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Lancet study highlights long-term effect of 1999 nationwide strategy to reduce teenage pregnancy

Lancet study highlights long-term effect of 1999 nationwide strategy to reduce teenage pregnancy

Rates of teenage pregnancy in England have halved since the implementation of the Government's Teenage Pregnancy Strategy (TPS) in 1999, and the greatest effect is seen in areas of high deprivation and areas that received the most TPS funding, according to research published in The Lancet. [More]
Rural, low-income mothers face obstacles in accessing outdoor recreation resources

Rural, low-income mothers face obstacles in accessing outdoor recreation resources

Research shows that spending just 20 minutes in nature can promote health and well-being. Although the assumption may be that living in rural areas provides ample opportunities for recreation in nature, many rural, low-income mothers, who rely on outdoor activities to promote health and well-being for themselves and their families, face obstacles in accessing publicly available outdoor recreation resources. [More]
Nine creative ways to improve cognitive development of children in developing countries

Nine creative ways to improve cognitive development of children in developing countries

Grand Challenges Canada, funded by the Government of Canada, and the "Saving Brains" partners today announced investments in nine creative ways to protect and nurture the cognitive development of children in developing countries. [More]
Study highlights importance of Medicaid expansion in states with limited coverage

Study highlights importance of Medicaid expansion in states with limited coverage

Patients who receive care at migrant health centers located in Medicaid expansion states are increasingly likely to have Medicaid, according to a report published today by the Geiger Gibson/RCHN Community Health Foundation Research Collaborative at the Milken Institute School of Public Health at the George Washington University. [More]
Rural children have high rates of medical complexity

Rural children have high rates of medical complexity

Children in rural areas have high rates of medical complexity and often reside in low-income and medically underserved areas, according to researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. [More]
People in low-income communities more likely to be hospitalized for AMI

People in low-income communities more likely to be hospitalized for AMI

While heart attack rates across all income levels have declined significantly over the last 15 years, people living in low-income communities are still more likely to be hospitalized for acute myocardial infarction (AMI), according to a new study published by Yale School of Medicine researchers in the journal JAMA Cardiology. [More]
CSU study offers new strategies to address complex challenges of global food production

CSU study offers new strategies to address complex challenges of global food production

Agriculture now produces more than enough calories to meet basic human dietary needs worldwide. Despite this seeming abundance, one out of eight people do not have access to sufficient food. [More]
Children infected with Cryptosporidium parasite more likely to suffer from stunted growth

Children infected with Cryptosporidium parasite more likely to suffer from stunted growth

Children infected even just once with a certain type of waterborne parasite are nearly three times as likely to suffer from moderate or severe stunted growth by the age of two than those who are not - regardless of whether their infection made them feel sick, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health-led research suggests. [More]
Lack of ready financial resources in family affects overall health of children

Lack of ready financial resources in family affects overall health of children

The connection between a family's income and childhood health has been well-established, with lower income linked to poorer health and a greater likelihood of more chronic conditions. Now a new study by UCLA researchers shows that the size of the paycheck is not all that matters when it comes to children's health risks. So does the amount that a family has tucked away in savings. [More]
Nepal, one year on – VSO heads up new recovery and reconstruction hub.

Nepal, one year on – VSO heads up new recovery and reconstruction hub.

VSO and the UK government (DfID) have set up the ‘National Disaster Recovery Coordination Secretariat’ (NDRCS) in Kathmandu. It aims to help rebuild Nepal, following the devastation of two earthquakes (25th April and 12th May 2015) which claimed nearly 9,000 lives and left hundreds of thousands people homeless. [More]

Study analyzes health, wellbeing of indigenous and tribal groups

A world-first University of Melbourne-led study into the health and wellbeing of more than 154 million Indigenous and tribal people globally reveals the extent of work that needs to be done if the United Nations is to meet its 2030 goals of ending poverty and inequality. [More]
Study reveals best ways to reduce substance use among African Americans

Study reveals best ways to reduce substance use among African Americans

Cocaine use has increased substantially among African Americans in some of the most underserved areas of the United States. Interventions designed to increase connection to and support from non-drug using family and friends, with access to employment, the faith community, and education, are the best ways to reduce substance use among African Americans and other minorities in low-income, resource-poor communities, concludes a study led by a medical anthropologist at the University of California, Riverside. [More]
Mother’s misperception of child's weight status linked to childhood obesity or malnutrition

Mother’s misperception of child's weight status linked to childhood obesity or malnutrition

A new study from the University of Houston Department of Health and Human Performance finds a child's risk for obesity or malnutrition may be tied to the mother's misperception of her child's weight status. A key to understanding this phenomenon may lie in how she regards her own weight status. Researchers say the situation shows that healthcare providers need to broaden their health care screenings. [More]
Expanded Medicaid coverage shows increase in health insurance rates among low-income adults

Expanded Medicaid coverage shows increase in health insurance rates among low-income adults

Researchers at UCLA have that found states that expanded Medicaid coverage under the Affordable Care Act saw a significant increase in rates of health insurance among low-income adults compared with states that did not expand the program. [More]
Newly launched TB-PACTS could be a valuable tool to combat world's leading infectious killer

Newly launched TB-PACTS could be a valuable tool to combat world's leading infectious killer

The Critical Path Institute, the Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases, TB Alliance, and St. George's, University of London, are pleased to announce the launch of the TB-Platform for Aggregation of Clinical TB Studies. [More]

Global inequities in health spending expected to intensify over next 25 years

Global inequities in health spending are expected to persist and intensify over the next 25 years, according to a new study that estimates total health financing in countries around the world. [More]
Study reveals low rates of targeted drug use among older black women with early-stage breast cancer

Study reveals low rates of targeted drug use among older black women with early-stage breast cancer

The advent of targeted drugs for a specific type of breast cancer - HER2 positive - has dramatically improved survival rates for women with the disease. But a study led by researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center reveals low rates of use of a targeted drug among older women with early-stage breast cancer of this type, and even lower rates for older black women. [More]
PATH and SD/Alere announce commercial availability of two diagnostic tools for NTDs

PATH and SD/Alere announce commercial availability of two diagnostic tools for NTDs

PATH and Standard Diagnostics/Alere announced today the commercial availability of two rapid diagnostic tools for onchocerciasis and lymphatic filariasis. Designed for use in disease surveillance, the antibody-based tests are part of a suite of diagnostic innovations intended to support the elimination of neglected tropical diseases (NTDs), a group of illnesses that affect more than a billion people worldwide. [More]
New study finds precipitous decline in homicide victimization rates for two minority groups in the U.S.

New study finds precipitous decline in homicide victimization rates for two minority groups in the U.S.

A new study reveals that while homicide victimization rates declined for whites, blacks, and Hispanics in the United States from 1990-2010, the drop was much more precipitous for the two minority groups. [More]
New Jersey’s paid family leave program needs adequate information and better outreach

New Jersey’s paid family leave program needs adequate information and better outreach

New Jersey parents say that inadequate information and outreach, a lack of employer support, and a confusing application process discourage their participation in the state's landmark paid family leave program, according to new research from the National Center for Children in Poverty at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health. [More]
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