Schizophrenia News and Research RSS Feed - Schizophrenia News and Research

Schizophrenia is a chronic debilitating disorder which affects more than two million Americans, and millions more worldwide. While significant progress has been made in understanding the disease and developing treatments, there remains a significant unmet medical need. More than 50% of patients switch their medication in a given year due to either poor response or the experience of adverse events.
New study finds high mortality risks from alcohol and drug abuse among ex-prisoners

New study finds high mortality risks from alcohol and drug abuse among ex-prisoners

Alcohol and drug misuse are responsible for around a third of all deaths in former male prisoners and half in female ex-prisoners, a new study of almost 48000 ex-prisoners published in The Lancet Psychiatry journal has found. Moreover, the research shows that a substantial proportion of these deaths are from preventable causes, including accidents and suicide (42% in men and 70% in women). [More]
Two existing drugs may reverse damage caused by multiple sclerosis

Two existing drugs may reverse damage caused by multiple sclerosis

A pair of topical medicines already alleviating skin conditions each may prove to have another, even more compelling use: instructing stem cells in the brain to reverse damage caused by multiple sclerosis. [More]

TSRI scientists find molecular trigger of schizophrenia-like behaviors and brain changes

According to the World Health Organization, more than 21 million people worldwide suffer from schizophrenia, a severe psychiatric disorder that can cause delusions and hallucinations and lead to increased risk of suicide... [More]
Study: 9% of U.S. adults have impulsive, angry behavior and have access to guns

Study: 9% of U.S. adults have impulsive, angry behavior and have access to guns

An estimated 9 percent of adults in the U.S. have a history of impulsive, angry behavior and have access to guns, according to a study published this month in Behavioral Sciences and the Law. The study also found that an estimated 1.5 percent of adults report impulsive anger and carry firearms outside their homes. [More]
Scientists identify brain molecule that triggers schizophrenia-like behaviors, brain changes

Scientists identify brain molecule that triggers schizophrenia-like behaviors, brain changes

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have identified a molecule in the brain that triggers schizophrenia-like behaviors, brain changes and global gene expression in an animal model. The research gives scientists new tools for someday preventing or treating psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and autism. [More]
Antipsychotic drugs may elevate child's risk for weight gain, type II diabetes

Antipsychotic drugs may elevate child's risk for weight gain, type II diabetes

Today in JAMA Pediatrics, researchers from The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia's (CHOP) PolicyLab published the largest study to date documenting the significant risks to children's health associated with prescription antipsychotics, a powerful a class of medications used to treat mental and behavioral health disorders. [More]
Mouse model may help understand the physiology behind complex brain disorders

Mouse model may help understand the physiology behind complex brain disorders

Complex brain disorders, such as autism or schizophrenia, still puzzle scientists because their causes lie hidden in early events of brain development, which are still poorly understood. [More]
Omeros announces commercial availability of Omidria in U.S.

Omeros announces commercial availability of Omidria in U.S.

Omeros Corporation, a biopharmaceutical company committed to discovering, developing and commercializing small-molecule and protein therapeutics for large-market as well as orphan indications targeting inflammation, coagulopathies and disorders of the central nervous system, announced today the nationwide commercial availability of Omidria (phenylephrine and ketorolac injection) 1%/0.3%. [More]
Purdue researchers identify new class of chemical insecticides to control mosquitoes

Purdue researchers identify new class of chemical insecticides to control mosquitoes

Purdue researchers have identified a new class of chemical insecticides that could provide a safer, more selective means of controlling mosquitoes that transmit key infectious diseases such as dengue, yellow fever and elephantiasis. [More]
Long-term effects of using cognitive-enhancing drugs by healthy people need to be determined

Long-term effects of using cognitive-enhancing drugs by healthy people need to be determined

The government, pharmaceutical industry, and national medical organisations need to work together to look at the harms and benefits of long-term use of cognitive-enhancing drugs by healthy individuals, say neuroscientists Professor Barbara Sahakian and Dr Sharon Morein-Zamir from the University of Cambridge in the UK, writing in a Personal View in The Lancet Psychiatry journal. [More]
Antibodies may trigger psychiatric illness in children

Antibodies may trigger psychiatric illness in children

A world first study revealing the presence of two antibodies in a sub-group of children experiencing their first episode of psychosis affirms a longstanding recognition that auto-immune disorders play a significant role in psychiatric illness. [More]
Women suffering from domestic violence at greater risk of mental health problems

Women suffering from domestic violence at greater risk of mental health problems

In addition to their physical injuries, women who are victims of domestic violence are also at a greater risk of mental health problems such as depression and psychotic symptoms. These are the findings of a study that was just published by a team of researchers at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience at King's College London in England, the Institut universitaire en santé mentale de Montréal, and the University of Montreal. [More]
Big data helps discover gephyrin protein's connection in human history

Big data helps discover gephyrin protein's connection in human history

Big data: It's a term we read and hear about often, but is hard to grasp. Computer scientists at Washington University in St. Louis' School of Engineering & Applied Science tackled some big data about an important protein and discovered its connection in human history as well as clues about its role in complex neurological diseases. [More]
Researchers present new studies on cognition and reasoning at CNS conference in San Francisco

Researchers present new studies on cognition and reasoning at CNS conference in San Francisco

Even rats can imagine: A new study finds that rats have the ability to link cause and effect such that they can expect, or imagine, something happening even if it isn't. [More]
New Autism-Causing Genetic Variant Identified

New Autism-Causing Genetic Variant Identified

Using a novel approach that homes in on rare families severely affected by autism, a Johns Hopkins-led team of researchers has identified a new genetic cause of the disease. The rare genetic variant offers important insights into the root causes of autism, the researchers say. And, they suggest, their unconventional method can be used to identify other genetic causes of autism and other complex genetic conditions. [More]
Broad Institute of MIT researcher honored for groundbreaking research using new gene editing tool

Broad Institute of MIT researcher honored for groundbreaking research using new gene editing tool

The newest gene editing tool - called CRISPR-Cas9 - is leading to new research possibilities in cell biology and neuroscience. This includes the ability to make transgenic animal models more quickly, which helps researchers better study diseases that affect thousands of people each year. [More]
New methodology isolates functional differences between autistic, non-autistic brains

New methodology isolates functional differences between autistic, non-autistic brains

The functional differences between autistic and non-autistic brains have been isolated for the first time, following the development of a new methodology for analysing MRI scans. [More]
Study offers new insights into diagnosis and treatment of social dysfunctions

Study offers new insights into diagnosis and treatment of social dysfunctions

What if there were a pill that made you more compassionate and more likely to give spare change to someone less fortunate? UC Berkeley scientists have taken a big step in that direction. [More]
AbbVie signs exclusive worldwide license agreement with C2N for Alzheimer's disease therapies

AbbVie signs exclusive worldwide license agreement with C2N for Alzheimer's disease therapies

AbbVie today announced that it has entered into an exclusive worldwide license agreement with C2N Diagnostics, a privately held protein diagnostic and therapeutic discovery company, to develop and commercialize a portfolio of anti-tau antibodies for the treatment of Alzheimer's Disease and other neurological disorders. [More]
IU researchers reveal how Toxoplasma parasites modify brain cells

IU researchers reveal how Toxoplasma parasites modify brain cells

Rodents infected with a common parasite lose their fear of cats, resulting in easy meals for the felines. Now IU School of Medicine researchers have identified a new way the parasite may modify brain cells, possibly helping explain changes in the behavior of mice -- and humans. [More]
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