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Prostate cancer is the most common non-skin cancer in the United States and the third most common cancer worldwide. More than 1 million men in the United States have prostate cancer and it is the second leading cause of cancer death amongst men after lung cancer. In 2009, an estimated 192,280 new cases are expected to be diagnosed and approximately 27,360 men are expected to die from the disease. Castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is defined as prostate cancer that continues to grow despite all standard-of-care hormonal (anti-androgen) therapies. Patients with castration-resistant (also known as hormone-refractory) prostate cancer have few treatment options and a poor prognosis.
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A quarter of men could safely avoid prostate biopsy if MRI is used

A quarter of men could safely avoid prostate biopsy if MRI is used

Performing an MRI scan of men with suspected prostate cancer could spare a quarter of men from having to undergo prostate biopsy, according to a study published in The Lancet. [More]
MGH-developed CTC-iChip with digital PCR assay improves detection of early-stage liver cancer

MGH-developed CTC-iChip with digital PCR assay improves detection of early-stage liver cancer

Use of an advanced form of the commonly used polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method to analyze circulating tumor cells (CTCs) may greatly increase the ability to diagnose early-stage cancer, increasing the likelihood of successful treatment. [More]
Protein involved in pancreatic cancer development plays more complicated role, study finds

Protein involved in pancreatic cancer development plays more complicated role, study finds

A protein thought to fuel pancreatic cancer development plays a much more complicated role, a new study finds. [More]
Anxiety after prostate cancer diagnosis may motivate men to choose aggressive treatment, study reports

Anxiety after prostate cancer diagnosis may motivate men to choose aggressive treatment, study reports

The anxiety many men experience after being diagnosed with prostate cancer may lead them to choose potentially unnecessary treatment options, researchers from the University at Buffalo and Roswell Park Cancer Institute report in a new study. [More]
Roswell Park researchers identify gene signatures that may help predict fatal prostate cancers

Roswell Park researchers identify gene signatures that may help predict fatal prostate cancers

Standard therapy for prostate cancer, the third-leading cause of cancer-related deaths in American men, is based on blocking androgens, the male sex hormones. [More]
Study finds decline in rate of prostate cancer treatment after change in screening recommendations

Study finds decline in rate of prostate cancer treatment after change in screening recommendations

As some national guidelines now recommend against routine prostate cancer screening, the overall rate of men receiving treatment for the disease declined 42 percent, a new study finds. [More]
Scientists crack genetic code to identify men at risk for prostate cancer that spreads after treatment

Scientists crack genetic code to identify men at risk for prostate cancer that spreads after treatment

Canadian prostate cancer researchers have discovered the genetic fingerprint that explains why up to 30 per cent of men with potentially curable localized prostate cancer develop aggressive disease that spreads following radiotherapy or surgery. [More]
Landmark study unravels secrets of aggressive prostate cancer

Landmark study unravels secrets of aggressive prostate cancer

A landmark study, led by Monash University's Biomedicine Discovery Institute with the involvement of the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, has revealed the reason why men with a family history of prostate cancer who also carry the BRCA2 gene fault have a more aggressive form of prostate cancer. [More]
A new strategy to fight prostate cancer

A new strategy to fight prostate cancer

A new study led by scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) sheds light on a signaling circuit in cells that drives therapy resistance in prostate cancer. [More]
IQWiG investigates benefit of biomarker tests to support decision on adjuvant chemotherapy

IQWiG investigates benefit of biomarker tests to support decision on adjuvant chemotherapy

The German Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG) investigated the benefit of biomarker tests to support the decision for or against adjuvant systemic chemotherapy in certain breast cancer patients, that is, women with primary hormone receptor-positive, HER2-negative breast cancer and up to 3 affected lymph nodes. [More]
Targeted alpha therapy shows promise in treatment of metastatic prostate cancer

Targeted alpha therapy shows promise in treatment of metastatic prostate cancer

Nearly three years of research have brought about remarkable results for the majority of 80 patients subjected to targeted alpha therapy of metastatic prostate cancer. [More]
New SWOG review shows vitamin E and selenium do not prevent colorectal adenomas

New SWOG review shows vitamin E and selenium do not prevent colorectal adenomas

Eight years ago, results from a landmark cancer prevention trial run by SWOG showed that a daily dose of vitamin E and selenium did not prevent prostate cancer. [More]
Scientists identify novel protein pathway across cancer types that fuels tumor progression

Scientists identify novel protein pathway across cancer types that fuels tumor progression

Scientists at The Wistar Institute have identified a novel protein pathway across several types of cancer that controls how tumor cells acquire the energy necessary for movement, invasion and metastasis. [More]
Germline mutations in ATM and BRCA1/2 genes could help predict death risk from aggressive prostate cancer

Germline mutations in ATM and BRCA1/2 genes could help predict death risk from aggressive prostate cancer

A study of three genes associated with the development of prostate cancer found that men with inherited mutations in these genes are more likely to develop aggressive forms of the disease and die from prostate cancer at an earlier age than those without the mutations. [More]
Study shows the use of Renishaw inVia™ microscope in prostate cancer detection

Study shows the use of Renishaw inVia™ microscope in prostate cancer detection

New research at the Guangdong Medical University suggests a laser-based approach could be the latest breakthrough in prostate cancer detection. The proposed non-invasive blood test uses a combination of two techniques: surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and a new mathematical analysis technique called support vector machine (SVM). [More]
Researchers use patient prostate tissue to create new model for cancer research

Researchers use patient prostate tissue to create new model for cancer research

For the first time, researchers have been able to grow, in a lab, both normal and primary cancerous prostate cells from a patient, and then implant a million of the cancer cells into a mouse to track how the tumor progresses. [More]
New technique uses focused ultrasound to detect cancer biomarkers in the blood

New technique uses focused ultrasound to detect cancer biomarkers in the blood

Each year, thousands of Canadian men with prostate cancer undergo biopsies to help their doctors better understand the progression and nature of their disease. It provides vital, sometimes life-saving information, yet cancer researcher John Lewis knows it can be a difficult test to ask of anyone. [More]
Controversial hormone could fight against recurring breast cancers

Controversial hormone could fight against recurring breast cancers

An international team of researchers involving the University of Adelaide is tackling the controversy over what some scientists consider to be a "harmful" hormone, arguing that it could be a game changer in the fight against recurring breast cancers that are resistant to standard treatments. [More]
Study reveals men diagnosed with prostate cancer more likely to die of other diseases

Study reveals men diagnosed with prostate cancer more likely to die of other diseases

Starting in 1993 and ending in 2001, ten academic medical centers in the United States screened 76,685 men and 78,216 women for prostate, lung, colorectal and ovarian cancers. [More]
PITX2 methylation biomarker shows promise for predicting prostate cancer recurrence risk

PITX2 methylation biomarker shows promise for predicting prostate cancer recurrence risk

Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and other biomarkers are essential tools for diagnosing and monitoring prostate cancer. [More]
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