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Sepsis is a life-threatening illness. Your body's response to a bacterial infection usually causes it. Your immune system goes into overdrive, overwhelming normal processes in your blood. The result is that small blood clots form, blocking blood flow to vital organs. This can lead to organ failure. Babies, old people and those with weakened immune systems are most likely to get sepsis. But even healthy people can become deathly ill from it. A quick diagnosis can be crucial, because one third of people who get sepsis die from it. Sepsis is usually treated in a hospital intensive care unit (ICU). IV antibiotics and fluids may be given to try to knock out the infection and to keep blood pressure from dropping too low. Patients may also need respirators to help them breathe.
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New approach bolsters protein in blood vessels to protect against cerebral malaria

New approach bolsters protein in blood vessels to protect against cerebral malaria

Boosting a protective protein to stabilize blood vessels weakened by malaria showed improved survival beyond that of antimalarial drugs alone in pre-clinical research. [More]
PinnacleHealth, Pennsylvania leaders launch new campaign to help combat sepsis

PinnacleHealth, Pennsylvania leaders launch new campaign to help combat sepsis

PinnacleHealth System launched its "Knock Out Sepsis" campaign this morning from the Harrisburg State Capitol Rotunda steps joined by Pennsylvania Secretary of Health Karen Murphy, Insurance Commissioner Teresa Miller, State Representatives Mike Regan and Patty Kim, sepsis survivors Russ DiGilio, Aaron Stoner, and Carol Brame, mother of Sean Brame, and medical professionals on the frontlines of combatting sepsis. [More]
Radiometer to sponsor 2016 EuSEM Congress in Vienna, Austria

Radiometer to sponsor 2016 EuSEM Congress in Vienna, Austria

Radiometer is proud to be a gold sponsor of this year’s European Congress on Emergency Medicine organized by the European Society for Emergency Medicine (EuSEM) in Vienna, Austria, October 1-5. [More]
Mitochondrial alternative oxidase from sea-squirt shows potential to fight against sepsis

Mitochondrial alternative oxidase from sea-squirt shows potential to fight against sepsis

Mitochondrial alternative oxidase from a sea-squirt works as a safety valve for stressed mitochondria. This property enables it to stop the runaway inflammatory process that leads to multiple organ failure and eventual death in bacterial sepsis. [More]
MSU experts pioneer pathways to new treatment options for pneumonia

MSU experts pioneer pathways to new treatment options for pneumonia

Streptococcus pneumoniae likely is not a term immediately recognizable by most individuals, even if they have had unpleasant run-ins with the common bacterium. However, experts at Mississippi State University are pioneering pathways to new treatment options. [More]
New study shows how increase in medication-resistant bacteria impedes treatment of kidney infections

New study shows how increase in medication-resistant bacteria impedes treatment of kidney infections

The increase in illnesses and deaths linked to medication-resistant bacteria has been well-documented by researchers and received extensive public attention in recent years. Now, UCLA-led research shows how these bacteria are making it more difficult to treat a common but severe kidney infection. [More]
Researchers develop new model to map links between salmonella and sepsis

Researchers develop new model to map links between salmonella and sepsis

Research by industrial engineering and biology researchers at Kansas State University marks a significant milestone in the battle against sepsis, the second highest cause of death in intensive care units in the U.S. [More]
New value driven outcomes program makes difference in healthcare quality and cost

New value driven outcomes program makes difference in healthcare quality and cost

Bucking national trends, a new study shows that a program is making a difference in healthcare quality and cost. [More]
VIB-Ghent University research provides insights into septic shock

VIB-Ghent University research provides insights into septic shock

Researchers at VIB and Ghent University have discovered an important mechanism of sepsis, an overreaction of the body's immune system to an infection. [More]

Implementation of value-driven outcomes tool in health care system can lead to lower costs, better quality

Implementing an analytic tool that allocates clinical care costs and quality measures to individual patient encounters was associated with significant improvements in value of care for 3 designated outcomes—total joint replacement, laboratory testing among medical inpatients, and sepsis management, according to a study appearing in the September 13 issue of JAMA. [More]
Delirium in advanced cancer patients: an interview with Dr Knox Todd

Delirium in advanced cancer patients: an interview with Dr Knox Todd

Delirium is a terribly distressing syndrome of acute confusion. We often see it in the emergency department in older patients and in those with multiple medical problems. They may be acting strangely at home and concerned loved ones bring them to the emergency department. [More]
Researchers isolate cord blood factor that helps fight harmful inflammation

Researchers isolate cord blood factor that helps fight harmful inflammation

A factor found in umbilical cord blood could become the basis for developing a new therapy to fight harmful inflammation, University of Utah School of Medicine researchers report. [More]
Good blood microcirculation linked to longevity

Good blood microcirculation linked to longevity

Human longevity has been previously linked by researchers to genetic factors, calorie restriction, and certain life-style factors such as physical activity or the Mediterranean diet. [More]
Using biomarkers to diagnose sepsis: an interview with Jordi Trafi

Using biomarkers to diagnose sepsis: an interview with Jordi Trafi

Sepsis, according to the new clinical definition of sepsis, is organ dysfunction caused by the body’s dysregulated response to an infection. Sepsis is common, with about 20 million patients/year in the developed world. It can escalate to septic shock, which is a life-threatening condition with a mortality rate of about 40%. In fact, about every second someone in the world dies of sepsis. [More]
Early diagnosis and treatment key to surviving sepsis

Early diagnosis and treatment key to surviving sepsis

Every minute, someone comes into a hospital emergency department in the United States with sepsis, a life-threatening over-response to infection that damages tissues and organs. [More]
Study collects data on 30-day mortality for breast, lung cancer patients after SACT to improve patient care

Study collects data on 30-day mortality for breast, lung cancer patients after SACT to improve patient care

For the first time, national data on 30-day mortality for patients with breast and lung cancer treated with chemotherapy have been collected and analysed in order to help clinical teams review and improve patient care, and identify groups of patients who may have additional needs. [More]
Radiometer announces sponsorship for World Sepsis Day 2016

Radiometer announces sponsorship for World Sepsis Day 2016

Radiometer is proud to announce that it is sponsoring this year’s World Sepsis Day on the 13th September, continuing its commitment to the fight against this life-threatening medical condition. [More]
Simple steps can improve survival of sepsis patients

Simple steps can improve survival of sepsis patients

Sepsis, commonly called blood poisoning, is a common affliction that can affect people of all ages. A series of simple measures tested at a Norwegian hospital can make a difference in successfully treating sepsis. [More]
Selective manipulation of enzyme can stop cancer cachexia

Selective manipulation of enzyme can stop cancer cachexia

Healthy fat tissue is essential for extended survival in the event of tumor-induced wasting syndrome (cachexia). In Nature Medicine, researchers at Helmholtz Zentrum München show that selective manipulation of an enzyme can stop unwanted metabolic processes. [More]
European scientists invent new microscope for rapid detection of deadly infections

European scientists invent new microscope for rapid detection of deadly infections

A group of European scientists have invented a microscope that will allow the fastest ever detection of life-threatening infections caused by bacteria, such as E. coli or Staphylococcus, and conditions such as Meningitis, saving millions of lives every year. [More]
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