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Researchers find that same desire for intimacy is strong predictor for PrEp HIV prevention

Researchers find that same desire for intimacy is strong predictor for PrEp HIV prevention

Men in steady same-sex relationships where both partners are HIV negative will often forgo condoms out of a desire to preserve intimacy, even if they also have sex outside the relationship. [More]
Study measures quality indicators in cardiac rehabilitation programs across Canada

Study measures quality indicators in cardiac rehabilitation programs across Canada

The quality of cardiac rehabilitation programs across Canada is strong, with specific criteria areas now identified as requiring further enhancement to improve patient outcomes, according to a new study conducted by researchers at the Peter Munk Cardiac Centre, York University and UHN. [More]
Study examines national impact of newborn screening test for SCID

Study examines national impact of newborn screening test for SCID

Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), a potentially life-threatening, but treatable, disorder affecting infants, is twice as common as previously believed, according to a new study that is the first to examine the national impact of this newborn screening test. [More]
Women could benefit from Affordable Care Act's mandate for contraceptive coverage

Women could benefit from Affordable Care Act's mandate for contraceptive coverage

Women could benefit greatly from the Affordable Care Act's mandate for contraceptive coverage, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers. [More]
Study helps explain why sleep becomes more fragmented with age

Study helps explain why sleep becomes more fragmented with age

As people grow older, they often have difficulty falling asleep and staying asleep, and tend to awaken too early in the morning. [More]
Death rate increases with hospitals shift from inpatient procedures to outpatient for urological surgeries

Death rate increases with hospitals shift from inpatient procedures to outpatient for urological surgeries

As hospitals have shifted an array of common urological surgeries from inpatient procedures to outpatient, potentially preventable deaths have increased following complications. [More]
Springer launches new book series, Healthy Aging and Longevity

Springer launches new book series, Healthy Aging and Longevity

As the longevity of the world's population continues to increase, the challenges accompanying this become more complex and touch nearly every aspect of society. Springer has therefore launched a new book series, Healthy Aging and Longevity, to address issues related to this achievement. [More]
Johns Hopkins Center for Injury Research and Policy gets $4M grant from CDC

Johns Hopkins Center for Injury Research and Policy gets $4M grant from CDC

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has awarded $4 million to the Johns Hopkins Center for Injury Research and Policy at the Bloomberg School of Public Health to help the Center continue its mission of making discoveries that save lives and reduce costs due to injuries. [More]
New study highlights the need for evidence-based sexual and reproductive health education

New study highlights the need for evidence-based sexual and reproductive health education

A new national survey reveals that the political divide among red-versus-blue states does not support the hypothesis that knowledge about abortion and health is shaped by the state in which one lives. [More]
Violent video games can cause depression in children, new study finds

Violent video games can cause depression in children, new study finds

While much attention has focused on the link between violent video game playing and aggression among youths, a new study finds significantly increased signs of depression among preteens with high daily exposure to violent video games. [More]
Actavis reports positive results from ceftazidime-avibactam Phase III studies in cIAI patients

Actavis reports positive results from ceftazidime-avibactam Phase III studies in cIAI patients

Actavis plc today confirmed positive topline results from RECLAIM-1 and -2, pivotal Phase III studies evaluating the potential for the investigational antibiotic, ceftazidime-avibactam as a treatment for adult hospitalized patients with complicated intra-abdominal infections. [More]
People's educational attainment influences level of physical activity

People's educational attainment influences level of physical activity

People's educational attainment influences their level of physical activity both during the week and on weekends, according to a study whose authors include two University of Kansas researchers. [More]
Some mothers-to-be opt out of getting flu vaccine despite recommendations from physicians

Some mothers-to-be opt out of getting flu vaccine despite recommendations from physicians

Both mother and fetus are at increased risk for complications of flu infection during pregnancy. And prenatal care providers say they're advising women to get the flu vaccine, in line with recommendations from various organizations. But many pregnant women don't understand the importance of this advice-and don't get the vaccine. [More]
Experts provide useful recommendations for research on suicide prevention

Experts provide useful recommendations for research on suicide prevention

In a new supplement to the September issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, experts address the state of the science on suicide prevention and provide useful recommendations for research to inform effective suicide prevention. [More]
Natural killer cells can be used to combat acute lymphoblastic leukemia

Natural killer cells can be used to combat acute lymphoblastic leukemia

Researchers at Children's Hospital Los Angeles have shown that a select team of immune-system cells from patients with leukemia can be multiplied in the lab, creating an army of natural killer cells that can be used to destroy the cancer cells. [More]
Mount Sinai researchers receive federal funding to treat HCV in primary care settings

Mount Sinai researchers receive federal funding to treat HCV in primary care settings

With the number of people with chronic hepatitis C reaching record levels in New York City and the recent availability of more effective treatments, researchers from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai recently announced the receipt of $1.9 million in federal funding to increase its capacity to treat HCV in primary care settings. [More]
Research findings call for clinical testing of relevant drugs to prevent NASH

Research findings call for clinical testing of relevant drugs to prevent NASH

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a common affliction, affecting almost 30 percent of Americans, with a significant number suffering from its most severe form, called non-alcoholic steatohepatitis or NASH, which can lead to cirrhosis and liver cancer. In recent years, NASH has become the leading cause of liver transplantation. [More]
Communications about the benefits of vaccination influence parents' intentions to immunize children

Communications about the benefits of vaccination influence parents' intentions to immunize children

How do parents decide whether to vaccinate their child? In a study designed to formally look at the content of parent-targeted communications about the benefits of vaccination for measles, mumps and rubella, Indiana University School of Medicine investigators report that the framing of these messages influences parents' intentions to immunize their children. [More]
Chronic musculoskeletal pain influenced by genetics

Chronic musculoskeletal pain influenced by genetics

Children of parents with chronic musculoskeletal pain are at increased risk of also suffering from such pain as adults, a large family-linkage study shows. [More]
Patients who rely on pacemakers and defibrillators run risk of serious health complications

Patients who rely on pacemakers and defibrillators run risk of serious health complications

Patients who rely on pacemakers and defibrillators to maintain a normal heart rhythm run the risk of serious health complications if they don't fully understand how the devices work and what to do when they experience an irregular heartbeat. [More]