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Violent video games do not contribute to aggressive behavior, show studies

In the wake of the tragic shooting in a Charleston, S.C., church, many look for reasons to explain such violent behavior. Some already have pointed to violent video games as a possible reason, but three new studies from Stetson University found no evidence violent video games contribute to aggressive behavior, violent behavior or hostility in teens. [More]
Despite global progress, unequal opportunities have left millions of world’s children living in poverty

Despite global progress, unequal opportunities have left millions of world’s children living in poverty

The global community will fail millions of children if it does not focus on the most disadvantaged in its new 15-year development roadmap, UNICEF warned today. [More]
Tackling fuel poverty can help reduce debilitating sickle cell disease, save significant money for NHS

Tackling fuel poverty can help reduce debilitating sickle cell disease, save significant money for NHS

Tackling fuel poverty in the homes of people with sickle cell disease could reduce debilitating attacks and save significant money for the NHS, according to a study by Sheffield Hallam University funded by the Chesshire Lehmann Fund. [More]
Columbia University's Earth Institute director recognized with 2015 Blue Planet Prize

Columbia University's Earth Institute director recognized with 2015 Blue Planet Prize

Jeffrey Sachs, director of Columbia University's Earth Institute, has been awarded the 2015 Blue Planet Prize. The prize is presented each year to two individuals or organizations worldwide to recognize major efforts to solve global environmental problems. Many consider it to be the world's highest such honor. The other recipient this year is Cambridge University economist emeritus Sir Partha Dasgupta (also a member of the Earth Institute Advisory Board). [More]
Link between poverty and kidney disease changes over time, shows study

Link between poverty and kidney disease changes over time, shows study

Poverty is known to be a strong risk factor for end-stage kidney disease. Now, a first of-its-kind study has found that the association between poverty and kidney disease changes over time. [More]
Protiviti's 'i on Hunger campaign' reaches one million meals goal

Protiviti's 'i on Hunger campaign' reaches one million meals goal

According to the World Food Programme, 805 million people in the world do not have enough food to lead a healthy active life, and poor nutrition causes nearly half (45 percent) of deaths in children under five years old – that's 3.1 million children each year. In the fall of 2014, global consulting firm Protiviti launched its year-long i on Hunger initiative as part of the fight to help end world hunger. [More]
Link between poverty and kidney disease changes over time, study finds

Link between poverty and kidney disease changes over time, study finds

Poverty is known to be a strong risk factor for end-stage kidney disease. Now, a first of-its-kind study has found that the association between poverty and kidney disease changes over time. [More]
WHO and World Bank Group: 400 million people do not have access to essential health services

WHO and World Bank Group: 400 million people do not have access to essential health services

A World Health Organization and World Bank Group report launched today shows that 400 million people do not have access to essential health services and 6% of people in low- and middle-income countries are tipped into or pushed further into extreme poverty because of health spending. [More]
New report highlights inequities in healthy food access in Baltimore City

New report highlights inequities in healthy food access in Baltimore City

A new report by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future (CLF), in collaboration with the Baltimore Food Policy Initiative, found that one in four of the city's residents live in so-called food deserts with limited access to healthy foods. [More]
Montefiore's School Health Program awarded $3 million grant to support teen pregnancy prevention initiative

Montefiore's School Health Program awarded $3 million grant to support teen pregnancy prevention initiative

Montefiore Health System announced today that its School Health Program received a $3 million grant from the Jerome L. Greene Foundation, which is dedicated to furthering the causes of education, the arts, health, and social justice. The generous pledge will support a new teen pregnancy prevention initiative in the Bronx, which has one of the highest rates of teen pregnancy in the nation. [More]
ICM provides formal endorsement of Direct Relief Midwife Kit as global standard for midwives

ICM provides formal endorsement of Direct Relief Midwife Kit as global standard for midwives

The International Confederation of Midwives has provided its first-ever formal endorsement of a Midwife Kit as a standard for midwives trained to ICM's competency standards. The Midwife Kit was developed by Direct Relief in consultation with ICM experts. Direct Relief will provide the kit free of charge to midwives in developing countries. [More]
GSF's financial support helps seven million people become open-defecation free

GSF's financial support helps seven million people become open-defecation free

The GSF's latest Progress Report details how its financial support for nationally-led programmes has helped seven million people in over 20,500 communities become open-defecation free, improved toilets for 4.2 million people and seen eight million people gain access to hand-washing facilities. [More]
Study points to the importance of addressing health-related needs of ex-prisoners

Study points to the importance of addressing health-related needs of ex-prisoners

Ex-prisoners with a history of risky drug use, mental illness or poverty are more likely to end up back behind bars. Those who are obese, are chronically ill or have attempted suicide are more likely to remain in the community. These are some of the findings from an exploratory study into health-related factors that could be used to predict whether a person released from prison will end up in custody again. [More]
LegWorks receives grant to produce affordable prosthetic knee for amputees in developing countries

LegWorks receives grant to produce affordable prosthetic knee for amputees in developing countries

Backed with a blend of private and Government of Canada investments catalyzed by Grand Challenges Canada, a new Toronto-based company will contribute to a better life for amputees in developing countries. [More]
UH pharmacy students receive awards for excellence in clinical skills, disease management

UH pharmacy students receive awards for excellence in clinical skills, disease management

University of Houston pharmacy students wrapped up the spring semester with awards for excellence in professional service, clinical skills and disease management, earning kudos at the state level from the Texas Society of Health-System Pharmacists. [More]
Pharmacy data ‘could reduce asthma treatment inequality’

Pharmacy data ‘could reduce asthma treatment inequality’

Research has found that the ratio of dispensed asthma controller to rescue medication at community pharmacies is associated with the need for emergency asthma treatment in paediatric patients. [More]
HIV infections continue to rise among YMSM despite prevention efforts

HIV infections continue to rise among YMSM despite prevention efforts

HIV infections continue to rise in a new generation of young, gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men (YMSM) despite three decades of HIV prevention as well as recent availability of biomedical technologies to prevent infection. [More]
MSR, PATH announce launch of new water treatment product

MSR, PATH announce launch of new water treatment product

Local outdoor gear manufacturer MSR (Mountain Safety Research) and Seattle-based international nonprofit organization and global health innovation leader PATH today announced the launch of a new water treatment product, the result of a five-year partnership to bring low-cost community water solutions to the global market. [More]
Uninsured, low-income women in non-expansion states less likely to receive breast, cervical cancer screenings

Uninsured, low-income women in non-expansion states less likely to receive breast, cervical cancer screenings

Virginia Commonwealth University Massey Cancer Center researchers recently conducted a study that found low-income and uninsured women in states that are not expanding their Affordable Care Act (ACA) Medicaid coverage are less likely to receive breast and cervical cancer screenings compared to states that are implementing expansions. [More]
Study: Failure to extend ACA Medicaid coverage widens cancer screening disparities for low-income women

Study: Failure to extend ACA Medicaid coverage widens cancer screening disparities for low-income women

Virginia Commonwealth University Massey Cancer Center researchers recently conducted a study that found low-income and uninsured women in states that are not expanding their Affordable Care Act Medicaid coverage are less likely to receive breast and cervical cancer screenings compared to states that are implementing expansions. [More]
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