Radiology News and Research RSS Feed - Radiology News and Research

Radiology is the medical specialty directing medical imaging technologies to diagnose and sometimes treat diseases. Originally it was the aspect of medical science dealing with the medical use of electromagnetic energy emitted by X-ray machines or other such radiation devices for the purpose of obtaining visual information as part of medical imaging.
Royal Sussex County Hospital helps reduce general anaesthetic administration with Siemens' new MR technology

Royal Sussex County Hospital helps reduce general anaesthetic administration with Siemens' new MR technology

Royal Sussex County Hospital, part of Brighton and Sussex University Hospitals has helped to reduce the administration of general anaesthetic by a third in patients aged 4-17 by expanding its MR capability with the help of new technology from Siemens Healthcare. [More]
DTI may predict functional post-deployment outcomes for veterans with MTBI

DTI may predict functional post-deployment outcomes for veterans with MTBI

Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), a type of MRI, may be able to predict functional post-deployment outcomes for veterans who sustained mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI), or concussion, during combat, according to a new study published in the journal Radiology. [More]
Transcranial magnetic stimulation of STS can change behaviour of gaze

Transcranial magnetic stimulation of STS can change behaviour of gaze

A study financed by the Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris has been conducted under the direction of Monica Zilbovicius in the Inserm Unit 1000 on a particular region of the brain, the superior temporal sulcus (STS), influencing perception and behaviour of the gaze. [More]
Mount Sinai Hospital uses M1 LUMI Bead loaded with doxorubicin for liver cancer treatment

Mount Sinai Hospital uses M1 LUMI Bead loaded with doxorubicin for liver cancer treatment

An innovative cancer treatment made of luminescent chemotherapy-filled beads injected into tumors through the wrist is now available for patients with inoperable and difficult-to-treat liver cancer. [More]
Annual LDCT screenings not required for most high-risk lung cancer patients

Annual LDCT screenings not required for most high-risk lung cancer patients

Most high-risk lung cancer patients might not need annual low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) screenings if they are cleared of disease in their initial test, according to a study led by a Duke Cancer Institute researcher. [More]
Ontario to invest $4.22 million to support R&D expansion project at Baylis' Mississauga manufacturing plant

Ontario to invest $4.22 million to support R&D expansion project at Baylis' Mississauga manufacturing plant

Ontario is partnering with Baylis Medical Company, a leading supplier of cardiology and radiology products, to support an R&D expansion project at the company’s Mississauga manufacturing plant. [More]
New ultra-sensitive technique shows promise as diagnostic tool for cancers, HIV

New ultra-sensitive technique shows promise as diagnostic tool for cancers, HIV

A common theme in medicine is that detecting a disease early on can lead to more effective treatments. This relies partly on luck that the patient gets screened at the right time, but more important is that the testing techniques are sensitive enough to register the minuscule hints that diseases leave in the blood stream. [More]
Siemens Healthcare launches new MR applications to help hospitals reduce scan times in neurology

Siemens Healthcare launches new MR applications to help hospitals reduce scan times in neurology

Siemens Healthcare has launched a range of new MR applications to help hospitals reduce the time needed for MR imaging within neurology. It is estimated that 20 to 25 per cent of all MR examinations are neurological, with the number expected to grow in 2016. [More]
Hi-tech Hybrid Operating Theatre has potential to improve patient care, reduce overall cost of treatment

Hi-tech Hybrid Operating Theatre has potential to improve patient care, reduce overall cost of treatment

Last month, St George’s Hospital - one of the biggest in the UK - opened their new hi-tech Hybrid Operating Theatre, where state of the art imaging could mean less invasive surgery and safer procedures for patients. [More]
New chemical probe could tag cells for detection by MRI

New chemical probe could tag cells for detection by MRI

The need to non-invasively "see" and track cells in living persons is indisputable - a boon to both research and development of future therapies. Emerging treatments using stem cells and immune cells are poised to most benefit from cell tracking, which would visualize their behavior in the body after delivery. Clinicians require such data to speed these cell treatments to patients. [More]
Simple diagnostic liquid offers a pain-free method for detecting tooth decay

Simple diagnostic liquid offers a pain-free method for detecting tooth decay

The days of the dreaded dental drill-and-fill as the standard solution for tooth decay may be numbered if a discovery by a Creighton University School of Dentistry professor continues to advance. [More]
People who burn more calories have larger gray matter volume in key brain areas linked to memory, cognition

People who burn more calories have larger gray matter volume in key brain areas linked to memory, cognition

Whether they jog, swim, garden or dance, physically active older persons have larger gray matter volume in key brain areas responsible for memory and cognition, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and UCLA. [More]
FDA OKs ACR's new Digital Mammography QC Manual

FDA OKs ACR's new Digital Mammography QC Manual

The Food and Drug Administration approved the American College of Radiology's alternative standard request to allow mammography facilities to use the new Digital Mammography Quality Control Manual and Digital Mammography QC Phantom in routine QC of digital equipment. The new manual and phantom will aid in ensuring uniformity of QC testing. [More]
CWRU researcher to customize tobacco mosaic virus to treat human cancers

CWRU researcher to customize tobacco mosaic virus to treat human cancers

A Case Western Reserve University researcher has been awarded more than $3 million in federal and foundation grants to turn common plant viruses into cancer sleuths and search-and-destroy emissaries. [More]
New co-marketing deal to make AMRA Profiler protocol available on future GE Healthcare MRI scanners

New co-marketing deal to make AMRA Profiler protocol available on future GE Healthcare MRI scanners

AMRA has announced at the European Congress of Radiology in Vienna, Austria, that it has entered into a new co-marketing agreement with GE Healthcare, a leading provider of MRI systems. [More]
Renishaw inVia to support development of nanomolecular probes in Kircher Laboratory at Memorial Sloan Kettering

Renishaw inVia to support development of nanomolecular probes in Kircher Laboratory at Memorial Sloan Kettering

The Kircher laboratory at Memorial Sloan Kettering is developing novel nanoprobes for molecular imaging, image-guided therapy and theranostics. [More]
New method uses MRT with Dixon sequence for accurate measurement of breast density

New method uses MRT with Dixon sequence for accurate measurement of breast density

A high breast density is an independent risk factor for breast cancer. MRT is the safest method for breast cancer diagnosis and is now used for early diagnosis. Medical University Vienna researchers at the University Clinic for Radiology and Nuclear Medicine have now successfully developed a method for the exact measurement of breast density using magnetic resonance tomography (MRT) examinations with the Dixon sequence. [More]
Modified protein appears to reverse liver fibrosis, cirrhosis in rats

Modified protein appears to reverse liver fibrosis, cirrhosis in rats

A protein modified to increase the amount of time it circulates in the bloodstream appears to reverse liver fibrosis and cirrhosis in rats, according to results of a study led by Johns Hopkins researchers. [More]
NYU Langone Medical Center researchers successfully perform CT scans for joint fractures

NYU Langone Medical Center researchers successfully perform CT scans for joint fractures

Computed Tomography (CT) scans are one of the most frequently used imaging tools in medicine. In fact, more than 72 million scans are performed each year to diagnose various medical conditions. But public health concerns persist about radiation exposure from these tests—especially when given to children and young adults. [More]
Teleradiology Specialists reports record growth in January

Teleradiology Specialists reports record growth in January

Teleradiology Specialists is positioned for explosive volume and market share growth in 2016 after completing a record number of reads in January. [More]
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