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Study: Patients with 2 or more ED visits in one year account for disproportionate costs

Study: Patients with 2 or more ED visits in one year account for disproportionate costs

Almost one-third of acute heart failure syndrome patients seen in hospital emergency departments (EDs) in Florida and California during 2010 had ED visits during the following year, findings that suggest a lack of appropriate outpatient care. [More]
New therapeutic drug may prevent respiratory depression in patients taking opioid medication

New therapeutic drug may prevent respiratory depression in patients taking opioid medication

People taking prescription opioids to treat moderate to severe pain may be able to breathe a little easier, literally. [More]
Rettsyndrome.Org awards $1.5M to advance translational research, support Neuro-Habilitation Program

Rettsyndrome.Org awards $1.5M to advance translational research, support Neuro-Habilitation Program

The International Rett Syndrome Foundation now doing business as Rettsyndrome.org announces today that the Board of Trustees has awarded $1.5M to support 10 new grants to further translational research and launch of the neuro-habilitation therapeutic program, and fund clinical research. [More]
Actavis reports positive results from ceftazidime-avibactam Phase III studies in cIAI patients

Actavis reports positive results from ceftazidime-avibactam Phase III studies in cIAI patients

Actavis plc today confirmed positive topline results from RECLAIM-1 and -2, pivotal Phase III studies evaluating the potential for the investigational antibiotic, ceftazidime-avibactam as a treatment for adult hospitalized patients with complicated intra-abdominal infections. [More]
Another threat lies in the spread of Chikungunya virus, say experts

Another threat lies in the spread of Chikungunya virus, say experts

While media attention has been focused recently on coronavirus cases in the Arabian peninsula and the Ebola outbreak in West Africa, experts note that another threat lies in the spread of Chikungunya fever, an illness that is transmitted by mosquitoes and can cause fever, joint and muscle pain, headaches, and rashes. While it does not often cause death, the symptoms can be severe and disabling, with no treatment available. [More]
Aging Japanese population driving high CAP burden

Aging Japanese population driving high CAP burden

There is a high incidence of community-acquired pneumonia in Kochi City in western Japan, which is primarily explained by the large proportion of elderly inhabitants, researchers report. [More]
Study finds link between common respiratory diseases and increased risk of lung cancer

Study finds link between common respiratory diseases and increased risk of lung cancer

Links between a number of common respiratory diseases and an increased risk of developing lung cancer have been found in a large pooled analysis of seven studies involving more than 25,000 individuals. [More]
State highlights: TB outbreak in Alabama prisons; court order could force Wash. hospitals to release many psychiatric patients

State highlights: TB outbreak in Alabama prisons; court order could force Wash. hospitals to release many psychiatric patients

Alabama's prison system, badly overcrowded and facing a lawsuit over medical treatment of inmates, is facing its worst outbreak of tuberculosis in five years, a health official said Thursday. Pam Barrett, director of tuberculosis control for the Alabama Department of Public Health, said medical officials have diagnosed nine active cases of the infectious respiratory disease in state prisons so far this year (8/14). [More]
New x-ray imaging system helps monitor effectiveness of treatment for cystic fibrosis

New x-ray imaging system helps monitor effectiveness of treatment for cystic fibrosis

Scientists have developed an x-ray imaging system that enables researchers to see 'live' how effective treatments are for cystic fibrosis. [More]
First Edition: August 15, 2014

First Edition: August 15, 2014

Today's headlines include a variety of updates regarding health policy and the health care marketplace. [More]
Researchers develop new lung-on-chip model for laboratory studies of respiratory challenges

Researchers develop new lung-on-chip model for laboratory studies of respiratory challenges

Researchers at RTI International, in collaboration with the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, have developed a new lung-on-chip microdevice for laboratory studies of respiratory challenges and therapeutics. The microdevice includes multiple vertically stacked cellular layers that mimic the structure of the airway tissue. [More]
New therapeutic strategy to combat common genetic risk factor for ALS, FTD

New therapeutic strategy to combat common genetic risk factor for ALS, FTD

A team of researchers at Mayo Clinic and The Scripps Research Institute in Florida have developed a new therapeutic strategy to combat the most common genetic risk factor for the neurodegenerative disorders amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS or Lou Gehrig's disease) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). [More]
Paediatric PAH treatment goals identified

Paediatric PAH treatment goals identified

Researchers from the Netherlands have identified three baseline variables that may qualify as treatment goals in children with pulmonary arterial hypertension. [More]
Researchers find method to repair gene mutation causing autoimmune deficiency disease

Researchers find method to repair gene mutation causing autoimmune deficiency disease

Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have found a method to repair the gene mutation causing agammaglobulinemia, an autoimmune deficiency disease that almost exclusively affects boys and in which the body lacks the ability to produce immunoglobulins (gamma globulin). [More]
Microbiologist receives contract from U.S. DOD to develop vaccine against tularemia

Microbiologist receives contract from U.S. DOD to develop vaccine against tularemia

Microbiologist Karl Klose, a professor in the UTSA College of Sciences' Department of Biology and a member of the South Texas Center for Emerging Infectious Diseases, has received a contract from the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) to conduct research that would bring scholars one step closer to developing a vaccine against tularemia. [More]
High-dose influenza vaccine 24% more effective in older adults

High-dose influenza vaccine 24% more effective in older adults

High-dose influenza vaccine is 24 percent more effective than the standard-dose vaccine in protecting persons ages 65 and over against influenza illness and its complications, according to a Vanderbilt-led study published today in the New England Journal of Medicine. [More]

Umeclidinium/vilanterol outperforms monotherapies in COPD

A combination of umeclidinium and vilanterol is more effective than each drug as monotherapy for the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, research indicates. [More]
Physical illness may add to schizophrenia risk

Physical illness may add to schizophrenia risk

A wide range of physical ailments that require hospital contact may contribute to an increased risk of schizophrenia, a study suggests. [More]
Only 52% of women receive low-cost treatment to prevent babies death

Only 52% of women receive low-cost treatment to prevent babies death

A major international study of more than 303 000 births in 29 low-income and middle-income countries has found that only half (52%) of women who are eligible to receive a simple, effective, low-cost treatment to prevent death and disability in their newborn babies are getting it. [More]
Dangerous air quality alert issued due to high mold count

Dangerous air quality alert issued due to high mold count

A dangerous air quality alert was called today due to the extremely high count for mold detected in the Gottlieb Allergy Count. [More]