumonia is a leading cause of death and hospitalization, costing health care systems billions of dollars and an estimated 600,000 adult deaths worldwide each year. Pneumococcal disease is caused by the bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae and the term describes a group of illnesses, including invasive infections, such as bacteremia/sepsis and meningitis, as well as pneumonia and upper respiratory tract infections. Although all age groups may be affected, the highest rate of pneumococcal disease occurs in young children and older adults. In addition, persons suffering from a wide range of chronic conditions (eg, diabetes, cardiovascular disease) and immune deficiencies are at increased risk.
Novartis gets three FDA approvals for expanded use of biologic drug to treat rare autoinflammatory diseases

Novartis gets three FDA approvals for expanded use of biologic drug to treat rare autoinflammatory diseases

Novartis announced today that the US Food and Drug Administration has granted three simultaneous approvals for the expanded use of Ilaris (canakinumab) to treat three rare and distinct types of Periodic Fever Syndromes. [More]
World leaders at UN meeting commit to develop action plans on antimicrobial resistance

World leaders at UN meeting commit to develop action plans on antimicrobial resistance

World leaders today signalled an unprecedented level of attention to curb the spread of infections that are resistant to antimicrobial medicines. [More]
MSU experts pioneer pathways to new treatment options for pneumonia

MSU experts pioneer pathways to new treatment options for pneumonia

Streptococcus pneumoniae likely is not a term immediately recognizable by most individuals, even if they have had unpleasant run-ins with the common bacterium. However, experts at Mississippi State University are pioneering pathways to new treatment options. [More]
Solid cooking fuels linked to pneumonia among young children in developing countries

Solid cooking fuels linked to pneumonia among young children in developing countries

Solid fuels used for cooking are the prevailing source of indoor pollution in developing countries. [More]
AACN Practice Alert offers detailed checklist for aspiration prevention in tube-fed patients

AACN Practice Alert offers detailed checklist for aspiration prevention in tube-fed patients

Aspiration among critically ill patients may often be subtle or even silent, but that doesn't mean it's insignificant. [More]
AUDs and smoking may disproportionately increase upper airways' oxidative stress

AUDs and smoking may disproportionately increase upper airways' oxidative stress

Cells in the lung are constantly exposed to oxygen and intermittently exposed to other environmental factors, resulting in a susceptibility to oxidative injury. Both alcohol use disorders (AUDs) and cigarette smoking heighten pulmonary oxidative stress, likely due to antioxidant depletion. [More]
Study shows increasing healthcare costs for infections linked to premise plumbing pathogens

Study shows increasing healthcare costs for infections linked to premise plumbing pathogens

A new analysis of 100 million Medicare records from U.S. adults aged 65 and older reveals rising healthcare costs for infections associated with opportunistic premise plumbing pathogens--disease-causing bacteria, such as Legionella--which can live inside drinking water distribution systems, including household and hospital water pipes. [More]
Experts develop urine-based method to diagnose conditions in newborn babies

Experts develop urine-based method to diagnose conditions in newborn babies

Experts from the V. I. Kulakov Research Center for Obstetrics, Gynecology and Perinatology and the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology have devised a method that uses the urinary proteome to diagnose conditions in newborn babies. [More]
Trial of high-dose flu vaccine aims to better protect heart failure patients

Trial of high-dose flu vaccine aims to better protect heart failure patients

A network of researchers in the United States and Canada will try to spare thousands of patients the dangers of heart attacks and hospitalizations over the next five years in a trial of a high-dose flu vaccine. [More]
New collaborative initiative seeks to develop interventions for optimizing adult vaccination rates

New collaborative initiative seeks to develop interventions for optimizing adult vaccination rates

A new quality improvement initiative that aims to create effective solutions in optimizing adult vaccination rates was announced today. [More]
Caltech scientists uncover three-dimensional structure of disease-fighting protein

Caltech scientists uncover three-dimensional structure of disease-fighting protein

The polymeric immunoglobulin receptor, or pIgR, is a multitasking protein produced in the lining of mucosal surfaces, such as the intestines. It plays a pivotal role in the body's immune functions by sequestering bacteria and by assisting antibodies—large proteins that can identify and neutralize specific bacteria and viruses. [More]
School holidays may be linked to increased rates of adult pneumococcal CAP

School holidays may be linked to increased rates of adult pneumococcal CAP

A study presented today (6 September 2016) at this year's European Respiratory Society International Congress in London, UK shows that adults admitted to hospital during school holidays are 38% more likely to have pneumococcal community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) than those admitted during term time. [More]
Hospitals with high readmission rates more likely to show better mortality scores

Hospitals with high readmission rates more likely to show better mortality scores

A group of Johns Hopkins physicians and researchers today published an article in the Journal of Hospital Medicine suggesting that data on mortality and hospital readmission used by the United States Centers for Medicare and Medicaid suggest a potentially problematic relationship. [More]
Simple steps can improve survival of sepsis patients

Simple steps can improve survival of sepsis patients

Sepsis, commonly called blood poisoning, is a common affliction that can affect people of all ages. A series of simple measures tested at a Norwegian hospital can make a difference in successfully treating sepsis. [More]
Novel technology LifeVest can help newborns breathe

Novel technology LifeVest can help newborns breathe

LifeVest, a technology being developed at St. Michael's Hospital to help newborns breathe, won the Global Healthcare Innovation Academy's international competition in Calgary. [More]
New collaborative initiative aims to improve adult immunization rates

New collaborative initiative aims to improve adult immunization rates

A new quality improvement initiative that aims to create effective solutions in optimizing adult vaccination rates was announced today. [More]
Antipsychotic use linked to higher pneumonia risk in patients with Alzheimer's disease

Antipsychotic use linked to higher pneumonia risk in patients with Alzheimer's disease

Antipsychotic medications are associated with an increased risk of pneumonia in persons with Alzheimer's disease (AD), according to new research from the University of Eastern Finland. [More]
Study explains long-term pulmonary outcomes among childhood cancer survivors

Study explains long-term pulmonary outcomes among childhood cancer survivors

A team of researchers from nine leading academic hospitals and research centers have published a paper in the early online edition of the journal Cancer that describes pulmonary outcomes among childhood cancer survivors. [More]
Researchers explain why secondary infection with MRSA kills influenza patients

Researchers explain why secondary infection with MRSA kills influenza patients

Researchers have discovered that secondary infection with the Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacterium (or "superbug") often kills influenza patients because the flu virus alters the antibacterial response of white blood cells, causing them to damage the patients' lungs instead of destroying the bacterium. [More]
St. Jude scientists identify key innate immune sensor that attacks influenza virus

St. Jude scientists identify key innate immune sensor that attacks influenza virus

St. Jude Children's Research Hospital immunologists have identified the protein trigger in the body's quick-reaction innate immune system that specifically recognizes the influenza virus in infected cells and triggers their death. [More]
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