Radiology News and Research RSS Feed - Radiology News and Research

Radiology is the medical specialty directing medical imaging technologies to diagnose and sometimes treat diseases. Originally it was the aspect of medical science dealing with the medical use of electromagnetic energy emitted by X-ray machines or other such radiation devices for the purpose of obtaining visual information as part of medical imaging.
CT scans allow rheumatologists to diagnose gout

CT scans allow rheumatologists to diagnose gout

Gout is on the rise among U.S. men and women, and this piercingly painful and most common form of inflammatory arthritis is turning out to be more complicated than had been thought. [More]
Johns Hopkins researchers use 3-D MRI scans to accurately measure tumor viability and death

Johns Hopkins researchers use 3-D MRI scans to accurately measure tumor viability and death

In a series of studies involving 140 American men and women with liver tumors, researchers at Johns Hopkins have used specialized 3-D MRI scans to precisely measure living and dying tumor tissue to quickly show whether highly toxic chemotherapy - delivered directly through a tumor's blood supply - is working. [More]
Pacific Vascular purchases Toshiba's Aplio 300 ultrasound systems

Pacific Vascular purchases Toshiba's Aplio 300 ultrasound systems

Pacific Vascular, Inc. is providing its patients with the latest in ultrasound technology by acquiring 36 Aplio 300 ultrasound systems from Toshiba America Medical Systems, Inc. [More]
A fast, non-invasive method to genotype late-onset Alzheimer's disease

A fast, non-invasive method to genotype late-onset Alzheimer's disease

The apolipoprotein E gene ε4 allele is considered a negative factor for neural regeneration in late-onset Alzheimer's disease cases. [More]

Studying brain network changes in stroke patients possible with functional network connection models

Studies have shown that functional network connection models can be used to study brain network changes in patients with schizophrenia. A research team from Huazhong University of Science and Technology in China inferred that these models could also be used to explore functional network connectivity changes in stroke patients. [More]
State highlights: Fla. employees' unequal premiums; abuse by Calif. doctor alleged

State highlights: Fla. employees' unequal premiums; abuse by Calif. doctor alleged

The Florida Cabinet, state agency managers and legislative staff are among 30,000 top-ranked state workers who will continue to pay ultra-low health insurance premiums in the coming year. In a reverse of the Robin Hood principle, the state charges lower-paid workers six times more than those who have the highest earnings pay. ... [B]oth the House and Senate this week released initial budgets that would keep premiums at the same rate (3/22). [More]

CytRx initiates Phase 3 clinical trial to evaluate efficacy of aldoxorubicin in STS patients

CytRx Corporation (Nasdaq: CYTR), a biopharmaceutical research and development company specializing in oncology, today announced it has initiated a pivotal global Phase 3 clinical trial to evaluate the efficacy and safety of aldoxorubicin as a second-line treatment for patients with soft tissue sarcoma (STS) under a Special Protocol Assessment with the FDA. [More]

Physicists recommend new strategies to make computed tomography safer

UC Davis clinicians and physicists have recommended new strategies to make computed tomography (CT) safer, including adoption of a new metric for dose measurement, ways to manage exposure protocols that differ by CT brand and specific approaches to reduce exposure during needle biopsies. [More]
Researchers use "big data" analytics to predict triple-negative breast cancer and other cancers with 95% accuracy

Researchers use "big data" analytics to predict triple-negative breast cancer and other cancers with 95% accuracy

Researchers at Case Western Reserve University and colleagues used "big data" analytics to predict if a patient is suffering from aggressive triple-negative breast cancer, slower-moving cancers or non-cancerous lesions with 95 percent accuracy. [More]
Building muscle mass important in decreasing metabolic risk

Building muscle mass important in decreasing metabolic risk

New UCLA research suggests that the more muscle mass older Americans have, the less likely they are to die prematurely. The findings add to the growing evidence that overall body composition - and not the widely used body mass index, or BMI - is a better predictor of all-cause mortality. [More]
Top medical organizations urge CMS to provide full Medicare coverage for LDCT screening

Top medical organizations urge CMS to provide full Medicare coverage for LDCT screening

In a joint response to the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) National Coverage and Analysis Group, the Lung Cancer Alliance, The Society of Thoracic Surgeons, American College of Radiology (ACR) and 38 other medical organizations called on CMS to quickly provide national Medicare coverage of low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) screening for patients at high risk for lung cancer. [More]
Sports medicine physicians to convene at 2014 AMSSM Annual Meeting

Sports medicine physicians to convene at 2014 AMSSM Annual Meeting

More than 1,400 sports medicine physicians from the United States and abroad will attend the 23rd Annual Meeting of the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine (AMSSM), the largest primary care sports medicine physician organization in the nation. [More]
Surgeons perform first auditory brainstem implant operation in Northeast Ohio

Surgeons perform first auditory brainstem implant operation in Northeast Ohio

Surgeons at University Hospitals Case Medical Center have completed the first auditory brainstem implant (ABI) operation in Northeast Ohio on a woman who has lost most of her hearing due to benign tumors on her auditory nerves. [More]
Study shows effect of oral fungal yeast in inhibiting thrush

Study shows effect of oral fungal yeast in inhibiting thrush

Scientists at Case Western Reserve School of Medicine and University Hospitals (UH) Case Medical Center have discovered how the beneficial fungal yeast, Pichia, holds at bay a harmful fungal yeast, Candida. [More]
Physician-scientists present pancreatic cancer surgery findings at SSO Cancer Symposium

Physician-scientists present pancreatic cancer surgery findings at SSO Cancer Symposium

Despite the benefits of surgery for early stage pancreatic cancer, it remains under-utilized for patients with this deadly disease, according to a new national analysis of trends and outcomes. Physician-scientists at University Hospitals Case Medical Center and Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine presented their findings and strategies to increase rates on March 13 at the Society of Surgical Oncology Cancer Symposium in Phoenix. [More]

Surefire Medical's new line of Surefire Guiding Catheters receive FDA clearance and CE Mark

Surefire Medical, Inc., developer of a new class of infusion systems designed to maximize direct-to-tumor drug delivery, announced today that the company has received 510(k) FDA clearance and the CE Mark for its enhanced line of Surefire Guiding Catheters used in radioembolization and chemoembolization procedures. [More]
Sutures embedded with stem cells led to quicker and stronger healing of Achilles tendon tears

Sutures embedded with stem cells led to quicker and stronger healing of Achilles tendon tears

Researchers have found that sutures embedded with stem cells led to quicker and stronger healing of Achilles tendon tears than traditional sutures, according to a new study published in the March 2014 issue of Foot & Ankle International (published by SAGE). [More]

FDA clears Toshiba’s CT Myocardial Perfusion technology

To improve cardiac diagnoses with simplified dose reduction technology, Toshiba announces the FDA clearance of its industry-exclusive CT Myocardial Perfusion capability. Available on Toshiba's AquilionTM ONE and Aquilion ONE ViSION Edition CT systems. [More]

New MRI shows detailed image following fracture repair without any distortion by metal surgical screws

People who sustain the most common type of hip fracture, known as a femoral neck fracture, are at increased risk of complications. A special type of MRI developed at Hospital for Special Surgery in collaboration with GE Healthcare can show a detailed image following fracture repair, without the distortion caused by metal surgical screws that are problematic in standard MRIs. [More]

New MRI can show detailed image following fracture repair without distortion by metal surgical screws

People who sustain the most common type of hip fracture, known as a femoral neck fracture, are at increased risk of complications. A special type of MRI developed at Hospital for Special Surgery in collaboration with GE Healthcare can show a detailed image following fracture repair, without the distortion caused by metal surgical screws that are problematic in standard MRIs. [More]