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Researchers identify molecular pathways that could lead to new therapeutic targets for cerebral malaria

Researchers identify molecular pathways that could lead to new therapeutic targets for cerebral malaria

A drug already approved for treating other diseases may be useful as a treatment for cerebral malaria, according to researchers at Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health. They discovered a novel link between food intake during the early stages of infection and the outcome of the disease, identifying two molecular pathways that could serve as new targets for treatment. [More]
Research shows effectiveness of Tamiflu

Research shows effectiveness of Tamiflu

Earlier this month, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommended the use of antiviral drugs to help treat influenza, in a year when the available vaccine is not a good match for the current strain. [More]
K. Hovnanian Children's Hospital introduces Meridian Dentistry for Children

K. Hovnanian Children's Hospital introduces Meridian Dentistry for Children

K. Hovnanian Children's Hospital at Jersey Shore University Medical Center introduces Meridian Dentistry for Children, a specialized, full-service, dental practice for infants, children and adolescents in a child-friendly, caring environment. [More]
Leading academics underscore the importance of diet and nutrition for mental Health

Leading academics underscore the importance of diet and nutrition for mental Health

Evidence is rapidly growing showing vital relationships between both diet quality and potential nutritional deficiencies and mental health, a new international collaboration led by the University of Melbourne and Deakin University has revealed. [More]
Neuroscientists propose new strategy for brain evolution

Neuroscientists propose new strategy for brain evolution

Little animations trying to master a computer game are teaching neuroscience researchers how the brain evolves when faced with difficult tasks. [More]
Study shows only 15% of newly diagnosed adults seek HIV care

Study shows only 15% of newly diagnosed adults seek HIV care

Between December 2009 and February 2011, health workers with the AMPATH Consortium sought to test and counsel every adult resident in the Bunyala subcounty of Kenya for HIV. [More]

IOMC receives initial funding to help eliminate health disparities in Chicago's underserved communities

The Institute of Medicine of Chicago (IOMC) has announced the receipt of initial funding to pursue its new initiative designed to help eliminate health disparities in Chicago's underserved communities. [More]
Online social connectedness promotes weight loss, shows study

Online social connectedness promotes weight loss, shows study

If you want to lose pounds using an online weight management program, don't be a wallflower. A new Northwestern University study shows that online dieters with high social embeddedness -- who logged in regularly, recorded their weigh-ins and 'friended' other members -- lost more than 8 percent of their body weight in six months. [More]
CUMC evaluates impact, cost-effectiveness of implementing new hypertension guidelines

CUMC evaluates impact, cost-effectiveness of implementing new hypertension guidelines

Full implementation of new hypertension guidelines could prevent 56,000 cardiovascular disease events (mostly heart attacks and strokes) and 13,000 deaths each year, without increasing overall health care costs, an analysis conducted by researchers at Columbia University Medical Center found. [More]
Researchers discover novel compound that helps curtail progression of temporal lobe epilepsy

Researchers discover novel compound that helps curtail progression of temporal lobe epilepsy

Researchers at the LSU Health New Orleans Neuroscience Center of Excellence have found that a novel compound they discovered helps curtail the onset and progression of temporal lobe epilepsy. [More]
Quest Diagnostics, CDC collaborate to reduce deaths from hepatitis

Quest Diagnostics, CDC collaborate to reduce deaths from hepatitis

Quest Diagnostics, the world's leading provider of diagnostic information services, today announced that it will collaborate with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to identify trends in screening, diagnosis and treatment for four strains of viral hepatitis in the United States, based on insights revealed by analysis of Quest's national testing database. [More]
Pollinator decline could increase risk of malnutrition, disease

Pollinator decline could increase risk of malnutrition, disease

A new study shows that more than half the people in some developing countries could become newly at risk for malnutrition if crop-pollinating animals -- like bees -- continue to decline. [More]
Oatmeal breakfast results in greater fullness, lower hunger ratings and fewer calories intake at lunch

Oatmeal breakfast results in greater fullness, lower hunger ratings and fewer calories intake at lunch

A new study suggests that your breakfast cereal choice may affect how full you feel and how much you eat for lunch, especially if you're overweight. According to new research published in the latest issue of the Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, scientists found that having oatmeal (Quaker Oats Quick 1-minuteā„¢) for breakfast resulted in greater fullness, lower hunger ratings and fewer calories eaten at the next meal compared to a calorie-matched breakfast of a ready-to-eat cereal (RTEC) - sugared corn flakes. [More]
Doctoral thesis finds how parental time pressure leads to mental health problems among children

Doctoral thesis finds how parental time pressure leads to mental health problems among children

A doctor's thesis at Sahlgrenska Academy has found that children whose parents experience time pressure are more likely to have mental health problems. [More]
Study finds no evidence that testosterone replacement therapy increases cardiovascular risk

Study finds no evidence that testosterone replacement therapy increases cardiovascular risk

Fears of a link between testosterone replacement therapy and cardiovascular risk are misplaced, according to a review published in this month's Mayo Clinic Proceedings. The therapy has come under widespread scrutiny in recent months, including by a federal Food and Drug Administration panel convened last fall. [More]
Low staff vaccination rates put vulnerable populations at risk of getting influenza

Low staff vaccination rates put vulnerable populations at risk of getting influenza

Influenza is associated with as many as 7,300 deaths annually in nursing home residents, but the vaccination rate for nursing home staff is only 54 percent, according to a study in the February issue of the American Journal of Infection Control, the official publication of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology. [More]
Kaleo, CHMI partner to reduce prescription drug-related deaths

Kaleo, CHMI partner to reduce prescription drug-related deaths

Kaleo, a privately-held pharmaceutical company, today announced a national strategic partnership with the Clinton Health Matters Initiative, an initiative of the Clinton Foundation, that will help support its goal of cutting prescription drug-related deaths in half, saving approximately 10,000 lives over five years. [More]
Raiing Medical, Boston Children's Hospital sign license agreement for Thermia education platform

Raiing Medical, Boston Children's Hospital sign license agreement for Thermia education platform

Raiing Medical Inc. and Boston Children's Hospital entered a license agreement for Boston Children's Thermia education platform, designed to assist parents in learning more about fever, illness and fever management. The online educational framework will be integrated with Raiing's iThermonitor device, a wearable thermometer with US FDA 510(k) clearance. [More]
Pitt researchers receive NIH grant to improve health of sedentary, overweight people

Pitt researchers receive NIH grant to improve health of sedentary, overweight people

University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health researchers are flipping conventional thought on its head regarding how to improve the health of sedentary people at risk for diabetes and heart disease in a new study designed to combat a condition popularly called "sitting disease." [More]
Study explores economic outcomes of hospital-based violence intervention

Study explores economic outcomes of hospital-based violence intervention

At more than 25 hospitals across the U.S., health care professionals have embraced a public health approach to their work--taking action to prevent violent injuries, not just treat them. In programs known as hospital-based violence intervention programs (HVIPs), teams of medical professionals, social workers and researchers step in at a critical moment in a patient's life--the period following a violent injury such as a gunshot or stab wound--with case management, counseling and other services that help these victims break free from the cycle of violence. [More]