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Ribonucleic acid (RNA) is a biologically important type of molecule that consists of a long chain of nucleotide units. Each nucleotide consists of a nitrogenous base, a ribose sugar, and a phosphate.
Isis Pharmaceuticals CEO honored with SCRIP Lifetime Achievement Award

Isis Pharmaceuticals CEO honored with SCRIP Lifetime Achievement Award

Stanley T. Crooke, Ph.D., M.D., founder, CEO and chairman of the board of directors of Isis Pharmaceuticals, Inc., has been awarded the 2014 SCRIP Lifetime Achievement Award, one of the most prestigious of its kind in the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries worldwide. [More]
Resveratrol in red wine inhibits formation of inflammatory factors that activate cardiovascular diseases

Resveratrol in red wine inhibits formation of inflammatory factors that activate cardiovascular diseases

A natural substance present in red wine, resveratrol, inhibits the formation of inflammatory factors that trigger cardiovascular diseases. This has been established by a research team at the Department of Pharmacology of the University Medical Center of Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz working in collaboration with researchers of the Friedrich Schiller University in Jena and the University of Vienna. [More]
New technology reveals cellular gene transcription process in detail

New technology reveals cellular gene transcription process in detail

A new technology that reveals cellular gene transcription in greater detail has been developed by Dr. Daniel Kaufmann of the University of Montreal Hospital Research Centre and the research team he directed. "This new research tool offers us a more profound view of the immune responses that are involved in a range of diseases, such as HIV infection. At the level of gene transcription, this had been difficult, complex and costly to do with current technologies, such as microscopy," explained the University of Montreal professor. [More]
MIT engineers create new computer model to design complex 3-D DNA shapes

MIT engineers create new computer model to design complex 3-D DNA shapes

MIT biological engineers have created a new computer model that allows them to design the most complex three-dimensional DNA shapes ever produced, including rings, bowls, and geometric structures such as icosahedrons that resemble viral particles. [More]
Elevated anxious temperament associated with neuropeptide Y receptors

Elevated anxious temperament associated with neuropeptide Y receptors

Persistent anxiety is one of the most common and distressing symptoms compromising mental health. Most of the research on the neurobiology of anxiety has focused on the generation of increased anxiety, i.e., the processes that "turn on" anxiety. [More]
UT Austin researchers identify network of genes that drives alcohol dependence

UT Austin researchers identify network of genes that drives alcohol dependence

Researchers at The University of Texas at Austin have identified a network of genes that appear to work together in determining alcohol dependence. The findings, which could lead to future treatments and therapies for alcoholics and possibly help doctors screen for alcoholism, are being published this week in the journal Molecular Psychiatry. [More]
Researchers explore how to turn on the activity of paternal gene

Researchers explore how to turn on the activity of paternal gene

Most genes are inherited as two working copies, one from the mother and one from the father. However, in a few instances, a gene is imprinted, which means that one copy is silenced. This is called genomic imprinting. If the active copy is mutated, then disease results, even though the silenced gene copy may be normal. [More]
Researchers develop low-cost, electricity-free device for detecting DNA of infectious pathogens

Researchers develop low-cost, electricity-free device for detecting DNA of infectious pathogens

Diagnosing HIV and other infectious diseases presents unique challenges in remote locations that lack electric power, refrigeration, and appropriately trained health care staff. To address these issues, researchers funded by the National Institutes of Health have developed a low-cost, electricity-free device capable of detecting the DNA of infectious pathogens, including HIV-1. [More]
Finding could upend scientific consensus about when embryonic cells begin separating into cell types

Finding could upend scientific consensus about when embryonic cells begin separating into cell types

Bioengineers at the University of California, San Diego have discovered that mouse embryos are contemplating their cellular fates in the earliest stages after fertilization when the embryo has only two to four cells, a discovery that could upend the scientific consensus about when embryonic cells begin differentiating into cell types. [More]
HIV drugs could be harnessed to treat leading cause of blindness

HIV drugs could be harnessed to treat leading cause of blindness

An established class of drugs, traditionally used to control HIV/AIDS infections, could soon be harnessed to treat the leading cause of blindness and visual impairment in the UK, for which currently there exists no cure. [More]
Researchers find unusual role of lactate in metabolism of alveolar soft part sarcoma

Researchers find unusual role of lactate in metabolism of alveolar soft part sarcoma

Researchers from Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah discovered the unusual role of lactate in the metabolism of alveolar soft part sarcoma (ASPS), a rare, aggressive cancer that primarily affects adolescents and young adults. The study also confirmed that a fusion gene is the cancer-causing agent in this disease. [More]
Tufts University study explores relationship between transcription, expansions of DNA repeats

Tufts University study explores relationship between transcription, expansions of DNA repeats

Researchers in human genetics have known that long nucleotide repeats in DNA lead to instability of the genome and ultimately to human hereditary diseases such Freidreich's ataxia and Huntington's disease. [More]
Choosing the best way to verify the quality and quantity of Chromatin Immunoprecipitation DNA

Choosing the best way to verify the quality and quantity of Chromatin Immunoprecipitation DNA

Porvair Sciences has published a new guide to help laboratories choose the best way to verify the quality and quantity of their Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP) DNA. [More]
MACROD2 gene may explain why some breast cancers are resistant to tamoxifen

MACROD2 gene may explain why some breast cancers are resistant to tamoxifen

After mining the genetic records of thousands of breast cancer patients, researchers from the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center have identified a gene whose presence may explain why some breast cancers are resistant to tamoxifen, a widely used hormone treatment generally used after surgery, radiation and other chemotherapy. [More]
Six Albert Einstein College of Medicine faculty members selected as AAAS Fellows

Six Albert Einstein College of Medicine faculty members selected as AAAS Fellows

Six faculty members at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University have been named Fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Election as an AAAS Fellow is an honor bestowed upon AAAS members by their peers. This year, 401 members have been awarded this honor by AAAS because of their scientifically or socially distinguished efforts to advance science or its applications. [More]
UTMB researchers receive awards at American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene meeting

UTMB researchers receive awards at American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene meeting

Scientists at the University of Texas Medical Branch were recognized with prestigious awards for their contributions in research at the annual American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene meeting. [More]
Researchers discover new method to deliver drugs into aggressive tumors

Researchers discover new method to deliver drugs into aggressive tumors

A multi-disciplinary team of Yale Cancer Center researchers has discovered a promising new method for delivering drugs into aggressive tumors by exploiting a unique feature of tumors themselves. [More]
New method could make Ebola surveillance quicker, cheaper for West African nations

New method could make Ebola surveillance quicker, cheaper for West African nations

A new method for examining the Ebola virus genome could make surveillance quicker and cheaper for West African nations, and help detect new forms of the virus. The detailed procedure is being shared with the research community along with the study paper, which is freely available in the open access journal Genome Biology. [More]
Scientists identify how ADAR1 gene mutation can lead to diseases

Scientists identify how ADAR1 gene mutation can lead to diseases

Scientists have discovered how a gene mutation can lead to diseases that occur when the immune system attacks the body by mistake. [More]
New look at the workings of HIV, other viruses

New look at the workings of HIV, other viruses

UC Davis researchers are getting a new look at the workings of HIV and other viruses thanks to new techniques in electron microscopy developed on campus. [More]