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Scientists find link between makeup of individual's microbiome and head and neck cancer

Scientists find link between makeup of individual's microbiome and head and neck cancer

In a sample study, researchers at Johns Hopkins say they have found an association between the makeup of an individual's microbiome and head and neck cancer, a finding that potentially advances the quest for faster and more accurate cancer diagnosis and therapy. [More]
Laundry pods more likely to cause poisoning injuries in small children than nonpod detergents

Laundry pods more likely to cause poisoning injuries in small children than nonpod detergents

Laundry pod detergents are far more likely to cause poisoning injuries in young children than are nonpod laundry detergents, and are four times more likely to lead to hospitalization, according to findings published today from researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. [More]
LGB adults experience higher rates of distress, impaired physical health than heterosexuals

LGB adults experience higher rates of distress, impaired physical health than heterosexuals

In one of the largest, most representative health surveys conducted to date, lesbian, gay and bisexual adults reported substantially higher rates of severe psychological distress, heavy drinking and smoking, and impaired physical health than did heterosexuals. [More]
Genomic techniques help scientists understand diversity of P.vivax parasites

Genomic techniques help scientists understand diversity of P.vivax parasites

While most malaria research has focused on the parasite Plasmodium falciparum, which is common in Africa, another parasite, Plasmodium vivax (P.vivax) is responsible for the majority of malaria infections outside this region, causing an estimated 15.8 million clinical malaria cases each year. [More]
Blood levels of omega-3s fatty acids linked to lower risk of deadly heart attacks

Blood levels of omega-3s fatty acids linked to lower risk of deadly heart attacks

Blood levels of seafood and plant-based omega-3 fatty acids are moderately associated with a lower risk of dying from heart attacks, according to a new epidemiological study, published today in JAMA Internal Medicine, led by Liana C. Del Gobbo, Ph.D., a postdoctoral research fellow in the division of cardiovascular medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine and senior author Dariush Mozaffarian, M.D., Dr.P.H., dean of the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University in Boston. [More]
Study shows increase in costs of hospitalization for people with private insurance

Study shows increase in costs of hospitalization for people with private insurance

Even if you have what you might think of as good health insurance, your next hospital stay could cost you more than $1,000 out of your own pocket. [More]
Survey finds regular sports drinks consumption among children

Survey finds regular sports drinks consumption among children

A high proportion of 12-14 year olds are regularly consuming sports drinks socially, increasing their risk of obesity and tooth erosion, concludes a Cardiff University School of Dentistry survey. [More]
Neural features can help predict initiation of adolescent alcohol use

Neural features can help predict initiation of adolescent alcohol use

Underage drinking is a major public health and social problem in the U.S. The ability to identify at-risk children before they initiate heavy alcohol use has immense clinical and public health implications. [More]
Researchers to explore how Zika virus enters human cells

Researchers to explore how Zika virus enters human cells

A group of Western Illinois University student and faculty researchers are spending the summer conducting surveillance of tick-borne diseases and mosquito-borne arboviruses in regional counties. [More]
Cardiologist Emelia Benjamin receives AHA 2016 Gold Heart Award

Cardiologist Emelia Benjamin receives AHA 2016 Gold Heart Award

Emelia J. Benjamin, MD, ScM, FACC, FAHA, professor of medicine in the section of cardiovascular medicine at Boston University School of Medicine, is the recipient of the American Heart Association's 2016 Gold Heart Award. [More]
Primary care visits lead to more screenings and follow-up colonoscopies

Primary care visits lead to more screenings and follow-up colonoscopies

People who visit their primary care physicians are more likely to get potentially life-saving colon cancer screenings and follow up on abnormal stool blood test results - even in health systems that heavily promote mail-in home stool blood tests that don't require a doctor visit, a study involving UT Southwestern population health researchers shows. [More]
Race impacts adverse outcomes in atrial fibrillation

Race impacts adverse outcomes in atrial fibrillation

Black individuals with atrial fibrillation have markedly higher rates of stroke, heart failure, coronary heart disease and mortality than their White counterparts, data from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study show. [More]
WHO violated sound standards of TB medical care, researchers say

WHO violated sound standards of TB medical care, researchers say

The World Health Organization (WHO) violated sound standards of medical care and human rights by nudging poorer countries to follow less expensive, untested and largely ineffective treatment protocols for tuberculosis patients, a new paper by researchers at Duke, Brandeis and Harvard universities argues. [More]
Regular park visits for 30 minutes may help prevent high blood pressure and mental health problems

Regular park visits for 30 minutes may help prevent high blood pressure and mental health problems

People who visit parks for 30 minutes or more each week are much less likely to have high blood pressure or poor mental health than those who don't, according to new research by Australian and UK environmental scientists. [More]
Research shows enveloped viruses could survive on toys long enough to cause infection

Research shows enveloped viruses could survive on toys long enough to cause infection

Certain viruses, such as influenza, could survive on children's toys long enough to result in exposures, placing children at risk for getting infectious diseases, according to researchers at Georgia State University. [More]
KARMA study confirms resistance to anti-malarial drugs confined to Southeast Asia

KARMA study confirms resistance to anti-malarial drugs confined to Southeast Asia

The first global mapping of artemisinin resistance has definitively confirmed that resistance to the main drug currently used in the treatment of Plasmodium falciparum malaria is for the moment confined to Southeast Asia and has not spread to sub-Saharan Africa. [More]

Increase in EPA/DHA omega-3 intake linked to lower risk of all-cause mortality

A recent meta-analysis in Scientific Reports supports a link between EPA and DHA omega-3 intake and a reduced risk of death by any cause. The meta-analysis included 11 studies involving 371,965 participants and 31,185 death events, with a subset of the studies being used for different analyses. [More]
Study finds dramatic increase in nonmedical use of prescription opioids in the U.S.

Study finds dramatic increase in nonmedical use of prescription opioids in the U.S.

Nonmedical use of prescription opioids more than doubled among adults in the United States from 2001-2002 to 2012-2013, based on a study from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, part of the National Institutes of Health. Nearly 10 million Americans, or 4.1 percent of the adult population, used opioid medications in 2012-2013 a class of drugs that includes OxyContin and Vicodin, without a prescription or not as prescribed (in greater amounts, more often, or longer than prescribed) in the past year. [More]
Major review highlights lack of genetic understanding of Zika virus

Major review highlights lack of genetic understanding of Zika virus

A major review of the Zika virus has concluded that further research to understand the nature of the virus is critical to developing antiviral treatments and vaccines.The paper, published in the journal Veterinary Quarterly, considers the breadth of current research and highlights a lack of understanding of the nature of the virus. [More]
Adherence to cancer prevention guidelines on diet and physical activity may reduce disease incidence

Adherence to cancer prevention guidelines on diet and physical activity may reduce disease incidence

"Behaviors such as poor diet choices, physical inactivity, excess alcohol consumption and unhealthy body weight could account for more than 20 percent of cancer cases, and could, therefore, be prevented with lifestyle modifications," Kohler said, adding that when tobacco exposure is considered, these modifiable issues are believed to be factors in two-thirds of U.S. cancer deaths. [More]
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