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New noninvasive method could lead to better diagnosis, treatment of gut diseases

New noninvasive method could lead to better diagnosis, treatment of gut diseases

A multi-institutional team of researchers has developed a new nanoscale agent for imaging the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. This safe, noninvasive method for assessing the function and properties of the GI tract in real time could lead to better diagnosis and treatment of gut diseases. [More]
Eye exam for beta-amyloid correlates with levels in brain, detects people with Alzheimer's

Eye exam for beta-amyloid correlates with levels in brain, detects people with Alzheimer's

A decreased ability to identify odors might indicate the development of cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease, while examinations of the eye could indicate the build-up of beta-amyloid, a protein associated with Alzheimer's, in the brain, according to the results of four research trials reported today at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference- 2014 (AAIC- 2014) in Copenhagen. [More]
18F-FGD-PET measures predict mRCC TKI response

18F-FGD-PET measures predict mRCC TKI response

Positron emission tomography could be used to predict the response of metastatic renal cell carcinoma to tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy within a couple of weeks of a patient beginning treatment, research suggests. [More]
EMA CHMP recommends marketing authorization for GE's VIZAMYL for PET imaging to detect beta amyloids

EMA CHMP recommends marketing authorization for GE's VIZAMYL for PET imaging to detect beta amyloids

GE Healthcare today announced the receipt of a positive opinion from the European Medicines Agency's Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use. This opinion recommends the granting of a marketing authorisation for VIZAMYL (Flutemetamol F18 injection), a radiopharmaceutical medicinal product indicated for Positron Emission Tomography imaging of beta amyloid neuritic plaque density in the brains of adult patients with cognitive impairment who are being evaluated for Alzheimer's disease and other causes of cognitive impairment. [More]
Autism Speaks awards more than $600,000 to scientists pursuing training in translational research

Autism Speaks awards more than $600,000 to scientists pursuing training in translational research

Autism Speaks, the world's leading autism science and advocacy organization, today announced it has awarded more than $600,000 in funding for six promising scientists pursuing academic training in translational research. [More]
European approval process for Eckert & Ziegler’s gallium-68 generator is successfully completed

European approval process for Eckert & Ziegler’s gallium-68 generator is successfully completed

Eckert & Ziegler Radiopharma GmbH has received a recommendation from the European Medicines Agency for approval of its pharmaceutical 68Ge/68Ga generators. [More]
Combination of MRI and PET imaging techniques can prevent second breast biopsy

Combination of MRI and PET imaging techniques can prevent second breast biopsy

Following a diagnosis of breast cancer, one of the hardest tasks is to distinguish the benign nodes in the breast from the malignant tumours, and this usually requires a tissue sample (biopsy) to be taken. [More]
Antibody-based molecular imaging agent offers hope for novel breast cancer treatments

Antibody-based molecular imaging agent offers hope for novel breast cancer treatments

For years researchers have been developing molecular imaging techniques that visualize hormonally active breast cancer cells-specifically those testing positive for human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2). [More]
New "18F radiotracers" to detect and track certain diseases in patients

New "18F radiotracers" to detect and track certain diseases in patients

Radioactivity is usually associated with nuclear fallout or comic-book spider bites, but in very small amounts it can be a useful tool for diagnosing diseases. [More]
New optical approach to brain scanning for patients with electronic implants

New optical approach to brain scanning for patients with electronic implants

Scientists have advanced a brain-scanning technology that tracks what the brain is doing by shining dozens of tiny LED lights on the head. This new generation of neuroimaging compares favorably to other approaches but avoids the radiation exposure and bulky magnets the others require, according to new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. [More]
Research helps unpick long-standing mystery about how dietary fibre supresses appetite

Research helps unpick long-standing mystery about how dietary fibre supresses appetite

New research has helped unpick a long-standing mystery about how dietary fibre supresses appetite. In a study led by Imperial College London and the Medical Research Council (MRC), an international team of researchers identified an anti-appetite molecule called acetate that is naturally released when we digest fibre in the gut. [More]
PET scan can identify vegetative patients who have potential for long-term recovery

PET scan can identify vegetative patients who have potential for long-term recovery

A functional brain imaging technique known as positron emission tomography (PET) is a promising tool for determining which severely brain damaged individuals in vegetative states have the potential to recover consciousness, according to new research published in The Lancet. [More]
First MRI scan shows 'brown fat' in living adult can help fight diabetes

First MRI scan shows 'brown fat' in living adult can help fight diabetes

The first MRI scan to show 'brown fat' in a living adult could prove to be an essential step towards a new wave of therapies to aid the fight against diabetes and obesity. [More]
Multifunctional microcapsules can be produced from tannic acid and metals

Multifunctional microcapsules can be produced from tannic acid and metals

Microcapsules with a broad spectrum of applications in biomedicine, catalysis, and technology can be produced by using plant-derived, phenolic tannic acid and a variety of metals. The capsules are formed by a simple self-assembly process, and their properties can be controlled through the choice of metal, as demonstrated by a team of Australian and German researchers in the journal Angewandte Chemie. [More]
Loyola offers patients the most advanced PET/CT scanner

Loyola offers patients the most advanced PET/CT scanner

Loyola University Medical Center is now offering patients the most advanced PET/CT scanner on the market. The state-of-the-art system is improving the diagnosis and treatment of cancer, heart disease, epilepsy, Alzheimer's disease and other conditions. [More]
PET eliminates approximately 50% of unnecessary surgeries in lung cancer patients

PET eliminates approximately 50% of unnecessary surgeries in lung cancer patients

New quantitative data suggests that 30 percent of the surgeries performed for non-small cell lung cancer patients in a community-wide clinical study were deemed unnecessary. [More]
Study lays groundwork for PET imaging studies on human Menkes disease

Study lays groundwork for PET imaging studies on human Menkes disease

Scientists at the RIKEN Center for Life Science Technologies have used PET imaging to visualize the distribution in the body of copper, which is deregulated in Menkes disease, a genetic disorder, using a mouse model. This study lays the groundwork for PET imaging studies on human Menkes disease patients to identify new therapy options. [More]
Imaging cancer in children using MRI: an interview with Dr. Heike E. Daldrup-Link, Stanford University School of Medicine

Imaging cancer in children using MRI: an interview with Dr. Heike E. Daldrup-Link, Stanford University School of Medicine

There have been a number of scientific publications recently that suggest that the radiation exposure from imaging tests can induce secondary cancers later in life. [More]
Plaque in brain could guide treatment decisions for patients at risk for Alzheimer's

Plaque in brain could guide treatment decisions for patients at risk for Alzheimer's

Brain imaging using radioactive dye can detect early evidence of Alzheimer's disease that may predict future cognitive decline among adults with mild or no cognitive impairment, according to a 36-month follow-up study led by Duke Medicine. [More]
Johns Hopkins selects MILabs VECTor+ system to enhance molecular imaging capabilities

Johns Hopkins selects MILabs VECTor+ system to enhance molecular imaging capabilities

MILabs is pleased to announce that the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine will install the recently launched MILabs VECTor+ system to expand and further enhance its contributions to translational molecular imaging. [More]