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Rotavirus is the most common cause of severe diarrhea among children, resulting in the hospitalization of approximately 55,000 children each year in the United States and the death of over 600,000 children annually worldwide. The incubation period for rotavirus disease is approximately 2 days. The disease is characterized by vomiting and watery diarrhea for 3 - 8 days, and fever and abdominal pain occur frequently. Immunity after infection is incomplete, but repeat infections tend to be less severe than the original infection.
Four out of ten children in Burkina Faso genetically resistant to virus strains

Four out of ten children in Burkina Faso genetically resistant to virus strains

Every year rotavirus causes half a million diarrhoea-related deaths amongst children in developing countries. Existing vaccines provide poor protection. The reason could be a widespread genetic resistance amongst children, according to virologists at Linköping University. [More]
UPM researchers find way to enhance detection of rotavirus

UPM researchers find way to enhance detection of rotavirus

Researchers at the Universidad Politécnica de Madrid have found a way to enhance detection capacity of small concentrations of rotavirus. All this thanks to a new way to assess the biosensing response applied to an interferometric device. [More]
Gastroenterologist hopes to achieve healthy growth and development in children around the world

Gastroenterologist hopes to achieve healthy growth and development in children around the world

Why is it harder for kids in low- and middle-income countries to grow as well as kids in wealthy countries? Food security, or access to good nutrition, remains a major challenge. The issue is not just food supply but poor sanitation - a problem exacerbated by local infrastructure and cultural mores. [More]
High uptake of US infant vaccination in 2013

High uptake of US infant vaccination in 2013

The recently published National Immunization Survey (NIS) conducted by the CDC, shows that the majority of infants in the US were vaccinated against potentially serious diseases in 2013. Fewer than 1% of children were unvaccinated in 2013. [More]
Norovirus vaccines: an interview with Dr Benjamin Lopman, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, USA

Norovirus vaccines: an interview with Dr Benjamin Lopman, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, USA

Noroviruses are a group of viruses. They're the leading cause of gastroenteritis, which causes diarrhea and vomiting. They affect the whole age range from young children to the elderly, and, in the US, they cause about 20 million cases annually. [More]
Chronic bystander viral impairs development of memory T cells

Chronic bystander viral impairs development of memory T cells

Studies of vaccine programs in the developing world have revealed that individuals with chronic infections such as malaria and hepatitis tend to be less likely to develop the fullest possible immunity benefits from vaccines for unrelated illnesses. [More]
Researchers use modeling software to bring more lifesaving vaccines to children

Researchers use modeling software to bring more lifesaving vaccines to children

The HERMES Logistics Modeling Team, consisting of researchers from Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center (PSC), the University of Pittsburgh School of Engineering and the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, have used HERMES, their modeling software, to help the Republic of Benin in West Africa determine how to bring more lifesaving vaccines to its children. [More]
Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and herpesvirus saimiri: an interview with Elazar Rabbani, Chief Executive Officer of Enzo

Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and herpesvirus saimiri: an interview with Elazar Rabbani, Chief Executive Officer of Enzo

Pulmonary fibrosis is a condition where fibrotic or scarred tissue progressively develops in the lungs. In some cases the particular cause is known but in others it remains unknown and is given the term “idiopathic”. [More]
Vaccinating kids against rotavirus may also reduce risk of seizures

Vaccinating kids against rotavirus may also reduce risk of seizures

A new study suggests an additional-and somewhat surprising-potential benefit of vaccinating children against rotavirus, a common cause of diarrhea and vomiting. Besides protecting kids from intestinal illness caused by rotavirus, immunization may also reduce the risk of related seizures, according to findings published in Clinical Infectious Diseases and available online. [More]
Evidence shows vaccination pilot campaigns highly successful during 2010 cholera epidemic

Evidence shows vaccination pilot campaigns highly successful during 2010 cholera epidemic

The deadly cholera epidemic that rocked earthquake-shattered Haiti in 2010, claiming 8,000 lives and counting, has rallied the public health community to seek water and sewer improvements that, combined with vaccination, could prevent some 89,000 future cholera infections. [More]
VVRP receives contract from NIH to continue its work as Vaccine and Treatment Evaluation Units

VVRP receives contract from NIH to continue its work as Vaccine and Treatment Evaluation Units

The Vanderbilt Vaccine Research Program (VVRP) has received a contract from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to continue its work as one of the nation's Vaccine and Treatment Evaluation Units (VTEU). [More]
Ten health care innovations could save lives of mothers and children

Ten health care innovations could save lives of mothers and children

Ten health care innovations, if brought to scale immediately in low-resource countries, could have the potential to save the lives of some 1.2 million mothers and children in 2015. [More]
MIT engineers develop nanoparticles that deliver cancer vaccines to lungs

MIT engineers develop nanoparticles that deliver cancer vaccines to lungs

Many viruses and bacteria infect humans through mucosal surfaces, such as those in the lungs, gastrointestinal tract and reproductive tract. To help fight these pathogens, scientists are working on vaccines that can establish a front line of defense at mucosal surfaces. [More]
Infant rotavirus vaccination reduced severe gastroenteritis among U.S. children

Infant rotavirus vaccination reduced severe gastroenteritis among U.S. children

"Implementation of infant rotavirus vaccination in 2006 has substantially reduced the burden of severe gastroenteritis among U.S. children younger than 5 years," write Paul A. Gastanaduy, M.D., M.P.H., of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, and colleagues. "Whether indirect protection (due to reduced transmission of rotavirus) extends to adults remains unclear." [More]

Study provides efficient strategy for prevention of rotavirus infection

For children and immune compromised adults in developing countries, diarrheal disease induced by rotavirus can be life threatening. Current rotaviral vaccines are highly effective in the Western world, but are not as effective in developing countries. [More]
Immunization in developing countries: an interview with Dr. Jos Vandelaer, Chief of Immunization for UNICEF

Immunization in developing countries: an interview with Dr. Jos Vandelaer, Chief of Immunization for UNICEF

Overall, worldwide, immunization programs reach around 83% of all children – this is an enormous achievement. With this level of immunization coverage, we prevent over 2 million deaths, year after year. This statistic is often forgotten or taken for granted. [More]
Study shows risk of Guillain-Barre syndrome after vaccination is extremely low

Study shows risk of Guillain-Barre syndrome after vaccination is extremely low

Patients are not at increased risk of Guillain-Barr- syndrome in the six-week period after vaccination with any vaccine, including influenza, according to a Kaiser Permanente study published in Clinical Infectious Diseases. [More]
Medicago produces Rotavirus VLP vaccine candidate using plant-based manufacturing platform

Medicago produces Rotavirus VLP vaccine candidate using plant-based manufacturing platform

Medicago Inc. (TSX: MDG; OTCQX: MDCGF), a biopharmaceutical company focused on developing highly effective and competitive vaccines based on proprietary manufacturing technologies and Virus-Like Particles (VLPs), today announced the successful production of a Rotavirus VLP vaccine candidate comprising all four structural antigens of rotavirus (VP2, VP4, VP6 and VP7) using Medicago's plant-based manufacturing platform. [More]
New book explores experiences of polio victims alongside medical, scientific landmarks

New book explores experiences of polio victims alongside medical, scientific landmarks

Thanks to vaccination, polio has been pushed to the brink of extinction - but can we finish the job? This is one of the big questions which a Bristol academic addresses in his new book, published next week. [More]
Vaccine given to newborns 60% effective against rotavirus in Ghana

Vaccine given to newborns 60% effective against rotavirus in Ghana

Mayo Clinic and other researchers have shown that a vaccine given to newborns is at least 60 percent effective against rotavirus in Ghana. Rotavirus causes fever, vomiting and diarrhea, which in infants can cause severe dehydration. [More]