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Pneumonia is a leading cause of death and hospitalization, costing health care systems billions of dollars and an estimated 600,000 adult deaths worldwide each year. Pneumococcal disease is caused by the bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae and the term describes a group of illnesses, including invasive infections, such as bacteremia/sepsis and meningitis, as well as pneumonia and upper respiratory tract infections. Although all age groups may be affected, the highest rate of pneumococcal disease occurs in young children and older adults. In addition, persons suffering from a wide range of chronic conditions (eg, diabetes, cardiovascular disease) and immune deficiencies are at increased risk.
New course underlines the importance of early detection of lung cancer

New course underlines the importance of early detection of lung cancer

In Japan, 40 percent of lung cancer cases are detected on early stages and treated with a high probability of remission; in the US 20 percent of cases have that possibility, while in Mexico, in the National Cancer Institute (INCan), only 1.2 percent of patients are diagnosed at an early stage. [More]
Targeting bacterial motility to combat chronic respiratory disease

Targeting bacterial motility to combat chronic respiratory disease

Mycoplasma gallisepticum causes chronic respiratory disease in birds. The illness particularly affects domestic chicken and turkey flocks. The bacteria are especially life-threatening for the animals when they occur in combination with other infections. In order to control the spread of the disease, poultry farms in the EU must be proven free from Mycoplasma gallisepticum or face being closed. [More]
Nutrition treatment for older COPD patients shows better outcomes

Nutrition treatment for older COPD patients shows better outcomes

People aged 65 and older, who were being treated for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in the hospital and received nutrition treatment (oral nutrition supplements) had reduced lengths of stay, hospital costs and chances of returning to the hospital within 30-days, according to a study published in CHEST. [More]
Three Johns Hopkins hospitals recognized as Top Performer on Key Quality Measures

Three Johns Hopkins hospitals recognized as Top Performer on Key Quality Measures

Three Johns Hopkins Medicine hospitals are recipients of The Joint Commission’s 2013 Top Performer on Key Quality Measures award. The Top Performer program recognizes hospitals for improving performance on evidence-based interventions that increase the chances of healthy outcomes for patients with certain conditions, including heart attack, heart failure, pneumonia, surgical care, children’s asthma, stroke, venous thromboembolism (VTE) and perinatal care, as well as for inpatient psychiatric services and immunizations. [More]
Preterm birth becomes world's number one killer of young children

Preterm birth becomes world's number one killer of young children

For the first time in history, the complications of preterm birth outrank all other causes as the world's number one killer of young children. [More]
University at Buffalo researchers receive $500,000 grant to study IED-induced vision loss

University at Buffalo researchers receive $500,000 grant to study IED-induced vision loss

It's well known that battlefield explosions can cause hearing loss, but veterans may be surprised to learn that their vision may also suffer — sometimes weeks or months after combat exposure. [More]
A goodwill ambassador of palliative care

A goodwill ambassador of palliative care

Leanne Schoberl could have put anyone's picture on the home screen of her cell phone. "She loved American Idol winner Scotty McCreery. She envisioned marrying him one day," says Leanne's father John Schoberl. [More]
Sutter Health network hospitals recognized as ‘Top Performers on Key Quality Measures’

Sutter Health network hospitals recognized as ‘Top Performers on Key Quality Measures’

For the fourth year, The Joint Commission, the nation's leading accreditor of health care organizations, recognized hospitals in the Sutter Health network as among the nation's Top Performers on Key Quality Measures®. Sutter Health-affiliated hospitals have earned these quality recognitions each year since the program began in 2011. [More]
Researchers explore new ways to treat, prevent Streptococcus pneumoniae

Researchers explore new ways to treat, prevent Streptococcus pneumoniae

Scientists from Massachusetts Eye and Ear/Harvard Medical School Department of Ophthalmology have used the power of new genomic technology to discover that microbes that commonly infect the eye have special, previously unknown properties. These properties are predicted to allow the bacterium -- Streptococcus pneumoniae -- to specifically stick to the surface of the eye, grow, and cause damage and inflammation. [More]
Griffith University receives significant funding boost to combat pneumonia

Griffith University receives significant funding boost to combat pneumonia

Griffith University’s bid to fight the childhood killer pneumonia has received a significant boost following the award of a $304,000 grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. [More]
Survey: Majority of U.S. adult women do not believe that they are up to date on vaccinations

Survey: Majority of U.S. adult women do not believe that they are up to date on vaccinations

A national survey from Rite Aid and National Foundation for Infectious Diseases reveals that the majority of adult women living in the United States do not believe they are up to date on vaccinations to protect against many preventable diseases. [More]
LSTM receives research grants to develop Experimental Human Pneumococcal Carriage model

LSTM receives research grants to develop Experimental Human Pneumococcal Carriage model

Respiratory specialists at Liverpool School Tropical Medicine (LSTM) have been awarded two substantial research grants to further develop and utilise their Experimental Human Pneumococcal Carriage (EHPC) model. [More]
LSTM awarded research grants to develop Experimental Human Pneumococcal Carriage model

LSTM awarded research grants to develop Experimental Human Pneumococcal Carriage model

Respiratory specialists at Liverpool School Tropical Medicine have been awarded two substantial research grants to further develop and utilise their Experimental Human Pneumococcal Carriage (EHPC) model. [More]
Liposomes can help prevent bacterial toxins from killing human cells

Liposomes can help prevent bacterial toxins from killing human cells

Published in Nature Biotechnology, the study at the University of Liverpool showed that specially engineered lipid (fat) bodies, called liposomes, can be used to prevent bacterial toxins from killing human cells. [More]
Penn researchers show that 23% of patients who survive septic shock return to hospital within 30 days

Penn researchers show that 23% of patients who survive septic shock return to hospital within 30 days

A diagnosis of septic shock was once a near death sentence. At best, survivors suffered a substantially reduced quality of life. [More]
New policy targeting hospital readmissions for COPD may hurt vulnerable patients, say experts

New policy targeting hospital readmissions for COPD may hurt vulnerable patients, say experts

Last week, the federal government revealed that it will fine more than 2,600 hospitals in the coming year, because too many Medicare patients treated at these hospitals are ending up back in the hospital within 30 days of going home. Two new conditions have been added in this round of penalties: elective hip and knee replacement and chronic lung disease. [More]
Study estimates Medicare costs of lung cancer diagnostic workup in patients

Study estimates Medicare costs of lung cancer diagnostic workup in patients

Biopsies were found to be the most costly tool prescribed in lung cancer diagnosis, according to research presented today at the 2014 Chicago Multidisciplinary Symposium in Thoracic Oncology. [More]
Hospital bed positioning can affect outcomes of stroke patients

Hospital bed positioning can affect outcomes of stroke patients

During the first 24 hours after a stroke, attention to detail --such as hospital bed positioning -- is critical to patient outcomes. [More]
Pulmocide uses INTEGRA's VIAFLO Assist pipetting assistant to improve screening of novel compounds

Pulmocide uses INTEGRA's VIAFLO Assist pipetting assistant to improve screening of novel compounds

INTEGRA reports on how respiratory drug discovery and development specialists - Pulmocide Ltd. (London, UK) are using a VIAFLO Assist pipetting assistant to enhance the productivity and reproducibility of their screening of novel compounds in a range of biological assays. [More]
MinuteClinic enters into clinical collaboration agreement with Lifespan

MinuteClinic enters into clinical collaboration agreement with Lifespan

MinuteClinic, the retail medical clinic of CVS Health, and Lifespan, Rhode Island's largest health system, which includes five partner hospitals and multiple physician groups, announced today that they have entered into a clinical collaboration agreement. [More]