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Poverty has detrimental effects on child's brain development

Poverty has detrimental effects on child's brain development

An alarming 22 percent of U.S. children live in poverty, which can have long-lasting negative consequences on brain development, emotional health and academic achievement. A new study, published July 20 in JAMA Pediatrics, provides even more compelling evidence that growing up in poverty has detrimental effects on the brain. [More]
New study finds that intellectual pursuits can buffer the brain's reward system against drug dependence

New study finds that intellectual pursuits can buffer the brain's reward system against drug dependence

Challenging the idea that addiction is hardwired in the brain, a new UC Berkeley study of mice suggests that even a short time spent in a stimulating learning environment can rewire the brain's reward system and buffer it against drug dependence. [More]
Obesity-promoting behaviors increase among children during the summer break

Obesity-promoting behaviors increase among children during the summer break

Regardless of family income, children on summer break consume more sugar, watch more television, and eat fewer vegetables than the rest of the year, according to researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health. [More]
U-M Medical School researchers compare reality and rhetoric of two health plans

U-M Medical School researchers compare reality and rhetoric of two health plans

Few people today would dare call President Richard Nixon a radical liberal. But 44 years ago, he proposed a health plan that went far beyond what today's Affordable Care Act includes. After the first plan failed, he did it again three years later. [More]
Fixing up abandoned buildings in inner city can reduce crime, violence

Fixing up abandoned buildings in inner city can reduce crime, violence

Fixing up abandoned buildings in the inner city doesn't just eliminate eyesores, it can also significantly reduce crime and violence, including gun assaults, researchers from the University of Pennsylvania and Penn's Perelman School of Medicine report in the first study to demonstrate the direct impact of building remediation efforts on crime. T [More]
Experts argue that 'beyond aid' policies in health care need greater scrutiny

Experts argue that 'beyond aid' policies in health care need greater scrutiny

The UK government's investments in private hospital chains in developing countries, in the form of 'beyond aid' approaches, could actually be hindering inclusive development and need greater scrutiny, argue experts in The BMJ this week. [More]
Improving access to affordable primary care cuts hospital stays, but fails to reduce ED visits in dual eligible patients

Improving access to affordable primary care cuts hospital stays, but fails to reduce ED visits in dual eligible patients

Convincing the nation's most vulnerable citizens to avoid costly emergency department visits is proving harder than expected. A new study from the University of Iowa found improving access to affordable primary care reduced preventable hospital stays for black and Hispanics who receive both Medicare and Medicaid but failed to reduce the number of trips to the emergency department. [More]
Mortality rates vary depending on socioeconomic differences among areas in Europe

Mortality rates vary depending on socioeconomic differences among areas in Europe

For a number of years now, scientific literature has questioned whether mortality rates depend on socioeconomic differences among the population. Recently, a new study carried out in 15 European cities - including Barcelona and Madrid - detected inequalities for the majority of causes, concluding that higher levels of poverty are associated with higher mortality rates and there is a great deal of variation among areas. [More]
ProfNet network experts available to discuss timely issues in your coverage area

ProfNet network experts available to discuss timely issues in your coverage area

Below are experts from the ProfNet network that are available to discuss timely issues in your coverage area. You can also submit a query to the hundreds of thousands of experts in our network – it's easy and free! [More]
Caya contoured diaphragm to expand U.S. women's options for nonhormonal barrier contraception

Caya contoured diaphragm to expand U.S. women's options for nonhormonal barrier contraception

With the launch of the Caya contoured diaphragm this June, women in the United States will have access to a method of contraception that is nonhormonal, has few side effects, and can be used for up to two years. Last fall, the United States Food and Drug Administration cleared the single-size Caya contoured diaphragm for marketing in the US, and now the diaphragm is available by prescription from healthcare providers. [More]
Chronic disease, mental health issues affect low-income African-Americans, Latinos and Hispanics

Chronic disease, mental health issues affect low-income African-Americans, Latinos and Hispanics

Chronic disease and mental health issues disproportionately affect low-income African-Americans, Latinos and Hispanics, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Two new studies by the UCLA Center for Culture, Trauma and Mental Health Disparities shed light on the causes and impacts of this disparity. [More]

Violent video games do not contribute to aggressive behavior, show studies

In the wake of the tragic shooting in a Charleston, S.C., church, many look for reasons to explain such violent behavior. Some already have pointed to violent video games as a possible reason, but three new studies from Stetson University found no evidence violent video games contribute to aggressive behavior, violent behavior or hostility in teens. [More]
Despite global progress, unequal opportunities have left millions of world’s children living in poverty

Despite global progress, unequal opportunities have left millions of world’s children living in poverty

The global community will fail millions of children if it does not focus on the most disadvantaged in its new 15-year development roadmap, UNICEF warned today. [More]
Tackling fuel poverty can help reduce debilitating sickle cell disease, save significant money for NHS

Tackling fuel poverty can help reduce debilitating sickle cell disease, save significant money for NHS

Tackling fuel poverty in the homes of people with sickle cell disease could reduce debilitating attacks and save significant money for the NHS, according to a study by Sheffield Hallam University funded by the Chesshire Lehmann Fund. [More]
Columbia University's Earth Institute director recognized with 2015 Blue Planet Prize

Columbia University's Earth Institute director recognized with 2015 Blue Planet Prize

Jeffrey Sachs, director of Columbia University's Earth Institute, has been awarded the 2015 Blue Planet Prize. The prize is presented each year to two individuals or organizations worldwide to recognize major efforts to solve global environmental problems. Many consider it to be the world's highest such honor. The other recipient this year is Cambridge University economist emeritus Sir Partha Dasgupta (also a member of the Earth Institute Advisory Board). [More]
Link between poverty and kidney disease changes over time, shows study

Link between poverty and kidney disease changes over time, shows study

Poverty is known to be a strong risk factor for end-stage kidney disease. Now, a first of-its-kind study has found that the association between poverty and kidney disease changes over time. [More]
Protiviti's 'i on Hunger campaign' reaches one million meals goal

Protiviti's 'i on Hunger campaign' reaches one million meals goal

According to the World Food Programme, 805 million people in the world do not have enough food to lead a healthy active life, and poor nutrition causes nearly half (45 percent) of deaths in children under five years old – that's 3.1 million children each year. In the fall of 2014, global consulting firm Protiviti launched its year-long i on Hunger initiative as part of the fight to help end world hunger. [More]
Link between poverty and kidney disease changes over time, study finds

Link between poverty and kidney disease changes over time, study finds

Poverty is known to be a strong risk factor for end-stage kidney disease. Now, a first of-its-kind study has found that the association between poverty and kidney disease changes over time. [More]
WHO and World Bank Group: 400 million people do not have access to essential health services

WHO and World Bank Group: 400 million people do not have access to essential health services

A World Health Organization and World Bank Group report launched today shows that 400 million people do not have access to essential health services and 6% of people in low- and middle-income countries are tipped into or pushed further into extreme poverty because of health spending. [More]
New report highlights inequities in healthy food access in Baltimore City

New report highlights inequities in healthy food access in Baltimore City

A new report by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future (CLF), in collaboration with the Baltimore Food Policy Initiative, found that one in four of the city's residents live in so-called food deserts with limited access to healthy foods. [More]
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