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Study estimates prevalence of periodontitis at state and local levels across U.S. using SAE method

Study estimates prevalence of periodontitis at state and local levels across U.S. using SAE method

The International and American Associations for Dental Research have published an article titled "Predicting Periodontitis at State and Local Levels in the United States" in the OnlineFirst portion of the Journal of Dental Research. In it, authors P.I. Eke, X. Zhang, H. Lu, L. Wei, G. Thornton-Evans, K.J. Greenlund, J.B. Holt and J.B. Croft estimate the prevalence of periodontitis at state and local levels across the United States by using a novel, small area estimation (SAE) method. [More]
Early use of influenza drug in pregnant women with flu may reduce length of stay in hospital

Early use of influenza drug in pregnant women with flu may reduce length of stay in hospital

Pregnant women are at higher risk for serious illness and complications, including death, from influenza. For expectant mothers hospitalized with flu, early treatment with the influenza antiviral drug oseltamivir may shorten their time in the hospital, especially in severe cases, suggests a new study published in The Journal of Infectious Diseases and available online. [More]
Using corticosteroids before late preterm delivery reduces respiratory complications in babies

Using corticosteroids before late preterm delivery reduces respiratory complications in babies

A multicenter clinical trial led by researchers at Columbia University Medical Center and NewYork-Presbyterian has found that the use of corticosteroids in mothers at risk for late preterm delivery significantly reduced the incidence of severe respiratory complications in their babies. [More]
Study examines links between spending on social services and AIDS deaths in U.S.

Study examines links between spending on social services and AIDS deaths in U.S.

Despite considerable advances in the prevention and treatment of HIV/AIDS over the past 30 years, HIV infection rates have remained stagnant in the United States for the past decade. A study by researchers at the Yale Global Health Leadership Institute examines links between spending on social services and public health and AIDS deaths in the United States. [More]
One million serious medical complications could be avoided with improvements in blood glucose levels in diabetics

One million serious medical complications could be avoided with improvements in blood glucose levels in diabetics

Sanofi, Diabetes UK and JDRF today announce the publication of IMPACT 2 in the journal Diabetic Medicine. This new study shows that, if sustained, even modest improvement in blood glucose levels can provide significantly improved outcomes for the 3.5 million people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK. [More]
High school wrestlers have highest number of skin infections

High school wrestlers have highest number of skin infections

The first national survey of skin infections among high school athletes has found that wrestlers have the highest number of infections, with football players coming in a distant second, according to researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. [More]
One million people across England, North Wales now registered to book blood donation appointments online

One million people across England, North Wales now registered to book blood donation appointments online

One million people across England and North Wales are now registered to book donation appointments online, making it one of the largest digital booking systems of any blood service in the world. [More]
NJHF awards 30 grants for NJ researchers working on health-related research

NJHF awards 30 grants for NJ researchers working on health-related research

New Jersey Health Foundation has awarded 30 grants totaling more than $1 million for researchers in New Jersey who are working on health-related research that demonstrates exciting potential. [More]
International collaboration critical in dealing with Zika virus outbreak

International collaboration critical in dealing with Zika virus outbreak

The rapid spread of the Zika virus in Latin America and its apparent association with microcephaly is concerning, said an expert in legal and ethical issues relating to public health responses to epidemics. However, fear-based reactions are not the answer. [More]
Height affects risk of major non-communicable diseases

Height affects risk of major non-communicable diseases

Height is largely genetically determined, but in recent decades the height of children and adults has steadily increased throughout the world: In adulthood the children are almost always significantly taller than their parents. [More]
Black-box warnings about dangers of ADHD drugs confusing, say researchers

Black-box warnings about dangers of ADHD drugs confusing, say researchers

Black-box warnings about the dangers of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) medications are confusing and could have serious consequences for the risk of youth suicide, according to researchers at the Institut universitaire en santé mentale de Montréal (CIUSSS de l'Est-de-l'Île-de-Montréal) and the University of Montreal, whose correspondence has just been published in the most recent issue of the journal The Lancet Psychiatry. [More]
Researchers publish work on how news articles shape perceptions of obesity

Researchers publish work on how news articles shape perceptions of obesity

Researchers at Chapman University, UCLA, and Stanford have just published work on how news media coverage shapes perceptions of obesity. They examined how perspectives on obesity portrayed in news articles affect people's support for different obesity-related public policies and their prejudice towards fat men and women. [More]
Coordinated specialty care more cost-effective for young people with first episode psychosis

Coordinated specialty care more cost-effective for young people with first episode psychosis

New analysis from a mental health care study shows that "coordinated specialty care" (CSC) for young people with first episode psychosis is more cost-effective than typical community care. Cost-effectiveness analysis in health care is a way to compare the costs and benefits of two or more treatment options. [More]
Study provides new insights into breast cancer metastasis

Study provides new insights into breast cancer metastasis

It has long been thought that cancer metastasizes, or spreads, when a single cancer cell escapes from the original tumor, travels through the bloodstream and sets up shop in distant organs. However, a growing body of evidence suggests that these bad actors don't travel alone; instead they migrate through the body in cellular clusters, like gangs. [More]
Study examines ways to develop predictive tool for cesarean delivery in nulliparous patients

Study examines ways to develop predictive tool for cesarean delivery in nulliparous patients

In a study to be presented on Feb. 4 in an oral concurrent session at 1:15 p.m. EST, at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine's annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting, in Atlanta, researchers will present findings from a study titled, How to Predict Cesarean Delivery in the Nulliparous Patient: Results from the Prospective Multi-center Genesis Study. [More]
LSTM-led researchers publish findings from lung health study in international respiratory journal

LSTM-led researchers publish findings from lung health study in international respiratory journal

A team of investigators led from LSTM has published findings from a lung health study to determine the prevalence of lung disease among adults in Malawi, in the leading international respiratory journal, the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. [More]
Women who eat more high-fiber foods during young adulthood may have lower breast cancer risk

Women who eat more high-fiber foods during young adulthood may have lower breast cancer risk

Women who eat more high-fiber foods during adolescence and young adulthood--especially lots of fruits and vegetables--may have significantly lower breast cancer risk than those who eat less dietary fiber when young, according to a new large-scale study led by researchers at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. [More]
People injured by police officers more likely to have mental illness

People injured by police officers more likely to have mental illness

People hospitalized due to an encounter with a law enforcement officer are more likely to have a mental illness, have longer hospitalizations, more injuries to the back and spine, and greater need for extended care than those hospitalized due to altercations with other civilians. [More]
Children born to obese women with diabetes at higher risk of developing autism

Children born to obese women with diabetes at higher risk of developing autism

Children born to obese women with diabetes are more than four times as likely to be diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder than children of healthy weight mothers without diabetes, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health research suggests. [More]
Young African Americans, Hispanics fare worse when faced with Hodgkin lymphoma

Young African Americans, Hispanics fare worse when faced with Hodgkin lymphoma

African American and Hispanic adolescents and young adults fare far worse than their white counterparts when faced with a mostly curable type of cancer, Hodgkin lymphoma, a study by a UC Davis epidemiologist has found. [More]
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