Schizophrenia News and Research RSS Feed - Schizophrenia News and Research

Schizophrenia is a chronic debilitating disorder which affects more than two million Americans, and millions more worldwide. While significant progress has been made in understanding the disease and developing treatments, there remains a significant unmet medical need. More than 50% of patients switch their medication in a given year due to either poor response or the experience of adverse events.
Phase III trial results show cariprazine effective in treating negative symptoms associated with schizophrenia

Phase III trial results show cariprazine effective in treating negative symptoms associated with schizophrenia

Results of a clinical trial seem to show the first effective treatment for the negative symptoms - withdrawal, lack of emotion, and apathy - associated with schizophrenia. [More]
Single dose of cocaine can impair ability to recognise negative emotions

Single dose of cocaine can impair ability to recognise negative emotions

A single dose of cocaine can interfere with the ability to recognise negative emotions, according to new research presented at the ECNP conference in Amsterdam. [More]
Brain scans may help predict patients' response to antipsychotic drug treatment

Brain scans may help predict patients' response to antipsychotic drug treatment

Investigators at The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research have discovered that brain scans can be used to predict patients' response to antipsychotic drug treatment. The findings are published online in the latest issue of The American Journal of Psychiatry. [More]
Brain cells in Parkinson's disease die prematurely, burning out like an overheating motor

Brain cells in Parkinson's disease die prematurely, burning out like an overheating motor

The death of brain cells in Parkinson's disease may be caused by a form of cellular energy crisis in neurons that require unusually high quantities of energy to carry out their job of regulating movement, researchers at the University of Montreal reported today. [More]
UiO researchers test new nasal spray device for treating mental illness

UiO researchers test new nasal spray device for treating mental illness

Researchers at the University of Oslo have tested a new device for delivering hormone treatments for mental illness through the nose. This method was found to deliver medicine to the brain with few side effects. [More]
Automated speech analysis program correctly identifies young people at risk for psychosis

Automated speech analysis program correctly identifies young people at risk for psychosis

An automated speech analysis program correctly differentiated between at-risk young people who developed psychosis over a two-and-a-half year period and those who did not. In a proof-of-principle study, researchers at Columbia University Medical Center, New York State Psychiatric Institute, and the IBM T. J. Watson Research Center found that the computerized analysis provided a more accurate classification than clinical ratings. [More]

GW researchers find potential link between microbes in the throat and schizophrenia

In the most comprehensive study to date, researchers at the George Washington University have identified a potential link between microbes (viruses, bacteria and fungi) in the throat and schizophrenia. This link may offer a way to identify causes and develop treatments of the disease and lead to new diagnostic tests. [More]
Mental visual imagery training may improve AM/EFT functioning in RR-MS patients

Mental visual imagery training may improve AM/EFT functioning in RR-MS patients

Patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RR-MS), the most common form of the disease, often have deficits in two neuropsychological functions, autobiographical memory (AM) and episodic future thinking (EFT), which impact quality of life. [More]
Psychiatric disorders may follow trigeminal neuralgia

Psychiatric disorders may follow trigeminal neuralgia

Patients with trigeminal neuralgia have an increased risk of later developing certain psychiatric disorders, a population-based study suggests. [More]
Medicaid could save billions as patents for several blockbuster antipsychotic medications expire

Medicaid could save billions as patents for several blockbuster antipsychotic medications expire

Medicaid is expected to save billions of dollars a year as patents for several blockbuster antipsychotic medications expire and use of generic versions of these drugs increases, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. These savings may provide relief from the high costs of these medications and allow policymakers to lift restrictions on patients' access, the researchers argue. [More]
New initiative aims to collect samples from schizophrenia patients across the globe

New initiative aims to collect samples from schizophrenia patients across the globe

Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM) at the University of Helsinki and The Stanley Center for Psychiatric Research at Broad Institute, together with its international partners, are initiating major new sample collections in several regions and countries. [More]
Omeros reports additional positive data from OMS721 Phase 2 trial for treatment of thrombotic microangiopathies

Omeros reports additional positive data from OMS721 Phase 2 trial for treatment of thrombotic microangiopathies

Omeros Corporation today announced additional positive data in the company's Phase 2 clinical trial of OMS721 for the treatment of thrombotic microangiopathies (TMAs). TMAs are a family of rare, debilitating and life-threatening disorders characterized by excessive thrombi (clots) – aggregations of platelets – in the microcirculation of the body's organs, most commonly the kidney and brain. [More]
Physicians may now have tools to predict people at greater risk of attempting suicide

Physicians may now have tools to predict people at greater risk of attempting suicide

People being treated for bipolar disorder and other psychiatric illnesses are at greater risk of attempting suicide, but physicians may now have tools to predict which of those individuals will attempt it and intervene early to prevent such tragedies from occurring. [More]
Scientists map 3-D atomic structure of protein complex that controls neurotransmitter release from brain cells

Scientists map 3-D atomic structure of protein complex that controls neurotransmitter release from brain cells

Scientists have revealed never-before-seen details of how our brain sends rapid-fire messages between its cells. They mapped the 3-D atomic structure of a two-part protein complex that controls the release of signaling chemicals, called neurotransmitters, from brain cells. Understanding how cells release those signals in less than one-thousandth of a second could help launch a new wave of research on drugs for treating brain disorders. [More]
New research identifies cause of disruption in brain's communication channels linked to psychiatric disorders

New research identifies cause of disruption in brain's communication channels linked to psychiatric disorders

New research has identified the mechanisms that trigger disruption in the brain's communication channels linked to symptoms in psychiatric disorders including schizophrenia. The University of Bristol study, published today [17 Aug] in the Proceedings of National Academy of Sciences, could have important implications for treating symptoms of brain disorders. [More]
Tracking retinal changes may help doctors to adjust schizophrenia treatment in the future

Tracking retinal changes may help doctors to adjust schizophrenia treatment in the future

Schizophrenia is associated with structural and functional alterations of the visual system, including specific structural changes in the eye. Tracking such changes may provide new measures of risk for, and progression of the disease, according to a literature review published online in the journal Schizophrenia Research: Cognition, authored by researchers at New York Eye and Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai and Rutgers University. [More]
Omeros plans to file patent infringement lawsuit against Par

Omeros plans to file patent infringement lawsuit against Par

Omeros Corporation today, in response to investor questions, announced that it plans to file a patent infringement lawsuit against Par Pharmaceutical, Inc. and its subsidiary, Par Sterile Products, LLC in response to the Abbreviated New Drug Application (ANDA) filed by Par seeking FDA approval to market a generic version of Omeros' commercial drug Omidria (phenylephrine and ketorolac injection) 1%/0.3%. [More]
Low birth weight, preterm birth increase schizophrenia risk in individuals with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

Low birth weight, preterm birth increase schizophrenia risk in individuals with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

Low birth weight and preterm birth appear to increase the risk of schizophrenia among individuals with a genetic condition called the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, a new study from the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) shows. [More]
Neurocrine completes enrollment in Phase III clinical trial of NBI-98854 in tardive dyskinesia patients

Neurocrine completes enrollment in Phase III clinical trial of NBI-98854 in tardive dyskinesia patients

Neurocrine Biosciences, Inc. announced today that it has recently completed subject randomization of the Phase III clinical trial (Kinect 3 Study) of its proprietary Vesicular Mono-Amine Transporter 2 (VMAT2) compound NBI-98854 in tardive dyskinesia patients. [More]
Loss of critical receptor in the brain may be responsible for autism, schizophrenia

Loss of critical receptor in the brain may be responsible for autism, schizophrenia

The loss of a critical receptor in a special class of inhibitory neurons in the brain may be responsible for neurodevelopmental disorders including autism and schizophrenia, according to new research by Salk scientists. [More]
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