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Medicaid programs cover more number of preterm births than private insurance plans, study shows

Medicaid programs cover more number of preterm births than private insurance plans, study shows

Medicaid programs cover a higher proportion of preterm births than private insurance plans, according to a new study from researchers at the George Washington University Milken Institute School of Public Health and the March of Dimes. [More]
Prevalence of HIV in western Nepal linked to lack of technical and vocational education

Prevalence of HIV in western Nepal linked to lack of technical and vocational education

Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) is a global health problem, especially affecting developing countries due to lack of education and awareness of the possible means of transmission. [More]
Penn researchers develop pilot program to train library staff into community health specialists

Penn researchers develop pilot program to train library staff into community health specialists

Libraries are uniquely positioned to address public health needs in underserved populations, according to findings from a study by researchers at the University of Pennsylvania and the Free Library of Philadelphia in this month's issue of Health Affairs. [More]
Poor children with epilepsy have less favorable social outcomes as adults, study finds

Poor children with epilepsy have less favorable social outcomes as adults, study finds

In a population-based Canadian study of children with epilepsy, each of whom had access to universal health care, those from poor families had the same medical course and remission rate as their wealthier counterparts, but they had a less favorable social outcome as adults. [More]
Children of undernourished mothers more likely to suffer early aging of the heart

Children of undernourished mothers more likely to suffer early aging of the heart

New research has shown that the child of a slightly undernourished mother is more likely to suffer early aging of the heart. [More]
Authors call for international efforts to end preventable deaths from breast, cervical cancer

Authors call for international efforts to end preventable deaths from breast, cervical cancer

​Every year 800000 women die of cervical and breast cancer, but where a woman lives will largely determine her chance of survival. [More]
Low-impact exercise program for seniors helps reduce pain, improve mobility and enhance quality of life

Low-impact exercise program for seniors helps reduce pain, improve mobility and enhance quality of life

It's never too late to reap the benefits of exercise, and that includes older adults with arthritis and other muscle and joint conditions, according to a study. [More]
Study shows more than 50% of Americans suffer from multiple health challenges

Study shows more than 50% of Americans suffer from multiple health challenges

With the future of US healthcare likely to rest on the next presidency, a new study from Psychology, Health & Medicine highlights just how complex the medical needs of many Americans now are. [More]
TTUHSC El Paso receives grant for innovative medical school primary care program

TTUHSC El Paso receives grant for innovative medical school primary care program

Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center El Paso has received a $351,721 continuing grant from the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board. [More]
Babies in Canada's north face alarming rates of respiratory infection, study shows

Babies in Canada's north face alarming rates of respiratory infection, study shows

Infants in Canada's north are facing alarming rates of respiratory infection, but providing an antibody to all infants will prevent hundreds of hospitalizations of babies in the Arctic and save hundreds of thousands of dollars a year. [More]

Neighbourhood effect of slums could help alleviate some community-related health problems

A new study suggests that the 'neighbourhood effect' of slums could help to alleviate some of their associated health problems. [More]
Wayne State receives NIH grant to study use of opioid addiction drug to fight relapse in recovering addicts

Wayne State receives NIH grant to study use of opioid addiction drug to fight relapse in recovering addicts

A team led by Wayne State University School of Medicine researcher Mark Greenwald, Ph.D., will use a four-year, $2,279,723 competitively renewed grant from the National Institute on Drug Abuse of the National Institutes of Health to explore whether the opioid addiction treatment medication buprenorphine can decrease the magnitude and/or duration of responses to stressors faced by recovering addicts. [More]
Four CGIAR researchers win World Food Prize for improving nutrition and health

Four CGIAR researchers win World Food Prize for improving nutrition and health

Four CGIAR scientists, Dr. Howarth Bouis (HarvestPlus), Dr. Jan Low (CIP), Maria Andrade (CIP), and Robert Mwanga (CIP) will be awarded the World Food Prize tonight for their combined success in improving nutrition and health through biofortified crops. [More]
Children who experience family, environmental stressors more likely to be diagnosed with ADHD

Children who experience family, environmental stressors more likely to be diagnosed with ADHD

Children who experience family and environmental stressors, and traumatic experiences, such as poverty, mental illness and exposure to violence, are more likely to be diagnosed with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), according to new research by investigators at the Children's Hospital at Montefiore, titled "Associations Between Adverse Childhood Experiences and ADHD Diagnosis and Severity," published in Academic Pediatrics. [More]
Research underscores importance of increased global commitment to early childhood development

Research underscores importance of increased global commitment to early childhood development

An estimated 43 percent--249 million--of children under five in low-and middle-income countries (LMICs) are at an elevated risk of poor development due to extreme poverty and stunting, according to findings from The Lancet's new Series, Advancing Early Childhood Development: from Science to Scale. [More]
Exposure to community violence linked to violent behavior among minority adolescent men

Exposure to community violence linked to violent behavior among minority adolescent men

As exposure to community violence increases for adolescent men of color, symptoms of depression subside and violent behaviors increase, according to new research published in the Journal of Clinical Child & Adolescent Psychology, a journal of the Society of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology. [More]

Sustained exposure to economic hardship linked to worse cognitive function in young individuals

Poverty and perceived hardship over decades among relatively young people in the U.S. are strongly associated with worse cognitive function and may be important contributors to premature aging among disadvantaged populations, report investigators in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine. [More]
Unknown exposure to second-hand smoke linked to increased mortality in non-smokers

Unknown exposure to second-hand smoke linked to increased mortality in non-smokers

A new biomarker has identified known and unknown exposure to second-hand smoke and confirmed a strong association to increased mortality in non-smokers, according to a new study from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. [More]
Global study assesses countries on health-related Sustainable Development Goals

Global study assesses countries on health-related Sustainable Development Goals

Worldwide, good progress has been made towards some of the health-related Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) since 2000, particularly in reducing under-5 and neonatal mortality, family planning, and the rollout of universal health care. [More]
SLU receives HRSA grant for training family physicians and medical family therapists in behavioral health

SLU receives HRSA grant for training family physicians and medical family therapists in behavioral health

Saint Louis University has received a $1.87 million grant to strengthen behavioral health training for family physicians, who often are the primary physician seen by many adults and children, and for medical family therapists who practice alongside them. [More]
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