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Astute Medical, bioMérieux sign agreement to develop NephroCheck Test for acute kidney injury

Astute Medical, bioMérieux sign agreement to develop NephroCheck Test for acute kidney injury

bioMérieux, a world leader in the field of in vitro diagnostics, and Astute Medical, Inc., a company dedicated to improving the diagnosis of high-risk medical conditions and diseases through the identification and validation of protein biomarkers, today announced that they have signed a global, semi-exclusive agreement regarding the development of a test for the early risk assessment of acute kidney injury (AKI). [More]
Scientists take a huge step forward in identifying root causes of psoriasis

Scientists take a huge step forward in identifying root causes of psoriasis

Case Western Reserve scientists have taken a huge leap toward identifying root causes of psoriasis, an inflammatory skin condition affecting 125 million people around the world. Of the roughly 50,000 proteins in the human body, researchers have zeroed in on four that appear most likely to contribute this chronic disease. [More]
Personalized approaches to treating intellectual disability

Personalized approaches to treating intellectual disability

Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute have produced an approach that protects animal models against a type of genetic disruption that causes intellectual disability, including serious memory impairments and altered anxiety levels. [More]
Microscopic spheres of calcium phosphate linked to AMD development

Microscopic spheres of calcium phosphate linked to AMD development

Microscopic spheres of calcium phosphate have been linked to the development of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a major cause of blindness, by UCL-led research. [More]
Luminex's xMAP Biothreat Toxin Panel now available for detecting dangerous biotoxins

Luminex's xMAP Biothreat Toxin Panel now available for detecting dangerous biotoxins

Quickly detecting and identifying dangerous biotoxins is now a reality, thanks to the xMAP Biothreat Toxin Panel (BTP) by Luminex. The xMAP Biothreat Toxin Panel is the first multiplex assay to rapidly detect and identify the six most easily acquired and most dangerous biotoxins. All six of these biotoxins are on the US government's list of most dangerous substances. [More]
Penn researchers make breakthrough on novel anesthetics

Penn researchers make breakthrough on novel anesthetics

Penn Medicine researchers, in a continuation of their groundbreaking work to better understand how anesthesia works in the body, have found the first new class of novel anesthetics since the 1970s. Their findings, published in February issue of Anesthesiology, detail the processes through which the group uncovered these compounds. [More]
Rice researchers develop new version of hydrogel to promote wound healing

Rice researchers develop new version of hydrogel to promote wound healing

Rice University scientists have found the balance necessary to aid healing with high-tech hydrogel. [More]
HZI professor selected as recipient of 2015 Louis-Jeantet-Prize for Medicine

HZI professor selected as recipient of 2015 Louis-Jeantet-Prize for Medicine

Prof Emmanuelle Charpentier from the Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research in Braunschweig is one of the two recipients of the 2015 Louis-Jeantet-Prize for Medicine. The prize money of 700,000 Swiss francs is mostly attributed for the continuation of the awardees work. [More]
UChicago researchers awarded NIH grants to develop novel medications for sleep apnea, asthma

UChicago researchers awarded NIH grants to develop novel medications for sleep apnea, asthma

Two research teams based at the University of Chicago have received prestigious grants from the National Institutes of Health to develop novel medications to treat sleep apnea and asthma. [More]
Changes in current Ebola virus epidemic could potentially interfere with experimental treatments

Changes in current Ebola virus epidemic could potentially interfere with experimental treatments

Researchers have tracked the genetic mutations that have occurred in the Ebola virus during the last four decades. Their findings, published in mBio, the online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology, identified changes in the current West African outbreak strain that could potentially interfere with experimental, sequence-based therapeutics. [More]
Understanding heart mutations that cause sudden cardiac arrest

Understanding heart mutations that cause sudden cardiac arrest

New biosciences research at the University of Kent could point the way to greater understanding of the heart mutations that cause sudden cardiac arrest. [More]
MET amplified in NSCLC irrespective of type, genetic background

MET amplified in NSCLC irrespective of type, genetic background

A third of non-small-cell lung cancers show low- to high-level amplification of the MET gene, according to a German study, with no significant difference in frequency across different types of cancer and genetic backgrounds. [More]
Researchers explore how M6P deficiency affects different kinds of immune cells

Researchers explore how M6P deficiency affects different kinds of immune cells

A group of white blood cells known as B cells, which play a key role in the human immune response, need a protein-targeting signal called mannose 6-phosphate (M6P) in order to proliferate, differentiate, and present immune cell-activating antigens, according to a study in The Journal of Cell Biology. [More]
FDA removes partial clinical hold on CytRx's aldoxorubicin clinical trials

FDA removes partial clinical hold on CytRx's aldoxorubicin clinical trials

CytRx Corporation, a biopharmaceutical research and development company specializing in oncology, today announced that the United States Food and Drug Administration has removed the partial clinical hold on the Company's aldoxorubicin clinical trials. [More]
QMUL researchers develop new 'microcapsule' method to treat osteoarthritis

QMUL researchers develop new 'microcapsule' method to treat osteoarthritis

A new 'microcapsule' treatment delivery method developed by researchers at Queen Mary University of London could reduce inflammation in cartilage affected by osteoarthritis and reverse damage to tissue. The research was funded by Arthritis Research UK and the AO Foundation. [More]
Researchers identify novel life-preserving circuit responsible for recognizing threats

Researchers identify novel life-preserving circuit responsible for recognizing threats

Our existence depends on a bit of evolutionary genius aptly nicknamed "fight or flight." But where in our brain does the alarm first go off, and what other parts of the brain are mobilized to express fear and remember to avoid danger in the future? [More]
Research opens door to potential new cancer biomarkers

Research opens door to potential new cancer biomarkers

A new analysis opens the door to discovery of thousands of potential new cancer biomarkers. [More]
Researchers identify novel signaling pathway that triggers allergic asthma response

Researchers identify novel signaling pathway that triggers allergic asthma response

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, with collaborators in Korea and Scotland, have identified a novel signaling pathway critical to the immune response of cells associated with the initiation of allergic asthma. [More]
Tiny lumps of calcium phosphate may trigger age-related macular degeneration

Tiny lumps of calcium phosphate may trigger age-related macular degeneration

New research from scientists at the University of Maryland School of Medicine has found that tiny lumps of calcium phosphate may be an important triggering factor for age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a degenerative eye disease that can cause severe vision loss and blindness. [More]
Study leads to discovery of rare genetic disorder

Study leads to discovery of rare genetic disorder

Recently, a grassroots effort initiated by families and clinicians led to the discovery of a human genetic disorder with severe consequences that is linked to a mutation in the human NGLY1 gene. In a big step towards understanding the effects of this mutation, research by scientists at the RIKEN-Max Planck Joint Research Center in Japan implicates the enzyme ENGase as the factor responsible for deficient protein degradation that occurs in the absence of mouse Ngly1 gene expression. [More]