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Sepsis is a life-threatening illness. Your body's response to a bacterial infection usually causes it. Your immune system goes into overdrive, overwhelming normal processes in your blood. The result is that small blood clots form, blocking blood flow to vital organs. This can lead to organ failure. Babies, old people and those with weakened immune systems are most likely to get sepsis. But even healthy people can become deathly ill from it. A quick diagnosis can be crucial, because one third of people who get sepsis die from it. Sepsis is usually treated in a hospital intensive care unit (ICU). IV antibiotics and fluids may be given to try to knock out the infection and to keep blood pressure from dropping too low. Patients may also need respirators to help them breathe.
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California Initiative to Advance Precision Medicine selects two demonstration projects

California Initiative to Advance Precision Medicine selects two demonstration projects

Two demonstration projects that aim to yield quick results for patients have been selected by the new California Initiative to Advance Precision Medicine, a public-private effort launched by Governor Edmund G. Brown Jr. [More]
Study shows link between liver-produced molecules, pneumonia susceptibility during sepsis

Study shows link between liver-produced molecules, pneumonia susceptibility during sepsis

New evidence highlights the importance of the liver in immunity against bacterial pneumonia. The study is the first of its kind to directly show such a link between liver-produced molecules and pneumonia susceptibility during sepsis. [More]
CHOP surgeons successfully complete world's first bilateral hand transplant on child

CHOP surgeons successfully complete world's first bilateral hand transplant on child

Surgeons at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia joined with colleagues from Penn Medicine recently to complete the world's first bilateral hand transplant on a child. Earlier this month, the surgical team successfully transplanted donor hands and forearms onto eight-year-old Zion Harvey who, several years earlier, had undergone amputation of his hands and feet and a kidney transplant following a serious infection. [More]
Biologists identify genetic mechanisms behind anti-inflammatory impact of cortisone

Biologists identify genetic mechanisms behind anti-inflammatory impact of cortisone

There's no time to lose when an emergency doctor diagnoses „Shock lung!" at the accident scene. What physicians know as "acute lung injury" (ALI) otherwise leads to death by suffocation without immediate treatment. [More]
UVA partners with MITRE to develop better health data analysis tools

UVA partners with MITRE to develop better health data analysis tools

University of Virginia Health System and The MITRE Corporation are partnering to develop better health data analysis tools to help prevent patients from getting sick and improving care while reducing healthcare costs. [More]
Scientists discover new variant of streptococcal bacteria that contributes to severe infections

Scientists discover new variant of streptococcal bacteria that contributes to severe infections

Scientists have discovered a new variant of streptococcal bacteria that has contributed to a rise in disease cases in the UK over the last 17 years. [More]

University of Liverpool researchers discover common cause of cardiac injury in sepsis patients

Researchers at the University of Liverpool's Institute of Infection and Global Health (IGH) have discovered a common cause of heart damage in patients with sepsis. [More]
Severe burns dramatically change bacteria populations, study finds

Severe burns dramatically change bacteria populations, study finds

A study published in PLOS ONE has found that burn patients experience dramatic changes in the 100 trillion bacteria inside the gastrointestinal tract. [More]
Sepsis readmissions have significant impact on health care expenditures in California

Sepsis readmissions have significant impact on health care expenditures in California

The Affordable Care Act created several national initiatives aimed at reducing hospital readmission rates for heart attacks, congestive heart failure and other common high-risk conditions. But there is still no national program intended to address sepsis, a potentially life-threatening illness caused by infection. [More]
MSD announces EC approval of SIMPONI (golimumab) for treatment of adult patients with nr-axial SpA

MSD announces EC approval of SIMPONI (golimumab) for treatment of adult patients with nr-axial SpA

MSD (Merck & Co., Inc., Kenilworth, New Jersey, USA) today announced that on 22 June the European Commission approved SIMPONI (golimumab) for the treatment of adult patients with severe, active non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis (nr-axial SpA). [More]
University of Pittsburgh surgeon receives Anthony Cerami Award in Translational Medicine

University of Pittsburgh surgeon receives Anthony Cerami Award in Translational Medicine

The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research and Molecular Medicine announced today that the fourth Anthony Cerami Award in Translational Medicine will be conferred to Thomas E. Starzl, MD, PhD, professor of surgery at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. The award is in recognition of his research in organ transplantation and alloengraftment mechanisms. [More]
The Lancet Oncology publishes results of CYRAMZA (ramucirumab) Phase III trial for HCC treatment

The Lancet Oncology publishes results of CYRAMZA (ramucirumab) Phase III trial for HCC treatment

Eli Lilly and Company announced that The Lancet Oncology has published results of the Phase III REACH trial that evaluated CYRAMZA (ramucirumab) as a second-line treatment for people with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), also known as liver cancer. While the REACH trial's primary endpoint of overall survival favored the CYRAMZA arm, it was not statistically significant. [More]
Phase 3 study shows Vectibix meets primary endpoint in patients with chemorefractory wild-type KRAS mCRC

Phase 3 study shows Vectibix meets primary endpoint in patients with chemorefractory wild-type KRAS mCRC

Amgen today announced that a Phase 3 study evaluating Vectibix (panitumumab) and best supportive care (BSC) met its primary endpoint, demonstrating a statistically significant improvement in overall survival (OS) in patients with chemorefractory wild-type KRAS (exon 2) metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) compared to those patients treated with BSC alone. [More]
PAH diagnosis delayed for adult congenital heart disease patients

PAH diagnosis delayed for adult congenital heart disease patients

Pulmonary arterial hypertension is often not diagnosed in adult patients with congenital heart disease until 6 years or more after their symptoms first appear, research shows. [More]
JAMA: Extremely preterm infants enrolled in randomized clinical trials experience neither better nor worse outcomes

JAMA: Extremely preterm infants enrolled in randomized clinical trials experience neither better nor worse outcomes

In a group of more than 5,000 extremely preterm infants, important in-hospital outcomes were neither better nor worse in infants enrolled in randomized clinical trials (RCTs) compared with eligible but nonenrolled infants, findings that may provide reassurance regarding concerns about performing RCTs in this vulnerable population, according to a study in the June 16 issue of JAMA. [More]
Completing sepsis resuscitation bundle in six hours after diagnosis

Completing sepsis resuscitation bundle in six hours after diagnosis

Blood poisoning, known as sepsis, is the most common cause of death in intensive care units, according to the National Institutes of Health. The body's immune response to fight the infection triggers inflammation that restricts blood flow and leads to multiple organ failure. [More]
Researchers discover that extreme exercise can lead to blood poisoning

Researchers discover that extreme exercise can lead to blood poisoning

Researchers have discovered that extreme exercise can cause intestinal bacteria to leak into the bloodstream, leading to blood poisoning. [More]
Switching from Remicade to Inflectra benefits patients with rheumatic diseases

Switching from Remicade to Inflectra benefits patients with rheumatic diseases

Hospira, Inc., a global leader in biosimilars, today announced the results of an independent clinical study, showing patients with rheumatic diseases experienced comparable clinical effectiveness and safety after switching from Remicade™ to Inflectra. [More]
Duration of antibiotic treatment can be cut by half for complicated abdominal infections

Duration of antibiotic treatment can be cut by half for complicated abdominal infections

In a finding important for preventing the development of antibiotic-resistant superbugs, researchers at the University of Virginia School of Medicine and 22 other institutions have determined that the duration of antibiotic treatment for complicated abdominal infections can be cut by half and remain equally effective. [More]
Steven Schiff wins NIH Director's Pioneer Award to reduce infant deaths from neonatal sepsis

Steven Schiff wins NIH Director's Pioneer Award to reduce infant deaths from neonatal sepsis

Steven Schiff, professor of neurosurgery and Brush Chair Professor of Engineering in Engineering Science and Mechanics, has received a $4.1 million National Institutes of Health Director's Pioneer Award, for research aimed at reducing the number of infant deaths from neonatal sepsis in developing countries by identifying the roots of infection, from season of birth to home environment. [More]
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