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Waterloo researchers unveil new screening tool and data at 2016 AAIC

Waterloo researchers unveil new screening tool and data at 2016 AAIC

Two studies involving University of Waterloo researchers presented this week at the 2016 Alzheimer's Association International Conference (AAIC) in Toronto highlight a new diagnostic tool that can identify Alzheimer's disease long before the onset of symptoms as well as the increasing prevalence of Alzheimer's disease in Ontario. [More]
DPUK brings organisations together to tackle dementia across the UK

DPUK brings organisations together to tackle dementia across the UK

Dementia, is an overall term that describes a wide range of symptoms that includes memory loss and difficulties with thinking, is caused when the brain cells degenerate and die more quickly than they would as part of the normal ageing process. [More]
Spinach-like nanoparticle juice may improve doctor's ability to examine gastrointestinal tract

Spinach-like nanoparticle juice may improve doctor's ability to examine gastrointestinal tract

The pigment that gives spinach and other plants their verdant color may improve doctors' ability to examine the human gastrointestinal tract. [More]
New methods to examine the brain and spinal fluid could lead to early detection of Alzheimer's disease

New methods to examine the brain and spinal fluid could lead to early detection of Alzheimer's disease

New methods to examine the brain and spinal fluid heighten the chance of early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. Results from a large European study, led by researchers at the Karolinska Institutet, are now published in the medical journal BRAIN. [More]
Hippocampal inflammation linked to depressive symptoms in patients with multiple sclerosis

Hippocampal inflammation linked to depressive symptoms in patients with multiple sclerosis

Patients with multiple sclerosis have higher rates of depression than the general population, including people with other life-long disabling diseases. Symptoms of multiple sclerosis arise from an abnormal response of the body's immune system. [More]
Brain's reward system in obese people operates differently in response to food and dopamine

Brain's reward system in obese people operates differently in response to food and dopamine

As young people reach adulthood, their preferences for sweet foods typically decline. But for people with obesity, new research suggests that the drop-off may not be as steep and that the brain's reward system operates differently in obese people than in thinner people, which may play a role in this phenomenon. [More]
CT-derived SULps can improve accuracy of PET imaging in advanced cancer patients

CT-derived SULps can improve accuracy of PET imaging in advanced cancer patients

Cancer patients often experience significant fluctuations in weight and lean body mass (LBM). Neglecting to account for these changes can prevent clinicians from obtaining precise data from molecular imaging, but a new method of measuring LBM takes changes in individual body composition into account for better staging of disease and therapy monitoring, say researchers at the 2016 Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging. [More]
FDG-PET imaging tracks ability of atezolizumab to bolster immunity against NSCLC

FDG-PET imaging tracks ability of atezolizumab to bolster immunity against NSCLC

Non-small cell lung cancers have a collective reputation for not responding very well to chemotherapy. Researchers at the 2016 Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI) are presenting a means of evaluating an immunotherapy that fights off NSCLC by strengthening a patient's own immune system. [More]
Molecular imaging technique could help optimize radiotherapy dose to combat NETs

Molecular imaging technique could help optimize radiotherapy dose to combat NETs

Aggressive neuroendocrine cancer is something of a dark horse--a rare, elusive and persevering force linked to discouraging long-term survival rates. [More]
New imaging study links tau proteins to neurodegenerative pathology of Alzheimer's disease

New imaging study links tau proteins to neurodegenerative pathology of Alzheimer's disease

Alzheimer's is a devastating and incurable disease marked by beta-amyloid and tau protein aggregations in the brain, yet the direct relationship between these proteins and neurodegeneration has remained a mystery. [More]
PET imaging can help identify autoimmune inflammation in MS

PET imaging can help identify autoimmune inflammation in MS

The triggers of autoimmune inflammation in multiple sclerosis (MS) have eluded scientists for many years, but molecular imaging is bringing researchers closer to identifying them, while providing a means of evaluating next-generation therapies for MS, say researchers introducing a study at the 2016 Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging. [More]
PET/CT imaging technique may provide way to break perpetual cycle of alcohol abuse

PET/CT imaging technique may provide way to break perpetual cycle of alcohol abuse

Alcoholism is a devastating disorder that too often leads to a perpetual cycle of abuse. An emerging molecular imaging technique may provide a way to break that cycle. [More]
New endoscopic scanner may help in early detection of cancer

New endoscopic scanner may help in early detection of cancer

UPM researchers are involved in a European network to develop an endoscopic scanner for early detection of certain types of cancers that have a high mortality rate today. [More]
Advanced imaging kit Netspot gets FDA approval to detect rare neuroendocrine tumors

Advanced imaging kit Netspot gets FDA approval to detect rare neuroendocrine tumors

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Netspot, the first kit for the preparation of gallium Ga 68 dotatate injection, a radioactive diagnostic agent for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. [More]
Axumin approved for use in PET scans in patients with recurrent prostate cancer

Axumin approved for use in PET scans in patients with recurrent prostate cancer

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Axumin, a radioactive diagnostic agent for injection. Axumin is indicated for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging in men with suspected prostate cancer recurrence based on elevated prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels following prior treatment. [More]
PET imaging with PiB may help in early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease

PET imaging with PiB may help in early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease

The effort to find ways to detect and diagnose preclinical Alzheimer's disease (AD) has taken a big step forward with the use of positron emission tomography (PET), a "nuclear medicine" for imaging processes in the body, when PET is used with a special 'tracer' that binds to the amyloid plaques in the brain that are a characteristic cause of AD. [More]
Technical advances in neuroimaging offer new promise to clinicians

Technical advances in neuroimaging offer new promise to clinicians

The current special issue of Technology and Innovation, Journal of the National Academy of Inventors, Volume 18, Number 1 (all open access), is devoted to the evolution of neuroimaging technology, with seven articles chronicling the latest advances in this critical area. [More]
Lightpoint Medical signs exclusive global license agreement with UA for Beta Emission Tomography

Lightpoint Medical signs exclusive global license agreement with UA for Beta Emission Tomography

Lightpoint Medical, a clinical-stage medical device company developing advanced imaging technologies for intraoperative cancer detection, announced today that the company has signed an exclusive global license agreement for a molecular imaging technology called Beta Emission Tomography, developed by Professor Harrison Barrett, Regents Professor of Radiology and Optical Science, with his student Yijun Ding and colleague Dr. Luca Caucci at the University of Arizona Center for Gamma Ray Imaging. [More]
Tau pathology closely tracks brain function during early AD

Tau pathology closely tracks brain function during early AD

Tau tangles may be a better indicator of cognitive changes during Alzheimer's disease progression than beta-amyloid deposition, researchers propose. [More]
Scientists find tau protein as better marker of Alzheimer's disease

Scientists find tau protein as better marker of Alzheimer's disease

A buildup of plaque and dysfunctional proteins in the brain are hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease. While much Alzheimer's research has focused on accumulation of the protein amyloid beta, researchers have begun to pay closer attention to another protein, tau, long associated with this disease but not studied as thoroughly, in part, because scientists only recently have developed effective ways to image tau. [More]
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