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School-based obesity prevention efforts may influence weight status of parents

School-based obesity prevention efforts may influence weight status of parents

Parents of children involved in an elementary school-based community intervention to prevent obesity appear to share in its health benefits. A new analysis of Shape Up Somerville: Eat Smart Play Hard shows an association between being exposed to the intervention as a parent and a modest decrease in body mass index (BMI) compared to parents in two similar control communities. [More]
Shriners Hospitals for Children-Chicago, UI Health to provide specialized pediatric medical services

Shriners Hospitals for Children-Chicago, UI Health to provide specialized pediatric medical services

Shriners Hospitals for Children-Chicago and the University of Illinois Hospital & Health Sciences System have signed an affiliation agreement to enhance their existing partnership and provide expanded pediatric specialty medical services to their patients. [More]
Gene variations predispose mestizo Mexican population to develop severe form of COPD

Gene variations predispose mestizo Mexican population to develop severe form of COPD

A study by Ramcés Falfán-Valencia, researcher at the National Institute of Respiratory Diseases, found that the mestizo Mexican population has a number of variations in certain genes that predispose them to develop the most severe form of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). [More]
LSTM emerges high on academic rankings

LSTM emerges high on academic rankings

Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine is emerging high on the academic rankings under its own name following the designation of Higher Education Institutions status earlier in 2013. [More]
Findings show effective treatment for type 1 diabetes patients with severe hypoglycemia

Findings show effective treatment for type 1 diabetes patients with severe hypoglycemia

Type 1 diabetes (T1D) patients who have developed low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) as a complication of insulin treatments over time are able to regain normal internal recognition of the condition after receiving pancreatic islet cell transplantation, according to a new study led by researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, published online in Diabetes. [More]
New study highlights importance of generating awareness about HCV testing, support and care

New study highlights importance of generating awareness about HCV testing, support and care

A new study shows that many patients infected with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) are lost during different stages of health care to manage the disease. This real-life' view of the HCV patient care continuum in a major U.S. urban area is published in Hepatology, a journal of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, and highlights the importance of generating awareness among clinicians and at-risk groups about appropriate HCV testing, referral, support and care. [More]
Columbia University researchers analyze results of Oregon Health Experiment

Columbia University researchers analyze results of Oregon Health Experiment

Researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health analyzed the results of the Oregon Health Experiment, where eligible uninsured individuals were randomly assigned Medicaid or to stay with their current care. Considered controversial because the experiment found no measurable gains for physical health it did reveal benefits for mental health, financial wellbeing, and preventive screening. [More]
Maternal exposure to fine particulate air pollution contributes to autism risk

Maternal exposure to fine particulate air pollution contributes to autism risk

Women exposed to high levels of fine particulate matter specifically during pregnancy--particularly during the third trimester--may face up to twice the risk of having a child with autism than mothers living in areas with low particulate matter, according to a new study from Harvard School of Public Health. [More]
Study offers insights into mechanisms of bacterial resistance to antimicrobial peptides

Study offers insights into mechanisms of bacterial resistance to antimicrobial peptides

Antimicrobial peptides are a distinctive class of potent, broad-spectrum antibiotics produced by the body's innate immune system--the first line of defense against disease-causing microbes. [More]
R. Geigy Foundation recognizes scientific endeavours in neglected disease research, public health

R. Geigy Foundation recognizes scientific endeavours in neglected disease research, public health

The R. Geigy Foundation honours two scientific endeavours in neglected disease research and public health. It confers the R. Geigy Award (10'000 CHF) to the Laotian scientists Somphou Sayasone and the Jubilee Award (70'000) to the project "Connecting the Dots" proposed by the Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute. [More]
COUNTDOWN research consortium focuses on neglected tropical diseases

COUNTDOWN research consortium focuses on neglected tropical diseases

The COUNTDOWN research consortium has been launched today following a £7 million grant allocation from the UK Department for International Development earlier in the year. [More]
UC Davis study finds that firearm suicides on the rise among whites

UC Davis study finds that firearm suicides on the rise among whites

While the overall death rate from firearm violence has remained unchanged for more than a decade, the patterns for suicide and homicide have changed dramatically, a UC Davis study on the epidemiology of gun violence from 2003 to 2012 has found. [More]
Research outlines new model for measuring acceptability of contraceptive vaginal ring

Research outlines new model for measuring acceptability of contraceptive vaginal ring

The Population Council published new research in the November issue of the journal Contraception demonstrating that an investigational one-year contraceptive vaginal ring containing Nestorone and ethinyl estradiol was found to be highly acceptable among women enrolled in a Phase 3 clinical trial. [More]
Health promotion program reduces cardiovascular risk in obese people with serious mental illness

Health promotion program reduces cardiovascular risk in obese people with serious mental illness

A health promotion program, called In SHAPE, specifically designed for people with serious mental illness, produced more fit participants and significant weight loss than a control group where participants only received a gym membership. [More]
More open discussions needed when referring patients for cancer investigation, study says

More open discussions needed when referring patients for cancer investigation, study says

GPs should consider a more overt discussion with patients when referring them for further investigation of symptoms which may indicate cancer, according to a paper published in the British Journal of General Practice. [More]
Diabetes drug can boost efficacy of TB medication without causing drug resistance

Diabetes drug can boost efficacy of TB medication without causing drug resistance

A more effective treatment for tuberculosis (TB) could soon be available as scientists have discovered that Metformin (MET), a drug for treating diabetes, can also be used to boost the efficacy of TB medication without inducing drug resistance. [More]
Researchers identify 53 existing drugs that may block Ebola virus from entering human cells

Researchers identify 53 existing drugs that may block Ebola virus from entering human cells

Researchers found 53 existing drugs that may keep the Ebola virus from entering human cells, a key step in the process of infection, according to a study led by researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and the National Institutes of Health, and published today in the Nature Press journal Emerging Microbes and Infections. [More]
Bacterial biofilms may increase colon cancer risk

Bacterial biofilms may increase colon cancer risk

Researchers from Johns Hopkins have found that dense mats of interacting bacteria, called biofilms, were present in the majority of cancers and polyps, particularly those on the right side of the colon. The presence of these bacterial bunches, they say, may represent an increased risk for colon cancer and could form the basis of new diagnostic tests. [More]
New intervention combines social media with behavioral psychology to encourage more HIV testing

New intervention combines social media with behavioral psychology to encourage more HIV testing

Social media such as Twitter and Facebook can be valuable in the fight against HIV in the United States, where research has demonstrated they can prompt high-risk populations to request at-home testing kits for the virus that causes AIDS, suggesting a way to potentially boost testing rates. [More]
Researchers explore lifespan variability between races

Researchers explore lifespan variability between races

Eliminating health disparities between races is a goal of many groups and organizations, but a team of sociologists suggests that finding the reasons for the differences in the timing of black and white deaths may be trickier than once thought. [More]