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Smiling Brazil initiative sets example to other nations to eliminate healthcare disparities

Smiling Brazil initiative sets example to other nations to eliminate healthcare disparities

Today, the International and American Associations for Dental Research (IADR/AADR) published a Discovery! article titled "10 Years of a National Oral Health Policy in Brazil: Innovation, Boldness and Numerous Challenges." [More]
JRC foresight report on global food security

JRC foresight report on global food security

Long considered in relation to malnutrition and humanitarian aid, food security policy should be moving towards a much broader landscape and focusing on regular access to food for a population nearing nine billion towards 2030-2050, while addressing food insecurity for a fraction of communities, according to a JRC foresight report. [More]
Population Council findings highlight strategies to delay child marriage

Population Council findings highlight strategies to delay child marriage

Today the Population Council released new evidence on what works to delay the age of marriage for extremely vulnerable girls in sub-Saharan Africa. Researchers also shared rarely available data on the cost of interventions that were tested, and issued recommendations for policymakers, donors, and organizations concerned about child marriage. [More]
Only 1 in 4 patients with ESRD in Georgia referred for kidney transplant evaluation

Only 1 in 4 patients with ESRD in Georgia referred for kidney transplant evaluation

Only about one in four patients with end-stage renal disease in Georgia were referred for kidney transplant evaluation within 1 year of starting dialysis between 2005 and 2011, although there was substantial variability in referral among dialysis facilities, according to a study in the August 11 issue of JAMA. [More]
World population to increase from today's 7.3 billion people to 11.2 billion in 2100

World population to increase from today's 7.3 billion people to 11.2 billion in 2100

The world's population will increase from today's 7.3 billion people to 9.7 billion in 2050 and 11.2 billion at century's end, John R. Wilmoth, the director of the United Nations (UN) Population Division, told a session focused on demographic forecasting at the 2015 Joint Statistical Meetings (JSM 2015) today in Seattle. [More]
Leading public health scholars argue that increasing national focus on precision medicine misguided

Leading public health scholars argue that increasing national focus on precision medicine misguided

The increasing national focus on personalized or 'precision' medicine is misguided, distracting from broader investments to reduce health inequities and address the social factors that affect population health, two leading public health scholars argue in the New England Journal of Medicine. [More]
Charity and uncompensated care spending vary greatly among not-for-profit hospitals

Charity and uncompensated care spending vary greatly among not-for-profit hospitals

While not-for-profit hospitals receive substantial tax benefits, some do not provide free or subsidized care for a higher percentage of patients living in poverty than their for-profit counterparts, according to a study of California medical centers. [More]
Access to dental care by low-income Americans becomes exception as only fewer dentists accept Medicaid

Access to dental care by low-income Americans becomes exception as only fewer dentists accept Medicaid

More than 2 percent of all emergency department visits are now related to nontraumatic dental conditions, according to a study by researchers at Stanford University, the University of California-San Francisco, Truven Health Analytics and the federal Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. [More]

Study identifies factors that contribute to government transparency

Public affairs experts say easy and constant access by citizens to important government information, referred to as government transparency, is vital for good governance as well as the perception by citizens that the government is trustworthy. [More]

New book reviews up-to-date accounts promoting energy access in remote villages

Opinion pieces from experts tackling the idea of energy as a catalyst for sustainable development - health, food security, education gender equality, governance, security and employment. [More]
UChicago Medicine contributes to Illinois Transplant Fund

UChicago Medicine contributes to Illinois Transplant Fund

The University of Chicago Medicine has become the first transplant center to contribute to the Illinois Transplant Fund (ITF), a new not-for-profit that provides financial support for organ transplants to qualified uninsured residents of northern and central Illinois and Northwest Indiana. [More]
Study reveals lingering effects of Superstorm Sandy among New Jersey residents

Study reveals lingering effects of Superstorm Sandy among New Jersey residents

Superstorm Sandy continues to affect the lives of tens of thousands of New Jersey residents, in the form of unfinished repairs, disputed claims, and recurrent mold. These after-effects still linger for Sandy-impacted residents, and are associated with increased odds of residents experiencing mental health distress, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and depression. [More]
Innovative course helps make medical students more confident about dealing with health disparities

Innovative course helps make medical students more confident about dealing with health disparities

An innovative three-month elective course has helped make some first-year medical students at Albert Einstein College of Medicine more confident about dealing with health disparities they'll likely encounter as physicians, according to a follow-up study published online today in the journal Academic Medicine. [More]

PWNA announces supply drive for Native Americans living on isolated reservations

Partnership With Native Americans, formerly National Relief Charities, announced today a 100-day supply drive for Native Americans living on remote and isolated reservations. The nonprofit is calling upon individuals, corporations and foundations to help meet the critical needs of Native Americans who suffer the highest poverty in the U.S. yet receive less than one percent of the nation's charitable giving. [More]
National survey finds improvements in self-reported insurance coverage, access to care and health under ACA

National survey finds improvements in self-reported insurance coverage, access to care and health under ACA

Results of a national survey that included more than half a million adults indicates significant improvements in trends for self-reported insurance coverage, access to a personal physician and medications, affordability and health after the Affordable Care Act's first and second open enrollment periods, according to a study in the July 28 issue of JAMA, a theme issue on Medicare and Medicaid at 50. [More]
Cepheid, FIND unveil new portable molecular diagnostics system for patients suspected of TB, HIV and Ebola

Cepheid, FIND unveil new portable molecular diagnostics system for patients suspected of TB, HIV and Ebola

Cepheid and FIND today unveiled the GeneXpert Omni, the world's most portable molecular diagnostics system enabling unprecedented access to accurate, fast and potentially life-saving diagnosis for patients suspected of TB, HIV and Ebola in even the most remote areas of the world. [More]
Study sheds light on current and potential treatment options for schistosomiasis

Study sheds light on current and potential treatment options for schistosomiasis

In a special free issue of Future Medicinal Chemistry, leading experts explore current and potential new treatment options for the deadly neglected tropical disease schistosomiasis. [More]
UTHealth researchers provide insights into current understanding of childhood obesity epidemic

UTHealth researchers provide insights into current understanding of childhood obesity epidemic

Encouraging more social interaction for children rather than just limiting TV time and enforcing strong nutritional policies in schools are two of the ways to decrease child obesity rates, according to researchers from the Michael & Susan Dell Center for Healthy Living at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston School of Public Health Austin Regional Campus. [More]

Study: Cash to stay in school did not reduce HIV risk among young women in South Africa

A Phase III, individually randomized trial has found conditional cash transfers for school attendance did not reduce the risk of HIV among high-school aged women in South Africa, investigators from the HIV Prevention Trials Network (HPTN) reported today at the 8th International AIDS Society (IAS) Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention in Vancouver, Canada. [More]
Georgetown's Institute for Reproductive Health receives $30 million from USAID to support Passages Project

Georgetown's Institute for Reproductive Health receives $30 million from USAID to support Passages Project

The U.S. Agency for International Development has awarded $30 million to Georgetown University Medical Center's Institute for Reproductive Health to fund its Passages Project, which aims to improve healthy timing and spacing of pregnancies among youth and first-time parents in developing countries. [More]
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