Pneumonia News and Research RSS Feed - Pneumonia News and Research

Pneumonia is a leading cause of death and hospitalization, costing health care systems billions of dollars and an estimated 600,000 adult deaths worldwide each year. Pneumococcal disease is caused by the bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae and the term describes a group of illnesses, including invasive infections, such as bacteremia/sepsis and meningitis, as well as pneumonia and upper respiratory tract infections. Although all age groups may be affected, the highest rate of pneumococcal disease occurs in young children and older adults. In addition, persons suffering from a wide range of chronic conditions (eg, diabetes, cardiovascular disease) and immune deficiencies are at increased risk.
Combatting Antibiotic Resistance, the role of POC Diagnostics

Combatting Antibiotic Resistance, the role of POC Diagnostics

During the winter months, patients frequently present with respiratory symptoms like coughing, sneezing and fever that could be caused by one of several bacterial and viral infections including influenza, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) or bacterial pneumonia. [More]
Researchers track severely brain injured woman to reveal biological process of recovery

Researchers track severely brain injured woman to reveal biological process of recovery

A severely brain injured woman, who recovered the ability to communicate using her left eye, restored connections and function of the areas of her brain responsible for producing expressive language and responding to human speech, according to new research from Weill Cornell Medicine scientists. [More]
New research suggests only 12% of older Americans have dental insurance

New research suggests only 12% of older Americans have dental insurance

Only 12 percent of older Americans have some form of dental insurance and fewer than half visited a dentist in the previous year, suggests new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health research on Medicare beneficiaries. [More]
New UGA research finds pathogen's motility activates immune response

New UGA research finds pathogen's motility activates immune response

Until now, a pathogen's ability to move through the body has been overlooked as a possible trigger of immune response, but new research from the University of Georgia College of Veterinary Medicine found that motility will indeed alarm the host and activate an immune response. [More]
FIRS calls on governments, health organizations to strengthen response to HIV on World AIDS Day

FIRS calls on governments, health organizations to strengthen response to HIV on World AIDS Day

In recognition of World AIDS Day, held annually on Dec. 1 each year since 1988, the Forum of International Respiratory Societies (FIRS) is calling on governments, health advocates and non-government organizations to strengthen their response to HIV/AIDS. In 2015 AIDS claimed 1.1 million lives. [More]
New study finds smoking cessation at any age reduces risk of death

New study finds smoking cessation at any age reduces risk of death

Tobacco use continues to be a major cause of cancer and premature death. Most studies of cigarette smoking and mortality have focused on middle-aged populations, with fewer studies examining the impact of tobacco cessation on disease and mortality risk among the elderly. [More]
WSU researchers develop novel technology to treat chronic wound infections

WSU researchers develop novel technology to treat chronic wound infections

A WSU research team has successfully used a mild electric current to take on and beat drug-resistant bacterial infections, a technology that may eventually be used to treat chronic wound infections. [More]
New report highlights global burden of maternal, newborn and young child deaths

New report highlights global burden of maternal, newborn and young child deaths

Today FIGO, ICM, ICN and IPA announce the publication of a report showing the global burden of maternal, newborn and young child deaths and launch the Together We Can campaign to tackle it. [More]
NTM lung infections

NTM lung infections

Nontuberculous mycobacteria are part of a group of bacteria called mycobacteria. The non-tuberculous mycobacteria are, as the name suggests, mycobacteria that are not tuberculosis. They're also not leprosy, but they are the other members of the bacteria group termed mycobacteria. [More]
Study compares risk of pneumonia linked to using different antidementia drugs

Study compares risk of pneumonia linked to using different antidementia drugs

A recent study from the University of Eastern Finland shows that among users of antidementia drugs, persons using memantine have the highest risk of pneumonia. The use of rivastigmine patches is associated with an increased risk as well. [More]
Doctors recommend oral antibiotics for children recovering from complex pneumonia

Doctors recommend oral antibiotics for children recovering from complex pneumonia

In some good news for families of children recovering from complex pneumonia, doctors recommend in a study published by Pediatrics it's better to send kids home from the hospital with oral instead of intravenous antibiotics. [More]
High daily doses of vitamin D can help reduce incidence of ARI in older, long-term care residents

High daily doses of vitamin D can help reduce incidence of ARI in older, long-term care residents

Researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus have found that high doses of vitamin D reduce the incidence of acute respiratory illness (ARI) in older, long-term care residents. [More]
Study: Fungal asthma in UK greatly exceeds prior estimates

Study: Fungal asthma in UK greatly exceeds prior estimates

Experts are warning of a significant increase in the number of people in the UK who are living with invasive and serious fungal diseases that affect the lungs, bloodstream and brain and can sometimes lead to death. [More]
Study reports increasing rates of hospital admissions for PD patients

Study reports increasing rates of hospital admissions for PD patients

Although treatment for Parkinson's disease (PD) is significantly extending the lives of patients, these patients are now being admitted to hospitals at increasing rates. [More]
Many people wrongly believe that sepsis is less deadly than breast cancer, research reveals

Many people wrongly believe that sepsis is less deadly than breast cancer, research reveals

Most people do not know how deadly sepsis is, with four out offive wrongly believingthe condition is less deadly than breast cancer, according to the latest research. [More]
Researchers report acute and fatal cases of pneumonitis from ingestion of fuel

Researchers report acute and fatal cases of pneumonitis from ingestion of fuel

People fleeing across the Mediterranean by boat face many dangers. In a paper now published in the renowned medical journal Lancet, researchers working at the Technical University of Munich's Klinikum rechts der Isar, Städtisches Klinikum München GmbH, and Jamaica Hospital, New York, report for the first time on acute and sometimes fatal cases of pneumonitis resulting from the ingestion of fuel. [More]
Study finds stable trends in ventilator-associated pneumonia rates

Study finds stable trends in ventilator-associated pneumonia rates

In a study published online by JAMA, Mark L. Metersky, M.D., of the UConn School of Medicine, Farmington, and colleagues analyzed trends in Medicare Patient Safety Monitoring System ventilator-associated pneumonia rates from 2005 through 2013. [More]
New report highlights need for innovations to combat pneumonia and diarrhea among children

New report highlights need for innovations to combat pneumonia and diarrhea among children

A new report finds some progress in combatting pneumonia and diarrhea among young children in the nations most severely impacted by the two diseases, but they remain responsible for hundreds of thousands of preventable deaths around the world. [More]
New biophotonic light sensor can detect Legionella bacteria in minutes

New biophotonic light sensor can detect Legionella bacteria in minutes

Outbreaks of Legionnaire’s Disease, a respiratory infection that can cause pneumonia, and in severe cases organ failure or septic shock, are more common than we might think. With anyone being susceptible, more than 100 cases are reported each week both in America and in Europe, with a fatality rate of around 10%. [More]
Using urine samples to diagnose disease in preterm newborns

Using urine samples to diagnose disease in preterm newborns

The majority of patients in neonatal intensive care units are premature babies, who often have infectious (congenital pneumonia) or noninfectious (tachypnea, infant respiratory distress syndrome) respiratory pathologies. [More]
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