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Survey sheds light on issues that limit acute heart failure patients' ability to care for themselves

Survey sheds light on issues that limit acute heart failure patients' ability to care for themselves

A tool designed to assess what interferes with acute heart failure patients' ability to care for themselves after hospital discharge holds promise for improving patient outcomes and reducing readmissions to the hospital. [More]

Too many American children live in economically poor families

Four out of every ten American children live in low-income families, according to new research from the National Center for Children in Poverty at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health. [More]
Income, race and ethnic origin may play more potent roles in asthma risk

Income, race and ethnic origin may play more potent roles in asthma risk

Challenging the long-standing belief that city dwellers suffer disproportionately from asthma, the results of a new Johns Hopkins Children's Center study of more than 23,000 U.S. children reveal that income, race and ethnic origin may play far more potent roles in asthma risk than kids' physical surroundings. [More]
Prenatal program enhances couples' co-parenting relationship, improves childhood outcomes

Prenatal program enhances couples' co-parenting relationship, improves childhood outcomes

Children whose parents participated in a prenatal program aimed at enhancing couples' co-parenting relationship were better adjusted at age seven than children whose parents were assigned to a control group, according to Penn State researchers. [More]
WHO calls for urgent action to reduce premature deaths from noncommunicable diseases

WHO calls for urgent action to reduce premature deaths from noncommunicable diseases

Urgent government action is needed to meet global targets to reduce the burden of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs), and prevent the annual toll of 16 million people dying prematurely - before the age of 70 - from heart and lung diseases, stroke, cancer and diabetes, according to a new WHO report. [More]
Increase in Lassa fever cases could be due to human-to-human transmission, research reveals

Increase in Lassa fever cases could be due to human-to-human transmission, research reveals

One in five cases of Lassa fever - a disease that kills around 5,000 people a year in West Africa - could be due to human-to-human transmission, with a large proportion of these cases caused by 'super-spreaders', according to research published today in the journal PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases. [More]
HIV/AIDS survival rates lower in the southern U.S.

HIV/AIDS survival rates lower in the southern U.S.

The southern U.S. had the nation's lowest five-year survival rate among those diagnosed with HIV or AIDS in 2003-2004, according to new research. [More]
QDREC software may help find effective treatment for schistosomiasis

QDREC software may help find effective treatment for schistosomiasis

For decades, scientists around the world have worked to develop a treatment for schistosomiasis, a debilitating water-born parasite that affects more than 200 million people worldwide. To aid this research, Rahul Singh, professor of computer science at San Francisco State University, has developed software that solves the key challenge of quantitatively assessing the impact of a drug on the parasite. [More]
DNDi awarded USAID grant to develop new treatments for river blindness, elephantiasis

DNDi awarded USAID grant to develop new treatments for river blindness, elephantiasis

The Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative has been awarded US$ 10 million by the United States Agency for International Development to develop new treatments for onchocerciasis (river blindness) and lymphatic filariasis (elephantiasis) - the first-ever USAID grant for neglected tropical disease research and development (R&D). [More]
New report finds that American children are generally safer, better-educated

New report finds that American children are generally safer, better-educated

American children are generally safer and better-educated than they have been in 20 years, a new report from Duke University finds. [More]
Janssen, USAID sign MOU to fight against health threat of antibiotic-resistant bacteria

Janssen, USAID sign MOU to fight against health threat of antibiotic-resistant bacteria

Johnson & Johnson today announced that its affiliate Janssen Therapeutics, Division of Janssen Products, LP, has signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) representing the intention of the Company along with the United States Agency for International Development to step up the fight against the health threat of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. [More]
U-M researchers to evaluate Medicaid expansion in Michigan

U-M researchers to evaluate Medicaid expansion in Michigan

Since its launch in April, 481,863 Michiganders have signed up for a new Medicaid health insurance option offered by the state, called the Healthy Michigan Plan. Now, University of Michigan researchers will study how well the new plan works, and advise the state government on how well it's living up to what lawmakers intended. [More]
Study: Drive for energy efficient homes could raise asthma risks

Study: Drive for energy efficient homes could raise asthma risks

The drive for energy efficient homes could increase asthma risks, according to new research. [More]

Laws limiting alcohol outlet density may reduce intimate partner violence

Communities with fewer places to buy or drink alcohol also tend to have lower rates of intimate partner violence, new evidence suggests. [More]
Standardized set of measurements may help identify malnutrition among young children

Standardized set of measurements may help identify malnutrition among young children

Using a standardized set of measurements will help health professionals more accurately diagnose malnutrition among children ages 1 month to 18 years, as well as improve their treatment, according to a new joint statement from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition. [More]
Experts launch new interdisciplinary scientific collaboration to improve health in urban areas

Experts launch new interdisciplinary scientific collaboration to improve health in urban areas

Aiming to empower planners and policy-makers to achieve better health for billions of people living in fast-growing urban areas, world health, environmental, behavioural and social science experts today launched a major new interdisciplinary scientific collaboration. [More]
Older Latinos living in safe, walkable neighborhoods less likely to develop severe depressive symptoms

Older Latinos living in safe, walkable neighborhoods less likely to develop severe depressive symptoms

Older Latinos living in the U.S. who perceive their neighborhoods as safer and more walkable are less likely to develop severe depressive symptoms, and the effect may be long term, a new study suggests. [More]
Report: Child poverty widespread in America's largest cities

Report: Child poverty widespread in America's largest cities

Years after the end of the Great Recession, child poverty remains widespread in America's largest cities. A paper just released by the National Center for Children in Poverty, a research center based at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health, reports that nearly three children in five living in Detroit are poor, according to the most recent Census figures. This rate has grown by 10 percentage points since the onset of the Great Recession in 2007. [More]
Greater income inequality associated with more deaths among African Americans

Greater income inequality associated with more deaths among African Americans

Greater income inequality is linked to more deaths among African Americans, but the effect is reversed among white Americans, who experienced fewer deaths, according to a new study by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley. [More]
Prevalence of adult smoking is falling in US

Prevalence of adult smoking is falling in US

The proportion of US adults who smoke has dropped by around 3% (from 2005 to 2013) according to a study conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). [More]