Poverty News and Research RSS Feed - Poverty News and Research

Unknown exposure to second-hand smoke linked to increased mortality in non-smokers

Unknown exposure to second-hand smoke linked to increased mortality in non-smokers

A new biomarker has identified known and unknown exposure to second-hand smoke and confirmed a strong association to increased mortality in non-smokers, according to a new study from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. [More]
Global study assesses countries on health-related Sustainable Development Goals

Global study assesses countries on health-related Sustainable Development Goals

Worldwide, good progress has been made towards some of the health-related Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) since 2000, particularly in reducing under-5 and neonatal mortality, family planning, and the rollout of universal health care. [More]
SLU receives HRSA grant for training family physicians and medical family therapists in behavioral health

SLU receives HRSA grant for training family physicians and medical family therapists in behavioral health

Saint Louis University has received a $1.87 million grant to strengthen behavioral health training for family physicians, who often are the primary physician seen by many adults and children, and for medical family therapists who practice alongside them. [More]

Large proportion of women in their post-reproductive years visit only a generalist, study finds

The proportion of women ages 45-64 who rely solely on an obstetrician/gynecologist for their primary care needs is declining, although about 10-20% of the nearly 45,000 women who took part in a recent study still do. [More]
Review highlights progress made in addressing chronic pandemic of neglected tropical diseases

Review highlights progress made in addressing chronic pandemic of neglected tropical diseases

The Lancet published a review of the progress made in addressing, as lead author David Molyneux calls it, the chronic pandemic of neglected tropical diseases (NTDs). [More]
National Peruvian programme positively affects child development in rural and impoverished regions

National Peruvian programme positively affects child development in rural and impoverished regions

Scientists from the Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute and the Peruvian Instituto de Investigación Nutricional adapted the urban-based Peruvian National Early Child Development Programme and brought it to the doorstep of people living in the rural Cajamarca region. [More]
Intervention to address family social needs improves overall health status of pediatric patients

Intervention to address family social needs improves overall health status of pediatric patients

An intervention that paired caregivers with a navigator to help address the social needs of families of pediatric patients was associated with decreased needs reported by the families and improved overall child health status, according to an article published online by JAMA Pediatrics. [More]
New mathematical model could help predict potential outbreaks of Ebola and Lassa fever

New mathematical model could help predict potential outbreaks of Ebola and Lassa fever

Potential outbreaks of diseases such as Ebola and Lassa fever may be more accurately predicted thanks to a new mathematical model developed by researchers at the University of Cambridge. [More]
Study finds uneven Medicaid coverage for children's key mental health services in many states

Study finds uneven Medicaid coverage for children's key mental health services in many states

A national study by researchers at the National Center for Children in Poverty (NCCP), Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health--- shows an uneven picture of states' use of Medicaid to help families with young children gain access to mental health services [More]
Researchers working to find faster way to treat sleeping sickness using oral drugs

Researchers working to find faster way to treat sleeping sickness using oral drugs

Researchers at the University of Georgia are working to find the fastest way possible to treat and cure human African trypanosomiasis, long referred to as sleeping sickness. By working to improve chemical entities already tested in human clinical trials, they hope to have a faster route to field studies to treat the disease using drugs that can be administered orally to patients. [More]
Study shows many older jail inmates experience health-related distressing symptoms

Study shows many older jail inmates experience health-related distressing symptoms

More than 550,000 adults 55-years-old and older are arrested and detained every year--and that number is increasing rapidly. [More]
People with albinism suffer severe discrimination and social stigmatization, study reveals

People with albinism suffer severe discrimination and social stigmatization, study reveals

People with albinism face major health problems, including skin cancer, involuntary eye movements, and poor eyesight. [More]
Large-scale groundwater pumping increases arsenic risk in Southeast Asia

Large-scale groundwater pumping increases arsenic risk in Southeast Asia

Large-scale groundwater pumping is opening doors for dangerously high levels of arsenic to enter some of Southeast Asia's aquifers, with water now seeping in through riverbeds with arsenic concentrations more than 100 times the limits of safety, according to a new study from scientists at Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, MIT, and Hanoi University of Science. [More]
Study uses mathematical models to examine link between water fluoridation and diabetes

Study uses mathematical models to examine link between water fluoridation and diabetes

Water fluoridation prevents dental cavities, which are a costly public health concern. But despite the benefits supplemental water fluoridation remains a controversial subject. [More]

CPS caseworkers may need to use more holistic approach to improve response to chronic neglect

A new study by researchers at the University at Buffalo suggests that Child Protective Services caseworkers may need to use a more all-encompassing approach to improve how they respond to cases of chronic neglect. [More]
Kids who eat government-funded school meals at increased risk of being overweight

Kids who eat government-funded school meals at increased risk of being overweight

Government-funded school meals are putting financially vulnerable children at risk of being overweight, a Virginia Tech researcher has found. [More]
TTUHSC El Paso receives USDA grant to offer long-distance health education to rural communities

TTUHSC El Paso receives USDA grant to offer long-distance health education to rural communities

The Gayle Greve Hunt School of Nursing at Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center El Paso has received a $430,780 grant from the United States Department of Agriculture to provide long-distance health education to underserved communities in rural West Texas. [More]
Working full time not enough to make ends meet in Florida families

Working full time not enough to make ends meet in Florida families

Even after working 40 or more hours a week, thousands of Florida parents would need to earn nearly double the state's current hourly minimum wage in order to break even, according to policy analyses conducted by researchers at the National Center for Children in Poverty, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health. [More]
Child's home address may help identify children and families at risk of asthma

Child's home address may help identify children and families at risk of asthma

A child's home address may be enough information to identify children and families at risk for more severe cases of asthma due to social and economic hardships. In fact, the home address could guide risk assessment starting the moment a family arrives and registers in the hospital or at the doctor's office. [More]
Researchers using internet to find study participants may hamper recruitment of minority, poor people

Researchers using internet to find study participants may hamper recruitment of minority, poor people

Recruiting minorities and poor people to participate in medical research always has been challenging, and that may not change as researchers turn to the internet to find study participants and engage with them online, new research suggests. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement