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Researchers working to find faster way to treat sleeping sickness using oral drugs

Researchers working to find faster way to treat sleeping sickness using oral drugs

Researchers at the University of Georgia are working to find the fastest way possible to treat and cure human African trypanosomiasis, long referred to as sleeping sickness. By working to improve chemical entities already tested in human clinical trials, they hope to have a faster route to field studies to treat the disease using drugs that can be administered orally to patients. [More]
Study shows many older jail inmates experience health-related distressing symptoms

Study shows many older jail inmates experience health-related distressing symptoms

More than 550,000 adults 55-years-old and older are arrested and detained every year--and that number is increasing rapidly. [More]
People with albinism suffer severe discrimination and social stigmatization, study reveals

People with albinism suffer severe discrimination and social stigmatization, study reveals

People with albinism face major health problems, including skin cancer, involuntary eye movements, and poor eyesight. [More]
Large-scale groundwater pumping increases arsenic risk in Southeast Asia

Large-scale groundwater pumping increases arsenic risk in Southeast Asia

Large-scale groundwater pumping is opening doors for dangerously high levels of arsenic to enter some of Southeast Asia's aquifers, with water now seeping in through riverbeds with arsenic concentrations more than 100 times the limits of safety, according to a new study from scientists at Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, MIT, and Hanoi University of Science. [More]
Study uses mathematical models to examine link between water fluoridation and diabetes

Study uses mathematical models to examine link between water fluoridation and diabetes

Water fluoridation prevents dental cavities, which are a costly public health concern. But despite the benefits supplemental water fluoridation remains a controversial subject. [More]
CPS caseworkers may need to use more holistic approach to improve response to chronic neglect

CPS caseworkers may need to use more holistic approach to improve response to chronic neglect

A new study by researchers at the University at Buffalo suggests that Child Protective Services caseworkers may need to use a more all-encompassing approach to improve how they respond to cases of chronic neglect. [More]
Kids who eat government-funded school meals at increased risk of being overweight

Kids who eat government-funded school meals at increased risk of being overweight

Government-funded school meals are putting financially vulnerable children at risk of being overweight, a Virginia Tech researcher has found. [More]
TTUHSC El Paso receives USDA grant to offer long-distance health education to rural communities

TTUHSC El Paso receives USDA grant to offer long-distance health education to rural communities

The Gayle Greve Hunt School of Nursing at Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center El Paso has received a $430,780 grant from the United States Department of Agriculture to provide long-distance health education to underserved communities in rural West Texas. [More]
Working full time not enough to make ends meet in Florida families

Working full time not enough to make ends meet in Florida families

Even after working 40 or more hours a week, thousands of Florida parents would need to earn nearly double the state's current hourly minimum wage in order to break even, according to policy analyses conducted by researchers at the National Center for Children in Poverty, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health. [More]
Child's home address may help identify children and families at risk of asthma

Child's home address may help identify children and families at risk of asthma

A child's home address may be enough information to identify children and families at risk for more severe cases of asthma due to social and economic hardships. In fact, the home address could guide risk assessment starting the moment a family arrives and registers in the hospital or at the doctor's office. [More]
Researchers using internet to find study participants may hamper recruitment of minority, poor people

Researchers using internet to find study participants may hamper recruitment of minority, poor people

Recruiting minorities and poor people to participate in medical research always has been challenging, and that may not change as researchers turn to the internet to find study participants and engage with them online, new research suggests. [More]
New project examines use of mindfulness therapy in preventing drug abuse relapse among young adults

New project examines use of mindfulness therapy in preventing drug abuse relapse among young adults

A research project at the University of Illinois is examining the use of mindfulness therapy in preventing drug abuse relapse among marginalized young adults. [More]
Researchers study link between health insurance, tobacco and alcohol use among reproductive age women

Researchers study link between health insurance, tobacco and alcohol use among reproductive age women

Researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health studied the relationship between health insurance coverage and tobacco and alcohol use among reproductive age women in the United States, and whether there were differences according to pregnancy status. [More]
Ageing population can stimulate breakthroughs in medicine, technology but increase political risks

Ageing population can stimulate breakthroughs in medicine, technology but increase political risks

The UN estimates that the number of people aged 65 and older will have reached almost a billion by 2030. [More]
Study highlights need to deepen health reforms in China

Study highlights need to deepen health reforms in China

China needs to further reform its health system with a number of critical steps to meet the growing health needs of the population and further control spending increases, despite impressive achievements in healthcare reform and rapid progress toward universal health coverage. [More]
New study shows women with ADHD likely to have many mental, physical health problems

New study shows women with ADHD likely to have many mental, physical health problems

Women with ADHD are much more likely to have a wide range of mental and physical health problems in comparison to women without ADHD, according to a new study from researchers at the University of Toronto. [More]
Gates Institute launches new global urban reproductive health program

Gates Institute launches new global urban reproductive health program

The Bill & Melinda Gates Institute for Population and Reproductive Health, based at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, is launching The Challenge Initiative, a global urban reproductive health program supported by a three-year, $42 million grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. [More]
In-hospital formula introduction and family history may help explain racial, ethnic breastfeeding disparities

In-hospital formula introduction and family history may help explain racial, ethnic breastfeeding disparities

A national research collaboration funded by the National Institutes of Health has found significant racial and ethnic disparities in breastfeeding outcomes, according to a study published online this week in Pediatrics. [More]
Experts call on UN to implement four-part global action plan to increase access to effective antibiotics

Experts call on UN to implement four-part global action plan to increase access to effective antibiotics

Today some of the world's foremost experts on antibiotic resistance called on the United Nations General Assembly to decisively act to reduce the growing number of deaths due to limited access to effective antibiotics. [More]

Nearly one-third of Hispanic Texans remain uninsured, new report reveals

The percentage of Hispanics in Texas without health insurance has dropped by 30 percent since the Affordable Care Act went into effect, but almost one-third of Hispanic Texans ages 18 to 64 remain uninsured. [More]
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