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Pneumonia is a leading cause of death and hospitalization, costing health care systems billions of dollars and an estimated 600,000 adult deaths worldwide each year. Pneumococcal disease is caused by the bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae and the term describes a group of illnesses, including invasive infections, such as bacteremia/sepsis and meningitis, as well as pneumonia and upper respiratory tract infections. Although all age groups may be affected, the highest rate of pneumococcal disease occurs in young children and older adults. In addition, persons suffering from a wide range of chronic conditions (eg, diabetes, cardiovascular disease) and immune deficiencies are at increased risk.
Zydelig gets FDA approval for treatment of patients with three types of blood cancers

Zydelig gets FDA approval for treatment of patients with three types of blood cancers

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Zydelig (idelalisib) to treat patients with three types of blood cancers. [More]
Researchers release evidence substantiating unexpected dual role of immune system

Researchers release evidence substantiating unexpected dual role of immune system

University of Leicester researchers have released evidence substantiating an unexpected dual role of an important component of the immune system. [More]
Expert guidance helps prioritize strategies to prevent VAP

Expert guidance helps prioritize strategies to prevent VAP

Thousands of critically ill patients on life support develop ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) each year. A new document released today by a consortium of professional organizations helps prioritize strategies to prevent this potentially fatal infection. [More]
Saltier intravenous drip reduces overall rate of complications by 25% after Whipple surgery

Saltier intravenous drip reduces overall rate of complications by 25% after Whipple surgery

Adequate hydration via a saline drip is essential during surgery, but recent reports suggest that getting the balance of salt and water just right could have an important impact on patient recovery. [More]
Study finds 20% overall drop per decade in deaths after stroke

Study finds 20% overall drop per decade in deaths after stroke

Fewer Americans are having strokes and those who do have a lower risk of dying from them finds a new study led by Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health researchers. [More]
PAH disease burden ‘significant’

PAH disease burden ‘significant’

Patients with newly diagnosed pulmonary arterial hypertension have a substantial burden of disease, with more than half hospitalised during the first 3 years post-diagnosis, research shows. [More]
‘No convincing evidence’ for zinc supplements to prevent otitis media

‘No convincing evidence’ for zinc supplements to prevent otitis media

There is no convincing evidence that zinc supplements reduce the risk of otitis media in children or adults, say the authors of an updated Cochrane review. [More]
Medac Pharma's Rasuvo injection gets FDA approval for RA, pJIA and psoriasis

Medac Pharma's Rasuvo injection gets FDA approval for RA, pJIA and psoriasis

Medac Pharma, Inc., a privately held pharmaceutical company focused on the development of new molecules and improving the effectiveness of existing medicines, announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved Rasuvo, a subcutaneous injectable methotrexate (MTX) therapy delivered in an auto-injector for rheumatoid arthritis (RA), polyarticular-course juvenile idiopathic arthritis (pJIA) and psoriasis. [More]
ACS Infectious Diseases journal highlights chemistry and collaborative research area

ACS Infectious Diseases journal highlights chemistry and collaborative research area

The American Chemical Society (ACS) announced today that Courtney Aldrich, Ph.D., will head the brand-new, web-only journal ACS Infectious Diseases as editor-in-chief. With the first issue slated for publication in January 2015, the pioneering journal will meet a growing demand for a place to publish top-notch chemistry-focused infectious diseases research. [More]
Bacterial respiratory tract colonization before catching influenza may protect against severe disease

Bacterial respiratory tract colonization before catching influenza may protect against severe disease

Many studies have shown that more severe illness and even death are likely to result if you develop a secondary respiratory infection after developing influenza. Now, however, a team of researchers based at The Wistar Institute has determined that if you reverse the order of infection, the bacteria Streptococcus pneumoniae (often called pneumococcus) may actually protect against a bad case of the flu. [More]
Viewpoints: Misreading Hobby Lobby; calmer climate for ACA; danger of tuberculosis, measles

Viewpoints: Misreading Hobby Lobby; calmer climate for ACA; danger of tuberculosis, measles

Liberals should spend less time lauding the dissents in last week's Hobby Lobby decision by the U.S. Supreme Court and more time reading them. [More]

Scientists uncover mechanisms that can protect against lethal bacteria

An important development in understanding how the bacterium that causes pneumonia, meningitis and septicaemia remains harmlessly in the nose and throat has been discovered at the University of Liverpool's Institute of Infection and Global Health. [More]
Pneumonia patients treated with azithromycin face lower risk of death, slightly increased risk of heart attack

Pneumonia patients treated with azithromycin face lower risk of death, slightly increased risk of heart attack

In a study that included nearly 65,000 older patients hospitalized with pneumonia, treatment that included azithromycin compared with other antibiotics was associated with a significantly lower risk of death and a slightly increased risk of heart attack, according to a study in the June 4 issue of JAMA. [More]
Ralphs Pharmacies continue to offer Tdap vaccinations for whooping cough in Southern California

Ralphs Pharmacies continue to offer Tdap vaccinations for whooping cough in Southern California

As the number of pertussis cases, also known as whooping cough, reaches epidemic proportions in California, Ralphs Pharmacies continue to offer Tdap (tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis) vaccinations at its 85 in-store pharmacies throughout Southern California. [More]
Global forum calls for accelerated action to improve maternal, newborn and child health

Global forum calls for accelerated action to improve maternal, newborn and child health

More than 800 leaders and public health experts from around the world opened a landmark two-day meeting in Johannesburg to review new data and call for accelerated action to improve maternal, newborn and child health. [More]
LINX Reflux Management System safe for patients suffering from GERD, shows new data

LINX Reflux Management System safe for patients suffering from GERD, shows new data

Torax Medical today announced the release of new data from two leading U.S. medical centers that further establishes the LINX Reflux Management System as a safe and effective procedure for patients suffering from gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). [More]
Heavy drinkers at greater risk of developing pneumonia and ARDS

Heavy drinkers at greater risk of developing pneumonia and ARDS

Heavy drinking damages the body in many ways. In addition to liver failure, alcoholics are at a much greater risk of developing pneumonia and life threatening acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), for which there is no treatment. [More]
New research project aims to tackle antibiotic resistance with inhalable nanotherapeutics

New research project aims to tackle antibiotic resistance with inhalable nanotherapeutics

A new research project (PneumoNP) is aimed at tackling antibiotic resistance in respiratory tract infections via the use of inhalable nanotherapeutic compounds. Funded under the FP7 programme by the European Commission, the 4-year long PneumoNP project brings together top research institutes, universities, clinicians and enterprises from 6 EU member states. [More]
Motivational interviewing reduces secondhand smoke exposure among children living in households

Motivational interviewing reduces secondhand smoke exposure among children living in households

A Johns Hopkins-led research team has found that motivational interviewing, along with standard education and awareness programs, significantly reduced secondhand smoke exposure among children living in those households. [More]
Dental hygienists prepare to take increased responsibilities for oral health care

Dental hygienists prepare to take increased responsibilities for oral health care

With opportunities to take increased responsibility for oral health care and to deliver care in a more comprehensive way, it's an exciting time in the profession of dental hygiene. [More]