Rotavirus News and Research RSS Feed - Rotavirus News and Research

Rotavirus is the most common cause of severe diarrhea among children, resulting in the hospitalization of approximately 55,000 children each year in the United States and the death of over 600,000 children annually worldwide. The incubation period for rotavirus disease is approximately 2 days. The disease is characterized by vomiting and watery diarrhea for 3 - 8 days, and fever and abdominal pain occur frequently. Immunity after infection is incomplete, but repeat infections tend to be less severe than the original infection.
UCF researcher combines new and old science to create method for speedy medical tests

UCF researcher combines new and old science to create method for speedy medical tests

A UCF researcher has combined cutting-edge nanoscience with a magnetic phenomenon discovered more than 170 years ago to create a method for speedy medical tests. [More]
Scientists unravel new genetic immunodeficiency that makes children vulnerable to mild illnesses

Scientists unravel new genetic immunodeficiency that makes children vulnerable to mild illnesses

A team of scientists led by prof. Adrian Liston and prof. Isabelle Meyts were able to characterize a new genetic immunodeficiency resulting from a mutation in a gene named STAT2. [More]
Childhood diarrhea from pathogens more common than previously thought?

Childhood diarrhea from pathogens more common than previously thought?

The number of cases of childhood diarrhea, and its mortality toll of 500,000 per year, has not changed. Now, however, we can explain ~90% of the cases to specific pathogens. We can assign responsibility. [More]
New report highlights global burden of maternal, newborn and young child deaths

New report highlights global burden of maternal, newborn and young child deaths

Today FIGO, ICM, ICN and IPA announce the publication of a report showing the global burden of maternal, newborn and young child deaths and launch the Together We Can campaign to tackle it. [More]
GUMC to honor health professional Roger I. Glass with 2016 Cura Personalis Award

GUMC to honor health professional Roger I. Glass with 2016 Cura Personalis Award

Georgetown University Medical Center will honor Roger I. Glass, MD, PhD, with the 2016 Cura Personalis Award at its Ninth Annual GUMC Convocation on Thursday, Nov. 17. Glass also will be the Convocation keynote speaker. [More]
New report highlights need for innovations to combat pneumonia and diarrhea among children

New report highlights need for innovations to combat pneumonia and diarrhea among children

A new report finds some progress in combatting pneumonia and diarrhea among young children in the nations most severely impacted by the two diseases, but they remain responsible for hundreds of thousands of preventable deaths around the world. [More]
ETS provides key tips to be healthy during autumn and winter

ETS provides key tips to be healthy during autumn and winter

Proper hand drying after hand washing is a key step in keeping healthy, particularly during the autumn & winter months when coughs and colds abound. [More]
Study provides unprecedented insights into causes of childhood diarrhea

Study provides unprecedented insights into causes of childhood diarrhea

New research offers unprecedented insights into the causes of childhood diarrhea, the second-leading cause of death of children worldwide, and suggests that the role of pathogens such as bacteria, viruses and parasites has been vastly underestimated. [More]
Study offers unprecedented quantification of pathogens that cause childhood diarrhea

Study offers unprecedented quantification of pathogens that cause childhood diarrhea

New research offers unprecedented insights into the causes of childhood diarrhea, the second-leading cause of death of children worldwide, and suggests that the role of pathogens such as bacteria, viruses and parasites has been vastly underestimated. [More]
New research shows childhood diarrhea cases significantly higher than estimated

New research shows childhood diarrhea cases significantly higher than estimated

The number of cases of childhood diarrhoea attributable to pathogens (bacteria, parasites, viruses or other infections) have been substantially underestimated and may be nearly twice as high as previous analysis suggests, according to new research published in The Lancet. [More]
Batavia Biosciences receives $8 million grant to develop safe, affordable rotavirus vaccine

Batavia Biosciences receives $8 million grant to develop safe, affordable rotavirus vaccine

Batavia Biosciences received an $8 million grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to develop a low cost manufacturing process to bring an affordable rotavirus vaccine to the global health market. [More]
Pre-travel consultation can help international travelers to prepare for trip

Pre-travel consultation can help international travelers to prepare for trip

International tourism exceeds 1.2 billion persons each year, with more than 20 percent of travelers reporting some type of illness. [More]
Cases of rotavirus infections fall by 84% thanks to vaccination

Cases of rotavirus infections fall by 84% thanks to vaccination

Figures published by Public Health England have shown that the number of diagnosed Rotavirus cases, a highly infectious virus which may cause vomiting and diarrhoea, have dropped by 84% since the introduction of a vaccine to the national childhood immunisation schedule in July 2013. [More]
Scientists grow noroviruses in laboratory cultures of human intestinal epithelial cells

Scientists grow noroviruses in laboratory cultures of human intestinal epithelial cells

Human noroviruses - the leading viral cause of acute diarrhea around the world - have been difficult to study because scientists had not found a way to grow them in the lab. [More]
Naturally-occurring sugars in woman's breast milk may protect infants against life threatening bacteria

Naturally-occurring sugars in woman's breast milk may protect infants against life threatening bacteria

A type of sugar found naturally in some women's breast milk may protect newborn babies from infection with a potentially life threatening bacterium called Group B streptococcus, according to a new study from Imperial College London. [More]
Mobile devices of healthcare workers often contaminated by viral RNA

Mobile devices of healthcare workers often contaminated by viral RNA

In clinical settings, mobile phones benefit patients by placing useful data and information at the fingertips of health professionals during interactions on the ward. [More]
Unmanned drones could be economical to deliver vaccines quickly in developing countries

Unmanned drones could be economical to deliver vaccines quickly in developing countries

Using unmanned drones to deliver vaccines in low- and middle-income countries may save money and improve vaccination rates, new research led by the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and the Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center suggests. [More]
Study finds decrease in Google searches for chickenpox after vaccination implementation

Study finds decrease in Google searches for chickenpox after vaccination implementation

Countries that implement government-mandated vaccinations for chickenpox see a sharp drop in the number of Google searches for the common childhood disease afterward, demonstrating that immunization significantly reduces seasonal outbreaks. [More]
New data visualization platform identifies shortfalls in vaccine introduction and coverage

New data visualization platform identifies shortfalls in vaccine introduction and coverage

As the 69th World Health Assembly discusses progress on the Global Vaccine Action Plan, a new data visualization platform--from the International Vaccine Access Center at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health--provides stark numbers on where shortfalls exist in vaccine introduction and coverage. [More]
Rotavirus vaccine program reduces hospitalization rates by more than 70% in Ontario

Rotavirus vaccine program reduces hospitalization rates by more than 70% in Ontario

Hospitalization for rotavirus infections decreased by > 70% following the introduction of a vaccine program in Ontario, Canada, according to a study published May 11, 2016 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Sarah Wilson from Public Health Ontario and the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, Canada, and colleagues. [More]
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