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Minority groups in the U.S. less likely than white people to trust doctors

When it comes to trust in their physicians, minority groups in the United States are less likely than white people to believe their doctors care about them, according to research by University of Pennsylvania's Abigail Sewell. [More]
New study pinpoints five top risk factors responsible for undernutrition among children in India

New study pinpoints five top risk factors responsible for undernutrition among children in India

In India, nearly 40% of all children are stunted--of extremely low height for their age--and nearly 30% are underweight. A new study from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health has now pinpointed the five top risk factors responsible for more than two-thirds of the problem. [More]
More effort needed to reduce risks of mosquito-transmitted epidemics in the U.S. and Mexico

More effort needed to reduce risks of mosquito-transmitted epidemics in the U.S. and Mexico

Despite the increasing risks of mosquito-transmitted epidemics in the United States and Mexico, policymakers in both countries have made little effort to prevent future outbreaks, according to a new policy brief by tropical-disease and science policy experts at Rice University's Baker Institute for Public Policy. [More]
Cancer treatment costs push patients into poverty in Southeast Asia

Cancer treatment costs push patients into poverty in Southeast Asia

Five percent of cancer patients and their families were pushed into poverty in Southeast Asia between March 2012 and September 2013, because of high disease-related costs, a study at the inaugural ESMO Asia 2015 Congress in Singapore shows. [More]
Clinical depression during early childhood can change the brain's anatomy

Clinical depression during early childhood can change the brain's anatomy

The brains of children who suffer clinical depression as preschoolers develop abnormally, compared with the brains of preschoolers unaffected by the disorder, according to new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. [More]
Children from low income environments experience higher risk of neurological impairment

Children from low income environments experience higher risk of neurological impairment

Children from low income environments appear to have a higher risk of neurological impairment than those from more economically secure circumstances, according to researchers at the National Institutes of Health and other institutions. This neurological impairment appears to be distinct from the risk of cognitive and emotional delays known to accompany early-life poverty. [More]
Using antidepressants during pregnancy greatly increases autism risk

Using antidepressants during pregnancy greatly increases autism risk

Using antidepressants during pregnancy greatly increases the risk of autism, Professor Anick Bérard of the University of Montreal and its affiliated CHU Sainte-Justine children's hospital revealed today. Prof. Bérard, an internationally renowned expert in the fields of pharmaceutical safety during pregnancy, came to her conclusions after reviewing data covering 145,456 pregnancies. [More]
Global Health Impact Index can measure actual impact of drugs worldwide

Global Health Impact Index can measure actual impact of drugs worldwide

Billions of dollars have been spent on developing drugs and supplying them around the world, but which companies' drugs are actually making an impact? The Global Health Impact Index, headed by Binghamton University Associate Professor Nicole Hassoun and highlighted in a new article published Friday in PLOS ONE, addresses this issue by ranking pharmaceutical companies based on their drugs' impact on global health. [More]
New research sheds light on how gut damage can cause malnutrition, oral vaccine failure

New research sheds light on how gut damage can cause malnutrition, oral vaccine failure

It has been estimated that if every nutritional measure known to be helpful were applied to every child in the world, global malnutrition would be decreased by only a third. New research from the University of Virginia School of Medicine, the University of Vermont and the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research in Bangladesh sheds light on why: Damage to the gut from infection explains why food alone is not a solution to malnutrition. [More]
Social and emotional skills intervention can help young Syrian refugees heal psychological wounds

Social and emotional skills intervention can help young Syrian refugees heal psychological wounds

A social and emotional skills intervention developed to help children recover from the trauma of natural disasters is being adapted to help young Syrian refugees heal their psychological wounds. [More]
Experts call for radical action to assure health for entire India

Experts call for radical action to assure health for entire India

A paper published in The Lancet today calls for a radical transformation in the architecture of India’s healthcare delivery system, if the country is to achieve the government’s vision of assuring health for all. [More]

Direct Relief ranked among nation's ten top charities

Direct Relief, a California-based humanitarian aid organization, became the ninth-largest charity in the United States this year, according to Forbes Magazine's annual ranking of U.S. charities based on private support. [More]
Earlier intervention can lead to better recovery in underweight children with multiple household risk factors

Earlier intervention can lead to better recovery in underweight children with multiple household risk factors

Young children who are underweight experienced greater weight recovery the earlier an intervention was started, and the recovery was more significant in children with multiple household risk factors, according to a study published this week in The Journal of Pediatrics. [More]
Children with cleft lip or palate and spina bifida at increased risk for abuse

Children with cleft lip or palate and spina bifida at increased risk for abuse

Children born with cleft lip or palate and spina bifida are at an increased risk for abuse before the age of 2, according to researchers from The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. [More]
TB sidetracked in the fight against HIV epidemic in Malawi

TB sidetracked in the fight against HIV epidemic in Malawi

Tuberculosis seems to have fallen between the cracks in poverty-stricken Malawi's sponsor-dependent health sector. The dominating focus on HIV may have left parts of Africa with a skewed health service, say researchers. [More]
Recommendations for caring for Syrian refugees' health care needs

Recommendations for caring for Syrian refugees' health care needs

What unique health needs will Syrian refugees face, and how can Canadian physicians best provide health care to them and their families? A practice article posted online today in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) provides recommendations on screening and advice for primary care physicians to deal with this specific population's health care needs. [More]
People exiting prison or jail get access to health services

People exiting prison or jail get access to health services

With the expansion of Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act, an entire new population is eligible for government health care: low-income men. [More]
Home intervention, education improve vaccination rates in at-risk children

Home intervention, education improve vaccination rates in at-risk children

A program by Stony Brook Children's Hospital that involves the use of trained community health workers on child immunization reveals that home intervention and education improves vaccine/immunization rates in at-risk children, including those living in poverty. [More]
Study: Medicaid expansion increases use of breast cancer screening among low-income women

Study: Medicaid expansion increases use of breast cancer screening among low-income women

Low-income women in Medicaid expansion states in the U.S. are more likely to have a breast screening performed than those in non-expansion states, according to a study presented today at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America. [More]
Bringing ill children from hospital to home can overwhelm family caregivers, affect children's recovery

Bringing ill children from hospital to home can overwhelm family caregivers, affect children's recovery

Bringing acutely ill children home from the hospital can overwhelm family caregivers and affect a child's recovery and long-term health, according to research in the journal Pediatrics. [More]
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