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Prostate cancer is the most common non-skin cancer in the United States and the third most common cancer worldwide. More than 1 million men in the United States have prostate cancer and it is the second leading cause of cancer death amongst men after lung cancer. In 2009, an estimated 192,280 new cases are expected to be diagnosed and approximately 27,360 men are expected to die from the disease. Castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is defined as prostate cancer that continues to grow despite all standard-of-care hormonal (anti-androgen) therapies. Patients with castration-resistant (also known as hormone-refractory) prostate cancer have few treatment options and a poor prognosis.
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Scientists find way to enhance, restore sensitivity to common treatment for breast cancer

Scientists find way to enhance, restore sensitivity to common treatment for breast cancer

Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer among women, with estrogen-receptor-positive (ER+) being the most common type. [More]
PinnacleHealth, Pennsylvania leaders launch new campaign to help combat sepsis

PinnacleHealth, Pennsylvania leaders launch new campaign to help combat sepsis

PinnacleHealth System launched its "Knock Out Sepsis" campaign this morning from the Harrisburg State Capitol Rotunda steps joined by Pennsylvania Secretary of Health Karen Murphy, Insurance Commissioner Teresa Miller, State Representatives Mike Regan and Patty Kim, sepsis survivors Russ DiGilio, Aaron Stoner, and Carol Brame, mother of Sean Brame, and medical professionals on the frontlines of combatting sepsis. [More]
HPV vaccine can decrease incidence of cervical pre-cancers among young women, research shows

HPV vaccine can decrease incidence of cervical pre-cancers among young women, research shows

Every 20 minutes, someone in the United States receives a cancer diagnosis related to human papillomavirus. HPV causes cancer of the cervix, anus and throat. [More]
Bioactive compound from neem plant shows promising effects on prostate cancer

Bioactive compound from neem plant shows promising effects on prostate cancer

A team of international researchers led by Associate Professor Gautam Sethi from the Department of Pharmacology at the Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine at the National University of Singapore has found that nimbolide, a bioactive terpenoid compound derived from Azadirachta indica or more commonly known as the neem plant, could reduce the size of prostate tumour by up to 70 per cent and suppress its spread or metastasis by half. [More]
Recycling existing drugs may help fight several types of cancer

Recycling existing drugs may help fight several types of cancer

Researchers at the University of Bergen have discovered that a drug against kidney cancer possibly can fight several types of cancer. [More]
Study examines benefits of hormonal therapy for prostate cancer patients with prior history of heart attack

Study examines benefits of hormonal therapy for prostate cancer patients with prior history of heart attack

In a recent study, a Yale Cancer Center team determined that men who received hormonal therapy for prostate cancer had a net harm if they had a prior history of a heart attack. [More]
Intermediate risk prostate cancer patients can achieve survival benefit with brachytherapy alone

Intermediate risk prostate cancer patients can achieve survival benefit with brachytherapy alone

For men with intermediate risk prostate cancer, radiation treatment with brachytherapy alone can result in similar cancer control with fewer long-term side effects, when compared to more aggressive treatment that combines brachytherapy with external beam therapy (EBT), according to research presented today at the 58th Annual Meeting the American Society for Radiation Oncology. [More]
Increasing adoption of SBRT improves survival rates for older patients with early stage lung cancer

Increasing adoption of SBRT improves survival rates for older patients with early stage lung cancer

Survival rates for elderly patients who received stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) rose from roughly 40 to 60 percent over the past decade, concurrent with the increasing adoption of SBRT, according to research presented today at the 58th Annual Meeting of the American Society for Radiation Oncology. [More]
IMRT reduces risk of side effects, improves quality of life for endometrial and cervical cancer patients

IMRT reduces risk of side effects, improves quality of life for endometrial and cervical cancer patients

Patients with cervical and endometrial cancer have fewer gastrointestinal and genitourinary side effects and experience better quality of life when treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) than with conventional radiation therapy (RT), according to research presented today at the 58th Annual Meeting of the American Society for Radiation Oncology. [More]
Study reveals radiosurgery as viable treatment option for patients with resected brain metastases

Study reveals radiosurgery as viable treatment option for patients with resected brain metastases

For patients who have cancer that has metastasized to the brain, stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) results in statistically comparable survival rates, reduced cognitive decline and better quality of life (QOL), compared to whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT), according to research presented today at the 58th Annual Meeting of the American Society for Radiation Oncology. [More]
Hypofractionated RT can reduce treatment time by half in stage II and III NSCLC patients

Hypofractionated RT can reduce treatment time by half in stage II and III NSCLC patients

For patients with stage II and III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) unable to receive standard treatments of surgery or chemoradiation (CRT), hypofractionated radiation therapy (RT) results in similar overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) rates, limited severe side effects and shorter treatment times when compared to conventional RT, according to research presented today at the 58th Annual Meeting of the American Society for Radiation Oncology. [More]
SRS reduces likelihood of local recurrence of brain metastases in cancer patients

SRS reduces likelihood of local recurrence of brain metastases in cancer patients

Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for cancer patients who receive the treatment for brain metastases decreases the likelihood of local recurrence but shows no positive difference in terms of overall survival (OS) or distant brain metastases (DBMs) rates, when compared to observation alone following surgical resection of brain metastases, according to research presented today at the 58th Annual Meeting of the American Society for Radiation Oncology. [More]
Researchers identify, validate three distinct molecular subtypes of prostate cancer

Researchers identify, validate three distinct molecular subtypes of prostate cancer

In the largest study of its kind to date, researchers have identified and validated three distinct molecular subtypes of prostate cancer that correlate with distant metastasis-free survival and can assist in future research to determine how patients will respond to treatment, according to research presented today at the 58th Annual Meeting of the American Society for Radiation Oncology. [More]
Increased use of SBRT linked to improved survival outcomes of NSCLC patients

Increased use of SBRT linked to improved survival outcomes of NSCLC patients

A new analysis of records in the Veteran's Affairs Central Cancer Registry demonstrates a clear positive impact of the increased use of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) to treat patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in recent years, according to research presented today at the 58th Annual Meeting of the American Society for Radiation Oncology. [More]
One single genomic fingerprinting could potentially miss smaller, more aggressive prostate tumors

One single genomic fingerprinting could potentially miss smaller, more aggressive prostate tumors

While the majority of prostate cancers are slow growing and not fatal, some are aggressive and lethal. [More]
Duke researchers discover blood markers linked to drug-resistant tumor cells

Duke researchers discover blood markers linked to drug-resistant tumor cells

While searching for a non-invasive way to detect prostate cancer cells circulating in blood, Duke Cancer Institute researchers have identified some blood markers associated with tumor resistance to two common hormone therapies. [More]
Study underscores importance of joint treatment decisions between prostate cancer patients and doctors

Study underscores importance of joint treatment decisions between prostate cancer patients and doctors

In light of the findings from the Prostate Testing for Cancer and Treatment trial published yesterday in the New England Journal of Medicine, the American Society for Radiation Oncology would like to congratulate the authors and investigators for conceiving and completing a difficult clinical trial to randomize care for 2,664 men who volunteered to be a part of this study. [More]
HMS scientists reveal how certain tumors develop taste for fat

HMS scientists reveal how certain tumors develop taste for fat

Cancers are such notorious sugar addicts that PET scans searching for the disease light up when they detect sugar-gobbling tumor cells. [More]
Automated CTC analysis isoflux cytation imager launched by Fluxion Biosciences

Automated CTC analysis isoflux cytation imager launched by Fluxion Biosciences

Fluxion Biosciences, Inc. announced today that it has launched a new imaging system, the IsoFlux Cytation Imager, designed to work exclusively with the IsoFlux Liquid Biopsy System and CTC Enumeration Kit. The IsoFlux Cytation Imager comes pre-configured with all components and software required for automated CTC image acquisition. [More]
Innovative procedure combining MRI and ultrasound can accurately diagnose prostate cancer

Innovative procedure combining MRI and ultrasound can accurately diagnose prostate cancer

New research confirms that an innovative procedure combining MRI and ultrasound to create a 3D image of the prostate can more accurately locate suspicious areas and help diagnose whether it's prostate cancer. [More]
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