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Researchers develop simple assay that reveals evolutionary relationships among various tumor sites within patient

Researchers develop simple assay that reveals evolutionary relationships among various tumor sites within patient

​The process of metastasis - a tumor's ability to spread to other parts of the body - is still poorly understood. It is not easy to determine whether metastasis began early or late in the development of the primary tumor or whether individual metastatic sites were seeded directly from the original tumor or from an intermediate site. [More]
Small gene embedded in large gene contributes to development of acute myeloid leukemia

Small gene embedded in large gene contributes to development of acute myeloid leukemia

A small gene that is embedded in a larger, well-known gene is the true leukemia-promoting force usually attributed to the larger gene, according to a new study by researchers at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute (OSUCCC - James). [More]

Sarepta Therapeutics plans to submit eteplirsen NDA for treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

Sarepta Therapeutics, Inc., a developer of innovative RNA-based therapeutics, today announced it plans to submit a New Drug Application (NDA) to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration by the end of 2014 for the approval of eteplirsen for the treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). [More]

BRI scientists receive grant to study new approach to blocking metastatic breast cancer

Benaroya Research Institute at Virginia Mason recently received a grant to research how blocking a particular molecule in metastatic breast cancer reduces both the growth of primary tumors and the number of lung metastases. [More]

Researchers unravel complex genetic coding that allows embryonic cells to proliferate, perform myriad biological tasks

Consider the marvel of the embryo. It begins as a glob of identical cells that change shape and function as they multiply to become the cells of our lungs, muscles, nerves and all the other specialized tissues of the body. [More]

Stanford researchers identify normal cell type that gives rise to most invasive bladder cancers

A single type of cell in the lining of the bladder is responsible for most cases of invasive bladder cancer, according to researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. [More]

Northwestern Medicine study provides new insights on tissue scarring in scleroderma

A discovery by Northwestern Medicine scientists could lead to potential new treatments for breaking the cycle of tissue scarring in people with scleroderma. [More]
Researchers devise new approach to treatment of Alzheimer's disease

Researchers devise new approach to treatment of Alzheimer's disease

A team of researchers from Columbia University Medical Center, Weill Cornell Medical College, and Brandeis University has devised a wholly new approach to the treatment of Alzheimer's disease involving the so-called retromer protein complex. Retromer plays a vital role in neurons, steering amyloid precursor protein (APP) away from a region of the cell where APP is cleaved, creating the potentially toxic byproduct amyloid-beta, which is thought to contribute to the development of Alzheimer's. [More]
U.Va. researchers named recipients of 2013 Hartwell Individual Biomedical Research Awards

U.Va. researchers named recipients of 2013 Hartwell Individual Biomedical Research Awards

University of Virginia neurologist Dr. Erin Pennock Foff, biologist Sarah Kucenas and biomedical engineer Shayn Peirce-Cotter have been named recipients of 2013 Hartwell Individual Biomedical Research Awards to benefit children of the United States. Each scientist will receive $100,000 in direct annual research support from The Hartwell Foundation for three years. [More]

Three Johns Hopkins researchers awarded grants for work on potential treatments for diabetes

Three Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine researchers have been awarded two-year grants for their work on potential treatments for diabetes, Novo Nordisk announced this month. Of the 110 initial submissions to the new Novo Nordisk Diabetes and Obesity Biologics Science Forum Program, only four projects were funded, three of which are led by Johns Hopkins researchers. They are Jonathan Powell, M.D., Ph.D.; G. William Wong, Ph.D.; and Elias Zambidis, M.D., Ph.D. [More]

Cyclenium Pharma signs drug discovery and development agreement with Southern Research Institute

Cyclenium Pharma Inc., an emerging pharmaceutical company specializing in the research and development of novel drug candidates based on proprietary macrocyclic chemistry, today announced the signing of a discovery and co-development agreement with Southern Research Institute, a not-for-profit 501(c)(3) scientific research organization founded in 1941. [More]

Global hemophilia market to grow at 6.07% CAGR by 2018

Research and Markets has announced the addition of the "Global Hemophilia Market 2014-2018" report to their offering. [More]

Drug used to treat TB may also act against various infections, says study

A drug under clinical trials to treat tuberculosis could be the basis for a class of broad-spectrum drugs that act against various bacteria, fungal infections and parasites, yet evade resistance, according to a study by University of Illinois chemists and collaborators. [More]

Engineering cell-based, biological devices may selectively kill cancer cells without disrupting healthy cells

​A Northwestern University synthetic biology team has created a new technology for modifying human cells to create programmable therapeutics that could travel the body and selectively target cancer and other sites of disease. [More]
B1/Cdk1 protein which plays key role in cell division also boosts power of mitochondrial activity

B1/Cdk1 protein which plays key role in cell division also boosts power of mitochondrial activity

​An international team led by researchers at UC Davis has shown that the cyclin B1/Cdk1 protein complex, which plays a key role in cell division, also boosts the mitochondrial activity to power that process. [More]

Princeton professor receives Agilent Thought Leader Award to research on cellular metabolism activity

Agilent Technologies Inc. today announced that Joshua Rabinowitz, M.D., Ph.D., professor at Princeton University's Department of Chemistry and the Lewis-Sigler Institute for Integrative Genomics, has received an Agilent Thought Leader Award to support his work on quantitative analysis of cellular metabolism. [More]

Research provides fresh insight into structure of sodium channels

Sodium channels are implicated in many serious conditions such as heart disease, epilepsy and pain, making them an important potential target for drug therapies. Unfortunately, there is still much scientists do not know about the molecules. [More]
Findings could revive use of chloroquine drug in treating, preventing mosquito-bourne disease

Findings could revive use of chloroquine drug in treating, preventing mosquito-bourne disease

An anti-malarial treatment that lost its status as the leading weapon against the deadly disease could be given a new lease of life, with new research indicating it simply needs to be administered differently. [More]

Nora Therapeutics closes $18M Series B financing to expand drug development

Nora Therapeutics, a biotechnology company focused on developing therapeutics to address unmet needs in reproductive medicine, today announced the closing of an $18 million Series B financing. [More]
Study provides better understanding of intestinal pathologies associated with inherited, infectious diseases

Study provides better understanding of intestinal pathologies associated with inherited, infectious diseases

The "brush border" - a densely packed array of finger-like projections called microvilli - covers the surfaces of the cells that line our intestines. [More]