Radiology News and Research RSS Feed - Radiology News and Research

Radiology is the medical specialty directing medical imaging technologies to diagnose and sometimes treat diseases. Originally it was the aspect of medical science dealing with the medical use of electromagnetic energy emitted by X-ray machines or other such radiation devices for the purpose of obtaining visual information as part of medical imaging.
DTI may play role in assessing brain damage in early Alzheimer's disease

DTI may play role in assessing brain damage in early Alzheimer's disease

Changes in brain connections visible on MRI could represent an imaging biomarker of Alzheimer's disease, according to a new study presented today at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA). [More]
Brain changes seen in high school football players after one season

Brain changes seen in high school football players after one season

Some high school football players exhibit measurable brain changes after a single season of play even in the absence of concussion, according to a study presented today at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA). [More]
Philips launches Ambient Experience patient in-bore solution to reduce patient anxiety during MRI scans

Philips launches Ambient Experience patient in-bore solution to reduce patient anxiety during MRI scans

Royal Philips announced the launch of the Ambient Experience patient in-bore solution designed to reduce patient anxiety and movement during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations. [More]
eHealth Technologies to provide imaging sites access to RSNA Image Share network

eHealth Technologies to provide imaging sites access to RSNA Image Share network

eHealth Technologies announced today it has concluded an agreement with the Radiological Society of North America that will increase standards-based interoperability between image sharing providers in New York State. [More]
Interventional X-ray guidance device may reduce radiation exposure of liver cancer patients

Interventional X-ray guidance device may reduce radiation exposure of liver cancer patients

Johns Hopkins researchers report that their test of an interventional X-ray guidance device approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in 2013 has the potential to reduce the radiation exposure of patients undergoing intra-arterial therapy (IAT) for liver cancer. [More]
Philips announces expanded availability of diagnostic X-ray solutions

Philips announces expanded availability of diagnostic X-ray solutions

Royal Philips today announced expanded availability of its portfolio of diagnostic X-ray solutions, including DuraDiagnost, DigitalDiagnost, MobileDiagnost wDR, MobileDiagnost Opta, ProGrade and PrimaryDiagnost. [More]
Eminent molecular cell biologist awarded GRC fellowship

Eminent molecular cell biologist awarded GRC fellowship

The Gutenberg Research College of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz has awarded the coveted GRC fellowship to Professor Krishnaraj Rajalingam. In the upcoming years, he will lead a research team at the Research Center for Immunotherapy at Mainz University. [More]
Philips' IQon Spectral CT receives FDA clearance

Philips' IQon Spectral CT receives FDA clearance

Reinforcing its commitment to enabling confident diagnosis through innovation, Royal Philips today announced 510(k) clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for its IQon Spectral CT, presenting an entirely new approach to spectral imaging. [More]
Advanced practice clinicians more likely to prescribe imaging exam for patients

Advanced practice clinicians more likely to prescribe imaging exam for patients

Advanced practice clinicians, such as nurse practitioners and physician assistants, are 34 percent more likely than primary care physicians to prescribe an imaging exam for patients, according to a Harvey L. Neiman Health Policy Institute study published in JAMA Internal Medicine. [More]
Plaque buildup in the arteries associated with mild cognitive impairment

Plaque buildup in the arteries associated with mild cognitive impairment

In a study of nearly 2,000 adults, researchers found that a buildup of plaque in the body's major arteries was associated with mild cognitive impairment. Results of the study conducted at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center will be presented next week at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America. [More]
Researchers discover new method to deliver drugs into aggressive tumors

Researchers discover new method to deliver drugs into aggressive tumors

A multi-disciplinary team of Yale Cancer Center researchers has discovered a promising new method for delivering drugs into aggressive tumors by exploiting a unique feature of tumors themselves. [More]
Model G: New patient hospital gown blends style and comfort

Model G: New patient hospital gown blends style and comfort

A new Detroit design is rolling off the assembly line in the Motor City in 2015, made with a cotton-poplin blend for comfort, color-coded trim for ease of use and - most importantly - a closed backside that finally offers patients more privacy and comfort in the hospital. [More]
Study finds that fat around heart closely associated with atrial fibrillation

Study finds that fat around heart closely associated with atrial fibrillation

Obesity is a known risk factor for atrial fibrillation, the most common heart rhythm disorder. [More]
UT Southwestern researchers identify new gene mutations involved in certain kidney cancers

UT Southwestern researchers identify new gene mutations involved in certain kidney cancers

Using next generation gene sequencing techniques, cancer researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have identified more than 3,000 new mutations involved in certain kidney cancers, findings that help explain the diversity of cancer behaviors. [More]
New technology improves lung cancer detection during radiation therapy

New technology improves lung cancer detection during radiation therapy

Researchers from Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine have developed a technology that improves the detection of tumors during radiation therapy for early-stage lung cancer. [More]
Novel medical-imaging technology helps make earlier treatment decisions for bowel cancer patients

Novel medical-imaging technology helps make earlier treatment decisions for bowel cancer patients

Technology developed at the University of Sussex helps hospitals make earlier and more accurate treatment decisions and survival assessments for patients with bowel cancer. [More]
CMS to cover low-dose CT screening for lung cancer

CMS to cover low-dose CT screening for lung cancer

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services today recognized the importance of lung cancer screening, announcing today that it will cover low-dose computed tomography (CT) screening, or "CAT" scans , for high-risk current and former smokers. The decision validates Mount Sinai's longstanding commitment to providing access to this essential screening tool. [More]
Lung cancer screening in NLST meets standard for cost effectiveness

Lung cancer screening in NLST meets standard for cost effectiveness

Dartmouth researchers say lung cancer screening in the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) meets a commonly accepted standard for cost effectiveness as reported in the Nov. 6 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. This relatively new screening test uses annual low-dose CT scans to spot lung tumors early in individuals facing the highest risks of lung cancer due to age and smoking history. [More]
Internet based screening mammography training: an interview with Dr. Holzhauer

Internet based screening mammography training: an interview with Dr. Holzhauer

About half of Radiologists in the USA who participate in breast imaging are estimated to read less than 2,000 screening mammograms per year. This is a suboptimal number, given that only 3-5 cancers in average are seen among 1,000 screening mammograms. [More]
Stanford scientists find new way to predict progression of AMD

Stanford scientists find new way to predict progression of AMD

Stanford University School of Medicine scientists have found a new way to forecast which patients with age-related macular degeneration are likely to suffer from the most debilitating form of the disease. [More]