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Ribonucleic acid (RNA) is a biologically important type of molecule that consists of a long chain of nucleotide units. Each nucleotide consists of a nitrogenous base, a ribose sugar, and a phosphate.
Animal study shows children exposed to famine grow smaller, become susceptible to metabolic diseases

Animal study shows children exposed to famine grow smaller, become susceptible to metabolic diseases

Starvation early in life can alter an organism for generations to come, according to a new study in roundworms. The effects are what Duke University biologist Ryan Baugh terms a "bet-hedging strategy." [More]
Reducing incorrect gene expression can extend lifespan of cells

Reducing incorrect gene expression can extend lifespan of cells

Working with yeast and worms, researchers found that incorrect gene expression is a hallmark of aged cells and that reducing such "noise" extends lifespan in these organisms. The team published their findings this month in Genes & Development. [More]
New synthetic gene drives could one day improve human health and the environment

New synthetic gene drives could one day improve human health and the environment

Gene drives are genetic elements - found naturally in the genomes of most of the world's organisms - that increase the chance of the gene they carry being passed on to all offspring, and thus, they can quickly spread through populations. Looking to these natural systems, researchers around the world, including some Wyss Institute scientists, are developing synthetic gene drives that could one day be leveraged by humans to purposefully alter the traits of wild populations of organisms to prevent disease transmission and eradicate invasive species. [More]
NEJM publishes positive clinical results from Phase 2 clinical study of volanesorsen

NEJM publishes positive clinical results from Phase 2 clinical study of volanesorsen

Isis Pharmaceuticals, Inc., the leader in RNA-targeted therapeutics, and Akcea Therapeutics, its wholly owned subsidiary, announced today that The New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) has published positive clinical results from a Phase 2 clinical study evaluating volanesorsen (formerly ISIS-APOCIII Rx) in patients with very high to severely high triglycerides. [More]
UIC, Northwestern University researchers create first artificial ribosome

UIC, Northwestern University researchers create first artificial ribosome

Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago and Northwestern University have engineered a tethered ribosome that works nearly as well as the authentic cellular component, or organelle, that produces all the proteins and enzymes within the cell. The engineered ribosome may enable the production of new drugs and next-generation biomaterials and lead to a better understanding of how ribosomes function. [More]
TGen scientist named a recipient of 2015 Bisgrove Scholars award

TGen scientist named a recipient of 2015 Bisgrove Scholars award

Dr. Candace Lewis, a research scientist at the Translational Genomics Research Institute, is one of five recipients of the 2015 Bisgrove Scholars award, Science Foundation Arizona announced today. [More]
Innovative approach to treating AAT deficiency

Innovative approach to treating AAT deficiency

Researchers have demonstrated the feasibility of delivering an RNA that encodes for the protein alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT)--which is missing or nonfunctional in the genetic disorder AAT deficiency--into cells in the laboratory, enabling the cells to produce highly functional AAT. [More]
Trends, R&D progress, and predicted revenues in RNAi therapies

Trends, R&D progress, and predicted revenues in RNAi therapies

When will RNAi therapies reach the market? Visiongain's brand new report shows you potential revenues to 2025, assessing data, trends, opportunities and prospects there. [More]
Researchers find way to reverse clotting factor deficiency that triggers hemophilia A

Researchers find way to reverse clotting factor deficiency that triggers hemophilia A

Sufferers of hemophilia live in a perpetual state of stress and anxiety: their joints wear down prematurely and they have bleeding episodes that feel like they will never end. Their bodies lack the ability to make the clotting factor responsible for the coagulation of blood so any cut or bruise can turn into an emergency without immediate treatment. [More]
Groundbreaking experimental therapy has ability to suppress ulcerative colitis

Groundbreaking experimental therapy has ability to suppress ulcerative colitis

UCLA scientists have discovered a groundbreaking experimental therapy that has the ability to suppress the development of ulcerative colitis (UC), a disease which causes inflammation in the digestive tract and colon cancer. The treatment utilizes a chemical inhibitor able to block an RNA molecule (microRNA-214) involved in the transmission of genetic information. [More]
Dietary phosphate appears to cause spikes in blood phosphorus levels

Dietary phosphate appears to cause spikes in blood phosphorus levels

Phosphates artificially added to dairy and cereal products appear to cause bigger spikes in blood phosphorus levels than naturally occurring phosphates, potentially putting harmful stress on kidneys. Too much dietary phosphate stiffens blood vessels, enlarges the heart and is bad for bones, but a new study by Houston Methodist researchers suggests it matters where the phosphates come from. [More]
Adaptimmune’s NY-ESO-1 TCR-engineered T-cell therapy mediates sustained antitumor effects in multiple myeloma patients

Adaptimmune’s NY-ESO-1 TCR-engineered T-cell therapy mediates sustained antitumor effects in multiple myeloma patients

Adaptimmune Therapeutics plc, a clinical stage biopharmaceutical company focused on the use of T-cell therapy to treat cancer, today announced that data from its Phase I/II study of its affinity enhanced T-cell receptor therapeutic targeting the NY-ESO-1 cancer antigen in patients with multiple myeloma has been published in Nature Medicine. [More]
Key differences identified among patients with ALS

Key differences identified among patients with ALS

Researchers on Mayo Clinic's Florida campus have identified key differences between patients with sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS or Lou Gehrig's disease) and those with the most common genetic form of ALS, a mutation in the C9orf72 gene. [More]
New approach holds great promise for developing effective treatments for human mitochondrial diseases

New approach holds great promise for developing effective treatments for human mitochondrial diseases

Using existing drugs, such as lithium, to restore basic biological processes in human cells and animal models, researchers may have broken a long-standing logjam in devising effective treatments for human mitochondrial diseases. [More]
NanoString Technologies launches “Dear Cancer Researchers” campaign

NanoString Technologies launches “Dear Cancer Researchers” campaign

One of the greatest obstacles in the fight against cancer is the pace of the cancer research itself. Today, NanoString Technologies, Inc., a provider of life science tools for translational research and molecular diagnostic products, launched an advertising campaign called “Dear Cancer Researchers” to unveil its industry-changing nCounter SPRINT™ Profiler. [More]
Scientists find potent agent that thwarts drug resistance in malaria parasite

Scientists find potent agent that thwarts drug resistance in malaria parasite

Scientists have made an important breakthrough in the fight against malaria, identifying a potent agent that thwarts drug resistance in the parasite that causes the disease. [More]
WSU's Li Yao explores use of electrical signal for treating spinal cord injuries

WSU's Li Yao explores use of electrical signal for treating spinal cord injuries

Wichita State University's Li Yao is taking a special approach to the study of spinal cord injuries through research that uses an electrical signal to repair tissue damage. [More]
New drug DSM265 shows potential to cure, prevent malaria

New drug DSM265 shows potential to cure, prevent malaria

Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center and in Australia have shown that a drug currently in testing shows potential to cure malaria in a single dose and offers promise as a preventive treatment as well. [More]
Emory University immunologists identify long-lived antibody-producing cells in bone marrow

Emory University immunologists identify long-lived antibody-producing cells in bone marrow

Immunologists from Emory University have identified a distinct set of long-lived antibody-producing cells in the human bone marrow that function as an immune archive. [More]
Research could lead to new approaches to treating spinal cord and brain injuries

Research could lead to new approaches to treating spinal cord and brain injuries

Many an injury will heal, but the damaged spinal cord is notoriously recalcitrant. There's new hope on the horizon, though. A team of researchers led by the University of South Carolina's Jeff Twiss just reported an innate repair mechanism in central nervous system axons that might be harnessed to regenerate nerves after brain or spinal cord injuries. [More]
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