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Home cooked food for young children not always better than readymade meals

Home cooked food for young children not always better than readymade meals

Home cooked meals specifically designed for infants and young children, are not always better than commercially available baby foods. [More]
New study reports significant increase in new metastatic prostate cancer cases

New study reports significant increase in new metastatic prostate cancer cases

The number of new cases of metastatic prostate cancer climbed 72 percent in the past decade from 2004 to 2013, reports a new Northwestern Medicine study. [More]
Study pinpoints how immune abnormalities in retina may lead to macular degeneration

Study pinpoints how immune abnormalities in retina may lead to macular degeneration

In a study published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, a University of Wisconsin-Madison research team pinpoints how immune abnormalities beneath the retina result in macular degeneration, a common condition that often causes blindness. [More]
Study reports BV therapy may be curative in some Hodgkin lymphoma patients

Study reports BV therapy may be curative in some Hodgkin lymphoma patients

Five-year survival data published online today in Blood, the Journal of the American Society of Hematology, suggest that the targeted therapy brentuximab vedotin may have cured some Hodgkin lymphoma patients whose disease has persisted despite receiving previous therapies. [More]
New subcutaneous treatment reduces pain, increases survival chances of breast cancer patients

New subcutaneous treatment reduces pain, increases survival chances of breast cancer patients

Breast cancer treatments are usually painful, time consuming and aggressive, which leads to long term hospitalization, medical staff and high economic expenses. [More]
Protein present on stem cell surface can boost growth of damaged muscle tissue

Protein present on stem cell surface can boost growth of damaged muscle tissue

Johns Hopkins University biologists have found that a protein that plays a key role in the lives of stem cells can bolster the growth of damaged muscle tissue, a step that could potentially contribute to treatments for muscle degeneration caused by old age and diseases such as muscular dystrophy. [More]
Researchers design inhibitory peptide to unleash defence mechanisms against fungal pathogens

Researchers design inhibitory peptide to unleash defence mechanisms against fungal pathogens

For most people, a simple case of thrush or athlete's foot can be quickly and easily treated using over-the-counter anti-fungal creams and pills. [More]
Soy-ghretropin protein increases ghrelin levels and improves appetite

Soy-ghretropin protein increases ghrelin levels and improves appetite

Researchers have discovered a protein that stimulates secretion of ghrelin, an appetite-stimulating hormone produced in the stomach. [More]
Scientists capture atomic level snapshots of how key enzyme modifies signaling proteins

Scientists capture atomic level snapshots of how key enzyme modifies signaling proteins

Scientists have captured atomic level snapshots showing how one key enzyme modifies a protein involved in turning genes on or off inside cells. Understanding this process-which is particularly important when cells are first taking on specialized identities such as nerve cells, muscle, skin, and so on-helps explain how complex organisms can arise from a finite number of genes. [More]
AMSBIO launches new CRISPR gRNA Lentivector Cloning Kits

AMSBIO launches new CRISPR gRNA Lentivector Cloning Kits

Anglo-American life science firm AMSBIO has introduced new CRISPR gRNA Lentivector Cloning Kits that provide scientists with a targeted and precise genomic gene editing methodology. [More]
Identifying new pathway of EZH2 gene may lead to targeted therapies for aggressive breast cancer

Identifying new pathway of EZH2 gene may lead to targeted therapies for aggressive breast cancer

Scientists from A*STAR's Genome Institute of Singapore and the Cancer Science Institute of Singapore at the National University of Singapore came together to understand how EZH2, a cancer-promoting gene which is known to be involved in many types of cancers, is activated in breast cancer and lymphomas. [More]
Scientists identify marker that subdivides insulin-producing beta cells of the pancreas

Scientists identify marker that subdivides insulin-producing beta cells of the pancreas

The marker Flattop subdivides the insulin-producing beta cells of the pancreas into those that maintain glucose metabolism and into immature cells that divide more frequently and adapt to metabolic changes. [More]
Novel biomarkers may offer solution for detecting autologous blood transfusion in athletes

Novel biomarkers may offer solution for detecting autologous blood transfusion in athletes

Increasing oxygen delivery to muscles can help athletes perform better and give them the edge needed to win elite competitions. One of the best ways to increase oxygen supply is through blood manipulation, undergoing a blood transfusion that provides extra red blood cells and boosts oxygen levels. [More]
Biologists develop new, faster method to calculate protein interactions

Biologists develop new, faster method to calculate protein interactions

Biologists and mathematicians from MIPT, Stony Brook University and other scientific research centres have taught a computer to predict the structure of protein complexes in a cell 10 times faster than before. [More]
HOPE study seeks to understand safety of vaginal ring in protecting women against HIV

HOPE study seeks to understand safety of vaginal ring in protecting women against HIV

Women who took part in ASPIRE, a trial that found a vaginal ring containing an antiretroviral (ARV) drug called dapivirine was safe and helped protect against HIV, will soon be offered the opportunity to use the ring as part of a new study called HOPE. [More]
New research shows how toxic Alzheimer's protein spreads through the brain

New research shows how toxic Alzheimer's protein spreads through the brain

A toxic Alzheimer's protein can spread through the brain--jumping from one neuron to another--via the extracellular space that surrounds the brain's neurons, suggests new research from Columbia University Medical Center. [More]
Soligenix announces encouraging preliminary results of heat stable Ebola vaccine

Soligenix announces encouraging preliminary results of heat stable Ebola vaccine

A biopharmaceutical company collaborating with Hawai'i scientists on an Ebola vaccine announced encouraging news about its vaccine today. [More]
Mutations in STN1 gene cause Coats plus syndrome

Mutations in STN1 gene cause Coats plus syndrome

A team of Israeli researchers has discovered that mutations in STN1, a gene that helps maintain the ends of chromosomes, cause the rare, inherited disorder Coats plus syndrome. [More]
Modifications to RUNX3 protein may promote cancer progression

Modifications to RUNX3 protein may promote cancer progression

Scientists from the Cancer Science Institute of Singapore at the National University of Singapore have discovered that modifications to a protein called RUNX3 may promote cancer progression. [More]
Scientists capture new images of calcium-shuttling molecule linked to aggressive cancers

Scientists capture new images of calcium-shuttling molecule linked to aggressive cancers

Scientists have captured new images of a calcium-shuttling molecule that has been linked to aggressive cancers. The three-dimensional structure could help researchers develop novel therapies and diagnostic tools for diseases that are caused by a malfunction in calcium adsorption. [More]
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