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Fasudil improves memory in rats, promotes degradation of toxic tau in the eyes of fruit flies

Fasudil improves memory in rats, promotes degradation of toxic tau in the eyes of fruit flies

Could a kinase inhibitor some doctors prescribe to keep blood flowing after brain surgery be used to treat neurodegeneration? New research suggests it might be worth exploring the question. [More]
LMU researchers identify new drug target for atherosclerosis

LMU researchers identify new drug target for atherosclerosis

The enzyme Dicer processes RNA transcripts, cutting them into short segments that regulate the synthesis of specific proteins. An Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet in Munich team has shown that Dicer promotes the development of atherosclerosis, thus identifying a new drug target. [More]
Helpful protein can change genetic sequence of normal cells and make mutations that cause cancers

Helpful protein can change genetic sequence of normal cells and make mutations that cause cancers

Washington State University researchers have determined how a protein that helps cells fight viruses can also cause genetic mutations that lead to cancer. [More]
2D-NMR could be a powerful complementary technique for assessing biosimilarity of protein drugs

2D-NMR could be a powerful complementary technique for assessing biosimilarity of protein drugs

A first-ever interlaboratory study of four versions of a therapeutic protein drug—all manufactured from living cells—reports that an established analytical tool akin to magnetic resonance imaging reliably assessed the atomic structures of the biologically similar products, yielding the equivalent of a fingerprint for each. [More]
Muscle protein titin plays vital role in Frank-Starling mechanism

Muscle protein titin plays vital role in Frank-Starling mechanism

Researchers at Illinois Institute of Technology and Loyola University have discovered new clues in the 100-year-old mystery of the Frank-Starling law of the heart: What makes the heart contract more strongly at longer lengths given the same level of calcium activation? [More]
Simple change in diet could boost vitamin D levels for people suffering from Type 2 diabetes

Simple change in diet could boost vitamin D levels for people suffering from Type 2 diabetes

A simple change in diet could boost vitamin D levels for millions of Americans suffering from Type 2 diabetes, according to new research from Iowa State University published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. [More]
Researchers sequence genetic blueprint of Lyme-disease-spreading tick

Researchers sequence genetic blueprint of Lyme-disease-spreading tick

Researchers have sequenced the genetic blueprint of one of the most prolific pathogen-transmitting agents on the planet - the Lyme-disease-spreading tick (Ixodes scapularis) that bites humans. The findings could lead to advances in not only disrupting the tick's capacity to spread diseases but also in eradicating the pest. [More]
Penn investigators devise new method to map 'transcriptome'

Penn investigators devise new method to map 'transcriptome'

A new way of mapping the "transcriptome" -- the collection of RNA read-outs that are expressed by a cell's active genes -- has been devised by researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
Temple team describes use of cadaver DNA to advance genetics learning in medical curriculum

Temple team describes use of cadaver DNA to advance genetics learning in medical curriculum

Cadavers have long been one of the most important resources for anatomy teaching in medical school. Now, they are also at the forefront of cutting-edge genetics teaching, thanks to innovative thinking by professors at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University. [More]
Certain gene variants influence what we eat

Certain gene variants influence what we eat

If you're fat, can you blame it on your genes? The answer is a qualified yes. Maybe. Under certain circumstances. Researchers are moving towards a better understanding of some of the roots of obesity. [More]
New technique allows better understanding of cellular stress reaction

New technique allows better understanding of cellular stress reaction

Stress in the body's cells is both the cause and consequence of inflammatory diseases or cancer. The cells react to stress to protect themselves. Researchers at the University of Zurich have now developed a new technique that allows studying a fundamental response to stress in much more detail than previously possible: the ADP-ribosylation of chromatin. [More]
Study provides insights into molecular basis of Frank-Starling regulatory mechanism

Study provides insights into molecular basis of Frank-Starling regulatory mechanism

In a finding that could lead to new drugs to treat heart failure, researchers have uncovered the molecular mechanism that regulates how the heart pumps blood. [More]
New discovery takes medical professionals a leap forward to effectively diagnose Alzheimer's disease

New discovery takes medical professionals a leap forward to effectively diagnose Alzheimer's disease

Medical professionals have to conduct a long series of tests to assess a patient's memory impairment and cognitive skills, functional abilities, and behavioral changes to accurately diagnose Alzheimer's disease. They also have to execute costly brain imagining scans and even, sometimes, invasive cerebral spinal fluid tests to rule out other diseases. The process is laborious at best -- and subjective at worst. [More]
Experimental nanoparticle therapy shows promise for fighting primary liver cancer

Experimental nanoparticle therapy shows promise for fighting primary liver cancer

An experimental nanoparticle therapy that combines low-density lipoproteins (LDL) and fish oil preferentially kills primary liver cancer cells without harming healthy cells, UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers report. [More]
TBX5 gene expression could play key role in congenital heart disease

TBX5 gene expression could play key role in congenital heart disease

Congenital heart disease is the most common birth defect and the leading cause of all infant deaths in the United States. Mutations in the gene TBX5 have been shown to cause both rare and more prevalent forms of congenital heart disease, yet the underlying mechanisms have remained unclear. [More]
Study provides new insight into complex interchange that can raise blood levels of fat in type 1 diabetes

Study provides new insight into complex interchange that can raise blood levels of fat in type 1 diabetes

Researchers have new insight into the complex interchange that can raise blood levels of unhealthy lipids, or fat, in type 1 diabetes, and early evidence that a drug under study to block cancer cell growth can restore healthier levels. [More]
University of Oxford, SomaLogic partner to discover protein biomarkers for clinical diseases and conditions

University of Oxford, SomaLogic partner to discover protein biomarkers for clinical diseases and conditions

The University of Oxford and SomaLogic announced today that they have agreed to undertake a number of collaborative projects that will employ SomaLogic's proprietary SOMAmer reagents and SOMAscan assay technologies to discover and characterize protein biomarkers for a range of clinical diseases and conditions. [More]
High-speed acquisition of multi-wavelength fluorescence images: an interview with Jeremy Graham, Cairn Research

High-speed acquisition of multi-wavelength fluorescence images: an interview with Jeremy Graham, Cairn Research

On-chip Electron Multiplication is now a mature technology, which has allowed manufacturers to build cameras that are both fast and sensitive; ideal for live cell fluorescence imaging. [More]
FDA clears Sangamo BioSciences' SB-318 IND application for treatment of MPS I

FDA clears Sangamo BioSciences' SB-318 IND application for treatment of MPS I

Sangamo BioSciences, Inc., the leader in therapeutic genome editing, announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has cleared the Company's Investigational New Drug (IND) application for SB-318, a single treatment strategy intended to provide a life-long therapy for Mucopolysaccharidosis Type I (MPS I). [More]
Aggression influences new nerve cell production in the brain

Aggression influences new nerve cell production in the brain

A group of neurobiologists from Russia and the USA, including Dmitry Smagin, Tatyana Michurina, and Grigori Enikolopov from Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, have proven experimentally that aggression has an influence on the production of new nerve cells in the brain. [More]
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