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Vasopressin more effective for cardiopulmonary resuscitation

Vasopressin more effective for cardiopulmonary resuscitation

Epinephrine has been shown to be a first-choice drug for cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Nevertheless, its β-adrenergic effect probably increases myocardial oxygen consumption and leads to severe cardiac and cerebral injuries; moreover, epinephrine does not elevate long-term survival rates. [More]
Specific foods and dietary patterns help prevent, control diabetes

Specific foods and dietary patterns help prevent, control diabetes

In a comprehensive review of recent randomized clinical trials and observational studies of diabetes and nutrition, Joslin Diabetes Center and Harvard School of Public Health investigators have identified specific foods and dietary patterns that are beneficial in preventing and controlling diabetes. [More]
CTC clusters cause metastasis

CTC clusters cause metastasis

Circulating tumor cell (CTC) clusters - clumps of from 2 to 50 tumor cells that break off a primary tumor and are carried through the bloodstream - appear to be much more likely to cause metastasis than are single CTCs, according to a study from investigators at the Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center. [More]
International consortium to accelerate collaborative multi-site trials of potential Ebola vaccine

International consortium to accelerate collaborative multi-site trials of potential Ebola vaccine

A candidate Ebola vaccine could be given to healthy volunteers in the UK, The Gambia and Mali as early as September, as part of an series of safety trials of potential vaccines aimed at preventing the disease that has killed more than 1,400 people in the current outbreak in West Africa. [More]
NIH to start initial human testing of investigational Ebola vaccine next week

NIH to start initial human testing of investigational Ebola vaccine next week

Initial human testing of an investigational vaccine to prevent Ebola virus disease will begin next week by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health. [More]
Changes in ADNP gene may provide further insight into causes of autism

Changes in ADNP gene may provide further insight into causes of autism

A new study from Bradley Hospital has identified a genetic change in a recently identified autism-associated gene, which may provide further insight into the causes of autism. The study, now published online in the Journal of Medical Genetics, presents findings that likely represent a definitive clinical marker for some patients' developmental disabilities. [More]
Minnesota researchers develop animal research model for FSHD

Minnesota researchers develop animal research model for FSHD

Researchers at the University of Minnesota have developed an animal research model for facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) to be used for muscle regeneration research as well as studies of the effectiveness of potential therapies for FSHD. [More]
Researchers develop potential antibody therapy for Sudan ebolavirus

Researchers develop potential antibody therapy for Sudan ebolavirus

Researchers from Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University and other institutions have developed a potential antibody therapy for Sudan ebolavirus (SUDV), one of the two most lethal strains of Ebola. [More]
School nurses reach 98% of students in U.S. public schools to diagnose primary immunodeficiency

School nurses reach 98% of students in U.S. public schools to diagnose primary immunodeficiency

School nurses reach 98 percent of the 50,000,000 students in U.S. public schools, grades k-12, and are uniquely positioned to facilitate the early diagnosis of serious medical conditions such as primary immunodeficiency (PI). [More]
Amgen seeks FDA approval for evolocumab to treat patients with high cholesterol

Amgen seeks FDA approval for evolocumab to treat patients with high cholesterol

Amgen today announced the submission of a Biologics License Application (BLA) to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for evolocumab seeking approval for the treatment of high cholesterol. [More]
Childhood inflammation linked to adult psychosis

Childhood inflammation linked to adult psychosis

Elevated levels of the inflammatory marker interleukin -6 in childhood are associated with an increased risk of psychosis and depression in adulthood, research shows. [More]
High PD-L1 expression linked to reduced survival in NSCLC

High PD-L1 expression linked to reduced survival in NSCLC

Overexpression of programmed death-ligand 1 is independently associated with the presence of epidermal growth factor receptor gene mutations and poor prognosis in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer, Japanese researchers report. [More]
Isis Pharmaceuticals begins ISIS-APOCIIIRx Phase 3 study in FCS patients

Isis Pharmaceuticals begins ISIS-APOCIIIRx Phase 3 study in FCS patients

Isis Pharmaceuticals, Inc. announced the initiation of a Phase 3 study evaluating ISIS-APOCIIIRx in patients with familial chylomicronemia syndrome (FCS). FCS is a rare orphan disease, characterized by extremely high triglyceride levels, that affects an estimated 3,000 to 5,000 patients worldwide. [More]
Scientists alter emotional associations of specific memories

Scientists alter emotional associations of specific memories

By manipulating neural circuits in the brain of mice, scientists have altered the emotional associations of specific memories. [More]
Study: Many HIV infected African-Americans may not be receiving effective doses of maraviroc drug

Study: Many HIV infected African-Americans may not be receiving effective doses of maraviroc drug

Many African-Americans may not be getting effective doses of the HIV drug maraviroc, a new study from Johns Hopkins suggests. The initial dosing studies, completed before the drug was licensed in 2007, included mostly European-Americans, who generally lack a protein that is key to removing maraviroc from the body. [More]
New MS treatment found safe, tolerable in phase I clinical trials

New MS treatment found safe, tolerable in phase I clinical trials

A new treatment under investigation for multiple sclerosis (MS) is safe and tolerable in phase I clinical trials, according to a study published August 27, 2014, in Neurology Neuroimmunology & Neuroinflammation, a new online-only, freely accessible, specialty medical journal. [More]
New UCLA study finds that oxidized lipids may also contribute to pulmonary hypertension

New UCLA study finds that oxidized lipids may also contribute to pulmonary hypertension

Oxidized lipids are known to play a key role in inflaming blood vessels and hardening arteries, which causes diseases like atherosclerosis. A new study at UCLA demonstrates that they may also contribute to pulmonary hypertension, a serious lung disease that narrows the small blood vessels in the lungs. [More]
Experimental drug shows promise as viable treatment for anemia of inflammation

Experimental drug shows promise as viable treatment for anemia of inflammation

An experimental drug designed to help regulate the blood's iron supply shows promise as a viable first treatment for anemia of inflammation, according to results from the first human study of the treatment published online today in Blood, the Journal of the American Society of Hematology. [More]
Researchers reveal how Listeria is able to survive antibiotics

Researchers reveal how Listeria is able to survive antibiotics

Listeria is a dreaded bacterium that can be found in both unprocessed and processed foods. Over the last few weeks, 28 persons in Denmark have been infected with Listeria from processed food, sold in supermarkets. 13 have died. [More]
HSP90 suggested as potential therapeutic target in PD

HSP90 suggested as potential therapeutic target in PD

Heat shock protein (HSP90) has been suggested to be involved in neuronal protein misfolding and accumulation in Parkinson's disease (PD) brains leading to dopaminergic neuronal death and the eventual dopamine depletion. [More]