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New hope for patients suffering from most severe forms of anorexia nervosa

New hope for patients suffering from most severe forms of anorexia nervosa

Anorexia Nervosa has the highest mortality rate of any mental illness. In its most severe form, victims face a devastating 4,500% increased risk for death. In the wake of the recent national attention on the limited treatment options available for these extreme cases, it is important for sufferers to know that help is available. [More]

DIR and CDPH awarded NIOSH grant for workers' compensation research project

The Department of Industrial Relations and the California Department of Public Health were this week awarded a grant of nearly $200,000 per year for a workers' compensation research project from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. [More]
Phages in chicken meat can transfer antimicrobial resistance to bacteria

Phages in chicken meat can transfer antimicrobial resistance to bacteria

Bacteria resistant to antibiotics are on the rise. There are different explanations for how resistances are transferred. Researchers from the Vetmeduni Vienna found phages in chicken meat that are able to transfer antimicrobial resistance to bacteria. Phages are viruses that exclusively infect bacteria. They can contribute to the spread of antimicrobial resistance. [More]
Bacterium can use cell-content sharing to repair damaged siblings

Bacterium can use cell-content sharing to repair damaged siblings

A University of Wyoming faculty member led a research team that discovered a certain type of soil bacteria can use their social behavior of outer membrane exchange (OME) to repair damaged cells and improve the fitness of the bacteria population as a whole. [More]
GHIT Fund expands investments in leishmaniasis, diagnostic tests

GHIT Fund expands investments in leishmaniasis, diagnostic tests

The Global Health Innovative Technology Fund, which in the last two years has funded almost $32 million for innovative tools to tackle global infectious diseases, today announced additional investments of nearly $11 million that bring its portfolio to approximately $43 million. [More]
Heart rate measures could identify individuals with higher risk of diabetes

Heart rate measures could identify individuals with higher risk of diabetes

An association between resting heart rate and diabetes suggests that heart rate measures could identify individuals with a higher future risk of diabetes, according to an international team of researchers. [More]
Splicing pattern of obesity, type 2 diabetes genes may contribute to pathophysiology of obesity

Splicing pattern of obesity, type 2 diabetes genes may contribute to pathophysiology of obesity

Alternative splicing of obesity and type 2 diabetes related genes may contribute to the pathophysiology of obesity, according to research from the University of Eastern Finland. Obesity leads to changes in the splicing pattern of metabolically relevant genes such as TCF7L2 and INSR, resulting in impaired insulin action. [More]
UH pharmacy students receive awards for excellence in clinical skills, disease management

UH pharmacy students receive awards for excellence in clinical skills, disease management

University of Houston pharmacy students wrapped up the spring semester with awards for excellence in professional service, clinical skills and disease management, earning kudos at the state level from the Texas Society of Health-System Pharmacists. [More]
Research finds association between fine particulate air pollution and childhood autism risk

Research finds association between fine particulate air pollution and childhood autism risk

Exposure to fine particulate air pollution during pregnancy through the first two years of a child's life may be associated with an increased risk of the child developing autism spectrum disorder (ASD), a condition that affects one in 68 children, according to a University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health investigation of children in southwestern Pennsylvania. [More]
Women more likely to be hospitalised after asthma emergency care

Women more likely to be hospitalised after asthma emergency care

US research shows that women who attend the emergency department with acute asthma are almost twice as likely to be admitted to hospital than men despite several measures of asthma control, treatment and severity being more favourable in women. [More]
CSGI joins with two California hospitals to eradicate deadly Clostridium difficile infections

CSGI joins with two California hospitals to eradicate deadly Clostridium difficile infections

Clean Sweep Group Inc., a Beverly Hills, CA, based microbial disinfection service company, joins with two California hospitals to significantly reduce deadly Clostridium difficile infections caught in their hospitals using ultraviolet (UV-C) germ-killing advanced disinfection devices. [More]
Researchers develop way to potentially predict future infectious disease outbreaks in humans

Researchers develop way to potentially predict future infectious disease outbreaks in humans

Researchers at the University of Georgia Odum School of Ecology have developed a way to predict which species of rodents are likeliest to be sources of new disease outbreaks in humans. Their study, which includes maps showing potential future disease hot spots, appears in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. [More]
Twitter 'big data' could provide important details about health, social needs of transgender people

Twitter 'big data' could provide important details about health, social needs of transgender people

Transgender and gender nonconforming people are at high risk for diseases such as AIDS and are vulnerable to depression and other mental health issues, but may be reluctant to disclose their identities to researchers due to stigma. As a result, very little is known about their health and social needs. [More]
Heavy metallic elements influence AMD progression

Heavy metallic elements influence AMD progression

Researchers report associations between age-related macular degeneration and five heavy metallic elements, in findings that highlight the detrimental effects of pollution but the possible benefits of essential elements supplementation. [More]
AMD severity and progression tracks across eyes

AMD severity and progression tracks across eyes

Age-related macular degeneration in one eye tracks the severity of it in the fellow eye at all stages of the disease, findings from the Beaver Dam Eye study show. [More]
Specific bacterial community in female genital tract induces inflammation, increases HIV risk

Specific bacterial community in female genital tract induces inflammation, increases HIV risk

A team led by researchers from Massachusetts General Hospital and the Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT and Harvard has found that the most common bacterial community in the genital tract among healthy South Africa women not only is significantly different from that of women in developed countries but also leads to elevated levels of inflammatory proteins. [More]
HIV infections continue to rise among YMSM despite prevention efforts

HIV infections continue to rise among YMSM despite prevention efforts

HIV infections continue to rise in a new generation of young, gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men (YMSM) despite three decades of HIV prevention as well as recent availability of biomedical technologies to prevent infection. [More]
Monash University researcher helps identify right type of Ebola vaccine trial

Monash University researcher helps identify right type of Ebola vaccine trial

An Australian researcher has helped identify the kind of human trial that is most effective for testing Ebola vaccines. [More]
MSR, PATH announce launch of new water treatment product

MSR, PATH announce launch of new water treatment product

Local outdoor gear manufacturer MSR (Mountain Safety Research) and Seattle-based international nonprofit organization and global health innovation leader PATH today announced the launch of a new water treatment product, the result of a five-year partnership to bring low-cost community water solutions to the global market. [More]
Chancellor Angela Merkel calls for new plan to tackle Ebola outbreak at 68th World Health Assembly

Chancellor Angela Merkel calls for new plan to tackle Ebola outbreak at 68th World Health Assembly

Angela Merkel, Chancellor of the Federal Republic of Germany addressed delegates on the first morning of the Sixty-eighth World Health Assembly. "The WHO is the only international organization that has universal political legitimacy on global health issues,” she said. [More]
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