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Biostatisticians project nearly 400 non-travel Zika cases in Florida by end of summer

Biostatisticians project nearly 400 non-travel Zika cases in Florida by end of summer

Nearly 400 non travel-related Zika infections will occur in Florida before the end of the summer, according to new projections by biostatisticians at the University of Florida and other institutions. [More]
Scientists grow noroviruses in laboratory cultures of human intestinal epithelial cells

Scientists grow noroviruses in laboratory cultures of human intestinal epithelial cells

Human noroviruses - the leading viral cause of acute diarrhea around the world - have been difficult to study because scientists had not found a way to grow them in the lab. [More]
Revised FDA guidance recommends universal testing of entire blood supply for Zika virus in the U.S.

Revised FDA guidance recommends universal testing of entire blood supply for Zika virus in the U.S.

As a further safety measure against the emerging Zika virus outbreak, today the U.S. Food and Drug Administration issued a revised guidance recommending universal testing of donated Whole Blood and blood components for Zika virus in the U.S. and its territories. [More]
Scientists report new neurological complication from Zika virus infection

Scientists report new neurological complication from Zika virus infection

Dr. John England, Professor and Chair of Neurology at LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine, and colleagues in Honduras and Venezuela have reported a new neurological complication of infection with the Zika virus. [More]
Fiocruz to start phase II clinical trials of novel vaccine for schistosomiasis

Fiocruz to start phase II clinical trials of novel vaccine for schistosomiasis

The Oswaldo Cruz Foundation at Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, will start the phase II clinical trials of a vaccine for schistosomiasis, called 'Sm14 Vaccine'. [More]
Researchers explore molecular mechanisms through which lead exposure may affect neural stem cells

Researchers explore molecular mechanisms through which lead exposure may affect neural stem cells

Researchers have identified a potential molecular mechanism through which lead, a pervasive environmental toxin, may harm neural stem cells and neurodevelopment in children. [More]
Banning tobacco product sales near schools could reduce disparities in tobacco retailer density

Banning tobacco product sales near schools could reduce disparities in tobacco retailer density

Banning tobacco sales within 1,000 feet of schools could reduce socioeconomic and racial/ethnic disparities in tobacco density across neighborhoods, according to a study being published today in the journal Nicotine & Tobacco Research. [More]
Novel inhibitory brain receptor reduces seizure-like activity in pubertal mice

Novel inhibitory brain receptor reduces seizure-like activity in pubertal mice

More than half of children with epilepsy outgrow their seizures, yet the mechanism underlying this remission is unknown. [More]
Arab uprising linked to detrimental effects on health and life expectancy in several countries

Arab uprising linked to detrimental effects on health and life expectancy in several countries

The Arab uprising in 2010 and subsequent wars in the eastern Mediterranean region have had serious detrimental effects on the health and life expectancy of the people living in many of the 22 countries in the region, according to a major new analysis from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013 (GBD 2013), published in The Lancet Global Health journal. [More]
PinnacleHealth replaces aortic valve in two patients using minimally invasive surgery

PinnacleHealth replaces aortic valve in two patients using minimally invasive surgery

This week, PinnacleHealth became the first hospital in the country to implant the EDWARDS INTUITY Elite valve, a rapid deployment device for surgical aortic valve replacement, after U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval. [More]
Gene fusions in esophageal adenocarcinomas offer new molecular insights into lethal cancer

Gene fusions in esophageal adenocarcinomas offer new molecular insights into lethal cancer

Despite years of research, cellular mechanisms contributing to cancers like esophageal adenocarcinoma have remained elusive. [More]
Scientists develop new predictive model to help identify sudden cardiac death

Scientists develop new predictive model to help identify sudden cardiac death

Researchers from Emory's Rollins School of Public Health developed a sudden cardiac death (SCD) predictive model that can help identify and prevent the disease in individuals at high risk. [More]
Liver cancer time-bomb as up to 70% people with Hep C miss out on follow-up testing

Liver cancer time-bomb as up to 70% people with Hep C miss out on follow-up testing

Up to 70 per cent of Victorians with suspected hepatitis C may not have received follow-up testing, putting them at risk of chronic liver disease and even cancer, University of Melbourne researchers say. [More]
New camera technology paired with electron microscope allows biologists to see tiny cellular components

New camera technology paired with electron microscope allows biologists to see tiny cellular components

Using a new, lightning-fast camera paired with an electron microscope, Columbia University Medical Center scientists have captured images of one of the smallest proteins in our cells to be "seen" with a microscope. [More]
New genetic markers linked to fast rate of nicotine metabolism in smokers may raise risk for lung cancer

New genetic markers linked to fast rate of nicotine metabolism in smokers may raise risk for lung cancer

University of Hawai'i Cancer Center researchers discovered new genetic markers associated with a fast rate of nicotine metabolism, which potentially leads smokers to smoke more, thereby, increasing their risk for lung cancer. [More]
TB burden in India may be two to three times higher than current estimates, study suggests

TB burden in India may be two to three times higher than current estimates, study suggests

The number of cases of tuberculosis (TB) in India may be up to two to three times higher than current estimates, suggests a new study. [More]
Scientists identify eight cancer types linked to excess weight and obesity

Scientists identify eight cancer types linked to excess weight and obesity

There's yet another reason to maintain a healthy weight as we age. An international team of researchers has identified eight additional types of cancer linked to excess weight and obesity: stomach, liver, gall bladder, pancreas, ovary, meningioma (a type of brain tumor), thyroid cancer and the blood cancer multiple myeloma. [More]
People with high levels of four biomarkers may have increased risk for stroke

People with high levels of four biomarkers may have increased risk for stroke

People with high levels of four biomarkers in the blood may be more likely to develop a stroke than people with low levels of the biomarkers, according to a study published in the August 24, 2016, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Climate change could contribute to increase in hay fever from ragweed pollen for millions

Climate change could contribute to increase in hay fever from ragweed pollen for millions

Climate change could cause new hay fever misery for millions of people across Europe - according to a new report from the FP7-EU project Atopica. [More]
High exposure to unconventional natural gas wells linked to migraine headaches, sinus and fatigue

High exposure to unconventional natural gas wells linked to migraine headaches, sinus and fatigue

New research suggests that Pennsylvania residents with the highest exposure to active natural gas wells operated by the hydraulic fracturing ("fracking") industry are nearly twice as likely to suffer from a combination of migraine headaches, chronic nasal and sinus symptoms and severe fatigue. [More]
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