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UCSF study reveals molecular timing mechanism of stem cells

UCSF study reveals molecular timing mechanism of stem cells

UC San Francisco researchers have for the first time developed a method to precisely control embryonic stem cell differentiation with beams of light, enabling them to be transformed into neurons in response to a precise external cue. [More]
Researchers explore better way to address the root cause of cystic fibrosis

Researchers explore better way to address the root cause of cystic fibrosis

Treatments for cystic fibrosis (CF) have added years to the lives of thousands of Americans. But they can be difficult to administer, and most don't fix the underlying cause. Scientists have now found that a small molecule, when tested in yeast, can substitute for a protein and restore a key cellular function related to those missing in people with CF and similar conditions. [More]
Breakthrough antibody therapy shows significant promise against drug-resistant multiple myeloma

Breakthrough antibody therapy shows significant promise against drug-resistant multiple myeloma

In its first clinical trial, a breakthrough antibody therapy produced at least partial remissions in a third of patients with multiple myeloma who had exhausted multiple prior treatments, investigators at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and other organizations report today online in the New England Journal of Medicine. [More]
Individuals having high blood levels of two closely related proteins experience few adverse health events

Individuals having high blood levels of two closely related proteins experience few adverse health events

Individuals previously diagnosed with heart disease may be less likely to experience heart failure, heart attacks, or stroke, or to die from these events, if they have higher blood levels of two very closely related proteins, according to a new study led by a UC San Francisco research team. [More]
Commonly used heart attack blood test may identify people at risk for hypertension

Commonly used heart attack blood test may identify people at risk for hypertension

Analysis of blood samples from more than 5,000 people suggests that a more sensitive version of a blood test long used to verify heart muscle damage from heart attacks could also identify people on their way to developing hypertension well before the so-called silent killer shows up on a blood pressure machine. [More]
Long lasting flu vaccine using antibodies advance from TSRI and Janssen

Long lasting flu vaccine using antibodies advance from TSRI and Janssen

Scientists from The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) and the Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson (Janssen) have found a way to induce antibodies to fight a wide range of influenza subtypes—work that could one day eliminate the need for repeated seasonal flu shots. [More]
Omega-3 supplements fail to slow cognitive decline in older persons, NIH clinical study shows

Omega-3 supplements fail to slow cognitive decline in older persons, NIH clinical study shows

While some research suggests that a diet high in omega-3 fatty acids can protect brain health, a large clinical trial by researchers at the National Institutes of Health found that omega-3 supplements did not slow cognitive decline in older persons. With 4,000 patients followed over a five-year period, the study is one of the largest and longest of its kind. [More]
Amgen to present data on Repatha (evolocumab) and observational studies at ESC Congress 2015

Amgen to present data on Repatha (evolocumab) and observational studies at ESC Congress 2015

Amgen today announced that it will present six abstracts at the upcoming ESC Congress 2015, organized by the European Society of Cardiology, being held Aug. 29 – Sept. 2 in London. [More]
Clementia expands enrollment to include children with FOP in ongoing Phase 2 clinical trial

Clementia expands enrollment to include children with FOP in ongoing Phase 2 clinical trial

Clementia Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced the initiation of enrollment of children as young as 6 years old in the company's ongoing Phase 2 study of palovarotene for the treatment of fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP). [More]
First patient enrolled in CSL Behring's rVIIa-FP Phase II/III study to treat patients with hemophilia A or B with inhibitors

First patient enrolled in CSL Behring's rVIIa-FP Phase II/III study to treat patients with hemophilia A or B with inhibitors

CSL Behring announced today that the first patient has been enrolled in its Phase II/III clinical study evaluating the pharmacokinetics (PK), efficacy, and safety of the company's recombinant fusion protein linking coagulation factor VIIa with albumin (rVIIa-FP) for on-demand treatment in patients with congenital hemophilia A or B who have developed an inhibitor to factor VIII or factor IX replacement therapy. [More]

Sandia researchers develop nerve-like polymer network using biological mechanisms

Using a succession of biological mechanisms, Sandia National Laboratories researchers have created linkages of polymer nanotubes that resemble the structure of a nerve, with many out-thrust filaments poised to gather or send electrical impulses. [More]
Medical case report of woman with Channelopathy-associated Insensitivity to Pain Syndrome

Medical case report of woman with Channelopathy-associated Insensitivity to Pain Syndrome

The report, published on F1000Research and titled Neuropathic pain in a patient with congenital insensitivity to pain has just passed peer review. It concerns a unique case of a woman with Channelopathy-associated Insensitivity to Pain (CIP) Syndrome, who developed features of neuropathic pain after sustaining pelvic fractures and an epidural hematoma that impinged on the right fifth lumbar (L5) nerve root. These injuries were sustained during a painless labour, which culminated in a Caesarean section. [More]
Dr. Sharma receives research award from ASCO to continue study on triple-negative breast cancer

Dr. Sharma receives research award from ASCO to continue study on triple-negative breast cancer

Dr. Sharma was awarded the 2015 Advanced Clinical Research Award in Breast Cancer from the American Society of Clinical Oncology to continue her research on triple-negative breast cancer. [More]
Mayo Clinic scientists discover potential way to reprogram cancer cells back to normalcy

Mayo Clinic scientists discover potential way to reprogram cancer cells back to normalcy

Cancer researchers dream of the day they can force tumor cells to morph back to the normal cells they once were. Now, researchers on Mayo Clinic's Florida campus have discovered a way to potentially reprogram cancer cells back to normalcy. [More]
BET inhibitors can cause molecular changes in neurons, lead to memory loss in mice

BET inhibitors can cause molecular changes in neurons, lead to memory loss in mice

Cancer researchers are constantly in search of more-effective and less-toxic approaches to stopping the disease, and have recently launched clinical trials testing a new class of drugs called BET inhibitors. These therapies act on a group of proteins that help regulate the expression of many genes, some of which play a role in cancer. [More]
FSU investigator solves cell division mystery

FSU investigator solves cell division mystery

In the second part of his lab's recent one-two punch, Florida State University researcher Daniel Kaplan said he has solved a cell division mystery in a way that will intrigue the makers of cancer-fighting drugs. [More]
TSRI, Janssen collaborate to find universal flu vaccine

TSRI, Janssen collaborate to find universal flu vaccine

Scientists from The Scripps Research Institute and the Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson have found a way to induce antibodies to fight a wide range of influenza subtypes—work that could one day eliminate the need for repeated seasonal flu shots. [More]
Beta-blockers improve overall survival among epithelial ovarian cancer patients

Beta-blockers improve overall survival among epithelial ovarian cancer patients

In a first-of-its-kind study, researchers demonstrate a benefit in overall survival among epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) patients receiving generic heart medications known as beta-blockers. Survival was shown to be greatest among those prescribed first-generation nonselective beta-blockers. [More]
New ASU-POSTECH collaboration aims to discover biological molecules for health care, renewable energy research

New ASU-POSTECH collaboration aims to discover biological molecules for health care, renewable energy research

The Biodesign Institute at Arizona State University and Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), Pohang, South Korea, have announced a partnership that will catalyze discoveries with a major impact on health care and clean energy applications. [More]
Novel technique may lead to therapies for pain relief in individuals with intractable pain

Novel technique may lead to therapies for pain relief in individuals with intractable pain

A team of scientists at Kyoto University's Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences (iCeMS) has developed a novel technique using tiny gold rods to target pain receptors. [More]
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