Radiotherapy News and Research RSS Feed - Radiotherapy News and Research

Radiation therapy (in North America), or radiotherapy (in the UK and Australia) also called radiation oncology, and sometimes abbreviated to XRT, is the medical use of ionizing radiation as part of cancer treatment to control malignant cells (not to be confused with radiology, the use of radiation in medical imaging and diagnosis).
International scientists discuss new treatments for non small cell lung cancer

International scientists discuss new treatments for non small cell lung cancer

More than 30 prominent international scientists gathered to discuss the state-of-the-art, as well as promising future approaches for the treatment of lung cancer at the stunning 17th century Borgo San Luigi, in Monteriggion, in the heart of the Tuscany countryside. [More]
Moffitt study reports that liver metastases have different sensitivities to radiation therapy

Moffitt study reports that liver metastases have different sensitivities to radiation therapy

Radiation is a commonly used therapeutic option to treat liver metastases, with the majority of tumors maintained under control after one year. However, some patients do not respond as well to radiation treatment, and the factors that predict patient outcomes are unclear. Moffitt Cancer Center researchers report that liver metastases have different sensitivities to radiation therapy based on the location of the primary tumor. [More]
RedHill Biopharma initiates phase II study of BEKINDA for irritable bowel syndrome

RedHill Biopharma initiates phase II study of BEKINDA for irritable bowel syndrome

RedHill Biopharma Ltd. (NASDAQ; RDHL) (TASE: RDHL) (“RedHill” or the “Company”), a biopharmaceutical company primarily focused on development and commercialization of late clinical-stage, proprietary, orally-administered, small molecule drugs for inflammatory and gastrointestinal diseases, including cancer, today announced that it has initiated a randomized, double-blind, 2-arm parallel group Phase II clinical study in the U.S. evaluating the safety and efficacy of BEKINDA™ 12 mg in patients with diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D). [More]
Shortened RT schedule has similar efficacy as conventional RT schedule in low-risk prostate cancer patients

Shortened RT schedule has similar efficacy as conventional RT schedule in low-risk prostate cancer patients

Of the more than 220,000 patients newly diagnosed with prostate cancer in 2015, the vast majority will have had early-stage disease at low risk for recurrence. [More]
MedUni Vienna researchers identify reason for chemoresistance in small cell lung cancer

MedUni Vienna researchers identify reason for chemoresistance in small cell lung cancer

Small cell lung cancer is not usually detected until it is at an advanced stage, when metastases have already formed. Chemotherapy is very effective initially but, within a year, cancer recurs and this time does not respond to a course of chemotherapy. The research group headed by Gerhard Hamilton, University Department of Surgery at MedUni Vienna, has now managed to identify the reason for this chemoresistance. [More]
Fertility 'reassurance' for most chemotherapy-treated female childhood cancer survivors

Fertility 'reassurance' for most chemotherapy-treated female childhood cancer survivors

Both female and male chemotherapy-treated survivors of childhood cancer have an increased risk of impaired fertility, but results suggest that the risk in women is limited to those given specific chemotherapy drugs. [More]
Versatile automated microplate sample screening applications: an interview with Tobias Pusterla

Versatile automated microplate sample screening applications: an interview with Tobias Pusterla

Microplate readers are divided into single-mode and multi-mode readers. A single mode reader is mainly a reader dedicated to the detection of absorbance, luminescence or fluorescence. [More]
Women who have survived childhood cancer can become pregnant, shows study

Women who have survived childhood cancer can become pregnant, shows study

For women who have survived childhood cancer, the impact of modern chemotherapy regimens on the likelihood of becoming pregnant is generally small, and most have a good chance of conceiving, according to one of the largest studies of its kind published in The Lancet Oncology. [More]
City University London opens new City TECS Smart Home Facility

City University London opens new City TECS Smart Home Facility

Imagine a world where healthcare professionals are able to identify if patients need help at home and can immediately alert the right person - be it A&E, a fire brigade responder or family member - even before the person knows something is wrong. [More]
New development offers hope to patients with inoperable advanced midgut neuroendocrine cancer

New development offers hope to patients with inoperable advanced midgut neuroendocrine cancer

A novel drug proven to reduce the risk of disease progression by 79% as well as three new European Centres of Excellence, offer new hope to patients with inoperable metastatic advanced midgut neuroendocrine cancer. [More]
Breast cancer can be more aggressive in obese people

Breast cancer can be more aggressive in obese people

An international team of researchers, with the participation of the University of Granada, has revealed new data on why breast cancer has a higher incidence and is more aggressive in obese people. The reason is that peritumoral fat (the fat around the tumor) facilitates the expansion and invasion of cancer stem cells (CSCs), which are responsible of the onset and growth of the tumor. [More]
Use of radiotherapy focused around tumour bed with IMRT benefits breast cancer patients

Use of radiotherapy focused around tumour bed with IMRT benefits breast cancer patients

Radiotherapy to the whole breast is standard treatment after breast-conserving surgery for women with early breast cancer, even those who have a low risk of the disease returning in the breast (local relapse). However, whole breast radiotherapy can cause changes in the appearance of the breast, which may also be firmer and tender to the touch, resulting in psychological distress. [More]
Research could pave way for new generation of anti-cancer drugs

Research could pave way for new generation of anti-cancer drugs

New research has identified a first step in the design of a new generation of anti-cancer drugs that include an agent to inhibit resistance to their effectiveness. [More]
Research proves importance of designing patient interactions with medical technologies

Research proves importance of designing patient interactions with medical technologies

Patients risk experiencing anxiety and fear when health care does not meet individual patients' needs. New approaches to reduce anxiety for instance over radiotherapy are needed and design research is well-suited to meet these challenges. This is according to a dissertation at Umeå University in Sweden. [More]
Drug-incorporated nanoparticle platforms allow for selective targeting of cancer cells

Drug-incorporated nanoparticle platforms allow for selective targeting of cancer cells

Cancer is a group of diseases characterized by the uncontrolled growth and spread of abnormal cells. It is a leading cause of death and the burden is expected to grow worldwide due to the growth and aging of the population, mainly in less developed countries, in which about 82% of the world's population resides. By 2030, the global burden is expected to grow to 21.7 million new cancer cases and 13 million cancer deaths simply due to the growth and aging of the population. Current cancer therapy approaches are based in surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, being the chemotherapy the one that shows the greater efficiency for cancer treatment, mainly in more advanced stages. A major problem with this conventional chemotherapy is its toxicity and it also destroys healthy tissues resulting in systemic toxicity besides beneficial characteristics of killing cancer cells. Anticancer drugs also destroy healthy tissues resulting in systemic toxicity. [More]
Allied health professionals to discuss ways to improve clinical research at Sheffield Hallam

Allied health professionals to discuss ways to improve clinical research at Sheffield Hallam

Allied health professionals from across the country will meet at Sheffield Hallam University today to discuss how they can improve clinical practice and patient care through research. [More]
Varian to collaborate with several Brazilian institutions to train healthcare professionals on radiotherapy technology

Varian to collaborate with several Brazilian institutions to train healthcare professionals on radiotherapy technology

Varian Medical Systems, today announced its intent to collaborate with several cancer treatment centers in Brazil for the training of healthcare professionals on advanced radiotherapy technologies. [More]
Cell-based immunotherapy may offer new hope in fight against brain cancer

Cell-based immunotherapy may offer new hope in fight against brain cancer

High-grade glioma is the most aggressive form of brain cancer. Despite improvements in surgical procedures, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy, this type of brain tumour is still notoriously hard to treat: less than 10% of patients survive beyond five years. [More]
New collaborative project aims to develop novel imaging technology for cancer treatments

New collaborative project aims to develop novel imaging technology for cancer treatments

Engineers are to develop new imaging technology that could provide more accurate cancer treatments. [More]
Early screening with MRIs can reduce risk of breast cancer mortality for survivors of childhood HL

Early screening with MRIs can reduce risk of breast cancer mortality for survivors of childhood HL

Researchers at Princess Margaret Cancer Centre have confirmed in a screening effectiveness study that early screening with MRIs can reduce breast cancer mortality for female survivors of childhood Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) who received chest radiation. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement