Pulmonary Hypertension News and Research RSS Feed - Pulmonary Hypertension News and Research

Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a condition involving high blood pressure and structural changes in the walls of the pulmonary arteries, which are the blood vessels that connect the right side of the heart to the lungs. Affecting people of all ages and ethnic backgrounds - but most commonly found in young women of child-bearing years - the disease has historically been chronic and incurable, with a poor survival rate. PAH is often not diagnosed in a timely manner because its early symptoms can be confused with those of many other pulmonary and respiratory conditions. Symptoms include shortness of breath, extreme fatigue, dizziness, fainting, swollen ankles and legs and chest pain (especially during physical activity). With proper diagnosis, there are currently several therapies to alleviate symptoms and improve quality of life for PAH patients. The key is to find a PAH specialist and pursue immediate treatment.
Clinical data demonstrates safe administration of Pexa-Vec in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

Clinical data demonstrates safe administration of Pexa-Vec in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

SillaJen, Inc., a private clinical-stage biotherapeutics company focused on the development of oncolytic immunotherapy products for cancer, today announced a publication of data demonstrating that in a Phase Ib trial of Pexa-Vec, patients received multiple bi-weekly doses of its lead product Pexa-Vec, representing the first report of multiple intravenous administrations of an oncolytic vaccinia. [More]
University of Pittsburgh surgeon receives Anthony Cerami Award in Translational Medicine

University of Pittsburgh surgeon receives Anthony Cerami Award in Translational Medicine

The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research and Molecular Medicine announced today that the fourth Anthony Cerami Award in Translational Medicine will be conferred to Thomas E. Starzl, MD, PhD, professor of surgery at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. The award is in recognition of his research in organ transplantation and alloengraftment mechanisms. [More]
Study examines mental health prognosis of young VTE patients

Study examines mental health prognosis of young VTE patients

EuroHeartCare is the official annual meeting of the Council on Cardiovascular Nursing and Allied Professions of the European Society of Cardiology. The 2015 meeting is held 14 to 15 June in Dubrovnik, Croatia, in collaboration with the Croatian Association of Cardiology Nurses. [More]
Triciribine drug may reverse progression of pulmonary fibrosis and pulmonary hypertension

Triciribine drug may reverse progression of pulmonary fibrosis and pulmonary hypertension

Researchers at the University of Georgia have discovered that the drug triciribine may reverse or halt the progression of pulmonary fibrosis and pulmonary hypertension, two respiratory diseases that are almost invariably fatal. [More]
Use of antidepressants in late pregnancy may be associated with increased risk of PPHN

Use of antidepressants in late pregnancy may be associated with increased risk of PPHN

An analysis of approximately 3.8 million pregnancies finds that use of antidepressants late in pregnancy may be associated with an increased risk of persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN), according to a study in the June 2 issue of JAMA. However, the absolute risk was small and the risk increase appears more modest than suggested in previous studies. [More]
Researchers explore association between SSRI exposure in late pregnancy and risk of PPHN

Researchers explore association between SSRI exposure in late pregnancy and risk of PPHN

Use of antidepressants late in pregnancy has been controversial since the FDA issued a Public Health Advisory in 2006 warning that the use of antidepressants in late pregnancy may increase risk of persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN), a condition that typically occurs in term or near-term infants and presents within hours of birth with severe respiratory failure requiring intubation and mechanical ventilation. [More]
Amgen starts Phase 3 study assessing the benefit of Kyprolis in patients with relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma

Amgen starts Phase 3 study assessing the benefit of Kyprolis in patients with relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma

Amgen today announced the initiation of the ARROW trial, a global Phase 3 study evaluating the benefit of Kyprolis® (carfilzomib) for Injection administered once-weekly with dexamethasone versus the current U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved twice-weekly administration schedule in patients with relapsed and refractory multiple myeloma who have received prior treatment with bortezomib and an immunomodulatory agent (IMiD). [More]
UT Southwestern Medical Center Performs its 500th Lung Transplant on Cystic Fibrosis Patient

UT Southwestern Medical Center Performs its 500th Lung Transplant on Cystic Fibrosis Patient

A lung transplant to relieve Christopher Bryant Vera from devastating effects of cystic fibrosis marked the 500th lung transplant performed at UT Southwestern Medical Center, positioning the Center among an elite group of fewer than 25 in the country to achieve that benchmark. [More]
Amgen to present clinical data on multiple blood cancer treatments at EHA 2015

Amgen to present clinical data on multiple blood cancer treatments at EHA 2015

Amgen today announced that it will present data from multiple Kyprolis (carfilzomib) for Injection, BLINCYTO (blinatumomab), oprozomib and Nplate (romiplostim)‎ studies at the 20th Congress of the European Hematology Association taking place in Vienna, June 11 - 14, 2015. [More]
Carbon monoxide may actually protect the brain from damage after subarachnoid hemorrhage

Carbon monoxide may actually protect the brain from damage after subarachnoid hemorrhage

Carbon monoxide is known by many as a poisonous gas that causes brain injury and other neurological symptoms, including memory loss and confusion. But a new study led by investigators at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center suggests the opposite may be true: When administered in small, carefully controlled amounts, carbon monoxide may actually protect the brain from damage following subarachnoid hemorrhage, a devastating stroke that results from bleeding in the brain. [More]
Noninvasive findings reduce catheterisation need in suspected PAH

Noninvasive findings reduce catheterisation need in suspected PAH

Research shows that a risk score based on noninvasive measures can identify left heart failure in a “substantial percentage” of patients with suspected pulmonary arterial hypertension, reducing the need for right heart catheterisation. [More]
Researchers explore how low-level electrical stimulation reduces inflammation

Researchers explore how low-level electrical stimulation reduces inflammation

The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, the research arm of the North Shore-LIJ Health System, and SetPoint Medical Inc., a biomedical technology company, today released the results of research on the therapeutic potential of vagus nerve stimulation. In a paper published by Bioelectronic Medicine, Kevin J. Tracey, MD, and his colleagues at the Feinstein Institute, explore how low-level electrical stimulation interacts with the body's nerves to reduce inflammation, a fundamental goal of bioelectronic medicine. [More]
Pulmonary Hypertension Center at RI Hospital receives PHA accreditation

Pulmonary Hypertension Center at RI Hospital receives PHA accreditation

The Pulmonary Hypertension Center at Rhode Island Hospital is one of the nation's first centers of its kind to be accredited by the Pulmonary Hypertension Association. For those affected by pulmonary hypertension (PH), accreditation assures them and their providers that they have access to the most advanced care available in the country. [More]
Capillary pCO2 helps determine IPAH diagnosis

Capillary pCO2 helps determine IPAH diagnosis

Capillary pCO2 can be used to distinguish idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension from pulmonary hypertension due to heart failure with preserved ejection fraction, research indicates. [More]
Eisai, Arena complete two Phase 1 registrational trials for once-daily formulation of lorcaserin

Eisai, Arena complete two Phase 1 registrational trials for once-daily formulation of lorcaserin

Eisai Inc. and Arena Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced the completion of two Phase 1 registrational clinical trials that Eisai and Arena believe demonstrate bioequivalence of an investigational once-daily extended release formulation of lorcaserin, as compared to the twice-daily immediate release formulation approved by the US Food and Drug Administration and marketed as BELVIQ. [More]
Survey reveals growing needs, challenges faced by health plans serving vulnerable populations

Survey reveals growing needs, challenges faced by health plans serving vulnerable populations

Health Integrated, a leader in precision care management solutions, released the results today of an annual health plan survey jointly commissioned with the Association for Community Affiliated Plans, a national trade association representing nonprofit safety net health plans. [More]
New Johns Hopkins mobile app educates care providers on improving sleep, overall health of patients

New Johns Hopkins mobile app educates care providers on improving sleep, overall health of patients

Experts from the Johns Hopkins Center for Sleep hope to help patients get a better night’s sleep by providing health care staff members with a basic educational tool on their smartphones. [More]
Amgen receives FDA priority review designation for Kyprolis to treat relapsed multiple myeloma

Amgen receives FDA priority review designation for Kyprolis to treat relapsed multiple myeloma

Amgen today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has accepted the supplemental New Drug Application (sNDA) of Kyprolis® (carfilzomib) for Injection for the treatment of patients with relapsed multiple myeloma who have received at least one prior therapy. [More]
Combining CT measurements assists pulmonary hypertension prediction

Combining CT measurements assists pulmonary hypertension prediction

Research suggests that combining pulmonary artery and ventricular measurements improves the chances of identifying pulmonary hypertension in patients undergoing computed tomography pulmonary angiography. [More]
Inhaled Nitric Oxide still being used in preterm neonates despite evidence of short-term benefit

Inhaled Nitric Oxide still being used in preterm neonates despite evidence of short-term benefit

Inhaled Nitric Oxide (iNO) is a drug approved by the Food and Drug Administration that is commonly used in term and near-term neonates who have severe respiratory failure caused by pulmonary hypertension. Over the last decade there have been multiple large studies trying to determine a clinical use for iNO in preterm neonates, but despite evidence of short-term benefit, this drug has not been shown to improve long-term outcomes in preemies. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement