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University of Michigan scientists grow first 3D mini lungs from human stem cells

University of Michigan scientists grow first 3D mini lungs from human stem cells

Scientists from the University of Michigan have grown the first 3D mini lungs from stem cells. The study, published in eLife, compliments other developments in the field such as growing mainly 2D structures and building lung tissue from the scaffold of donated organs. [More]
Study explains why COPD patients develop tolerance to roflumilast drug

Study explains why COPD patients develop tolerance to roflumilast drug

Roflumilast, a drug recently approved in the United States to treat severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), increases the production of a protein that causes inflammation, which possibly results in patients developing a tolerance to the drug after repeated use and makes the drug less effective, according to researchers at Georgia State University, Kumamoto University and the University of Rochester Medical Center. [More]
ItpkB enzyme regulates stem cells function to prevent cancer, anemia

ItpkB enzyme regulates stem cells function to prevent cancer, anemia

Stem cells can generate any type of cell in the body, but they are inactive most of the time--and for good reason. When stem cells become too active and divide too often, they risk acquiring cell damage and mutations. [More]
Researchers find Pom1 protein regulates different processes of cell growth and division

Researchers find Pom1 protein regulates different processes of cell growth and division

Investigators from Dartmouth's Norris Cotton Cancer Center led by James Moseley, PhD have found that the protein Pom1 possesses the ability to modify different sets of proteins to coordinate the processes of cell growth and division. [More]
Study: Progression of dysfunctional tau protein drives cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease

Study: Progression of dysfunctional tau protein drives cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease

By examining more than 3,600 postmortem brains, researchers at Mayo Clinic's campuses in Jacksonville, Florida, and Rochester, Minnesota, have found that the progression of dysfunctional tau protein drives the cognitive decline and memory loss seen in Alzheimer's disease. [More]
Newly identified proteins could shed light on the mechanisms of ALS

Newly identified proteins could shed light on the mechanisms of ALS

Where ALS comes from and how it progresses are mysteries that continue to vex medical science. But recent research at Sweden's KTH Royal Institute of Technology has found three proteins that could shed some light on the mechanisms behind this deadly disease. [More]
Scientists identify key molecules that trigger immune system to fight tularemia

Scientists identify key molecules that trigger immune system to fight tularemia

Research led by scientists at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital has identified key molecules that trigger the immune system to launch an attack on the bacterium that causes tularemia. [More]
Vitamin D3 and metformin show promising results in preventing colorectal cancer

Vitamin D3 and metformin show promising results in preventing colorectal cancer

The concept was simple: If two compounds each individually show promise in preventing colon cancer, surely it's worth trying the two together to see if even greater impact is possible. [More]
Low zinc levels in older adults correspond with increased chronic inflammation

Low zinc levels in older adults correspond with increased chronic inflammation

Zinc, an important mineral in human health, appears to affect how the immune system responds to stimulation, especially inflammation, new research from Oregon State University shows. [More]
Biologists identify new mechanisms linked to progression of aggressive form of dementia

Biologists identify new mechanisms linked to progression of aggressive form of dementia

Research by biologists at the University of York has identified new mechanisms potentially driving progression of an aggressive form of dementia. [More]
EHT expert paper raises important and unanswered questions about safety of wearable tech

EHT expert paper raises important and unanswered questions about safety of wearable tech

Wearable technology is raising health concerns worldwide. A recent New York Times article by Nick Bilton is raising important and unanswered questions about the safety of wearable tech, according to the non-profit research group, Environmental Health Trust. [More]
Isis Pharmaceuticals announces positive results from ISIS-ANGPTL3Rx Phase 1 study

Isis Pharmaceuticals announces positive results from ISIS-ANGPTL3Rx Phase 1 study

Isis Pharmaceuticals, Inc. announced today positive results from a Phase 1 study with ISIS-ANGPTL3Rx. In this study, healthy volunteers treated with ISIS-ANGPTL3Rx achieved dose-dependent, statistically significant reductions in angiopoietin-like 3 (ANGPTL3) of up to 93 percent with a mean reduction of up to 84 percent from baseline (p<0.001). [More]
Saccharin could potentially lead to development of drugs for difficult-to-treat cancers

Saccharin could potentially lead to development of drugs for difficult-to-treat cancers

Saccharin, the artificial sweetener that is the main ingredient in Sweet 'N Low, Sweet Twin and Necta, could do far more than just keep our waistlines trim. According to new research, this popular sugar substitute could potentially lead to the development of drugs capable of combating aggressive, difficult-to-treat cancers with fewer side effects. [More]
MSU scientists identify antioxidant system that backs up liver during crisis

MSU scientists identify antioxidant system that backs up liver during crisis

Scientists from Montana State University and Sweden have discovered an antioxidant system that helps sustain the liver when other systems are missing or compromised. [More]
Existing drugs could help prevent deadly familial stomach and lobular breast cancers

Existing drugs could help prevent deadly familial stomach and lobular breast cancers

Deadly familial stomach and lobular breast cancers could be successfully treated at their earliest stages, or even prevented, by existing drugs that have been newly identified by cancer genetics researchers at New Zealand's University of Otago. [More]
Copenhagen researchers develop secure way of measuring apo-M protein in human blood

Copenhagen researchers develop secure way of measuring apo-M protein in human blood

Researchers from the University of Copenhagen are the first in the world to develop a secure way of measuring the important protein apo-M. This could prove relevant for research into diseases such as diabetes, arteriosclerosis and sclerosis. [More]
Researchers identify new role for VEGFA that may help target metastatic neuroblastoma

Researchers identify new role for VEGFA that may help target metastatic neuroblastoma

Healthy bone is continuously involved in a dynamic process that includes bone deposition and bone resorption. [More]
Discovery may lead to new potential treatment for drug-resistant melanoma

Discovery may lead to new potential treatment for drug-resistant melanoma

In the last several years, targeted therapies - drugs that directly impact specific genes and proteins involved in the progression of cancer - have been approved for a wide variety of cancers, including melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer. Now, researchers at The Wistar Institute have discovered one way in which melanoma becomes resistant to a particular form of targeted therapy, and understanding this phenomenon may lead to a new melanoma target or prompt new designs of these treatments. [More]
Hypermethylation serves as protective barrier inhibiting development of ALS, FTD

Hypermethylation serves as protective barrier inhibiting development of ALS, FTD

Penn Medicine researchers have discovered that hypermethylation - the epigenetic ability to turn down or turn off a bad gene implicated in 10 to 30 percent of patients with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) and Frontotemporal Degeneration (FTD) - serves as a protective barrier inhibiting the development of these diseases. [More]
Amgen seeks marketing approval of Repatha (evolocumab) in Japan for treatment of high cholesterol

Amgen seeks marketing approval of Repatha (evolocumab) in Japan for treatment of high cholesterol

Amgen today announced that an application seeking marketing approval of Repatha (evolocumab) for the treatment of high cholesterol has been submitted for review to the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare in Japan. [More]
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