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LALES study analyzes risk, prevalence of early and late stage AMD among Latinos

LALES study analyzes risk, prevalence of early and late stage AMD among Latinos

The University of Southern California Roski Eye Institute researchers and clinicians published results of the largest population-based study of adult Latinos and age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in the National Eye Institute-funded "Los Angeles Latino Eye Study." The study, published in JAMA Ophthalmology, is the first to analyze the risk and prevalence of early and late stage AMD and its impact on quality of life for older Latinos. [More]
Safety tips to prevent slips and falls among seniors

Safety tips to prevent slips and falls among seniors

May is National Trauma Awareness Month, and this year the American Trauma Society is raising awareness about senior safety and falls with "Safe Steps for Seniors." The Stony Brook Trauma Center is taking steps to shed light on the matter to help prevent serious injuries from occurring. [More]
Dog ownership and walking increase physical health among older adults

Dog ownership and walking increase physical health among older adults

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that adults of all ages should engage in 150 or more minutes of moderate physical activity per week. Among adults 60 years of age or more, walking is the most common form of leisure-time physical activity because it is self-paced, low impact and does not require equipment. [More]
Alzheimer's disease impairs visual face perception beyond causing memory problems

Alzheimer's disease impairs visual face perception beyond causing memory problems

A recent study has demonstrated that, beyond causing memory problems, Alzheimer's disease also impairs visual face perception. This finding may help families better understand their loved one's inevitable difficulties and lead to new avenues to postpone this painful aspect of the disease, such as the recognition of particular facial traits or voice recognition. [More]
Wake Forest Baptist researchers looking for ways to keep older adults on their feet

Wake Forest Baptist researchers looking for ways to keep older adults on their feet

There's no getting around it: Simply getting around is a major issue for older adults.
"People are in nursing homes for two reasons, either they can't think or they can't walk," said Stephen Kritchevsky, Ph.D., director of the Sticht Center on Aging at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center. North Carolina. "We're working very hard on the thinking part, and the walking part is equally important. [More]
School fitness reports ineffective in promoting weight loss among students

School fitness reports ineffective in promoting weight loss among students

Teens being classified as overweight in school fitness reports does not appear to have any impact on short-term changes in body mass index, finds a new study by New York University's Institute for Education and Social Policy, the Center for Policy Research at Syracuse University's Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs, and Columbia University. [More]
One-fourth of seniors acquire new superbugs during hospital stay

One-fourth of seniors acquire new superbugs during hospital stay

One in four seniors is bringing along stowaways from the hospital to their next stop: superbugs on their hands.Moreover, seniors who go to a nursing home or other post-acute care facility will continue to acquire new superbugs during their stay, according to findings made by University of Michigan researchers published today in a JAMA Internal Medicine research letter. [More]
PACE: A community-based long-term care model for elderly

PACE: A community-based long-term care model for elderly

A new article "A Case Exemplar for National Policy Leadership: Expanding Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly (PACE)," in the March 2016 Journal of Gerontology, chronicles the beginnings of PACE (Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly) and outlines its rise to nationwide acceptance. PACE is a viable and sustainable model of community-based long-term care that provides coordinated and comprehensive services with an interdisciplinary patient-centered team model that is paid for through Medicare, Medicaid, and other insurers. [More]
Chronic low-dose exposure to organochlorine pesticides linked to future cognitive impairment

Chronic low-dose exposure to organochlorine pesticides linked to future cognitive impairment

Individuals subjected to chronic low-dose exposure to organochlorine pesticides show and increased risk to obtain a future diagnosis of cognitive impairment. This is shown in a study now published in Environmental International. [More]
Internet-based social interventions important for healthy ageing

Internet-based social interventions important for healthy ageing

Meaningful and Internet-based activities promote experiences of participation in society and are important for healthy ageing. In a new dissertation at Umeå University in Sweden, occupational therapists are shown to promote participation, reduce experiences of loneliness and strengthen seniors' social network using an Internet-based intervention programme. [More]
People with disabilities, caregivers, veterans and healthcare professionals to attend 2016 Abilities Expo

People with disabilities, caregivers, veterans and healthcare professionals to attend 2016 Abilities Expo

Thousands of people with disabilities, their families, caregivers, seniors, wounded veterans and healthcare professionals are expected to attend Abilities Expo on February 5-7, 2016 at the Los Angeles Convention Center, West Hall A. Admission is free and the new show hours will get attendees home in time to watch the Super Bowl: Friday 11 am to 5 pm, Saturday 10 am to 6 pm and Sunday 10 am to 2 pm. [More]
People suffering from chronic stress, anxiety may be at increased risk for depression and dementia

People suffering from chronic stress, anxiety may be at increased risk for depression and dementia

A scientific review paper warns that people need to find ways to reduce chronic stress and anxiety in their lives or they may be at increased risk for developing depression and even dementia. [More]
Incidence of childhood myopia has more than doubled over last 50 years among American children

Incidence of childhood myopia has more than doubled over last 50 years among American children

The largest study of childhood eye diseases ever undertaken in the U.S. confirms that the incidence of childhood myopia among American children has more than doubled over the last 50 years. The findings echo a troubling trend among adults and children in Asia, where 90 percent or more of the population have been diagnosed with myopia, up from 10 to 20 percent 60 years ago. [More]
High doses of vitamin D may increase risk of falls

High doses of vitamin D may increase risk of falls

According to new research summarized by California Pacific Medical Center Research Institute senior scientist Steven Cummings, MD, and colleagues at the University of California, San Francisco and Harvard Medical School, contrary to common beliefs, relatively high doses of vitamin D may increase the risk of falls. [More]
Harmony Health Plan of Illinois to donate $10,000 to Kidz Korna

Harmony Health Plan of Illinois to donate $10,000 to Kidz Korna

Harmony Health Plan of Illinois, Inc., a subsidiary of WellCare Health Plans, Inc. (NYSE: WCG), will give $10,000 to Kidz Korna to help make the holidays special for 10,000 low-income children in Chicago's Englewood community. [More]
Bio Light's IOPtiMate system approved in Canada for treatment of glaucoma

Bio Light's IOPtiMate system approved in Canada for treatment of glaucoma

Bio Light Israeli Life Sciences Investments Ltd., an emerging global ophthalmic company focused on the discovery, development and commercialization of products and product candidates which address ophthalmic conditions, announced today that its IOPtiMate system for the treatment of glaucoma has been approved by the Canadian Medical Devices Bureau, allowing the Company to commercialize the surgical system in Canada. [More]
Drug use remains stable among teens, MTF survey shows

Drug use remains stable among teens, MTF survey shows

The 2015 Monitoring the Future survey (MTF) shows decreasing use of a number of substances, including cigarettes, alcohol, prescription opioid pain relievers, and synthetic cannabinoids ("synthetic marijuana"). Other drug use remains stable, including marijuana, with continued high rates of daily use reported among 12th graders, and ongoing declines in perception of its harms. [More]
Major clinical trial launched to test ways to slow or halt mental decline in seniors

Major clinical trial launched to test ways to slow or halt mental decline in seniors

Some decline in memory and cognitive function is a normal part of aging, but what if it could be prevented? Researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and Washington University in St. Louis have launched a major clinical trial to investigate whether mental decline in seniors can be slowed or halted through exercise and other health-related interventions. [More]
Older adults experience problems in processing multisensory information

Older adults experience problems in processing multisensory information

Much like trying to watch a video with the audio out of synch, older adults may have difficulty combining the stimuli they see and hear, and it could have implications for rapid decision-making tasks such as driving, according to new research. [More]
New guidelines may help reduce medication use among seniors

New guidelines may help reduce medication use among seniors

We're not getting any younger. According to the Administration for Community Living, by 2060, there will be about 98 million older persons in the United States — more than twice their number in 2013. [More]
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