Postpartum Depression News and Research RSS Feed - Postpartum Depression News and Research

Eighty percent of women experience some level of the baby blues after giving birth, and symptoms usually clear up on their own. One in eight-to-ten women experiences postpartum depression. When symptoms don't go away in a few weeks, women should seek help through health care providers and licensed counselors. Treatment may include talk therapy, medication, support groups, or a combination of these.
Poll: Just 12% of parents without coverage take breastfeeding support classes

Poll: Just 12% of parents without coverage take breastfeeding support classes

Just 12 percent of parents without insurance coverage take breastfeeding support classes that can offer crucial support and encourage new moms to breastfeed, according to a new University of Michigan C.S. Mott Children's Hospital National Poll on Children's Health. [More]
Study examines trends in fertility rates among girls with mental illness

Study examines trends in fertility rates among girls with mental illness

Young girls with mental illness are three times more likely to become teenage parents than those without a major mental illness, according to a first-of-its-kind study by researchers at the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences and Women's College Hospital. [More]

Fear of childbirth puts women at higher risk of postpartum depression

Expectant women with prenatally diagnosed fear of childbirth are at an increased risk of postpartum depression, according to a study of over 500,000 mothers in Finland. Women with a history of depression are at the highest risk of postpartum depression. [More]
Women who take shorter maternity leave may have increased risk of postpartum depression

Women who take shorter maternity leave may have increased risk of postpartum depression

​The more leave time from work that a woman takes after giving birth -- up to six months -- the better protected she will be from experiencing post-partum depression, according to a study led by Dr. Rada K. Dagher, assistant professor of health services administration at the University of Maryland School of Public Health. [More]
Vaginal delivery and early breast-feeding increase mothers' level of satisfaction

Vaginal delivery and early breast-feeding increase mothers' level of satisfaction

An article published in the journal Nutricion Hospitalaria reveals that the attitude of healthcare personnel, along with starting early breast-feeding, are another two factors that help in increasing the mothers' level of satisfaction [More]
Evidence reveals lack of public acceptance toward breast-feeding may influence hesitation

Evidence reveals lack of public acceptance toward breast-feeding may influence hesitation

African-American mothers breast-feed their children at lower rates than Caucasian, Latina and Asian mothers. This difference often has been attributed to socio-demographic factors such as age, income, education and personal experience with breast-feeding. [More]
Valley Presbyterian Hospital receives First 5 LA grant to implement Welcome Baby program

Valley Presbyterian Hospital receives First 5 LA grant to implement Welcome Baby program

Valley Presbyterian Hospital was awarded a $772,643 grant from First 5 LA to implement the 'Welcome Baby' prenatal and infant care program. The grant period is from December 1, 2013 through June 30, 2014 and is expected to be extended for an additional year, through June 30, 2015. [More]
Study on women's preferences, decision-making patterns regarding treatment for depression during, after pregnancy

Study on women's preferences, decision-making patterns regarding treatment for depression during, after pregnancy

Women with depression in the perinatal period experience a high degree of conflict in deciding whether and how to treat their depression, but strongly prefer treatments other than antidepressant medications, reports a study in the November Journal of Psychiatric Practice®. The journal is published by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, a part of Wolters Kluwer Health. [More]

LUHS offers support group for women with postpartum depression

Loyola University Health System (LUHS) will offer a support group for women with postpartum depression. The group meets from 9-10 a.m. on the second and fourth Wednesday of the month at Loyola Center for Health at Oakbrook Terrace located at 1S260 Summit Ave. [More]
Viewpoints: Marketplaces' 'technical foibles' may keep young people from coming back; health law may be ushering in era of narrow networks

Viewpoints: Marketplaces' 'technical foibles' may keep young people from coming back; health law may be ushering in era of narrow networks

The encouraging view is that the overwhelming number of visitors to the site indicates high demand for insurance in the new system. That's critical, because the more people who participate, the better the system works. The danger is that the technical foibles since Oct. 1 will discourage people from coming back, particularly the young and healthy customers the system needs to keep rates reasonable. With some big deadlines approaching, the Obama administration needs to fix the bugs, and fast. People who need insurance from the federal marketplace have until mid-December to buy coverage that begins Jan. 1. If enrollment figures aren't robust by then, the new health-care system will have a problem even bigger than a frustrating Web (10/11). [More]

Study: Urban women report high risk of postpartum depression

Women living in large urban areas are at a significantly higher risk of postpartum depression after five to 14 months of giving birth compared to those living in rural areas, according to a new Canadian study led by Women's College Hospital's Dr. Simone Vigod. [More]
NCKU collaborates with Quanta Computer to launch QOCA baby for neonatal care

NCKU collaborates with Quanta Computer to launch QOCA baby for neonatal care

National Cheng Kung University, southern Taiwan, has collaborated with Quanta Computer to launch a cloud solution expecting to provide neonatal intensive care unit doctors and parents access to a live video stream that they can watch anywhere from mobile devices such as smartphones and tablets. [More]
Stronger epigenetic changes in estrogen responsive genes linked to postpartum depression

Stronger epigenetic changes in estrogen responsive genes linked to postpartum depression

The epigenetic modifications, which alter the way genes function without changing the underlying DNA sequence, can apparently be detected in the blood of pregnant women during any trimester, potentially providing a simple way to foretell depression in the weeks after giving birth, and an opportunity to intervene before symptoms become debilitating. [More]
Majority of women have postpartum depressive symptoms, finds study

Majority of women have postpartum depressive symptoms, finds study

A surprisingly high number of women have postpartum depressive symptoms, according to a new, large-scale study by a Northwestern Medicine- researcher. [More]
Link between family support in pregnancy and reduced postpartum depression symptoms

Link between family support in pregnancy and reduced postpartum depression symptoms

Women who receive strong social support from their families during pregnancy appear to be protected from sharp increases in a particular stress hormone, making them less likely to experience depression after giving birth, a new study by UCLA life scientists indicates. [More]

Study: Women receiving social support during pregnancy less likely to develop postpartum depression

Women who receive strong social support from their families during pregnancy appear to be protected from sharp increases in a particular stress hormone, making them less likely to develop postpartum depression, according to a new study published in Clinical Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. [More]

Postpartum depression could impact health of babies in Ghana

Postpartum depression not only affects mothers but it could mean higher health risks for the baby - especially in low-income countries like Ghana where the condition isn't well-recognized, University of Michigan Health System research shows. [More]
SLU receives $460,000 grant to expand efforts to detect and treat postpartum depression

SLU receives $460,000 grant to expand efforts to detect and treat postpartum depression

Saint Louis University has received a three-year, $460,000 grant from the Maternal Child and Family Health Coalition (MCHFC) and St. Louis Mental Health Board to expand efforts to detect and treat postpartum depression in new mothers. [More]
Omega-3 fatty acids can benefit women at risk of postpartum depression

Omega-3 fatty acids can benefit women at risk of postpartum depression

The "feel-good" hormone serotonin, depleted by pregnancy, can be replenished by adding sources of omega-3 to the diets of pregnant women and new mothers - a development particularly beneficial to the 10 to 15 percent of women at risk for postpartum depression, according to a recent University of Montreal study published in the latest edition of the Canadian Journal of Psychiatry. [More]

Low levels of omega-3 may be behind postpartum depression

Low levels of omega-3 may be behind postpartum depression, according to a review lead by Gabriel Shapiro of the University of Montreal and the Research Centre at the Sainte-Justine Mother and Child Hospital. [More]