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Kaleo announces U.S. availability of EVZIO for emergency treatment of opioid overdose

Kaleo announces U.S. availability of EVZIO for emergency treatment of opioid overdose

Kaleo, a privately-held pharmaceutical company headquartered in Richmond, Virginia, today announced the United States (U.S.) commercial availability of EVZIO for the emergency treatment of known or suspected opioid overdose, as manifested by respiratory and/or central nervous system depression. [More]
Pregnant women with obstructive sleep apnea more likely to die in hospital

Pregnant women with obstructive sleep apnea more likely to die in hospital

Pregnant women with obstructive sleep apnea are more than five times as likely to die in the hospital than those without the sleep disorder, a comprehensive national study by the University of South Florida researchers found. [More]
Study of non-surgically implanted replacement pulmonary valve shows strong results

Study of non-surgically implanted replacement pulmonary valve shows strong results

The first post-FDA approval study of a non-surgically implanted replacement pulmonary valve showed strong short- and mid-term results for the device in patients with certain congenital heart defects, according to research presented by a U-M pediatric interventional cardiologist at the American College of Cardiology's 63rd Annual Scientific Session Sunday. [More]
Lung ultrasound could help determine if pregnant woman with preeclampsia is at risk for respiratory failure

Lung ultrasound could help determine if pregnant woman with preeclampsia is at risk for respiratory failure

Lung ultrasound could help determine if pregnant woman with preeclampsia is at risk for respiratory failure [More]
Findings recommend expectant monitoring for women with gestational hypertension

Findings recommend expectant monitoring for women with gestational hypertension

In a study to be presented on Feb. 6 at 8:15 a.m. CST, at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine's annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting -, in New Orleans, researchers will report findings that recommend expectant monitoring instead of immediate delivery for women with gestational hypertension or preeclampsia between 34 and 37 weeks of pregnancy. [More]
Researchers develop first test to identify acute mountain sickness

Researchers develop first test to identify acute mountain sickness

The first test to identify acute mountain sickness has been developed by a team of researchers in Italy and France and is presented today at EuroEcho-Imaging 2013. The test could revolutionise trekking and climbing by predicting who will develop the potentially deadly condition so they can avoid high altitudes, ascend more gradually or take preventative medication. [More]
Interim data from Phase 1B trial of an investigational anti-PD-1 immunotherapy in patients with previously-treated NSCLC announced by Merck

Interim data from Phase 1B trial of an investigational anti-PD-1 immunotherapy in patients with previously-treated NSCLC announced by Merck

Merck (NYSE: MRK), known as MSD outside the United States and Canada, announced the presentation of interim data from a Phase 1B trial (PN001) evaluating MK-3475, an investigational anti-PD-1 immunotherapy, in patients with previously-treated non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The data were presented today by Dr. Edward Garon, Director of Thoracic Oncology, Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, Los Angeles, at the 15th World Conference on Lung Cancer in Sydney, Australia (Abstract #2416). [More]
Bayer HealthCare receives FDA approval for Adempas tablets

Bayer HealthCare receives FDA approval for Adempas tablets

Bayer HealthCare announced today that the United States Food and Drug Administration has approved Adempas (riociguat) tablets for: (i) the treatment of adults with persistent/recurrent chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (WHO Group 4) after surgical treatment or inoperable CTEPH to improve exercise capacity and WHO functional class; and (ii) the treatment of adults with pulmonary arterial hypertension (WHO Group 1) to improve exercise capacity, improve WHO functional class and delay clinical worsening. [More]
Gas transfer excels in predicting mortality in COPD

Gas transfer excels in predicting mortality in COPD

Researchers say that measuring gas transfer is the most effective way to predict mortality in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, after finding that it outperformed both spirometry and plethysmography for the purpose. [More]
Harvard University receives grant to use organs-on-chips device to test human response to radiation

Harvard University receives grant to use organs-on-chips device to test human response to radiation

A team at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University has received a $5.6 million grant award from the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to use its Organs-on-Chips technology for a novel application of keen interest to national security and health officials: to test human physiological responses to radiation, and to evaluate drugs designed to counter those effects. [More]

Chemicals added to swimming pool water can cause irritation, injury and even death, doctors warn

Chemicals are added to swimming pool water to enhance and protect the water quality and minimize disease-causing germs, but these same chemicals can cause irritation, injury and even death when not handled appropriately, doctors at Vanderbilt University Medical Center warn. [More]

Study: Exposure to high altitude can cause acute mountain sickness, cerebral or pulmonary edema

"Exposure to high altitude can cause acute mountain sickness (AMS) and, in severe cases, cerebral or pulmonary edema. Capillary leakage has been hypothesized to play a role in the pathogenesis of AMS, although the mechanism of altitude-related illnesses remains largely unknown," writes Gabriel Willmann, M.D., of the University of Tubingen, Germany, and colleagues. [More]
Immunoglobulin fails to meet co-primary endpoints in Phase III clinical study, Baxter reports

Immunoglobulin fails to meet co-primary endpoints in Phase III clinical study, Baxter reports

Baxter International Inc. today announced that its Phase III clinical study of immunoglobulin did not meet its co-primary endpoints of reducing cognitive decline and preserving functional abilities in patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease. [More]
European Commission grants conditional marketing authorization for Pfizer's BOSULIF

European Commission grants conditional marketing authorization for Pfizer's BOSULIF

Pfizer Inc. announced today that the European Commission has granted conditional marketing authorization for BOSULIF (bosutinib) in the European Union for the treatment of adult patients with chronic phase, accelerated phase and blast phase Philadelphia chromosome positive chronic myelogenous leukemia previously treated with one or more tyrosine kinase inhibitor(s) and for whom imatinib, nilotinib and dasatinib are not considered appropriate treatment options. [More]
Lung congestion increases dialysis patients' risks of premature death or heart attacks

Lung congestion increases dialysis patients' risks of premature death or heart attacks

Asymptomatic lung congestion increases dialysis patients' risks of dying prematurely or experiencing heart attacks or other cardiac events, according to a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (JASN). [More]
Wyss Founding Director receives NC3Rs 3Rs Prize for Lung-on-a-Chip

Wyss Founding Director receives NC3Rs 3Rs Prize for Lung-on-a-Chip

In a London ceremony today, Wyss Founding Director Don Ingber, M.D., Ph.D., received the NC3Rs 3Rs Prize from the UK's National Centre for the Replacement, Refinement and Reduction of Animals in Research (NC3Rs) for his innovative Lung-on-a-Chip -- a microdevice lined by human cells that recapitulates complex functions of the living lung. [More]
EMA adopts positive opinion for Pfizer’s bosutinib conditional approval in the EU

EMA adopts positive opinion for Pfizer’s bosutinib conditional approval in the EU

Pfizer Inc. announced today that the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use of the European Medicines Agency has adopted a positive opinion regarding the conditional marketing authorization of bosutinib in the European Union for the treatment of adult patients with chronic phase (CP), accelerated phase (AP), and blast phase (BP) Philadelphia chromosome positive chronic myelogenous leukemia previously treated with one or more tyrosine kinase inhibitor(s) (TKIs) and for whom imatinib, nilotinib and dasatinib are not considered appropriate treatment options. [More]
No significant difference in patient outcomes with RBC transfusions using lower threshold levels

No significant difference in patient outcomes with RBC transfusions using lower threshold levels

The level at which red blood cells are transfused, a common treatment in clinical practice, is often deliberated among physicians. Guidelines for blood transfusion levels were only recently issued in March 2012 diminishing some of the debate. Today, in a new section called JAMA Clinical Evidence Synopsis, the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), published a summary of the systematic review of the 19 clinical trials that compare higher versus lower hemoglobin thresholds in red blood cell transfusion. [More]
Surgery poses cardiac risk to lupus women

Surgery poses cardiac risk to lupus women

Women with systemic lupus erythematosus are at significantly increased risk for short-term perioperative adverse cardiovascular events, find researchers. [More]
Brain effects of high-altitude sickness retained long term

Brain effects of high-altitude sickness retained long term

Mountaineers who experience high-altitude cerebral edema often retain traces of the bleed in their brains for many years afterward, show study findings. [More]