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Prostate cancer is the most common non-skin cancer in the United States and the third most common cancer worldwide. More than 1 million men in the United States have prostate cancer and it is the second leading cause of cancer death amongst men after lung cancer. In 2009, an estimated 192,280 new cases are expected to be diagnosed and approximately 27,360 men are expected to die from the disease. Castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is defined as prostate cancer that continues to grow despite all standard-of-care hormonal (anti-androgen) therapies. Patients with castration-resistant (also known as hormone-refractory) prostate cancer have few treatment options and a poor prognosis.
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AR-V7 status does not affect response to taxane chemotherapy in patients with mCRPC

AR-V7 status does not affect response to taxane chemotherapy in patients with mCRPC

Findings from a small prospective study suggest that androgen receptor V7 (or AR-V7) status does not significantly affect response to taxane chemotherapy in men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Treatment outcomes were largely similar for the 17 patients with AR-V7-positive prostate cancer and the 20 patients with AR-V7-negative disease included in this analysis. [More]
Study shows that even breast cancers with few androgen receptors benefit from anti-androgen therapy

Study shows that even breast cancers with few androgen receptors benefit from anti-androgen therapy

A University of Colorado Cancer Center study published today in the journal Molecular Cancer Therapeutics shows that only about 1 percent of triple-negative breast cancer cells in a tumor must be "androgen-receptor-positive" to show benefit from anti-androgen therapies. [More]
PCF announces Challenge Awards to support research on new treatment strategies for prostate cancer

PCF announces Challenge Awards to support research on new treatment strategies for prostate cancer

The Prostate Cancer Foundation (PCF) announces 3 new Challenge Awards to support discoveries for the treatment of lethal prostate cancer. [More]
NeoGenomics' revenue increases 36% to $25.0 million in fourth quarter 2014

NeoGenomics' revenue increases 36% to $25.0 million in fourth quarter 2014

NeoGenomics, Inc., a leading provider of cancer-focused genetic testing services today reported its results for the fourth quarter and full year of 2014. [More]
MD Anderson awarded more than $22 million in research grants from CPRIT

MD Anderson awarded more than $22 million in research grants from CPRIT

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center has received more than $22 million in research grants this week from the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas. Approximately half of the funds awarded for Individual Investigator Research Awards went to MD Anderson faculty as well as 40 percent of total IIRA awards that include those for children's and adolescent cancer and early detection and prevention. [More]
Research findings lay groundwork for improving treatment assessment for men with prostate cancer

Research findings lay groundwork for improving treatment assessment for men with prostate cancer

UCLA researchers have found that radiation therapy is the most common treatment for men with prostate cancer regardless of the aggressiveness of the tumor, risk to the patient and overall patient prognosis. These findings lay the groundwork for improved treatment assessment by physicians and to better inform men fighting the disease. [More]
Scientists identify promising new therapeutic target for prostate cancer

Scientists identify promising new therapeutic target for prostate cancer

Keck Medicine of the University of Southern California scientists have found a promising new therapeutic target for prostate cancer. The findings offer evidence that a newly discovered member of a family of cell surface proteins called G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) promotes prostate cancer cell growth. The protein, GPR158, was found while the researchers were looking for new drug targets for glaucoma. [More]
Targeted nanomedicines could help prevent heart attacks caused by atherosclerosis

Targeted nanomedicines could help prevent heart attacks caused by atherosclerosis

Nanometer-sized "drones" that deliver a special type of healing molecule to fat deposits in arteries could become a new way to prevent heart attacks caused by atherosclerosis, according to a study in pre-clinical models by scientists at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Columbia University Medical Center. [More]
CTCA presents research on new cancer nutrition therapies at A.S.P.E.N. Clinical Nutrition Week

CTCA presents research on new cancer nutrition therapies at A.S.P.E.N. Clinical Nutrition Week

Several Cancer Treatment Centers of America clinicians presented research from studies evaluating new cancer nutrition techniques and therapies at the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition Clinical Nutrition Week held in Long Beach, Calif., February 14-17, 2015. CTCA clinicians led a plenary session and an oral abstract presentation, and presented eight posters to Clinical Nutrition Week attendees. [More]
Cabazitaxel therapy may be more effective in treating prostate cancer

Cabazitaxel therapy may be more effective in treating prostate cancer

Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer for men in the United States. Only one class of chemotherapy called taxanes is effective against the disease. [More]
Breckenridge files Paragraph IV ANDA litigation with Sanofi for generic version of Jevtana

Breckenridge files Paragraph IV ANDA litigation with Sanofi for generic version of Jevtana

Breckenridge Pharmaceutical, Inc. announced today that it has filed an ANDA with a Paragraph IV certification for cabazitaxel solution; IV (infusion) in 60 mg/1.5 mL (40 mg/mL) strength, a generic version of Jevtana® by Sanofi. [More]
GenomeDx announces publication of positive validation study for Decipher Prostate Cancer Classifier

GenomeDx announces publication of positive validation study for Decipher Prostate Cancer Classifier

GenomeDx Biosciences today announced the publication of a positive validation study for the Decipher® Prostate Cancer Classifier, a genomic test for prostate cancer. The study, published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, showed that patients with low genomic risk (as determined by Decipher) may be optimally managed with observation after radical prostatectomy (prostate surgery), while those with high genomic risk (as determined by Decipher) may be better managed earlier with adjuvant radiotherapy. [More]
Abiraterone drug improves survival in prostate cancer patients when given before chemotherapy

Abiraterone drug improves survival in prostate cancer patients when given before chemotherapy

Pioneering prostate cancer drug abiraterone significantly extends the lives of men with advanced prostate cancer if given before chemotherapy, the results of a major phase III clinical trial have shown. [More]
41% of the British population unaware of the role of diet in cancer development

41% of the British population unaware of the role of diet in cancer development

Surprising new statistics reveal that 41% of the British population are oblivious to the role that diet plays in the development of cancer - and even those with a family history of the disease are failing to consume potentially "cancer-preventing" compounds in their daily diet. [More]
Prostate cancer patients with detectable post-operative PSA should receive more aggressive treatment

Prostate cancer patients with detectable post-operative PSA should receive more aggressive treatment

Prostate cancer patients with detectable prostate specific antigen (PSA) following radical prostatectomy should receive earlier, more aggressive radiation therapy treatment, according to a study published in the February 1, 2015 issue of the International Journal of Radiation Oncology * Biology * Physics (Red Journal), the official scientific journal of the American Society for Radiation Oncology. [More]
Study focuses on two natural approaches to preventing breast cancer

Study focuses on two natural approaches to preventing breast cancer

Preventing cancer requires intimate knowledge of how cancer starts, what causes it to grow and flourish, and how to stop it in its tracks. Sometimes this comes in the form of a vaccine (the HPV vaccine for cervical and head and neck cancers), a screening (a colonoscopy for colorectal cancer) or a blood test (the PSA level test for prostate cancer). [More]
Researchers develop optimised PSA screening programme for prostate cancer

Researchers develop optimised PSA screening programme for prostate cancer

As an indicator of prostate cancer, the PSA test is regarded in urology as highly controversial since it is not always unequivocal. A team of researchers from the Comprehensive Cancer Center at the MedUni Vienna and Vienna General Hospital has now developed a programme that compensates the shortfalls of PSA screening with methods from personalised medicine. As a result, prostate cancer screening is able to reach a new level of quality. [More]
Clusters of gene-blocking microRNAs can limit spread of cancer

Clusters of gene-blocking microRNAs can limit spread of cancer

Cancers that have spread throughout the body, a process known as metastasis, are difficult, often impossible, to control. They are the leading cause of cancer-related deaths. [More]
Janssen granted Priority Review from FDA for YONDELIS (trabectedin) NDA to treat STS patients

Janssen granted Priority Review from FDA for YONDELIS (trabectedin) NDA to treat STS patients

Janssen Research & Development, LLC announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has granted Priority Review for the New Drug Application (NDA) for YONDELIS (trabectedin) to treat patients with advanced soft tissue sarcoma (STS), including liposarcoma and leiomyosarcoma subtypes, who have received prior chemotherapy including an anthracycline. [More]
NR2F1 gene: A 'master regulator' of tumor cell growth

NR2F1 gene: A 'master regulator' of tumor cell growth

Two existing cancer drugs turn on a gene that tells tumor cells to remain inactive, according to a study led by researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published today in Nature Communications. [More]