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Pneumonia is a leading cause of death and hospitalization, costing health care systems billions of dollars and an estimated 600,000 adult deaths worldwide each year. Pneumococcal disease is caused by the bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae and the term describes a group of illnesses, including invasive infections, such as bacteremia/sepsis and meningitis, as well as pneumonia and upper respiratory tract infections. Although all age groups may be affected, the highest rate of pneumococcal disease occurs in young children and older adults. In addition, persons suffering from a wide range of chronic conditions (eg, diabetes, cardiovascular disease) and immune deficiencies are at increased risk.
Tufts University researchers report that extra vitamin E can protect against pneumonia

Tufts University researchers report that extra vitamin E can protect against pneumonia

Extra vitamin E protected older mice from a bacterial infection that commonly causes pneumonia. Microbiologists and nutrition researchers from Tufts University report that the extra vitamin E helped regulate the mice's immune system. [More]
Lilly receives FDA approval for CYRAMZA (ramucirumab)

Lilly receives FDA approval for CYRAMZA (ramucirumab)

Eli Lilly and Company has received its third U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval for CYRAMZA (ramucirumab). [More]
Two MinuteClinic walk-in medical clinics open inside CVS/pharmacy stores in Northern Nevada

Two MinuteClinic walk-in medical clinics open inside CVS/pharmacy stores in Northern Nevada

Two MinuteClinic walk-in medical clinics opened today inside CVS/pharmacy stores in Reno and Sparks. They join eight MinuteClinic locations inside select CVS/pharmacy stores in the Las Vegas area in Southern Nevada. [More]
Infant mortality rates for RSV much lower than previously thought

Infant mortality rates for RSV much lower than previously thought

It's a virus that has long been characterized as dangerous and even deadly, but new research shows infant deaths from respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) are actually quite uncommon in the 21st century. [More]
Amgen announces new data from BLINCYTO Phase 2 study for treatment of patients with ALL

Amgen announces new data from BLINCYTO Phase 2 study for treatment of patients with ALL

Amgen today announced that new data from a pivotal Phase 2 study evaluating BLINCYTO (blinatumomab) for the treatment of adult patients with relapsed/refractory B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) was presented at the 56th American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting and Exposition. [More]
Phase 2 RESONATE-17 study: IMBRUVICA (ibrutinib) improves survival in CLL patients with del 17p

Phase 2 RESONATE-17 study: IMBRUVICA (ibrutinib) improves survival in CLL patients with del 17p

Results from the Phase 2 RESONATE-17 (PCYC-1117) study show IMBRUVICA (ibrutinib) was associated with an 82.6 percent investigator-assessed overall response rate (ORR; the primary endpoint) and a 79 percent progression-free survival (PFS) rate at 12 months in people living with relapsed/refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) or small lymphocytic lymphoma (SLL) who have a genetic mutation known as deletion 17p (del 17p). [More]
Alere starts voluntary correction about use of Alere INRatio and INRatio 2 PT/INR Monitor system

Alere starts voluntary correction about use of Alere INRatio and INRatio 2 PT/INR Monitor system

Alere Inc. has initiated a voluntary correction to inform U.S. users of the Alere INRatio and INRatio 2 PT/INR Monitor system of certain medical conditions that should not be tested with the system (INRatio Monitor or INRatio 2 Monitor and INRatio Test Strips). [More]
Children born prematurely need to be placed in a priority group for seasonal flu vaccination

Children born prematurely need to be placed in a priority group for seasonal flu vaccination

Children born prematurely are at an increased risk of flu-related complications, despite not being identified as an “at risk” group in UK, USA, or WHO guidelines, and should be a priority group for the seasonal flu vaccination, new research published in The Lancet Respiratory Medicine suggests. [More]
AbbVie reports results from venetoclax Phase 2 clinical trial in AML at ASH 2014

AbbVie reports results from venetoclax Phase 2 clinical trial in AML at ASH 2014

AbbVie presented during an oral presentation at the American Society of Hematology's 56th Annual Meeting new results from a Phase 2 study of investigational compound venetoclax (ABT-199/GDC-0199) in patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). AML is an aggressive and deadly type of blood cancer, in which the body produces too many of a specific type of white blood cell (myeloblast), which can crowd out healthy blood cells. [More]
Novel treatments show safe responses in patients with relapsed, treatment-resistant blood cancers

Novel treatments show safe responses in patients with relapsed, treatment-resistant blood cancers

Novel treatments that harness the body's own immune cells to attack cancer cells demonstrate safe and durable responses in patients with relapsed and treatment-resistant blood cancers, according to data presented today at the 56th American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting and Exposition. [More]
FDA Advisory Committee votes in favor of Actavis' ceftazidime-avibactam

FDA Advisory Committee votes in favor of Actavis' ceftazidime-avibactam

Actavis plc today announced that the Anti-Infective Drugs Advisory Committee convened by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has voted to recommend approval of Actavis' New Drug Application (NDA) for ceftazidime-avibactam, an investigational antibiotic being developed to treat hospitalized patients when limited or no treatment options are available for complicated intra-abdominal infections (cIAI) (in combination with metronidazole) and complicated urinary tract infections (cUTI) (including acute pyelonephritis) caused by Gram-negative pathogens. [More]
Many pediatric chest X-rays unnecessary, offer no clinical benefit

Many pediatric chest X-rays unnecessary, offer no clinical benefit

Researchers at Mayo Clinic found that some children are receiving chest X-rays that may be unnecessary and offer no clinical benefit to the patient, according to a study presented today at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America. [More]
Scientists reveal how bacterial nanodrills enter into our cells to kill them

Scientists reveal how bacterial nanodrills enter into our cells to kill them

A team of scientists has revealed how certain harmful bacteria drill into our cells to kill them. Their study shows how bacterial 'nanodrills' assemble themselves on the outer surfaces of our cells, and includes the first movie of how they then punch holes in the cells' outer membranes. [More]
Antibiotic resistance: Theme for next Uppsala Health Summit

Antibiotic resistance: Theme for next Uppsala Health Summit

The theme for the next Uppsala Health Summit, to be held in Uppsala on 2-3 June 2015, is antibiotic resistance -- one of the biggest global health challenges of our day. [More]
Researchers say that nervous system may play vital role in infections, autoimmune diseases

Researchers say that nervous system may play vital role in infections, autoimmune diseases

The nervous system may play a bigger role in infections and autoimmune diseases than previously known. If researchers can learn more about that role, it could provide insight into diagnosing and treating everything from the stomach flu to rheumatoid arthritis. [More]
New Mayo Clinic study shows impact of long-term use of proton pump inhibitors

New Mayo Clinic study shows impact of long-term use of proton pump inhibitors

Before reaching for that daily antacid, you might consider what it's doing to the trillions of bugs living in your gut. A new Mayo Clinic study in the open access journal Microbiome shows that people who regularly take proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) have less diversity among their gut bacteria, putting them at increased risk for infections like clostridium difficile and pneumonia, in addition to vitamin deficiencies and bone fractures. [More]
Bayer's Amikacin Inhale and Ciprofloxacin DPI receive QIDP designation from FDA

Bayer's Amikacin Inhale and Ciprofloxacin DPI receive QIDP designation from FDA

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has granted qualified infectious disease product (QIDP) designation to two Bayer investigational agents, Amikacin Inhale and Ciprofloxacin Dry Powder for Inhalation (DPI). [More]
New course underlines the importance of early detection of lung cancer

New course underlines the importance of early detection of lung cancer

In Japan, 40 percent of lung cancer cases are detected on early stages and treated with a high probability of remission; in the US 20 percent of cases have that possibility, while in Mexico, in the National Cancer Institute (INCan), only 1.2 percent of patients are diagnosed at an early stage. [More]
Targeting bacterial motility to combat chronic respiratory disease

Targeting bacterial motility to combat chronic respiratory disease

Mycoplasma gallisepticum causes chronic respiratory disease in birds. The illness particularly affects domestic chicken and turkey flocks. The bacteria are especially life-threatening for the animals when they occur in combination with other infections. In order to control the spread of the disease, poultry farms in the EU must be proven free from Mycoplasma gallisepticum or face being closed. [More]
Nutrition treatment for older COPD patients shows better outcomes

Nutrition treatment for older COPD patients shows better outcomes

People aged 65 and older, who were being treated for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in the hospital and received nutrition treatment (oral nutrition supplements) had reduced lengths of stay, hospital costs and chances of returning to the hospital within 30-days, according to a study published in CHEST. [More]