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Prostate cancer is the most common non-skin cancer in the United States and the third most common cancer worldwide. More than 1 million men in the United States have prostate cancer and it is the second leading cause of cancer death amongst men after lung cancer. In 2009, an estimated 192,280 new cases are expected to be diagnosed and approximately 27,360 men are expected to die from the disease. Castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is defined as prostate cancer that continues to grow despite all standard-of-care hormonal (anti-androgen) therapies. Patients with castration-resistant (also known as hormone-refractory) prostate cancer have few treatment options and a poor prognosis.
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Pitt scientists identify two new classes of RNAs closely associated with cancer biomarker

Pitt scientists identify two new classes of RNAs closely associated with cancer biomarker

Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine have identified two new classes of RNAs that are closely associated with a protein known to be a prognostic biomarker for breast cancer and could play a role in progression of prostate cancer. [More]
Researchers discover new gene subgroup that drives prostate cancer

Researchers discover new gene subgroup that drives prostate cancer

Prostate cancer researchers have drawn a molecular portrait that provides the first complete picture of localized, multi-focal disease within the prostate and also unveils a new gene subgroup driving it. [More]
Clinical genomic sequencing could impact treatment decisions in advanced prostate cancer patients

Clinical genomic sequencing could impact treatment decisions in advanced prostate cancer patients

An international collaboration of researchers are advancing precision medicine to men with advanced prostate cancer. [More]
Australian survey reveals that most people never been told about risk of overdiagnosis

Australian survey reveals that most people never been told about risk of overdiagnosis

A national survey reveals that only one in ten Australians report being told about the risk of overdiagnosis by their doctors, according to research published today in the scientific journal PLOS ONE. [More]
National Jewish Health researcher calls for men to be included in osteoporosis screening guidelines

National Jewish Health researcher calls for men to be included in osteoporosis screening guidelines

Most people associate osteoporosis with women. But the truth is, one in four men over the age of 50 will break a bone as a result of this condition. That's more men than will have prostate cancer, according to the National Osteoporosis Foundation. [More]
Scripps Proton Therapy Center reports exceptional results in treating patients with pencil-beam scanning

Scripps Proton Therapy Center reports exceptional results in treating patients with pencil-beam scanning

The nation's first and only proton therapy center to treat patients exclusively with pencil-beam scanning is reporting exceptional results in delivering cancer treatment since opening for patient care just more than a year ago. [More]
Research may offer new targets for diagnosing, treating advanced prostate cancer

Research may offer new targets for diagnosing, treating advanced prostate cancer

Researchers with the Indiana University School of Medicine have identified a molecule that promotes metastasis of advanced prostate cancer to the bone, an incurable condition that significantly decreases quality of life. [More]
Exact Imaging's ExactVu micro-ultrasound platform introduced at AUA 2015 Annual Meeting

Exact Imaging's ExactVu micro-ultrasound platform introduced at AUA 2015 Annual Meeting

Exact Imaging, the world's leader in high-resolution micro-ultrasound systems enabling real-time imaging and guided biopsies of the prostate, today introduced its ExactVu high-resolution micro-ultrasound platform for prostate imaging and biopsy. [More]
New microfluidic chip can capture rare clusters of circulating tumor cells

New microfluidic chip can capture rare clusters of circulating tumor cells

Researchers have developed a microfluidic chip that can capture rare clusters of circulating tumor cells, which could yield important new insights into how cancer spreads. The work was funded by the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, part of the National Institutes of Health. [More]
Mi-Prostate Score improves prostate cancer detection

Mi-Prostate Score improves prostate cancer detection

A new urine-based test improved prostate cancer detection - including detecting more aggressive forms of prostate cancer - compared to traditional models based on prostate serum antigen, or PSA, levels, a new study finds. [More]
Men with a history of asthma less likely to have aggressive prostate cancer

Men with a history of asthma less likely to have aggressive prostate cancer

In what they are calling a surprising finding in a large study of men who completed questionnaires and allowed scientists to review their medical records, Johns Hopkins researchers report that men with a history of asthma were less likely than those without it to develop lethal prostate cancer. [More]
New studies to improve prostate cancer detection to be presented at AUA annual meeting

New studies to improve prostate cancer detection to be presented at AUA annual meeting

Five new studies evaluating the use of imaging and urine-based biomarkers as ways to improve prostate cancer detection will be presented during the 110th Annual Scientific Meeting of the American Urological Association (AUA). [More]
Current fee-for-service models in U.S. healthcare may jeopardize prostate surgery patients

Current fee-for-service models in U.S. healthcare may jeopardize prostate surgery patients

A "perverse disincentive" for hospitals that have invested in expensive technology for robotic surgery may be jeopardizing prostate cancer patients who seek out the procedure, concluded a new study led by Henry Ford Hospital researchers. [More]
Information needs of cancer survivors differ depending on the type of cancer

Information needs of cancer survivors differ depending on the type of cancer

Judging by the nature and topics of their information seeking, cancer patients' information needs appear to differ depending on the type of cancer they have and where they are in their survivorship. [More]
Active surveillance appears to be safer management strategy for prostate cancer patients

Active surveillance appears to be safer management strategy for prostate cancer patients

Four studies evaluating effectiveness, trends and other considerations for active surveillance in managing prostate cancer will be presented during the 110th Annual Scientific Meeting of the American Urological Association. [More]
Quitting smoking can help improve outcomes after major urologic surgery

Quitting smoking can help improve outcomes after major urologic surgery

Quitting smoking can lead to a significant improvement in outcomes after major urologic surgery. These new data and their impact on urologic surgery will be highlighted by study authors during a special press conference at the 110th Annual Scientific Meeting of the American Urological Association. [More]
Results from four major studies on cancer treatments to be presented at ASCO Annual Meeting

Results from four major studies on cancer treatments to be presented at ASCO Annual Meeting

The American Society of Clinical Oncology today announced results from four major studies to be presented at ASCO's 51st Annual Meeting, May 29-June 2, in Chicago. Findings showed that use of a widely available vitamin pill reduces the risk of non-melanoma skin cancers; that early chemotherapy extends the lives of men with advanced prostate cancers; and that new therapies can improve outcomes for children with a rare form of kidney cancer and adults with relapsed multiple myeloma. [More]
Rises in unemployment linked to significant increases in prostate cancer mortality

Rises in unemployment linked to significant increases in prostate cancer mortality

The knock-on effects of the economic downturn have been explored in economy and psychology. Now researchers are examining the effects of unemployment on an even darker subject - cancer mortality. [More]

Men with asthma less likely to develop lethal prostate cancer

Scientists found that men with a history of asthma were 29 percent less likely to have been diagnosed with prostate cancer that spread or to have died of their prostate cancer... [More]
Prostate cancer patients can experience cognitive impairment following androgen deprivation therapy

Prostate cancer patients can experience cognitive impairment following androgen deprivation therapy

Cognitive impairment can occur in cancer patients who are treated with a variety of therapies, including radiation therapy, hormone therapy, and chemotherapy. [More]
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