Sarcoidosis News and Research RSS Feed - Sarcoidosis News and Research

Sarcoidosis is a disease of unknown cause that leads to inflammation. It can affect various organs in the body. Normally, your immune system defends your body against foreign or harmful substances. For example, it sends special cells to protect organs that are in danger. These cells release chemicals that recruit other cells to isolate and destroy the harmful substance. Inflammation occurs during this process. Once the harmful substance is destroyed, the cells and the inflammation go away. In people who have sarcoidosis, the inflammation doesn't go away. Instead, some of the immune system cells cluster to form lumps called granulomas in various organs in your body.
Research report on global market for respiratory devices

Research report on global market for respiratory devices

The worldwide respiratory device market continues to grow despite economic downturns mainly due to the aging of the world population and increasing incidence of COPD. [More]
Cigarette smoking and male sex are independent risk factors for ocular sarcoidosis

Cigarette smoking and male sex are independent risk factors for ocular sarcoidosis

Cigarette smoking and male sex are significant risk factors for developing ocular sarcoidosis, according to a new study presented at the 2014 American Thoracic Society International Conference. [More]
Bristol-Myers Squibb to present new immunotherapy study data at ASCO Annual Meeting

Bristol-Myers Squibb to present new immunotherapy study data at ASCO Annual Meeting

Bristol-Myers Squibb Company today announced that new data from studies investigating its immunotherapies in adjuvant and advanced melanoma, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) will be presented at the 50th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) in Chicago from May 30-June 3. [More]
Loyola offers patients the most advanced PET/CT scanner

Loyola offers patients the most advanced PET/CT scanner

Loyola University Medical Center is now offering patients the most advanced PET/CT scanner on the market. The state-of-the-art system is improving the diagnosis and treatment of cancer, heart disease, epilepsy, Alzheimer's disease and other conditions. [More]
Rituximab drug may be safe, effective for immunoglobulin G4-related disease treatment

Rituximab drug may be safe, effective for immunoglobulin G4-related disease treatment

Rituximab (Rituxan) — a drug commonly used rheumatoid arthritis, granulomatosis with polyangiitis (formerly Wegener's), and certain types of cancers — may be a safe and effective treatment for immunoglobulin G4-related disease (commonly called IgG4-RD), according to research presented this week at the American College of Rheumatology Annual Meeting in San Diego. [More]
BTNL2 gene mutation that impacts immune function increases risk of prostate cancer

BTNL2 gene mutation that impacts immune function increases risk of prostate cancer

​A team of researchers led by Janet Stanford, Ph.D., of Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center has discovered that mutations in the gene BTNL2, which encodes a protein involved in regulating T-cell proliferation and cytokine production - both of which impact immune function - increase the risk of developing prostate cancer. [More]
Endosonographic aspiration procedures result in greater diagnostic yield in treating pulmonary sarcoidosis

Endosonographic aspiration procedures result in greater diagnostic yield in treating pulmonary sarcoidosis

Among patients with suspected stage I/II pulmonary sarcoidosis who were undergoing confirmation of the condition via tissue sampling, the use of the procedure known as endosonographic nodal aspiration compared with bronchoscopic biopsy, the current diagnostic standard, resulted in greater diagnostic yield, according to a study in the June 19 issue of JAMA. [More]
Kinase inhibitors: an interview with Jan Hoflack, CSO of Oncodesign

Kinase inhibitors: an interview with Jan Hoflack, CSO of Oncodesign

Kinase inhibitors are molecules that block the activity of kinases. Kinases are a specific class of enzymes. They are extremely important in signal transduction processes in the human body meaning that they actually regulate most of the physiological processes that take place in the body. [More]
Genetic study defines link between primary sclerosing cholangitis and other autoimmune diseases

Genetic study defines link between primary sclerosing cholangitis and other autoimmune diseases

Researchers have newly associated nine genetic regions with a rare autoimmune disease of the liver known as primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). This brings the total number of genetic regions associated with the disease to 16. [More]
Researchers unravel dual role of tumor necrosis factor in TB

Researchers unravel dual role of tumor necrosis factor in TB

Tumor necrosis factor - normally an infection-fighting substance produced by the body- can actually heighten susceptibility to tuberculosis if its levels are too high. [More]
Mount Sinai to initiate immunological therapy trial against chronic pulmonary sarcoidosis

Mount Sinai to initiate immunological therapy trial against chronic pulmonary sarcoidosis

Patients are currently being enrolled in the first clinical trial to investigate the efficacy of immunological therapy for chronic pulmonary sarcoidosis. The trial is being conducted by researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. [More]
Enlarged lymph nodes may warn of cancer

Enlarged lymph nodes may warn of cancer

Enlarged lymph nodes are a marker for both occult cancer and a long-term risk for malignancy, confirms research published in the British Journal of Haematology. [More]
Immunologic diseases linked to poorer survival in PSC

Immunologic diseases linked to poorer survival in PSC

Primary sclerosing cholangitis patients with concomitant immunologic disorders, have reduced transplantation-free survival compared with patients without, say the authors of a German study. [More]

Fungal exposure in homes could increase risk of sarcoidosis

People who are exposed to mold in their homes could be at an increased risk for sarcoidosis, a chronic inflammatory lung disease. Researchers from Sweden and Slovenia tested 62 nonsmoking patients with sarcoidosis, 34 of whom had extrapulmonary manifestations (EPM). [More]
Researchers identify new genetic signature for sarcoidosis

Researchers identify new genetic signature for sarcoidosis

Researchers at the University of Illinois Hospital & Health Sciences System have identified a genetic signature that distinguishes patients with complicated sarcoidosis, an inflammatory lung disease that can be fatal, from patients with a more benign form of the disease. The gene signature could become the basis for a simple blood test. [More]
Sarcoidosis accounts for 25% of all deaths in African-American women

Sarcoidosis accounts for 25% of all deaths in African-American women

A new study conducted by researchers from Boston University has found that sarcoidosis accounts for 25 percent of all deaths among women in the Black Women's Health Study who have the disease. The study is the largest epidemiologic study to date to specifically address mortality in black females with sarcoidosis. [More]
Various combinations of biomarkers are required to unequivocally diagnose specific disease

Various combinations of biomarkers are required to unequivocally diagnose specific disease

With a range of diseases, doctors need unique features which they can use to unequivocally identify a patient's illness for an appropriate diagnosis. Scientists therefore search for the biomarkers for an illness or a combination of biomarkers, known as biosignatures, which are as easy as possible to measure. [More]
BU professor to study incidence of hypertension, diabetes and asthma in African American women

BU professor to study incidence of hypertension, diabetes and asthma in African American women

Patricia F. Coogan, ScD, an associate professor of epidemiology at Boston University's Slone Epidemiology Center (SEC), recently was awarded funding for two grants from the National Institutes of Health. [More]
Merck's VICTRELIS phase III study results against HCV presented at EASL annual meeting

Merck's VICTRELIS phase III study results against HCV presented at EASL annual meeting

Merck, known as MSD outside of the United States and Canada, announced results from several new data analyses from the pivotal Phase III studies evaluating the addition of its investigational oral protease inhibitor VICTRELIS to peginterferon alfa-2b and ribavirin in adult patients with chronic hepatitis C virus genotype 1 infection. [More]
Merck to present VICTRELIS phase III study data against HCV at EASL annual meeting

Merck to present VICTRELIS phase III study data against HCV at EASL annual meeting

Merck, known as MSD outside of the United States and Canada, announced that several new data analyses from Phase III studies of VICTRELIS, its investigational oral hepatitis C protease inhibitor, will be presented at The International Liver CongressTM / 46th European Association for the Study of the Liver annual meeting. [More]