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Low-income families having children with special health care needs at high risk for food insecurity

Low-income families having children with special health care needs at high risk for food insecurity

Low-income families with children who have special health care needs are at high risk for food insecurity, even when they receive Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and participate in public assistance programs, such as Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) and Women, Infants, and Children (WIC). [More]
Study estimates prevalence of periodontitis at state and local levels across U.S. using SAE method

Study estimates prevalence of periodontitis at state and local levels across U.S. using SAE method

The International and American Associations for Dental Research have published an article titled "Predicting Periodontitis at State and Local Levels in the United States" in the OnlineFirst portion of the Journal of Dental Research. In it, authors P.I. Eke, X. Zhang, H. Lu, L. Wei, G. Thornton-Evans, K.J. Greenlund, J.B. Holt and J.B. Croft estimate the prevalence of periodontitis at state and local levels across the United States by using a novel, small area estimation (SAE) method. [More]
Growing up poor promotes eating in the absence of hunger in adulthood

Growing up poor promotes eating in the absence of hunger in adulthood

How much you eat when you're not really hungry may depend on how well off your family was when you were a child, according to new research published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. [More]
Study examines links between spending on social services and AIDS deaths in U.S.

Study examines links between spending on social services and AIDS deaths in U.S.

Despite considerable advances in the prevention and treatment of HIV/AIDS over the past 30 years, HIV infection rates have remained stagnant in the United States for the past decade. A study by researchers at the Yale Global Health Leadership Institute examines links between spending on social services and public health and AIDS deaths in the United States. [More]
Innate lymphoid cells get destroyed in patients infected with HIV

Innate lymphoid cells get destroyed in patients infected with HIV

A research project headed by Henrik Kloeverpris, a postdoc at the Department of Immunology and Microbiology at the University of Copenhagen, shows that the so-called ILCs (innate lymphoid cells) - a component of the immune system crucial to maintaining immune system balance - are destroyed in patients infected with HIV. [More]
Innovative programs may increase social, academic engagement for children growing up in poverty

Innovative programs may increase social, academic engagement for children growing up in poverty

Programs that help parents read and play more effectively with their young children may prevent behavior problems such as hyperactivity and increase social and academic engagement for children growing up in poverty, according to a new study led by pediatricians and psychologists at NYU Langone Medical Center and NYC Health + Hospitals/Bellevue. [More]

Better universal healthcare needed to reduce CHE for low-income TB patients in China

Improved universal healthcare is urgently needed to lower catastrophic health expenditure (CHE) for low-income tuberculosis (TB) patients in China, according to a study published in the open access journal Infectious Diseases of Poverty. [More]
IDEAL study holds new hope for children exposed to methamphetamine in the womb

IDEAL study holds new hope for children exposed to methamphetamine in the womb

Despite continuing reports that methamphetamine abuse during pregnancy can lead to behavioral and emotional problems in children, pregnant women continue to abuse the illicit drug. Nearly one-fourth of pregnant women seeking treatment at federal facilities were methamphetamine users. [More]
Parental debt may have adverse effects on socioemotional well-being of children

Parental debt may have adverse effects on socioemotional well-being of children

Certain types of debt that parents take on may have adverse effects on children's socioemotional well-being according to a new study by researchers at the University of Wisconsin at Madison and Dartmouth published by the journal Pediatrics. [More]
Adults with long-term exposure to ozone face increased risk of respiratory and cardiovascular deaths

Adults with long-term exposure to ozone face increased risk of respiratory and cardiovascular deaths

Adults with long-term exposure to ozone (O3) face an increased risk of dying from respiratory and cardiovascular diseases, according to the study "Long-Term Ozone Exposure and Mortality in a Large Prospective Study" published online ahead of print in the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. [More]
Falls in stillbirth rates failing to keep pace with childhood, maternal mortality rates

Falls in stillbirth rates failing to keep pace with childhood, maternal mortality rates

Approximately 2.6 million babies were stillborn in 2015, or around 7200 every day globally. Falls in stillbirth rates since the year 2000 are failing to keep pace with falls in childhood and maternal mortality rates, say the authors of The Lancet’s new Ending preventable stillbirths Series. [More]
Growing up in poverty could alter children's brain connectivity, increase risk of depression

Growing up in poverty could alter children's brain connectivity, increase risk of depression

Many negative consequences are linked to growing up poor, and researchers at Washington University St. Louis have identified one more: altered brain connectivity. [More]
Geographic location influences quality grades assigned to Medicare Advantage plans

Geographic location influences quality grades assigned to Medicare Advantage plans

Geographic location is an important predictor of the quality grades assigned to Medicare Advantage insurance plans, and the federal government should consider accounting for geographic differences to allow for fairer comparisons among plans, Boston University School of Public Health researchers say in a new study. [More]
Young children in deep poverty fare worse on health and development indicators

Young children in deep poverty fare worse on health and development indicators

Young children in deep poverty, whose family income is below 50 percent of the federal poverty line, fare even worse on health and development indicators than children in poverty, according to a study released by the National Center for Children in Poverty at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health. [More]
Family income matters more than race in predicting obesity in children

Family income matters more than race in predicting obesity in children

For a long time researchers have tracked high rates of obesity among black and Hispanic kids, but a closer look at communities shows family income matters more than race in predicting which kids are overweight. [More]
Ebola health-care workers develop guidelines for treating children during future outbreaks

Ebola health-care workers develop guidelines for treating children during future outbreaks

When the Ebola virus outbreak erupted in West Africa in 2014, children infected with the virus -- particularly those under age 5 -- faced overwhelming challenges. Not only was there a high death rate among young children infected with the disease, they often were isolated from their families, leaving them feeling distressed and without the intensive care they needed. [More]

UD professor explores impact of STEGH programs on medical students

As American medical students increasingly want and expect to have international work experience, more and more short-term programs are being offered to give them that opportunity, according to Melissa Melby, assistant professor of anthropology at the University of Delaware. [More]
FAU study shows benefits of regular mammography among elder women

FAU study shows benefits of regular mammography among elder women

Breast cancer is the second most common cancer in women after skin cancer and occurred in 230,000 women in the United States in 2015. Breast cancer afflicts 1 in 8 women in their lifetime and 1 in 25 die from this disease. [More]
Study finds 50% drop in uninsured hospital stays in Medicaid expansion states

Study finds 50% drop in uninsured hospital stays in Medicaid expansion states

Just six months after opening up health insurance to more low-income people, states saw a huge drop in the amount of care their hospitals provided to uninsured patients, and a rise in care for people with coverage, a new study finds. [More]
Areas stricken by extreme poverty more likely to be associated with high rates of Ebola transmission

Areas stricken by extreme poverty more likely to be associated with high rates of Ebola transmission

Since October 2014 the Ebola epidemic in West Africa has been diminishing and efforts have shifted from emergency response to prevention and mitigation of future outbreaks. Researchers from the Liberian Ministry of Health and the Yale Center for Infectious Disease Modelling and Analysis evaluated 3532 Ebola cases reported in 2014 in order to quantify the impact of poverty on the transmission and spread of Ebola. [More]
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