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New study tracks developmental differences between late preterm babies and full term infants

New study tracks developmental differences between late preterm babies and full term infants

Developmental differences in babies born 4 to 6 weeks early may not show up until after they turn two, a new study suggests. [More]
Suicide mortality rate among people with epilepsy higher than general population, study shows

Suicide mortality rate among people with epilepsy higher than general population, study shows

Researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health and the Centers for Disease Control studied the prevalence of suicide among people with epilepsy compared to the population overall and estimated that the annual suicide mortality rate among those with epilepsy was 22 percent higher than in the general population. Results are online in the journal Epilepsy and Behavior. [More]
Global standards for vaping products need to be harmonised to promote innovation

Global standards for vaping products need to be harmonised to promote innovation

Against a backdrop of a growing number of e-cigarette users globally, British American Tobacco is leading efforts to develop and harmonise standards around vaping products to further reassure consumers of these products potential in reducing the harm from smoking. [More]
Combinations of three antibiotics could help combat drug-resistant bacterial infections

Combinations of three antibiotics could help combat drug-resistant bacterial infections

Each year, approximately 700,000 people die from drug-resistant bacterial infections. A study by UCLA life scientists could be a major step toward combating drug-resistant infections. [More]
Study highlights need to deepen health reforms in China

Study highlights need to deepen health reforms in China

China needs to further reform its health system with a number of critical steps to meet the growing health needs of the population and further control spending increases, despite impressive achievements in healthcare reform and rapid progress toward universal health coverage. [More]
New neuroprotective compounds may prevent development of epilepsy

New neuroprotective compounds may prevent development of epilepsy

A team led by Nicolas Bazan, MD, PhD, Boyd Professor and Director of LSU Health New Orleans' Neuroscience Center of Excellence, has developed neuroprotective compounds that may prevent the development of epilepsy. [More]
UTMB scientists find link between Aedes aegypti mosquito and  Zika virus transmission

UTMB scientists find link between Aedes aegypti mosquito and Zika virus transmission

In collaboration with colleagues from Mexico, University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston researchers were the first to directly connect the Aedes aegypti mosquito with Zika transmission in the Americas, during an outbreak in southern Mexico. [More]
New study reports strains of chimpanzee-carried SIVs can infect human cells

New study reports strains of chimpanzee-carried SIVs can infect human cells

No one knows exactly how it happened. It may have entered through a cut or bite wound, the blood of a chimpanzee seeping into an exposed fingertip or forearm or foot. [More]
Adults with pain could be at higher risk of developing prescription opioid use disorders

Adults with pain could be at higher risk of developing prescription opioid use disorders

What do we really know about the relationship between the experience of pain and risk of developing opioid use disorder? Results from a recent study - the first to directly address this question -- show that people with moderate or more severe pain had a 41 percent higher risk of developing prescription opioid use disorders than those without, independent of other demographic and clinical factors. [More]
Study finds no significant decline in indoor tanning use among school children after under-17 ban

Study finds no significant decline in indoor tanning use among school children after under-17 ban

Research from Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey and Rutgers School of Public Health shows no significant decline in indoor tanning rates among children under age 17 following a ban on such use in New Jersey enacted in 2013. [More]
New report urges policy makers to act against excessive energy drinks consumption by children, teenagers

New report urges policy makers to act against excessive energy drinks consumption by children, teenagers

UK policy makers must act against excessive energy drinks consumption by children and young people, argues a new report published by the Food Research Collaboration, an initiative of the Centre for Food Policy. [More]
New SACN guidelines recommend daily 10 micrograms intake of Vitamin D

New SACN guidelines recommend daily 10 micrograms intake of Vitamin D

The Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition (SACN) has published a report advising that anybody aged over one year should have a vitamin D intake of 10 micrograms a day throughout the year. [More]
Adding new monoclonal antibody to chemotherapy improves survival in soft-tissue sarcoma patients

Adding new monoclonal antibody to chemotherapy improves survival in soft-tissue sarcoma patients

Adding a novel monoclonal antibody therapy to traditional chemotherapy increased median survival by nearly a year in patients with advanced sarcoma, a lethal soft-tissue cancer. [More]
UC Riverside investigators to study impact of drought on public health

UC Riverside investigators to study impact of drought on public health

Drought and extreme temperatures continue to challenge policymakers in California and globally who grapple with managing limited water resources. [More]
Study explores positive aspects of physicians' attitudes towards patients

Study explores positive aspects of physicians' attitudes towards patients

Physicians like the majority of their patients, but a majority like some more than others, a study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health finds. [More]
JAIDS presents important information to prevent HIV epidemic among transgender individuals

JAIDS presents important information to prevent HIV epidemic among transgender individuals

Programs to reduce the high risk of HIV infection among transgender people are urgently needed—but efforts are hindered by a lack of accurate information on HIV prevalence, HIV incidence, and specific risk factors facing this key population. [More]
Study confirms efficacy of PrEP in reducing risk of HIV infection in men who have sex with men

Study confirms efficacy of PrEP in reducing risk of HIV infection in men who have sex with men

The last phase of ANRS IPERGAY has confirmed that "on-demand" pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is a highly effective method of reducing the risk of HIV infection in men who have sex with men and who report high-risk behavior. [More]
Researchers say sale of menthol-like cigarettes violates spirit of new laws in Canada

Researchers say sale of menthol-like cigarettes violates spirit of new laws in Canada

Despite a recent ban on the sale of menthol cigarettes in the Canadian provinces of Alberta and Nova Scotia, cigarettes made with similar coloring and marketed as having the same taste are still being sold, new research from the Institute for Global Tobacco Control at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health suggests. [More]
New HIV infections stagnating globally at 2.5 million per year, study reveals

New HIV infections stagnating globally at 2.5 million per year, study reveals

A major new analysis from the Global Burden of Disease 2015 study, published today in The Lancet HIV journal, reveals that although deaths from HIV/AIDS have been steadily declining from a peak in 2005, 2.5 million people worldwide became newly infected with HIV in 2015, a number that hasn't changed substantially in the past 10 years. [More]
Researchers find dangerous antibiotic-resistant bacteria in wastewater from broken sewer lines

Researchers find dangerous antibiotic-resistant bacteria in wastewater from broken sewer lines

University of South Florida researchers investigating the aftermath of a September, 2014 sewer line break in St. Petersburg, Florida, have found dangerous antibiotic-resistant bacteria in the untreated wastewater that gushed into neighborhoods and into Boca Ciega Bay at a rate of 250 to 500 gallons per minute. [More]
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