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Ribonucleic acid (RNA) is a biologically important type of molecule that consists of a long chain of nucleotide units. Each nucleotide consists of a nitrogenous base, a ribose sugar, and a phosphate.
RNA silencing technique developed by spinoff from UM-Madison effective in battling hepatitis B

RNA silencing technique developed by spinoff from UM-Madison effective in battling hepatitis B

A method for "silencing" RNA that emerged from a University of Wisconsin-Madison spinoff company is in clinical trials in Europe, Asia and the United States against hepatitis B, an infection that can destroy the liver. [More]
New disease gene linked to shortened telomeres appears to raise risk of pulmonary fibrosis-emphysema

New disease gene linked to shortened telomeres appears to raise risk of pulmonary fibrosis-emphysema

Johns Hopkins researchers say they have identified a new disease gene that, when mutated, appears to increase the risk in a small number of people of developing emphysema and a lung-scarring condition known as pulmonary fibrosis. [More]
UH biologists developing strategies to help regenerate heart muscle cell formation

UH biologists developing strategies to help regenerate heart muscle cell formation

Cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of death in the U.S. With one in every four deaths occurring each year, the five-year survival rate after a heart attack is worse than most cancers. [More]
Scientists link malfunctioning molecular pathways to specific heart abnormalities in SCA

Scientists link malfunctioning molecular pathways to specific heart abnormalities in SCA

Patients with sickle cell anemia (SCA) develop heart complications and nearly a quarter die a sudden death. Now, researchers have linked malfunctioning molecular pathways to specific heart anomalies in SCA that result from progressive fibrosis and result in sudden death. [More]
Researchers show how p53 protein can control gene expression at levels of transcription, mRNA translation

Researchers show how p53 protein can control gene expression at levels of transcription, mRNA translation

Proteins that bind DNA or RNA are usually put in different categories, but researchers at Umea University in Sweden and Inserm in France recently showed how the p53 protein has the capacity to bind both and how this controls gene expression on the levels of both transcription (RNA synthesis) and mRNA translation (protein synthesis). [More]
Brazilian study discovers promising therapeutic and diagnostic target for treatment of melanoma

Brazilian study discovers promising therapeutic and diagnostic target for treatment of melanoma

A Brazilian study shows that inhibition of an RNA named RMEL3, which is encoded by a previously uncharacterized gene (also named RMEL3), can reduce the viability of cultured melanoma cells by up to 95%. [More]
Research findings may have implications for ALS and other neurological disorders

Research findings may have implications for ALS and other neurological disorders

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, or Lou Gehrig's disease) is a progressive disorder that devastates motor nerve cells. People diagnosed with ALS slowly lose the ability to control muscle movement, and are ultimately unable to speak, eat, move, or breathe. [More]
Scientists engineer therapeutic system with two arms to get better hold on cancer target

Scientists engineer therapeutic system with two arms to get better hold on cancer target

Scientists have engineered a sort of biological barbell that can get inside cancer cells and do damage to two proteins that work independently and together to enable cancer's survival and spread. [More]
Scientists develop model using transformed stem cells to accelerate screening of drugs for rare cancers

Scientists develop model using transformed stem cells to accelerate screening of drugs for rare cancers

Researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center say they have developed a system that uses transformed human stem cells to speed up screening of existing drugs that might work against rare brain and other cancers. [More]
TSRI study unveils new twist in immune biology

TSRI study unveils new twist in immune biology

A new study, led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute, reveals a surprising twist in immune biology. [More]
USPTO grants key patent for Quark Pharmaceuticals' QPI-1007 ocular neuroprotectant

USPTO grants key patent for Quark Pharmaceuticals' QPI-1007 ocular neuroprotectant

Quark Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced that the United States Patent and Trademark Office has granted a key patent covering the treatment of patients suffering from non-arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy ("NAION") with the Company's ocular neuroprotectant QPI-1007. [More]
Novel conjugate therapy shows promise in destroying ALL cells with few side effects

Novel conjugate therapy shows promise in destroying ALL cells with few side effects

Researchers at UC Davis and Ionis Pharmaceuticals have developed a hybrid treatment that harnesses a monoclonal antibody to deliver antisense DNA to acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells and that may lead to less toxic treatments for the disease. [More]
Scientists identify new group of molecules that could slow tumour growth in prostate cancer patients

Scientists identify new group of molecules that could slow tumour growth in prostate cancer patients

Prostate cancer patients have been offered hope after scientists at Newcastle University, UK, have identified a new group of molecules that could be targeted to slow tumour growth. [More]
Human immune system proteins can help combat chlamydia infections

Human immune system proteins can help combat chlamydia infections

Scientists from Federal Research and Clinical Centre of Physical-Chemical Medicine, Koltzov Institute of Developmental Biology and MIPT have shown that peptidoglycan recognition proteins (PGLYRPs) of the human immune system can play a key role in the fight against chlamydia infections. Their study was published in Infection and Immunity. [More]
Researchers find easy way to ensure baby boomers get tested for hepatitis C

Researchers find easy way to ensure baby boomers get tested for hepatitis C

Baby boomers, adults born between 1945 and 1965, are five times more likely to have been exposed to the hepatitis C virus (HCV). [More]
New insights into RNA-protein interactions may lead to cure for heart disease

New insights into RNA-protein interactions may lead to cure for heart disease

Research led by The Australian National University has uncovered new insights into how the human genome gets through the daily grind with the help of RNA-binding proteins, in a discovery which could ultimately lead to a cure for heart disease. [More]
Large study of familial ALS finds new gene variant present in 3% of all patients with disease

Large study of familial ALS finds new gene variant present in 3% of all patients with disease

Variations in a gene with multiple functions in neurons are present in approximately 3 percent of all cases of ALS in North American and European populations, both sporadic and familial, making it one of the most common genetic causes of the disease, according to a paper published in Nature Genetics. [More]
Cancer risk screening for hereditary mutations: an interview with Ted Snelgrove

Cancer risk screening for hereditary mutations: an interview with Ted Snelgrove

Great question – the answer is actually unknown. Every month, there are publications that report on new cancer-related genes, so it's an area of great knowledge growth at the moment. [More]
Adhesive patch can deliver triple combination therapy to tumor sites

Adhesive patch can deliver triple combination therapy to tumor sites

Approximately one in 20 people will develop colorectal cancer in their lifetime, making it the third-most prevalent form of the disease in the U.S. In Europe, it is the second-most common form of cancer. [More]
Salmonella protein can reduce drug resistant molecule found in cancer cells

Salmonella protein can reduce drug resistant molecule found in cancer cells

A surprising result in an experiment on Salmonella bacteria has led to a discovery that may make drug resistant cancer cells more treatable by conventional chemotherapies. [More]
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