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Novel imaging technique shows promise to detect, monitor and guide therapy for prostate cancer

Novel imaging technique shows promise to detect, monitor and guide therapy for prostate cancer

An international group of researchers report success in mice of a method of using positron emission tomography scans to track, in real time, an antibody targeting a hormone receptor pathway specifically involved in prostate cancer. [More]
Johns Hopkins researchers find evidence of brain injury in young NFL players

Johns Hopkins researchers find evidence of brain injury in young NFL players

In a small study of young or recently retired NFL players, researchers at Johns Hopkins report finding evidence of brain injury and repair that is visible on imaging from the players compared to a control group of men without a history of concussion. [More]
Novel approach combines imaging and electroanatomical mapping for targeted cardiac gene transfer

Novel approach combines imaging and electroanatomical mapping for targeted cardiac gene transfer

Gene therapy to repair damaged heart muscle is most likely to succeed if it can be injected at the site of ischemia where there is viable myocardium with reduced contractile ability, and a new technique that combines imaging and electroanatomical mapping does just that. [More]
PET/CT imaging can effectively measure coronary artery calcification for assessing heart attack risk

PET/CT imaging can effectively measure coronary artery calcification for assessing heart attack risk

Many people who experience chest pain but don't have a heart attack breathe a big sigh of relief when a stress test comes back negative for blockages in their blood vessels. [More]
New imaging compound could help identify signs of early-stage Alzheimer's disease

New imaging compound could help identify signs of early-stage Alzheimer's disease

By the time unambiguous signs of memory loss and cognitive decline appear in people with Alzheimer's disease, their brains already are significantly damaged, dotted with clumps of a destructive protein known as amyloid beta. [More]
PET imaging can accurately identify difficult-to-diagnose cardiac amyloidosis

PET imaging can accurately identify difficult-to-diagnose cardiac amyloidosis

Reston, Virginia - Researchers at Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, Australia, have demonstrated that cardiac amyloidosis (abnormal deposits of proteins in the heart), which is notoriously difficult to diagnose, can be visualized noninvasively with positron emission tomography (PET) using the radiotracer fluorine-18 (F-18)-florbetaben. [More]
Scientists find new way to see where certain cancer drugs accumulate in the body

Scientists find new way to see where certain cancer drugs accumulate in the body

Nanomedicine has the potential to help personalize cancer treatments and reduce side effects of therapeutic drugs. [More]
Researchers find altered brain activity in specific brain regions of patients with insomnia

Researchers find altered brain activity in specific brain regions of patients with insomnia

Specific brain regions, including those involved in awareness of self and tendency to ruminate, show altered activity in patients with insomnia when compared to good sleepers, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine published this week in the journal SLEEP. [More]
Researchers find link between dopamine neurotransmitter system and facial recognition

Researchers find link between dopamine neurotransmitter system and facial recognition

In a recent study, researchers at Center for BrainHealth, working in collaboration with colleagues in Sweden, have revealed a link between the dopamine neurotransmitter system in the brain and an individual's ability to recognize faces. [More]
Experimental PET tracer can diagnose concussion-related brain degeneration in living person

Experimental PET tracer can diagnose concussion-related brain degeneration in living person

An experimental positron emission tomography (PET) tracer can effectively diagnose concussion-related brain degeneration while a person is still alive, according to a proof-of-concept study conducted at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published September 27 in the journal Translational Psychiatry. [More]
New JGU cyclotron to be employed for research into potential applications in medicine

New JGU cyclotron to be employed for research into potential applications in medicine

A new particle accelerator is further enhancing the research landscape at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz. [More]
Monoclonal antibody removes brain amyloid plaques in patients with Alzheimer's disease

Monoclonal antibody removes brain amyloid plaques in patients with Alzheimer's disease

Scientists at Neurimmune today described results from the Phase 1b PRIME clinical trial of the monoclonal antibody aducanumab. [More]
PACIFIC study may offer guidance to choose from number of non-invasive coronary artery imaging

PACIFIC study may offer guidance to choose from number of non-invasive coronary artery imaging

For patients presenting for the first time with suspected coronary artery disease (CAD) clinicians have had a number of non-invasive diagnostic tests to choose from, but little evidence for which is best. [More]
New research discovers how opposite-sex hormonal therapy influences the brain

New research discovers how opposite-sex hormonal therapy influences the brain

Women and men often show marked differences as regards mental illnesses. In order to learn more about this phenomenon, a project supported by the Austrian Science Fund FWF explored how opposite-sex hormonal therapy applied to transgender individuals influences the brain. [More]
Researchers find causal link between senescent cells and age-related osteoarthritis

Researchers find causal link between senescent cells and age-related osteoarthritis

Researchers at Mayo Clinic have reported a causal link between senescent cells — cells that accumulate with age and contribute to frailty and disease — and osteoarthritis in mice. [More]
Scientists use new non-invasive PET scanning method to monitor hippocampal neurogenesis

Scientists use new non-invasive PET scanning method to monitor hippocampal neurogenesis

Scientists from the RIKEN Center for Life Science Technology in Japan have used a new non-invasive PET scanning technique to obtain images of neuron proliferation in the subventricular zone and subgranular zone of the hippocampal dentate gyrus. Neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus is known to be particularly affected by depression. [More]
Waterloo researchers unveil new screening tool and data at 2016 AAIC

Waterloo researchers unveil new screening tool and data at 2016 AAIC

Two studies involving University of Waterloo researchers presented this week at the 2016 Alzheimer's Association International Conference (AAIC) in Toronto highlight a new diagnostic tool that can identify Alzheimer's disease long before the onset of symptoms as well as the increasing prevalence of Alzheimer's disease in Ontario. [More]
DPUK brings organisations together to tackle dementia across the UK

DPUK brings organisations together to tackle dementia across the UK

Dementia, is an overall term that describes a wide range of symptoms that includes memory loss and difficulties with thinking, is caused when the brain cells degenerate and die more quickly than they would as part of the normal ageing process. [More]
Spinach-like nanoparticle juice may improve doctor's ability to examine gastrointestinal tract

Spinach-like nanoparticle juice may improve doctor's ability to examine gastrointestinal tract

The pigment that gives spinach and other plants their verdant color may improve doctors' ability to examine the human gastrointestinal tract. [More]
New methods to examine the brain and spinal fluid could lead to early detection of Alzheimer's disease

New methods to examine the brain and spinal fluid could lead to early detection of Alzheimer's disease

New methods to examine the brain and spinal fluid heighten the chance of early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. Results from a large European study, led by researchers at the Karolinska Institutet, are now published in the medical journal BRAIN. [More]
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