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AHA selects UAB to take part in $15 million study on high blood pressure

AHA selects UAB to take part in $15 million study on high blood pressure

The University of Alabama at Birmingham is one of four institutions selected to study high blood pressure as part of the American Heart Association's new Strategically Focused Research Network on hypertension. [More]
Researchers reveal differing perceptions among people at-risk for diabetes

Researchers reveal differing perceptions among people at-risk for diabetes

Recent research published in by Dr. Shiela Strauss, associate professor of nursing and co-director of the Statistics and Data Management Core for NYU's Colleges of Nursing and Dentistry, along with a team of NYU researchers, reveals differing perceptions among adult populations at-risk for diabetes that may offer new approaches to diabetes education and prevention. [More]
Many people still underestimate health risks associated with smoking few cigarettes a day

Many people still underestimate health risks associated with smoking few cigarettes a day

Many people still dangerously underestimate the health risks associated with smoking even a few cigarettes a day, despite decades of public health campaigning, French researchers have reported at the European Lung Cancer Conference (ELCC) in Geneva, Switzerland. [More]
Study: Cardiorespiratory fitness associated with reduced metabolic syndrome risk among smokers

Study: Cardiorespiratory fitness associated with reduced metabolic syndrome risk among smokers

Cardiorespiratory fitness is associated with reduced metabolic syndrome risk among smokers, according to researchers from The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) School of Public Health. [More]
E-cigarette users less likely to quit smoking, shows study

E-cigarette users less likely to quit smoking, shows study

The rapid increase in use of e-cigarettes has led to heated debates between opponents who question the safety of these devices and proponents who claim the battery-operated products are a useful cessation tool. [More]
Obesity in African-American men increases prostate cancer risk

Obesity in African-American men increases prostate cancer risk

Obesity has a profoundly different effect on prostate cancer risk in African-American as compared to non-Hispanic white men. Obesity in black men substantially increases the risk of low- and high-grade prostate cancer, while obesity in white men moderately reduces the risk of low-grade cancer and only slightly increases the risk of high-grade cancer, according to the first large, prospective study to examine how race and obesity jointly affect prostate cancer risk. [More]
Non-vigorous walking may help prostate cancer survivors reduce damaging side effects

Non-vigorous walking may help prostate cancer survivors reduce damaging side effects

Walking at an easy pace for about three hours every week may be just enough physical activity to help prostate cancer survivors reduce damaging side effects of their treatment, according to a new Northwestern Medicine study. [More]
GW Cancer Institute finalizes competency statements for oncology patient navigators

GW Cancer Institute finalizes competency statements for oncology patient navigators

The George Washington University Cancer Institute has finalized 45 core competency statements for oncology patient navigators, who have become critical members of the health care team. These competency statements were published in the Journal of Oncology Navigation and Survivorship and were created through literature review, focus group data analysis, expert review, and a national survey of oncology patient navigation stakeholders. [More]
New text message alert system helps parents remember child's vaccination appointments

New text message alert system helps parents remember child's vaccination appointments

Nearly a third of all children nationwide and in Kentucky aren't up-to-date with the vaccination schedule recommended by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), but not because their parents are refusing vaccines. Evidence suggests parents tend to forget appointments when children are scheduled to receive immunizations. [More]
Two UC Davis researchers awarded grant to help improve surveillance for patients with small lung nodules

Two UC Davis researchers awarded grant to help improve surveillance for patients with small lung nodules

Two UC Davis researchers will help run a major national study to improve surveillance practices for patients with small lung nodules identified on CT imaging and extremely low risk for lung cancer. [More]
Racial and ethnic minority groups face disproportionate rates of smoking, health-related illnesses

Racial and ethnic minority groups face disproportionate rates of smoking, health-related illnesses

April is National Minority Health Month, and one of the most significant health issues minorities face is disproportionate rates of smoking and health-related illnesses. [More]
Heroin-assisted treatments benefit some drug users

Heroin-assisted treatments benefit some drug users

Drug users who do not benefit from conventional treatments for heroin addiction should be able to access the drug through the health system, urges a Canadian expert in The BMJ today. [More]
Health-related tweets may help predict hospital emergency room visits

Health-related tweets may help predict hospital emergency room visits

Twitter users who post information about their personal health online might be considered by some to be "over-sharers," but new research led by the University of Arizona suggests that health-related tweets may have the potential to be helpful for hospitals. [More]
Most people visit health care settings before attempting suicide, study finds

Most people visit health care settings before attempting suicide, study finds

Most people who attempt suicide make some type of healthcare visit in the weeks or months before the attempt, reports a study in the May issue of Medical Care, published by Wolters Kluwer. [More]
OSU study finds that injury prevention programs are not being used in high schools

OSU study finds that injury prevention programs are not being used in high schools

Injury prevention programs can help reduce ankle, knee and other lower extremity injuries in sports, but the programs are not being widely used in high schools, a new study from Oregon State University has found. [More]
NIH-supported clinical trial to test statin use in patients with HIV-related cardiovascular disease

NIH-supported clinical trial to test statin use in patients with HIV-related cardiovascular disease

Researchers have begun enrolling participants in a multicenter international clinical trial to test whether statin administration can reduce the risk for major adverse cardiovascular events, such as heart attacks, strokes, and heart disease, in people with HIV infection. The trial is supported by the National Institutes of Health's National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. [More]
Johns Hopkins researchers link sperm with specific 'epigenetic tags' to autism

Johns Hopkins researchers link sperm with specific 'epigenetic tags' to autism

In a small study, Johns Hopkins researchers found that DNA from the sperm of men whose children had early signs of autism shows distinct patterns of regulatory tags that could contribute to the condition. A detailed report of their findings will be published online in the International Journal of Epidemiology on April 15. [More]
Changes in JAK/STAT3 cell signaling pathway drive ALK-negative ALCL

Changes in JAK/STAT3 cell signaling pathway drive ALK-negative ALCL

The first-ever systematic study of the genomes of patients with ALK-negative anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL), a particularly aggressive form of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, shows that many cases of the disease are driven by alterations in the JAK/STAT3 cell signaling pathway. [More]

WHO issues public statement calling for transparency in medical research

WHO today issued a public statement calling for the disclosure of results from clinical trials for medical products, whatever the result.The move aims to ensure that decisions related to the safety and efficacy of vaccines, drugs and medical devices for use by populations are supported by the best available evidence. [More]
STRIVE study to assess safety, efficacy of rVSV-ZEBOV candidate Ebola vaccine

STRIVE study to assess safety, efficacy of rVSV-ZEBOV candidate Ebola vaccine

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), in partnership with the Sierra Leone College of Medicine and Allied Health Sciences and the Sierra Leone Ministry of Health and Sanitation, is now enrolling and vaccinating volunteers for the Sierra Leone Trial to Introduce a Vaccine against Ebola (STRIVE). [More]
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