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Eighty percent of women experience some level of the baby blues after giving birth, and symptoms usually clear up on their own. One in eight-to-ten women experiences postpartum depression. When symptoms don't go away in a few weeks, women should seek help through health care providers and licensed counselors. Treatment may include talk therapy, medication, support groups, or a combination of these.
Researchers find blood marker that can help identify women at particular risk for postpartum depression

Researchers find blood marker that can help identify women at particular risk for postpartum depression

Postpartum depression is a debilitating disorder that affects nearly 20 percent of new mothers, putting their infants at increased risk for poor behavioral, cognitive and social development. [More]
Study: Osteopathic manipulative therapy decreases low back pain by over 70% in postpartum women

Study: Osteopathic manipulative therapy decreases low back pain by over 70% in postpartum women

German researchers found osteopathic manipulative therapy (OMTh) decreased postpartum low back pain by over 70 percent in women who had given birth at least three months before beginning treatment, according to a new study published in July issue of the Journal of the American Osteopathic Association. [More]
Study examines mental health prognosis of young VTE patients

Study examines mental health prognosis of young VTE patients

EuroHeartCare is the official annual meeting of the Council on Cardiovascular Nursing and Allied Professions of the European Society of Cardiology. The 2015 meeting is held 14 to 15 June in Dubrovnik, Croatia, in collaboration with the Croatian Association of Cardiology Nurses. [More]
SLU study explores feasibility of using text messages for minority mothers with postpartum depression

SLU study explores feasibility of using text messages for minority mothers with postpartum depression

A Saint Louis University research paper published online March 16 in JMIR Mental Health explores the feasibility of helping low-income mothers through postpartum depression using text messages. [More]
Parental depression can put toddlers at risk of developing troubling behaviors

Parental depression can put toddlers at risk of developing troubling behaviors

A father's depression during the first years of parenting - as well as a mother's - can put their toddler at risk of developing troubling behaviors such as hitting, lying, anxiety and sadness during a critical time of development, according to a new Northwestern Medicine study. [More]
Telephone-based peer support may help reduce postpartum depression in new mothers

Telephone-based peer support may help reduce postpartum depression in new mothers

New research reveals that telephone-based peer support may help reduce postnatal depression, also known as postpartum depression, in new mothers. Findings published in the Journal of Advanced Nursing also found that social support from peers may be effective for maternal depression up to two years after delivery. [More]
Women with postpartum depression during pregnancy may face greater risk, study finds

Women with postpartum depression during pregnancy may face greater risk, study finds

When it comes to postpartum depression, one size does not fit all, according to a new study led by University of North Carolina School of Medicine researchers. [More]
Epidurals and reduced postpartum depression: an interview with Dr. Zakowski

Epidurals and reduced postpartum depression: an interview with Dr. Zakowski

The “maternity blues”, which resolve within 10 days of giving birth, occurs in up to 80% of new moms. A major depressive episode, by Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV) criteria, is defined as having at least a 2-week period of persistent depressed mood ... [More]
Childhood inflammation linked to adult psychosis

Childhood inflammation linked to adult psychosis

Elevated levels of the inflammatory marker interleukin -6 in childhood are associated with an increased risk of psychosis and depression in adulthood, research shows. [More]
Severe pain during and post delivery linked to postpartum depression

Severe pain during and post delivery linked to postpartum depression

Controlling pain during childbirth and post delivery may reduce the risk of postpartum depression, writes Katherine Wisner, M.D., a Northwestern Medicine- perinatal psychiatrist, in a July 23 editorial in Anesthesia & Analgesia. [More]
Viewpoints: Concerns about ACOs; problems in Va. gov.'s strategy; Medicaid 'black hole'

Viewpoints: Concerns about ACOs; problems in Va. gov.'s strategy; Medicaid 'black hole'

Although Obamacare's health insurance expansion has directly provided coverage to only about 4 percent of Americans, changes embedded in the Affordable Care Act could affect many more people, and not always in good ways. [More]
Longer looks: Caregivers effort to stay well; patients who turn to religion for cures; new views on postpartum depression

Longer looks: Caregivers effort to stay well; patients who turn to religion for cures; new views on postpartum depression

More than 65 million people, or 29 percent of the U.S. population, provide care for a chronically ill, disabled or aged family members or friends during any given year, and spend an average of 20 hours per week providing that care. [More]

Mothers who have unintended pregnancies return to work sooner after childbirth

Mothers in the United States who have unintended pregnancies return to work sooner after childbirth than mothers whose pregnancy was intended, according to a study led by Dr. Rada K. Dagher, assistant professor of health services administration in the University of Maryland School of Public Health. [More]

Dampening of positive emotions plays important role in development of postpartum depression

A new KU Leuven study shows for the first time that the dampening or suppression of positive emotions plays an important role in the development of postpartum depression. This has implications for the treatment of depressed mothers. [More]
Poll: Just 12% of parents without coverage take breastfeeding support classes

Poll: Just 12% of parents without coverage take breastfeeding support classes

Just 12 percent of parents without insurance coverage take breastfeeding support classes that can offer crucial support and encourage new moms to breastfeed, according to a new University of Michigan C.S. Mott Children's Hospital National Poll on Children's Health. [More]
Study examines trends in fertility rates among girls with mental illness

Study examines trends in fertility rates among girls with mental illness

Young girls with mental illness are three times more likely to become teenage parents than those without a major mental illness, according to a first-of-its-kind study by researchers at the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences and Women's College Hospital. [More]
Fear of childbirth puts women at higher risk of postpartum depression

Fear of childbirth puts women at higher risk of postpartum depression

Expectant women with prenatally diagnosed fear of childbirth are at an increased risk of postpartum depression, according to a study of over 500,000 mothers in Finland. Women with a history of depression are at the highest risk of postpartum depression. [More]
Women who take shorter maternity leave may have increased risk of postpartum depression

Women who take shorter maternity leave may have increased risk of postpartum depression

​The more leave time from work that a woman takes after giving birth -- up to six months -- the better protected she will be from experiencing post-partum depression, according to a study led by Dr. Rada K. Dagher, assistant professor of health services administration at the University of Maryland School of Public Health. [More]
Vaginal delivery and early breast-feeding increase mothers' level of satisfaction

Vaginal delivery and early breast-feeding increase mothers' level of satisfaction

An article published in the journal Nutricion Hospitalaria reveals that the attitude of healthcare personnel, along with starting early breast-feeding, are another two factors that help in increasing the mothers' level of satisfaction [More]
Evidence reveals lack of public acceptance toward breast-feeding may influence hesitation

Evidence reveals lack of public acceptance toward breast-feeding may influence hesitation

African-American mothers breast-feed their children at lower rates than Caucasian, Latina and Asian mothers. This difference often has been attributed to socio-demographic factors such as age, income, education and personal experience with breast-feeding. [More]
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