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Air pollution exposure may have direct role in triggering lupus among children and adolescents

Air pollution exposure may have direct role in triggering lupus among children and adolescents

The results of a study presented today at the European League Against Rheumatism Annual Congress show for the first time that an individual's exposure to air pollution may have a direct role in triggering disease activity as well as airway inflammation in children and adolescents with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE). [More]
New paediatric exoskeleton aims to support children with spinal muscular atrophy

New paediatric exoskeleton aims to support children with spinal muscular atrophy

Furthermore, it will also be used in physiotherapy in hospitals to prevent the secondary effects associated with the loss of mobility in this illness. The technology, which has been patented and licensed jointly by CSIC and its technology-based business unit, Marsi Bionics, is currently in the preclinical phase. [More]
Researchers identify lymphatic endothelial lineage that shows potential for new anti-cancer treatment

Researchers identify lymphatic endothelial lineage that shows potential for new anti-cancer treatment

Identifying the cell of origin is crucial to understanding how a tumor develops and metastasizes and for developing targeted therapies. [More]
New study sheds light on impact of unknown genetic mutations in cystic fibrosis patients

New study sheds light on impact of unknown genetic mutations in cystic fibrosis patients

When it comes to cystic fibrosis (CF), more than 2,000 different genetic mutations have been reported. However, only 200 of them have been categorized - leaving a genetic soup of 1,800 others for scientists and genetic counselors to figure out. [More]
Innovative RapifleX MALDI-TOF/TOF showcased by Bruker

Innovative RapifleX MALDI-TOF/TOF showcased by Bruker

At the 64th ASMS Conference, Bruker introducesrapifleX™, the highest performance MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometer, which had been shown as work-in-progress to early adopters at HUPO 2015. [More]
Researchers explore how ALS develops from muscle perspective

Researchers explore how ALS develops from muscle perspective

In an effort to better understand what happens during Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), researchers at Umea University in Sweden have compared the impact of ALS on the eye and limb muscles. [More]
New HET wearable system may help track user’s wellness to predict asthma attacks

New HET wearable system may help track user’s wellness to predict asthma attacks

Researchers have developed an integrated, wearable system that monitors a user's environment, heart rate and other physical attributes with the goal of predicting and preventing asthma attacks. [More]
Right carbohydrate intake linked to healthy aging

Right carbohydrate intake linked to healthy aging

Most people know that a diet high in fiber helps to keep us "regular." Now Australian researchers have uncovered a surprising benefit of this often-undervalued dietary component. [More]
Correcting defective p73 gene function may be promising therapeutic strategy for chronic lung diseases

Correcting defective p73 gene function may be promising therapeutic strategy for chronic lung diseases

Rising global air pollution and increasing smoking prevalence in many developing nations will likely lead to a growing incidence of lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), which currently affects more than 330 million people worldwide, is the third-leading cause of death and carries an estimated healthcare cost of $2.1 trillion. [More]
Cigarette smoke promotes bacteria colonization, immune invasion

Cigarette smoke promotes bacteria colonization, immune invasion

The mouth is one of the "dirtiest" parts of the body, home to millions of germs. But puffing cigarettes can increase the likelihood that certain bacteria like Porphyromonas gingivalis will not only set up camp but will build a fortified city in the mouth and fight against the immune system. [More]
Experts discuss new insights into early stages of Parkinson’s disease at EAN Congress

Experts discuss new insights into early stages of Parkinson’s disease at EAN Congress

Early diagnosis and starting treatment as early as possible are decisive factors in achieving improved quality of life for Parkinson's sufferers. Experts are discussing a wide range of new insights into the early stages of the disease at the Congress of the European Academy of Neurology in Copenhagen. [More]
Patients undergoing breast cancer surgery with non-opiate anaesthesia may need less painkillers

Patients undergoing breast cancer surgery with non-opiate anaesthesia may need less painkillers

New research presented at Euroanaesthesia 2016 shows that patients undergoing breast cancer surgery need less painkilling medication post-surgery if they have anaesthesia that is free of opioid drugs. [More]
Inadequate monitoring places post-operative patients at risk for opioid-induced respiratory depression

Inadequate monitoring places post-operative patients at risk for opioid-induced respiratory depression

Nearly 75 percent of hospitalized patients receiving opioids for pain management are not monitored according to hospital guidelines. [More]
Study finds link between respiratory sinus arrhythmia and survival prospects of heart attack patients

Study finds link between respiratory sinus arrhythmia and survival prospects of heart attack patients

The heart rate may be an indicator of a person's life expectancy. A research team at the Technical University of Munich has to this end analyzed an effect which at first seems paradoxical: Minor irregularities in the heartbeat are indicative of a healthy body. [More]
Zinbryta gets FDA approval for treating adults with relapsing forms of MS

Zinbryta gets FDA approval for treating adults with relapsing forms of MS

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Zinbryta (daclizumab) for the treatment of adults with relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (MS). Zinbryta is a long-acting injection that is self- administered by the patient monthly. [More]
Bereaved parents feel that pediatric end-of-life care needs improvement

Bereaved parents feel that pediatric end-of-life care needs improvement

Many pediatricians and pediatric subspecialists believe that their clinical care extends from treating ill children through end-of-life care. However, are pediatricians actually meeting the needs of families and their dying child? In a new study scheduled for publication in The Journal of Pediatrics, researchers surveyed bereaved parents and found that pediatric end-of-life care needs improvement. [More]
Researchers find potential link between pulmonary function and vocal fatigue symptoms in women

Researchers find potential link between pulmonary function and vocal fatigue symptoms in women

Teaching is an occupation with a high risk of developing vocal problems -- teachers have more than twice the voice problems than people in other professions, as the voice is the major tool in classroom instruction and is often used for long periods of time and in noisy environments. [More]
Researchers partially restore lost function of isolated cystic fibrosis lung cells

Researchers partially restore lost function of isolated cystic fibrosis lung cells

In experiments with isolated cystic fibrosis lung cells, University of Alabama at Birmingham researchers and colleagues from two other institutions have partially restored the lost function of those cells. [More]
Pre-treatment with antihistamines may suppress gastrointestinal symptoms of food allergy

Pre-treatment with antihistamines may suppress gastrointestinal symptoms of food allergy

Simultaneous pre-treatment with antihistamines that block both the H1 and H4 antihistamine receptors suppressed the gastrointestinal symptoms of food allergy in mice, according to researchers at National Jewish Health. [More]
Heart failure patients who receive influenza vaccine less likely to develop dementia

Heart failure patients who receive influenza vaccine less likely to develop dementia

Influenza vaccination is associated with a lower risk of dementia in patients with heart failure, according to a study in more than 20 000 patients presented today at Heart Failure 2016 and the 3rd World Congress on Acute Heart Failure by Dr Ju-Chi Liu, director of the Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Medicine, Taipei Medical University - Shuang Ho Hospital, in New Taipei City, Taiwan. [More]
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