Sarcoidosis News and Research RSS Feed - Sarcoidosis News and Research

Sarcoidosis is a disease of unknown cause that leads to inflammation. It can affect various organs in the body. Normally, your immune system defends your body against foreign or harmful substances. For example, it sends special cells to protect organs that are in danger. These cells release chemicals that recruit other cells to isolate and destroy the harmful substance. Inflammation occurs during this process. Once the harmful substance is destroyed, the cells and the inflammation go away. In people who have sarcoidosis, the inflammation doesn't go away. Instead, some of the immune system cells cluster to form lumps called granulomas in various organs in your body.
New Apple ResearchKit app from Penn Medicine focuses on sarcoidosis patients

New Apple ResearchKit app from Penn Medicine focuses on sarcoidosis patients

Penn Medicine today launched its first Apple ResearchKit app, focused on patients with sarcoidosis, an inflammatory condition that can affect the lungs, skin, eyes, heart, brain, and other organs. [More]
Researchers discover underlying cause for formation of granulomas

Researchers discover underlying cause for formation of granulomas

Granulomas are tissue nodules of immune cells that occur in diseases such as tuberculosis and sarcoidosis and can damage many organs. [More]
High-fat, low-sugar diet prior to imaging can help reduce uncertainty in diagnosing cardiac sarcoidosis

High-fat, low-sugar diet prior to imaging can help reduce uncertainty in diagnosing cardiac sarcoidosis

Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago were able to reduce uncertainty in diagnosing cardiac sarcoidosis by having patients consume a high-fat, low-sugar diet for 72 hours prior to diagnostic imaging. [More]
IPF diagnosis: how do patients feel about the discussion with their physician?

IPF diagnosis: how do patients feel about the discussion with their physician?

IPF (Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis) is a difficult disease to diagnose. Many patients will experience many visits to the doctor and some may even be told they have a different respiratory condition before they finally get the correct diagnosis that... [More]
Menopausal women may experience accelerated decline in lung function, research shows

Menopausal women may experience accelerated decline in lung function, research shows

Menopausal women appear to experience an accelerated decline in lung function, according to new research published online ahead of print in the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. [More]
BU researcher receives grant to better understand breast cancer in African-American women

BU researcher receives grant to better understand breast cancer in African-American women

Why do African-American women die at a higher rate and experience more aggressive breast tumors than white women? Researchers from Boston University's Slone Epidemiology Center (SEC) have received funding from the National Cancer Institute to explore this question. [More]
Systemic sclerosis: an interview with Dr Kristin Highland

Systemic sclerosis: an interview with Dr Kristin Highland

Systemic sclerosis, also known as scleroderma, is a rare disease characterized by the thickening and scarring of connective tissue of multiple organs in the body [More]
Araim Pharmaceuticals forms new strategic collaboration with Vault Bioventures to market novel peptides

Araim Pharmaceuticals forms new strategic collaboration with Vault Bioventures to market novel peptides

Araim Pharmaceuticals has formed a long-term strategic partnership with Vault Bioventures to facilitate the advancement to market of its novel peptide library which targets devastating injuries and chronic diseases underserved by current therapies. [More]
Scientists develop new strategy to target sarcoidosis

Scientists develop new strategy to target sarcoidosis

A team of scientists at the Helmholtz Zentrum München together with colleagues of the Ludwig Maximilians University Munich recently developed a new strategy to determine monocyte subsets involved in diseases. The results published in the journal 'Blood' could help facilitating the diagnosis of sarcoidosis and may improve the respective patient management. [More]
Pitt investigators to lead $15 million federal initiative to manage breathing disorder clinical trials

Pitt investigators to lead $15 million federal initiative to manage breathing disorder clinical trials

The University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health and School of Medicine investigators will be leading a $15 million, five-year federal initiative to manage national clinical trials aimed at developing new treatments for breathing disorders. [More]
American College of Chest Physicians releases new clinical guidelines on EBUS-guided TBNA

American College of Chest Physicians releases new clinical guidelines on EBUS-guided TBNA

The American College of Chest Physicians announced the release of new clinical guidelines on endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS)-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (TBNA). The guideline, which applies to a common bronchoscopic test, contains 12 recommendations including best practices related to patient factors and procedural aspects. [More]
Lenalidomide therapy may have immediate effect in treatment of sarcoidosis-related symptoms

Lenalidomide therapy may have immediate effect in treatment of sarcoidosis-related symptoms

A case study published in the August issue of the journal CHEST found lenalidomide treatments may have an immediate effect in the treatment of sarcoidosis-related symptoms. Sarcoidosis, a disease that involves abnormal collections of inflammatory cells that can form nodules in various organs, can affect individuals from all racial and age groups. [More]
Spouses & Relatives Of Celiac Disease Patients At Risk For Autoimmune Diseases

Spouses & Relatives Of Celiac Disease Patients At Risk For Autoimmune Diseases

Both spouses and first-degree relatives of patients with celiac disease are at increased risk of nonceliac autoimmune disease, according to a study in the July issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, the official clinical practice journal of the American Gastroenterological Association. This risk represents a mixture of genetic, environmental and ascertainment bias mechanisms. [More]
ARA 290 drug reduces neuropathic pain in type 2 diabetic patients

ARA 290 drug reduces neuropathic pain in type 2 diabetic patients

Molecular Medicine, a peer-reviewed biomedical journal published by the Feinstein Institute Press, published the results of a new study reporting clinically significant pain reduction in type 2 diabetic patients. In an exploratory study conducted by Araim Pharmaceuticals, a biotech company developing novel treatments for chronic diseases, investigators also observed improvements in metabolic control in patients administered ARA 290. [More]
Cigarette smoking and male sex are independent risk factors for ocular sarcoidosis

Cigarette smoking and male sex are independent risk factors for ocular sarcoidosis

Cigarette smoking and male sex are significant risk factors for developing ocular sarcoidosis, according to a new study presented at the 2014 American Thoracic Society International Conference. [More]
Bristol-Myers Squibb to present new immunotherapy study data at ASCO Annual Meeting

Bristol-Myers Squibb to present new immunotherapy study data at ASCO Annual Meeting

Bristol-Myers Squibb Company today announced that new data from studies investigating its immunotherapies in adjuvant and advanced melanoma, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) will be presented at the 50th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) in Chicago from May 30-June 3. [More]
Loyola offers patients the most advanced PET/CT scanner

Loyola offers patients the most advanced PET/CT scanner

Loyola University Medical Center is now offering patients the most advanced PET/CT scanner on the market. The state-of-the-art system is improving the diagnosis and treatment of cancer, heart disease, epilepsy, Alzheimer's disease and other conditions. [More]
Rituximab drug may be safe, effective for immunoglobulin G4-related disease treatment

Rituximab drug may be safe, effective for immunoglobulin G4-related disease treatment

Rituximab (Rituxan) — a drug commonly used rheumatoid arthritis, granulomatosis with polyangiitis (formerly Wegener's), and certain types of cancers — may be a safe and effective treatment for immunoglobulin G4-related disease (commonly called IgG4-RD), according to research presented this week at the American College of Rheumatology Annual Meeting in San Diego. [More]
BTNL2 gene mutation that impacts immune function increases risk of prostate cancer

BTNL2 gene mutation that impacts immune function increases risk of prostate cancer

​A team of researchers led by Janet Stanford, Ph.D., of Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center has discovered that mutations in the gene BTNL2, which encodes a protein involved in regulating T-cell proliferation and cytokine production - both of which impact immune function - increase the risk of developing prostate cancer. [More]
Endosonographic aspiration procedures result in greater diagnostic yield in treating pulmonary sarcoidosis

Endosonographic aspiration procedures result in greater diagnostic yield in treating pulmonary sarcoidosis

Among patients with suspected stage I/II pulmonary sarcoidosis who were undergoing confirmation of the condition via tissue sampling, the use of the procedure known as endosonographic nodal aspiration compared with bronchoscopic biopsy, the current diagnostic standard, resulted in greater diagnostic yield, according to a study in the June 19 issue of JAMA. [More]
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