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New study finds consistent weekly patterns in health-related Google searches

A new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine analyzing weekly patterns in health-related Google searches reveals a recurring pattern that could be leveraged to improve public health strategies. [More]
Edna Adan named inaugural recipient of Renfield Foundation Award for Global Women's Health

Edna Adan named inaugural recipient of Renfield Foundation Award for Global Women's Health

Following an intense selection process, Edna Adan has been named the inaugural recipient of the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing Renfield Foundation Award for Global Women's Health. The award will be presented to Adan on May 15, 2014 and includes a $100,000 cash prize which will be presented biennially to a leader in the field of global women's health. [More]
EcoHealth Alliance examines the origins of Ebola virus outbreaks

EcoHealth Alliance examines the origins of Ebola virus outbreaks

EcoHealth Alliance, a nonprofit organization that focuses on conservation and global public health issues, published a comprehensive review today examining the current state of knowledge of the deadly Ebola and Marburg virus. [More]

Percentage of uninsured adults in Texas declined since September 2013, survey reveals

The percentage of uninsured adults ages 18 to 64 in Texas declined from 24.8 to 23.5 between September 2013 and March 2014, according to a report released today by Rice University's Baker Institute for Public Policy and the Episcopal Health Foundation. The decrease in uninsured appears to be attributable to an increase in employer-sponsored health insurance. [More]
Researchers devise new approach to treatment of Alzheimer's disease

Researchers devise new approach to treatment of Alzheimer's disease

A team of researchers from Columbia University Medical Center, Weill Cornell Medical College, and Brandeis University has devised a wholly new approach to the treatment of Alzheimer's disease involving the so-called retromer protein complex. Retromer plays a vital role in neurons, steering amyloid precursor protein (APP) away from a region of the cell where APP is cleaved, creating the potentially toxic byproduct amyloid-beta, which is thought to contribute to the development of Alzheimer's. [More]
Longer Looks: HIV epidemic in the Deep South; planning for Alzheimer's; Obamacare conspiracy theory

Longer Looks: HIV epidemic in the Deep South; planning for Alzheimer's; Obamacare conspiracy theory

One of the strangest things about the H.I.V. epidemic in the Deep South-;from Louisiana to Alabama to Mississippi-;is how easily most Americans have elided it, choosing instead to imagine that the disease is now an out-there, elsewhere epidemic. [More]
Viewpoints: Obamacare still has more challenges; GOP needs to help make law work; census change is not Obama's decision

Viewpoints: Obamacare still has more challenges; GOP needs to help make law work; census change is not Obama's decision

The first open enrollment period under the Affordable Care Act ended this week with roughly 7.5 million people obtaining policies through the new state insurance exchanges, including more than 1.3 million at Covered California. [More]
Drug used to treat TB may also act against various infections, says study

Drug used to treat TB may also act against various infections, says study

A drug under clinical trials to treat tuberculosis could be the basis for a class of broad-spectrum drugs that act against various bacteria, fungal infections and parasites, yet evade resistance, according to a study by University of Illinois chemists and collaborators. [More]

Men with chronic inflammation in non-cancerous prostate tissue may have nearly twice risk of prostate cancer

Men who show signs of chronic inflammation in non-cancerous prostate tissue may have nearly twice the risk of actually having prostate cancer than those with no inflammation, according to results of a new study led by researchers from the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center. [More]

Scientists develop microbicide gel that prevents transmission of multiple STIs in vagina/rectum in animals

Population Council scientists and their partners have found that their proprietary microbicide gel is safe, stable, and can prevent the transmission of multiple sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in both the vagina and rectum in animals: HIV, herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2), and human papillomavirus (HPV). [More]
Study: Chronic inflammation associated with aggressive prostate cancer

Study: Chronic inflammation associated with aggressive prostate cancer

The presence of chronic inflammation in benign prostate tissue was associated with high-grade, or aggressive, prostate cancer, and this association was found even in those with low prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels, according to a study published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research. [More]

IMA World Health offers Safe Motherhood Kits this Mother's Day

Every minute, a woman dies of complications from pregnancy or childbirth and many more suffer infection or injury. [More]
Researchers identify novel vancomycin-resistant MRSA superbug in Brazil

Researchers identify novel vancomycin-resistant MRSA superbug in Brazil

An international research team led by Cesar A. Arias, M.D., Ph.D., at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston has identified a new superbug that caused a bloodstream infection in a Brazilian patient. The report appeared in the April 17 issue of The New England Journal of Medicine. [More]

Special supplement explores the causes of distracted driving among teens

Motor vehicle crashes rank as the leading cause of teen deaths and in 2008, 16% of all distraction-related fatal automobile crashes involved drivers under 20 years of age. [More]
Researchers uncover mechanism that may help explain severe forms of schistosomiasis

Researchers uncover mechanism that may help explain severe forms of schistosomiasis

​Researchers at the Sackler School of Graduate Biomedical Sciences at Tufts and Tufts University School of Medicine (TUSM) have uncovered a mechanism that may help explain the severe forms of schistosomiasis, or snail fever, which is caused by schistosome worms and is one of the most prevalent parasitic diseases in the world. The study in mice, published online in The Journal of Immunology, may also offer targets for intervention and amelioration of the disease. [More]
Scientists discover protein structure that helps common fungal pathogen to infect humans

Scientists discover protein structure that helps common fungal pathogen to infect humans

A team that includes scientists from the School of Medicine at The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, Johns Hopkins University and St. Mary's University reported the structure of a protein that helps a common fungus to infect the body. [More]
Study: HIV-positive women respond well to vaccine against human papillomavirus

Study: HIV-positive women respond well to vaccine against human papillomavirus

HIV-positive women respond well to a vaccine against the human papillomavirus (HPV), even when their immune system is struggling, according to newly published results of an international clinical trial. [More]

Researchers explore fishing-related injuries and prevention strategies

Handling frozen fish caused nearly half of all injuries aboard commercial freezer-trawlers and about a quarter of the injuries on freezer-longliner vessels operating off the coast of Alaska, new research from Oregon State University shows. [More]
Scientists to combine environmental, surveillance data to predict malaria outbreaks in Ethiopia

Scientists to combine environmental, surveillance data to predict malaria outbreaks in Ethiopia

Dealing with malaria is a fact of life for more than 91 million Ethiopians. Each year four to five million contract malaria, one of the biggest health problems in this poor country. [More]

Study analyzes data to assess health disparities of transgender individuals

Transgender individuals are medically underserved and their healthcare needs incompletely understood in part because they represent a subpopulation whose health is rarely monitored by U.S. national surveillance systems. [More]