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Ribonucleic acid (RNA) is a biologically important type of molecule that consists of a long chain of nucleotide units. Each nucleotide consists of a nitrogenous base, a ribose sugar, and a phosphate.
QIAGEN's therascreen EGFR RGQ PCR Kit to guide use of IRESSA for in NSCLC treatment

QIAGEN's therascreen EGFR RGQ PCR Kit to guide use of IRESSA for in NSCLC treatment

QIAGEN N.V. today received U.S. marketing (PMA) approval of its therascreen EGFR RGQ PCR Kit (therascreen EGFR test) as a companion diagnostic to guide the use of AstraZeneca's IRESSA (gefitinib) in the treatment of patients with advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). [More]
Researchers develop sperm RNA diagnostic test to help determine best infertility treatment for couples

Researchers develop sperm RNA diagnostic test to help determine best infertility treatment for couples

A Wayne State University School of Medicine professor, in collaboration with researchers at CReAte Fertility Center, University of Toronto, Harvard University and Georgia Reagents University, has developed the first diagnostic test for sperm RNA based on next-generation sequencing. For couples with unexplained infertility, the test may help determine the best infertility treatment for couples having difficulty conceiving. [More]
Four young scientists named recipients of Damon Runyon-Sohn Pediatric Cancer Research Fellowship Award

Four young scientists named recipients of Damon Runyon-Sohn Pediatric Cancer Research Fellowship Award

The Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation has named four outstanding young scientists as recipients of the prestigious Damon Runyon-Sohn Pediatric Cancer Research Fellowship Award, committing nearly $875,000 to help address a critical shortage of funding for pediatric cancer research. [More]
TSRI study reveals alternative approach to current anti-HIV strategies

TSRI study reveals alternative approach to current anti-HIV strategies

HIV-infected patients remain on antiretroviral therapy for life because the virus survives over the long-term in infected dormant cells. Interruption of current types of antiretroviral therapy results in a rebound of the virus and clinical progression to AIDS. [More]
UC San Diego, GSK collaborate to treat leukemia by eliminating cancer stem cells

UC San Diego, GSK collaborate to treat leukemia by eliminating cancer stem cells

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and Moores Cancer Center are working with GSK on a bench-to-bedside project to treat leukemia and other diseases by eliminating cancer stem cells. The collaboration is part of GSK's Discovery Partnerships with Academia (DPAc) program, where academic partners become core members of drug-hunting teams. [More]
Defects in mitochondria play key role in transition of normal cells to cancerous cells

Defects in mitochondria play key role in transition of normal cells to cancerous cells

Cancer cells defy the rules by which normal cells abide. They can divide without cease, invade distant tissues and consume glucose at abnormal rates. [More]
International research team identifies new gene associated with 4H leukodystrophy

International research team identifies new gene associated with 4H leukodystrophy

Leukodystrophies are deadly neurodegenerative diseases that affect one in 7,000 children and remain incurable. These genetic diseases attack myelin or the "insulating rubber sheath" surrounding neurons, which leads to deteriorating health for affected children. [More]
UK study suggests new approach to develop highly-potent drugs

UK study suggests new approach to develop highly-potent drugs

A new study led by University of Kentucky researchers suggests a new approach to develop highly-potent drugs which could overcome current shortcomings of low drug efficacy and multi-drug resistance in the treatment of cancer as well as viral and bacterial infections. [More]
SISSA scientists create synthetic enzymes that can differentiate between active and inactive genes

SISSA scientists create synthetic enzymes that can differentiate between active and inactive genes

Certain genetic diseases arise from a deficit of specific genes. An enzyme that amplifies gene transcription could be a viable therapy in these cases, as long as genes are not stimulated to work on the wrong part of the body. SISSA scientists have created synthetic "intelligent" enzymes which are able to differentiate between active and inactive genes and selectively stimulate the former ones. [More]
MU scientists develop RNAMiner tool to make genetic science easier

MU scientists develop RNAMiner tool to make genetic science easier

Technology rapidly is advancing the study of genetics and the search for causes of major diseases. Analysis of genomic sequences that once took days or months now can be performed in a matter of hours. Yet, for most genetic scientists, the lack of access to computer servers and programs capable of quickly handling vast amounts of data can hinder genetic advancements. [More]
UC researcher awarded NCI grant to study effect of MED1 protein on HER2-positive breast cancer

UC researcher awarded NCI grant to study effect of MED1 protein on HER2-positive breast cancer

Xiaoting Zhang, PhD, associate professor in the Department of Cancer Biology at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, has received a $1.8 million, five-year, R01 award (R01CA197865) from the National Cancer Institute to continue breast cancer research focusing on the function of the protein MED1 on HER2-positive breast cancer. [More]
Study sheds light on how dengue virus adapts, causes outbreaks as it travels

Study sheds light on how dengue virus adapts, causes outbreaks as it travels

A researcher from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston is an integral member of a collaborative group that is the first to explain the mechanisms that the Dengue virus has developed to optimize its ability to cause outbreaks as it travels across the globe to new places and revisits old ones. [More]
Akcea Therapeutics obtains FDA Orphan Drug Designation for volanesorsen

Akcea Therapeutics obtains FDA Orphan Drug Designation for volanesorsen

Akcea Therapeutics, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Isis Pharmaceuticals, Inc., announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has granted Orphan Drug Designation to volanesorsen (ISIS-APOCIIIRx) for the treatment of patients with Familial Chylomicronemia Syndrome (FCS). [More]
Harvard Medical School scientists reveal structure of vesicular stomatitis virus protein

Harvard Medical School scientists reveal structure of vesicular stomatitis virus protein

Viruses need us. In order to multiply, viruses have to invade a host cell and copy their genetic information. To do so, viruses encode their own replication machinery or components that subvert the host replication machinery to their advantage. [More]
NDSU researcher awarded $1.35 million research grant to develop targeted treatment for colorectal cancer

NDSU researcher awarded $1.35 million research grant to develop targeted treatment for colorectal cancer

A researcher at North Dakota State University, Fargo, is receiving a four-year $1.35 million research project grant from the National Cancer Institute of the National Institutes of Health to develop a targeted treatment for colorectal cancer. [More]
TSRI scientists find five different miRNAs involved in memory formation

TSRI scientists find five different miRNAs involved in memory formation

Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have found that a type of genetic material called “microRNA” plays surprisingly different roles in the formation of memory in animal models. In some cases, these RNAs increase memory, while others decrease it. [More]
7th Annual Personalized & Precision Medicine Conference to be held in Baltimore from Oct. 5 to 6, 2015

7th Annual Personalized & Precision Medicine Conference to be held in Baltimore from Oct. 5 to 6, 2015

Arrowhead's 7th Annual Personalized & Precision Medicine Conference is coming to Baltimore, MD on October 5-6, 2015 as an official satellite event to the American Society for Human Genetics Annual Meeting. [More]
New species of tRNA-derived small RNAs contribute to cell proliferation in cancer

New species of tRNA-derived small RNAs contribute to cell proliferation in cancer

Since their discovery in the 1950s, transfer RNAs (tRNAs) have been best known for their role in helping the cell make proteins from messenger RNA templates. However, recent studies have led to a previously-unsuspected concept that tRNAs are not always the end product; namely, they further serve as a source of small RNAs. [More]
Researchers identify better way to screen for lung cancer

Researchers identify better way to screen for lung cancer

The Valley Hospital in Ridgewood, NJ, is pleased to announce that two of its oncologists and a research scientist are helping pave the way to an easier, more accurate, less invasive way to screen for the most common form of lung cancer. Lung cancer is the most common cancer in men worldwide and the number one cancer killer in the United States. [More]
Study on fruit flies, brewer's yeast may provide clues about cause of Spinal Muscular Atrophy

Study on fruit flies, brewer's yeast may provide clues about cause of Spinal Muscular Atrophy

Scientists at the University of Malta and the Institut de Génétique Moléculaire de Montpellier (CNRS/Université de Montpellier) have shown that fruit flies and brewer's yeast can reveal clues about the cause of Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA), the most common genetic killer of infants. [More]
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