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Handful of nut consumption each day linked to reduced risk for wide range of diseases

Handful of nut consumption each day linked to reduced risk for wide range of diseases

A large analysis of current research shows that people who eat at least 20g of nuts a day have a lower risk of heart disease, cancer and other diseases. [More]
Surveys reveal exceptional progress against HIV in Africa

Surveys reveal exceptional progress against HIV in Africa

National surveys in Zimbabwe, Malawi, and Zambia reveal exceptional progress against HIV, with decreasing rates of new infection, stable numbers of people living with HIV, and more than half of all those living with HIV showing viral suppression through use of antiretroviral medication. For those on antiretroviral medication, viral suppression is close to 90 percent. [More]
Auditory deficits in people with schizophrenia linked to dysfunctional brain receptors

Auditory deficits in people with schizophrenia linked to dysfunctional brain receptors

The inability to hear subtle changes in pitch, a common and debilitating problem for people with schizophrenia, is due to dysfunctional N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) brain receptors, according to a study by Columbia University Medical Center researchers. [More]
Customized tablet-based tool can help epilepsy patients to manage own unique symptoms

Customized tablet-based tool can help epilepsy patients to manage own unique symptoms

Epilepsy patients who want to learn how to manage their own unique symptoms can now get individualized information via tablet computer through a research project at the University of Illinois at Chicago. [More]
New drug receives FDA approval to reduce risk of cardiovascular death in adults with diabetes

New drug receives FDA approval to reduce risk of cardiovascular death in adults with diabetes

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved a new indication for Jardiance (empagliflozin) to reduce the risk of cardiovascular death in adult patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease. [More]
NYU study finds cortisol profile differences among sexual minority men

NYU study finds cortisol profile differences among sexual minority men

Cortisol is a life sustaining adrenal hormone essential to maintaining the natural balance of the body. [More]
Latina women with breast cancer likely to experience many gaps in survivorship care, research suggests

Latina women with breast cancer likely to experience many gaps in survivorship care, research suggests

Breast cancer patients in one of the United States' largest and fastest-growing ethnic minority groups are likely to experience numerous gaps in care following their primary treatment, research from Oregon State University suggests. [More]
Research shows link between psychological well-being and physical activity in older adults

Research shows link between psychological well-being and physical activity in older adults

In a paper just published by researchers at Chapman University, findings showed associations between psychological well-being and physical activity in adults ages 50 and older. [More]
Antidepressant use in early pregnancy may increase risk of congenital anomalies in babies or stillbirths

Antidepressant use in early pregnancy may increase risk of congenital anomalies in babies or stillbirths

Academics at Swansea University have carried out a dose-response analysis which suggests that pregnant women who take a specific type of antidepressant in early pregnancy have a small but significantly greater risk of having babies with major congenital anomalies (sometimes referred to as birth defects) or stillbirths compared with those who did not take these antidepressants. [More]
Short-term sleep loss affects cardiac function

Short-term sleep loss affects cardiac function

Too little sleep takes a toll on your heart, according to a new study to be presented today at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America. [More]
‘Nudges’ could be effective way for encouraging patients to complete health care programs

‘Nudges’ could be effective way for encouraging patients to complete health care programs

Keeping messages brief and simple can produce gains when trying to encourage patients to complete a health care program, says research co-written by a University of Illinois expert in social psychology. [More]
NSF awards grant to advance new diagnostic test for fatal gastrointestinal disease in pre-term infants

NSF awards grant to advance new diagnostic test for fatal gastrointestinal disease in pre-term infants

The National Science Foundation has chosen an LSU Health New Orleans team that developed a test for the early detection of a potentially life-threatening gastrointestinal disease affecting pre-term, low birthweight babies to receive expert guidance to move the technology forward. [More]
Overweight adolescents with bipolar disorder show signs of increased illness severity, study finds

Overweight adolescents with bipolar disorder show signs of increased illness severity, study finds

Bipolar disorder is one of the most disabling medical conditions among adolescents worldwide. Similarly, being overweight or obese is common in adolescents and is known to confer risk for cardiovascular disease and other poor health outcomes in adulthood. [More]
UA awarded $1.5 million funding for long-term study of cancer in firefighters

UA awarded $1.5 million funding for long-term study of cancer in firefighters

Researchers at the University of Arizona Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health will lead a collaborative project to develop the framework for a larger long-term study of cancer in firefighters. [More]
New global network to explore link between genes and environmental factors to tackle health challenges

New global network to explore link between genes and environmental factors to tackle health challenges

A new global network linking leading research centres across the world has launched today to tackle some of the most pressing global health challenges of our time such as autism, cancer, diabetes and dementia. [More]
MDR-TB infection rates higher among migrants than general population, study finds

MDR-TB infection rates higher among migrants than general population, study finds

Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is widespread globally with almost half a million cases documented in 2014. [More]
First licensed vaccine could reduce burden in regions with high-levels of dengue infection

First licensed vaccine could reduce burden in regions with high-levels of dengue infection

The first licensed vaccine for the potentially life-threatening dengue virus should only be used in moderate-to high impacted regions, new research has predicted. [More]
New computer model provides neighborhood-level forecasts of influenza outbreaks

New computer model provides neighborhood-level forecasts of influenza outbreaks

Scientists at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health developed a computer model to predict the onset, duration, and magnitude of influenza outbreaks for New York City boroughs and neighborhoods. [More]
Targeted approach may improve recovery after concussion, experts say

Targeted approach may improve recovery after concussion, experts say

Prescribed rest—both physical and mental—is the standard treatment for concussion. But a growing body of evidence suggests that a more active, targeted approach might provide better outcomes for some patients, reports a special article in the December issue of Neurosurgery, official journal of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons. [More]
Zika virus can cause glaucoma in infants, report reveals

Zika virus can cause glaucoma in infants, report reveals

A team of researchers in Brazil and at the Yale School of Public Health has published the first report demonstrating that the Zika virus can cause glaucoma in infants who were exposed to the virus during gestation. [More]
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