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Viewpoints: Cooking the Census books; immigrants left off health law; abortion still a 'tripwire'

Viewpoints: Cooking the Census books; immigrants left off health law; abortion still a 'tripwire'

You can't manage what you don't measure, as the great Peter Drucker used to say, and for the White House that seems to be the goal. Out of the blue, the Census Bureau has changed how it counts health insurance-;at the precise moment when ObamaCare is roiling the insurance markets (4/15). [More]
Scientists to combine environmental, surveillance data to predict malaria outbreaks in Ethiopia

Scientists to combine environmental, surveillance data to predict malaria outbreaks in Ethiopia

Dealing with malaria is a fact of life for more than 91 million Ethiopians. Each year four to five million contract malaria, one of the biggest health problems in this poor country. [More]

CBO shrinks estimate of health law spending based on lower subsidy costs

Expanding health coverage under the health law will also slow premium growth, helping lower the total cost of the law, the nonpartisan office said. [More]

First Edition: April 15, 2014

Today's headlines include reports about the Congressional Budget Office's latest estimate of the costs for expanding health insurance. [More]

CBO projects health law subsidies will cost less than previously expected

The new CBO projections find that the health law's expansion of health coverage will, from 2015–2024, cost $104 billion less than previously projected. [More]
Research may provide insight into identifying, helping children with emotional behavior issues

Research may provide insight into identifying, helping children with emotional behavior issues

Research on children orphaned by HIV/AIDS in South Africa may provide insight on how to identify and help children with emotional behavior issues in other areas of the world, which may have limited access to healthcare and further research that could lead to successful interventions. [More]

New paper calls for increase in geographically targeted prevention, treatment for HIV-infected people

In U.S. cities, it's not just what you do, but also your address that can determine whether you will get HIV and whether you will survive. A new paper in the American Journal of Public Health illustrates the effects of that geographic disparity - which tracks closely with race and poverty - and calls for an increase in geographically targeted prevention and treatment efforts. [More]
Study examines effect of community on hospital readmission rates

Study examines effect of community on hospital readmission rates

Nearly 60 percent of the variation in hospital readmission rates appears to be associated with where the hospital is located rather than on the hospital's performance, finds a new study in Health Services Research. [More]
New Dartmouth study offers roadmap for better risk adjustment in Medicare

New Dartmouth study offers roadmap for better risk adjustment in Medicare

The methodology Medicare uses to adjust the billions of dollars it pays health plans and hospitals to account for how sick their patients are is flawed and should be replaced, according to a new study by Dartmouth investigators published in the journal BMJ that weighed the performance of Medicare's methodology against alternatives. [More]
Doc receives grant for helping young adults to move from child-centered to adult-oriented health care system

Doc receives grant for helping young adults to move from child-centered to adult-oriented health care system

Oscar Taube, M.D., director of the Pediatric Outpatient department and the coordinator of Adolescent Medicine at the Herman & Walter Samuleson Children's Hospital at Sinai, has been awarded a grant from the American Academy of Pediatrics to provide adolescents, young adults and their family members with the tools to make a smooth transition from pediatric medical care to adult medical care. [More]

Report: Food insecurity among people in northern Aboriginal requires urgent attention

A new expert panel report on food security in Northern Canada, has found that food insecurity among northern Aboriginal peoples requires urgent attention in order to mitigate impacts on health and well-being. [More]

New analysis shows signs of emerging middle way toward reducing ranks of uninsured

With the political divide over health care reform still strong going into this year's elections, a new analysis of state-level decisions shows signs of an emerging middle way toward reducing the ranks of the uninsured. [More]

Obama administration point to official end -- April 15 -- for enrollment extension

The Wall Street Journal reports that this cut-off will apply to the hundreds of thousands of people who started signing up for insurance on the federal health exchange but got held up during their last-minute shopping. Also in the news, the latest from California and Georgia in terms of deadlines and enrollment efforts. [More]

New Medicaid era takes different paths in Mich., Wis.

The neighboring states opt for different approaches to Medicaid expansion. Meanwhile, in Missouri, two Republican lawmakers clash over whether to accept the health law's expansion, and the Pennsylvania governor says he is nearly ready to pull back his proposal that is languishing with federal officials. [More]

Robin Hood releases Poverty Tracker survey results

Today, Robin Hood announced the release of the Poverty Tracker survey results, developed in partnership with Columbia University's Population Research Center. This quarterly survey of 2,300 households throughout the five boroughs and across all income levels is designed to take a deeper, more realistic look at disadvantage among New Yorkers. [More]

State roundup: W.Va. Governor Tomblin vetoes abortion ban; New York curbs medical bills with surprises; California bill aims to raise malpractice cap

Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin vetoed a bill late Friday that would have banned abortions of fetuses after 20 weeks gestation. The governor called the bill unconstitutional and a "detriment" to women's health. [More]
Expert panel report on the state of knowledge of food security in northern Canada

Expert panel report on the state of knowledge of food security in northern Canada

A new expert panel report on food security in Northern Canada, has found that food insecurity among northern Aboriginal peoples requires urgent attention in order to mitigate impacts on health and well-being. Aboriginal Food Security in Northern Canada: An Assessment of the State of Knowledge, released today by the Council of Canadian Academies, addresses the diversity of experience that northern First Nations, Inuit, and M-tis households and communities have with food insecurity. [More]

Medicaid expansion 'private option' plans drawing increasing concern from advocates

Stateline reports that backers of the health law and the expansion increasingly are worried that these alternative approaches being developed by some states could undermine the Medicaid program. [More]

Viewpoints: Health law didn't simplify anything; possible 'blowback' in 2016; now is the time for a 'doc fix'

Nelson's health insurance covered 90 percent of the costs after a reasonable $500 deductible. I'm happy he has such good health coverage. He's my dog. And I'm jealous of him. [More]

42% of Americans unable to describe deductible, shows survey

The week before open enrollment closes for new health care exchanges, a study by researchers at the USC Schaeffer Center for Health Policy and Economics and the USC Dornsife Center for Economic and Social Research shows that those who might potentially benefit the most from the Affordable Care Act - including those earning near the Federal Poverty Level - are also the most clueless about health care policies. [More]