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Tissue-level model of human airway musculature could pave way for patient-specific asthma treatments

Tissue-level model of human airway musculature could pave way for patient-specific asthma treatments

The majority of drugs used to treat asthma today are the same ones that were used 50 years ago. New drugs are urgently needed to treat this chronic respiratory disease, which causes nearly 25 million people in the United States alone to wheeze, cough, and find it difficult at best to take a deep breath. [More]
Yale University researchers study potential new treatment to reverse effects of pulmonary fibrosis

Yale University researchers study potential new treatment to reverse effects of pulmonary fibrosis

Yale University researchers are studying a potential new treatment that reverses the effects of pulmonary fibrosis, a respiratory disease in which scars develop in the lungs and severely hamper breathing. [More]
Curie-Cancer, Inventiva launch Epicure project that aims to develop epigenetic targets for cancer

Curie-Cancer, Inventiva launch Epicure project that aims to develop epigenetic targets for cancer

Curie-Cancer, the body responsible for developing Institut Curie’s industry partnership activities, and Inventiva, a drug discovery company that focuses on therapeutic approaches involving transcription factors and epigenetic targets, today announce the launch of the Epicure project, which has just received financial backing from France’s national research agency, the ANR [Agence Nationale pour la Recherche]. [More]
Moms should be vaccinated for whooping cough during third trimester

Moms should be vaccinated for whooping cough during third trimester

Expectant moms should be vaccinated for pertussis, or whooping cough, during their third trimester, according to obstetricians at Loyola University Health System. Those in close contact with the infant also should be up to date with their whooping cough vaccine. [More]
Novel virus could be source of severe respiratory disease in ball pythons

Novel virus could be source of severe respiratory disease in ball pythons

Researchers have identified a novel virus that could be the source of a severe, sometimes fatal respiratory disease that has been observed in captive ball pythons since the 1990s. The work is published this week in mBio-, the online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology. [More]

Different sub-groups of asthmatic children can be detected by electronic nose

An electronic nose can be used to successfully detect different sub-groups of asthmatic children, according to a new study. [More]
Researchers identify different types of tuberculosis using new genetic barcode

Researchers identify different types of tuberculosis using new genetic barcode

Doctors and researchers will be able to easily identify different types of tuberculosis (TB) thanks to a new genetic barcode devised by scientists from the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine. [More]
‘Concerning’ rise in pneumococcus risk factors

‘Concerning’ rise in pneumococcus risk factors

Researchers report that the incidence of Streptococcus pneumoniae infection has fallen significantly in the USA in the past decade but describe a “concerning trend” whereby the baseline health status of those with serious pneumococcal disease has worsened. [More]
New paper highlights ways to improve outcomes of Ebola virus infection

New paper highlights ways to improve outcomes of Ebola virus infection

The largest-ever Ebola virus disease outbreak is ravaging West Africa, but with more personnel, basic monitoring, and supportive treatment, many of the sickest patients with Ebola virus disease do not need to die, note the authors of a new paper published ahead of print publication in the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. [More]
School nurses reach 98% of students in U.S. public schools to diagnose primary immunodeficiency

School nurses reach 98% of students in U.S. public schools to diagnose primary immunodeficiency

School nurses reach 98 percent of the 50,000,000 students in U.S. public schools, grades k-12, and are uniquely positioned to facilitate the early diagnosis of serious medical conditions such as primary immunodeficiency (PI). [More]
Study finds link between common respiratory diseases and increased risk of lung cancer

Study finds link between common respiratory diseases and increased risk of lung cancer

Links between a number of common respiratory diseases and an increased risk of developing lung cancer have been found in a large pooled analysis of seven studies involving more than 25,000 individuals. [More]
State highlights: TB outbreak in Alabama prisons; court order could force Wash. hospitals to release many psychiatric patients

State highlights: TB outbreak in Alabama prisons; court order could force Wash. hospitals to release many psychiatric patients

Alabama's prison system, badly overcrowded and facing a lawsuit over medical treatment of inmates, is facing its worst outbreak of tuberculosis in five years, a health official said Thursday. Pam Barrett, director of tuberculosis control for the Alabama Department of Public Health, said medical officials have diagnosed nine active cases of the infectious respiratory disease in state prisons so far this year (8/14). [More]
First Edition: August 15, 2014

First Edition: August 15, 2014

Today's headlines include a variety of updates regarding health policy and the health care marketplace. [More]
Researchers identify porcine enterovirus G using next-generation sequencing

Researchers identify porcine enterovirus G using next-generation sequencing

He calls himself the bug hunter, but the target of his work consists of viruses that can only be found and identified with special methods and instruments. [More]
Experts release position statement on electronic cigarettes

Experts release position statement on electronic cigarettes

Experts from the world's leading lung organizations have released a position statement on electronic cigarettes, focusing on their potential adverse effects on human health and calling on governments to ban or restrict their use until their health impacts are better known. [More]
WHO presents new framework to eliminate TB in 33 countries

WHO presents new framework to eliminate TB in 33 countries

The World Health Organization today, together with the European Respiratory Society, presented a new framework to eliminate tuberculosis (TB) in countries with low levels of the disease. Today there are 33 countries and territories where there are fewer than 100 TB cases per million population. [More]
Study finds deployment-related respiratory symptoms in veterans returning from Iraq, Afghanistan

Study finds deployment-related respiratory symptoms in veterans returning from Iraq, Afghanistan

In a new study of the causes underlying respiratory symptoms in military personnel returning from duty in Iraq and Afghanistan, a large percentage of veterans had non-specific symptoms that did not lead to a specific clinical diagnosis. [More]
Discovery may lead to new treatments for common autoimmune diseases

Discovery may lead to new treatments for common autoimmune diseases

Researchers at the University of Georgia report in the Journal of Biological Chemistry that an enzyme known as Tumor Progression Locus 2, or Tpl2, plays a key role in directing and regulating several important components of the body's immune system. [More]
‘Real-world’ ambrisentan data unveiled

‘Real-world’ ambrisentan data unveiled

The use of and outcomes with ambrisentan in clinical practice are different to those in clinical trials, reflecting different patient characteristics in the “real world”, say researchers. [More]
Study demonstrates link between obstructive sleep apnea and development of diabetes

Study demonstrates link between obstructive sleep apnea and development of diabetes

In the largest study to date of the relationship between sleep apnea and diabetes, a new study of more than 8,500 Canadian patients has demonstrated a link between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and the development of diabetes, confirming earlier evidence of such a relationship from smaller studies with shorter follow-up periods. [More]