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Prostate cancer is the most common non-skin cancer in the United States and the third most common cancer worldwide. More than 1 million men in the United States have prostate cancer and it is the second leading cause of cancer death amongst men after lung cancer. In 2009, an estimated 192,280 new cases are expected to be diagnosed and approximately 27,360 men are expected to die from the disease. Castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is defined as prostate cancer that continues to grow despite all standard-of-care hormonal (anti-androgen) therapies. Patients with castration-resistant (also known as hormone-refractory) prostate cancer have few treatment options and a poor prognosis.
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Mitochondrial dysfunction linked to chemotherapeutic resistance in African-American men with prostate cancer

Mitochondrial dysfunction linked to chemotherapeutic resistance in African-American men with prostate cancer

Improper functioning of the mitochondria, a cell's source of energy, may help account for the fact that African-American men with prostate cancer respond poorly to the same conventional therapies provided to Caucasian-American men, according to research led by Dhyan Chandra, PhD, Associate Professor of Oncology in the Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics at Roswell Park Cancer Institute. [More]
Study helps discover new treatments for type 2 diabetes in men with low testosterone

Study helps discover new treatments for type 2 diabetes in men with low testosterone

Doctors have long known that men with low testosterone are at greater risk for developing type 2 diabetes. For the first time, researchers have identified how testosterone helps men regulate blood sugar by triggering key signaling mechanisms in islets, clusters of cells within the pancreas that produce insulin. The findings, co-authored by Tulane University researchers, are published in the journal [More]
New model can increase active surveillance for low-risk prostate cancer patients

New model can increase active surveillance for low-risk prostate cancer patients

Urologists at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and Genesis Healthcare Partners have tested a new model of care for patients with low-risk prostate cancer. The evidence-based approach uses best practices to appropriately select and follow patients to avoid disease overtreatment. Results of the three-year study are now published online in the journal of Urology. [More]
New form of SBRT to deliver radiation to specific area of prostate cancer

New form of SBRT to deliver radiation to specific area of prostate cancer

University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center physicians have started the world's first clinical trial using a new form of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) to deliver radiation to a specific area of the prostate invaded with cancer - instead of the entire gland. The study aims to determine if treating a targeted cancer region within the prostate in early stage prostate cancer can increase treatment options and reduce the side effects of radiation. [More]
Novel function of PLK1 gene in prostate cancer metastasis

Novel function of PLK1 gene in prostate cancer metastasis

Researchers at VCU Massey Cancer Center have uncovered a novel function of the gene PLK1 (polo-like kinase 1) that helps prostate cancer cells metastasize (spread) to other parts of the body. This mechanism highlights new potential targets for cancer therapies and challenges the previous understanding of PLK1's role in cancer growth and progression. [More]
SBRT for prostate cancer treatment offers higher cure rate than many traditional approaches

SBRT for prostate cancer treatment offers higher cure rate than many traditional approaches

A five-year study shows that Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) to treat prostate cancer offers a higher cure rate than more traditional approaches, according to researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center Harold C. Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center. [More]
High dietary saturated fat intake may lead to prostate cancer aggressiveness

High dietary saturated fat intake may lead to prostate cancer aggressiveness

Eating a diet higher in saturated fat, a type of fat found commonly in foods such as fatty beef and cheese, was linked to more aggressive prostate cancer, a study by University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers and collaborators has found. The preliminary results were presented Monday, April 18 at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting in New Orleans. [More]
Radiotherapy needs likely to increase in all European countries by 2025

Radiotherapy needs likely to increase in all European countries by 2025

The demand for radiotherapy across all European countries will increase by an average of 16% between 2012 and 2025, with the highest expected increase being for prostate cancer cases (24%), according to a new study published in Radiotherapy and Oncology. [More]
Researchers devise method to stably internalize chemotherapy loaded microparticles into prostate cells

Researchers devise method to stably internalize chemotherapy loaded microparticles into prostate cells

A collaborative Brigham and Women's Hospital and Johns Hopkins University co-led team has found proof-of-concept evidence for a potential cancer treatment that leverages microparticles and mesenchymal stem cells. [More]
Cholesterol-fighting drug molecule can kill prostate cancer cells

Cholesterol-fighting drug molecule can kill prostate cancer cells

Standard treatment for prostate cancer can include chemotherapy that targets receptors on cancer cells. However, drug-resistant cancer cells can emerge during chemotherapy, limiting its effectiveness as a cancer-fighting agent. Researchers at the University of Missouri have proven that a compound initially developed as a cholesterol-fighting molecule not only halts the progression of prostate cancer, but also can kill cancerous cells. [More]
Study reveals TRPV2 protein as new target for chronic pain, cancer treatments

Study reveals TRPV2 protein as new target for chronic pain, cancer treatments

In a recent paper published in Nature Communications, a group of Case Western University School of Medicine researchers presented their discovery of the full-length structure of a protein named Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid subtype 2 (TRPV2). [More]
High levels of COMP protein may lead to worse breast cancer prognosis

High levels of COMP protein may lead to worse breast cancer prognosis

Research from Lund University in Sweden shows that the protein COMP, which mainly exists in cartilage, can also be found in breast cancer tumours in patients with a poor prognosis. Studies on mice also showed that COMP contributed to the development and metastasis of the breast cancer. [More]
Study assesses risk factors for metastases in prostate cancer patients on active surveillance

Study assesses risk factors for metastases in prostate cancer patients on active surveillance

Radical treatment such as surgery and radiation for localized prostate cancer may cause significant side effects. Active surveillance is increasingly accepted as an option for treating patients with clinically insignificant disease to maintain their quality of life. [More]
Advances in NMR metabolomics: an interview with Professor Tone F. Bathen

Advances in NMR metabolomics: an interview with Professor Tone F. Bathen

The main objective of our research is to improve and individualize cancer diagnostics and cancer treatment. We try to achieve this through the integrated use of MR technology and the development of data-driven tools to analyze tumors on both a functional and molecular level. [More]
Shortened RT schedule has similar efficacy as conventional RT schedule in low-risk prostate cancer patients

Shortened RT schedule has similar efficacy as conventional RT schedule in low-risk prostate cancer patients

Of the more than 220,000 patients newly diagnosed with prostate cancer in 2015, the vast majority will have had early-stage disease at low risk for recurrence. [More]

Researchers aim to improve current procedures for predicting outcome of prostate cancer

Researchers are working to find a way to determine how serious prostate cancer is when first diagnosed to avoid unnecessary treatments, which can cause life long side effects and even death. [More]
Cutting energy-dense carbohydrate-containing foods may help reduce cancer risk

Cutting energy-dense carbohydrate-containing foods may help reduce cancer risk

Recent years have brought more attention to the role of carbohydrates in our diets and the differences between healthy and unhealthy carbs, most often in the context of weight control. A new study highlights one more reason to avoid sugary beverages, processed foods and other energy-dense carbohydrate-containing foods—cutting them may help reduce your risk of cancer. [More]
Electrical stimulation of deep brain structures to ease chronic pain

Electrical stimulation of deep brain structures to ease chronic pain

Abuse of prescription opioid medicines used to treat chronic pain has reached epidemic proportions, so much that the White House has announced new efforts to combat addiction and prevent the thousands of overdose-related deaths reported in the U.S. each year. [More]
Study finds that married men over age 55 more likely to get colonoscopy

Study finds that married men over age 55 more likely to get colonoscopy

A national study involving 804 couples found that married men over age 55 were almost 20 percent more likely to have had a screening colonoscopy in the previous five years than men who were not married. Men married to women who are happier with the marital relationship were nearly 30 percent more likely. That rises to more than 40 percent if their wives were highly educated. [More]
Experimental urine test identifies 92% of men with elevated PSA levels

Experimental urine test identifies 92% of men with elevated PSA levels

An experimental urine test that detects genetic changes associated with prostate cancer identified 92 percent of men with elevated PSA (prostate-specific antigen) levels who had high-grade cancers, according to a study published today in JAMA Oncology online. [More]
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