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Pneumonia is a leading cause of death and hospitalization, costing health care systems billions of dollars and an estimated 600,000 adult deaths worldwide each year. Pneumococcal disease is caused by the bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae and the term describes a group of illnesses, including invasive infections, such as bacteremia/sepsis and meningitis, as well as pneumonia and upper respiratory tract infections. Although all age groups may be affected, the highest rate of pneumococcal disease occurs in young children and older adults. In addition, persons suffering from a wide range of chronic conditions (eg, diabetes, cardiovascular disease) and immune deficiencies are at increased risk.
Existing anti-stroke drug can be effective in treating middle-ear infections

Existing anti-stroke drug can be effective in treating middle-ear infections

An existing anti-stroke drug is an effective treatment for middle-ear infections, showing the ability to suppress mucus overproduction, improve bacterial clearance and reduce hearing loss, according to researchers at Georgia State University and the University of Rochester. [More]
ICS use may lower risk of mortality from pneumonia and other causes in COPD patients

ICS use may lower risk of mortality from pneumonia and other causes in COPD patients

Treatment of COPD with inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) may decrease the risk of dying from pneumonia and from other causes despite being associated with an increase in the occurrence of pneumonia, according to a new meta-analysis presented at the 2015 American Thoracic Society International Conference. [More]
Second-generation antibiotic shows promise against common bacterial infections

Second-generation antibiotic shows promise against common bacterial infections

Researchers led by St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists have developed a second-generation antibiotic that shows early effectiveness against common bacterial infections that pose a serious health threat to children and adults. [More]
Kidney function plays critical role in sepsis patients

Kidney function plays critical role in sepsis patients

Researchers at Duke Medicine have determined that kidney function plays a critical role in the fate of patients being treated for sepsis, a potentially life-threatening complication of an infection. [More]
Toxin pneumolysin causes progressive and fatal heart complications

Toxin pneumolysin causes progressive and fatal heart complications

Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major human pathogen and is known to be associated with increased risk of fatal heart complications including heart failure and heart attacks. [More]
No data exists to support long-term efficacy, safety of e-cigarettes as smoking cessation tool

No data exists to support long-term efficacy, safety of e-cigarettes as smoking cessation tool

There is little reliable evidence that electronic cigarettes are effective for long-term smoking cessation, according to a new analysis of the currently available research which was presented at the 2015 American Thoracic Society International Conference. [More]
Bronchitis can cause pneumonia, says Loyola physician

Bronchitis can cause pneumonia, says Loyola physician

When a cold has lasted too long or a cough is especially bothersome, it's important to see a medical professional. [More]
LSTM scientists one step closer to understanding why HAP increases risk of pneumonia

LSTM scientists one step closer to understanding why HAP increases risk of pneumonia

Scientists at LSTM have come a step closer to understanding why people exposed to household air pollution (HAP) are at higher risk of lung infections such as pneumonia and tuberculosis. [More]
Lymphatic pump treatment may fight pneumonia by enhancing efficacy of antibiotics

Lymphatic pump treatment may fight pneumonia by enhancing efficacy of antibiotics

Lymphatic pump treatment (LPT) shows promise in managing pneumonia when combined with antibiotic treatment, according to a new study published in The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association. [More]
VHI publishes 20 new hospital quality measures

VHI publishes 20 new hospital quality measures

Virginia Health Information published 20 new hospital quality measures to help Virginians make more informed choices when choosing hospitals. The measures include mortality rates for pneumonia and stroke and results of care such as blood clots and accidental cuts and tears during treatment as well as more than a dozen other measures including many patient safety topics. [More]
Bone-marrow-derived MSCs can promote fracture healing

Bone-marrow-derived MSCs can promote fracture healing

Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been transplanted to successfully treat a variety of diseases and conditions. The benefit of using MSCs is their ability to self-renew and differentiate into a variety of specialized cell types, such as osteoblasts (cells contributing to bone formation), chondrocytes (cartilage cells), adipocytes (fat cells), myocardiocytes (the muscle cells that make up the cardiac muscle), and neurons (nervous system cells). [More]
Research findings pave way for development of new treatments for respiratory diseases

Research findings pave way for development of new treatments for respiratory diseases

The research has discovered a link between a vital pumping system that does not function correctly in people with cystic fibrosis and the parasite Toxoplasma. [More]
New WHO report analyzes global response to antimicrobial resistance

New WHO report analyzes global response to antimicrobial resistance

A quarter of countries that responded to a WHO survey have national plans to preserve antimicrobial medicines like antibiotics, but many more countries must also step up. A new report, "Worldwide country situation analysis: Response to antimicrobial resistance", which outlines the survey findings, reveals that while much activity is underway and many governments are committed to addressing the problem, there are major gaps in actions needed across all 6 WHO regions to prevent the misuse of antibiotics and reduce spread of antimicrobial resistance. [More]
Gas naturally produced within our bodies reduces severity of RSV infection, UTMB study finds

Gas naturally produced within our bodies reduces severity of RSV infection, UTMB study finds

A new study from the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston is the first to show that hydrogen sulfide, a gas produced naturally within our bodies, reduces the severity of respiratory syncytial virus, or RSV. [More]
Preclinical data from Synthetic Biologics' SYN-005 for Pertussis treatment presented at ECCMID 2015

Preclinical data from Synthetic Biologics' SYN-005 for Pertussis treatment presented at ECCMID 2015

Synthetic Biologics, Inc., a developer of pathogen-specific therapies for serious infections and diseases, with a focus on protecting the microbiome, announced that preclinical data from its novel SYN-005 program for the treatment of Pertussis were presented in two posters at ECCMID 2015 (European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases), on April 25, 2015, in Copenhagen, Denmark. [More]
Lilly receives fourth FDA approval for CYRAMZA (ramucirumab)

Lilly receives fourth FDA approval for CYRAMZA (ramucirumab)

Eli Lilly and Company has received its fourth U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval for CYRAMZA (ramucirumab). CYRAMZA (ramucirumab injection 10 mg/mL solution) is now also indicated in combination with FOLFIRI (irinotecan, folinic acid, and 5-fluorouracil) chemotherapy for the treatment of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) with disease progression on or after prior therapy with bevacizumab, oxaliplatin, and a fluoropyrimidine. [More]
Rising shortages of key antibiotics raise serious concerns about effects on patient care

Rising shortages of key antibiotics raise serious concerns about effects on patient care

Shortages of key antibiotics, including gold-standard therapies and drugs used to treat highly resistant infections, are on the rise, according to a new study of shortages from 2001 to 2013 published in Clinical Infectious Diseases and available online. The trends raise serious concerns about the effects on patient care, particularly for infections without effective alternative treatment options. [More]
New text message alert system helps parents remember child's vaccination appointments

New text message alert system helps parents remember child's vaccination appointments

Nearly a third of all children nationwide and in Kentucky aren't up-to-date with the vaccination schedule recommended by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), but not because their parents are refusing vaccines. Evidence suggests parents tend to forget appointments when children are scheduled to receive immunizations. [More]
More personalized treatment protocols can reduce mortality in cancer patients with severe pneumonia

More personalized treatment protocols can reduce mortality in cancer patients with severe pneumonia

Cancer patients are more likely to get infections. Pneumonia is the most frequent type of infection in this group and a frequent cause of ICU admission and mortality. A study conducted by researchers from the D'Or Institute for Research and Education in partnership with Brazilian hospitals and universities analyzed the factors associated with severe pneumonia in hospitalized cancer patients and suggests that more personalized treatment protocols can reduce mortality in these patients. [More]
NIAID funds nine research projects to advance rapid diagnostics tests for drug-resistant bacteria

NIAID funds nine research projects to advance rapid diagnostics tests for drug-resistant bacteria

The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, has awarded more than $11 million in first-year funding for nine research projects supporting enhanced diagnostics to rapidly detect antimicrobial-resistant bacteria. [More]
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