Sepsis News and Research RSS Feed - Sepsis News and Research

Sepsis is a life-threatening illness. Your body's response to a bacterial infection usually causes it. Your immune system goes into overdrive, overwhelming normal processes in your blood. The result is that small blood clots form, blocking blood flow to vital organs. This can lead to organ failure. Babies, old people and those with weakened immune systems are most likely to get sepsis. But even healthy people can become deathly ill from it. A quick diagnosis can be crucial, because one third of people who get sepsis die from it. Sepsis is usually treated in a hospital intensive care unit (ICU). IV antibiotics and fluids may be given to try to knock out the infection and to keep blood pressure from dropping too low. Patients may also need respirators to help them breathe.
Further Reading
Study suggests new approach to treat white blood cells of sepsis patients

Study suggests new approach to treat white blood cells of sepsis patients

New research findings published in the Journal of Leukocyte Biology, suggest that treating the white blood cells of sepsis patients with antibodies that block programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) and programmed cell death ligand (PD-L1) molecules may restore their function and ultimately their ability to eradicate deadly bacteria. [More]
Over-the-counter and prescription pain medications linked to drug-induced liver injury

Over-the-counter and prescription pain medications linked to drug-induced liver injury

More than 1,000 medications, with acetaminophen being the most common, have been associated with drug-induced liver injury. [More]
New report highlights global burden of maternal, newborn and young child deaths

New report highlights global burden of maternal, newborn and young child deaths

Today FIGO, ICM, ICN and IPA announce the publication of a report showing the global burden of maternal, newborn and young child deaths and launch the Together We Can campaign to tackle it. [More]
New research shows immune paralysis in sepsis patients can be reversed

New research shows immune paralysis in sepsis patients can be reversed

Failure of the immune system during blood poisoning (sepsis) can be reversed by a specific sugar. [More]
Research supports re-introduction of penicillin-type antibiotics as adjunct therapeutic for MRSA infections

Research supports re-introduction of penicillin-type antibiotics as adjunct therapeutic for MRSA infections

Microbiologists have identified how MRSA may be more effectively treated by modern-day antibiotics, if old-fashioned penicillin is also used. [More]
International scientists unravel mystery of newly discovered type of controlled cell death

International scientists unravel mystery of newly discovered type of controlled cell death

A multidisciplinary international team of scientists solved the mystery of a recently discovered type of controlled cell death, mapping the path to potential therapies for conditions ranging from radiation injury to cancer. [More]
Many people wrongly believe that sepsis is less deadly than breast cancer, research reveals

Many people wrongly believe that sepsis is less deadly than breast cancer, research reveals

Most people do not know how deadly sepsis is, with four out offive wrongly believingthe condition is less deadly than breast cancer, according to the latest research. [More]
Study finds stable trends in ventilator-associated pneumonia rates

Study finds stable trends in ventilator-associated pneumonia rates

In a study published online by JAMA, Mark L. Metersky, M.D., of the UConn School of Medicine, Farmington, and colleagues analyzed trends in Medicare Patient Safety Monitoring System ventilator-associated pneumonia rates from 2005 through 2013. [More]
New technology uses USB stick to monitor HIV in bloodstream

New technology uses USB stick to monitor HIV in bloodstream

The device, created by scientists at Imperial College London and DNA Electronics, uses a drop of blood to detect HIV, and then creates an electrical signal that can be read by a computer, laptop or handheld device. [More]
New research explains how tumors may impair ability of the liver to respond to caloric deprivation

New research explains how tumors may impair ability of the liver to respond to caloric deprivation

One of the worst cruelties of lethal cancer is the phenomenon called wasting, or in medical terms, cachexia (pronounced ka-CHEX-ia), in which a patient seems literally to diminish in bodily terms as the cancer ravages one or more internal organs. [More]
Scientists turn iron-scavenging power against common UTI-causing bacteria

Scientists turn iron-scavenging power against common UTI-causing bacteria

For most invading bacteria, the bladder is not a friendly place. But for those that have figured out how to scavenge iron from their hosts, it's a fine place to grow and reproduce. [More]
FDA approves expanded use of systemic therapy for treating chronic moderate-to-severe pediatric psoriasis

FDA approves expanded use of systemic therapy for treating chronic moderate-to-severe pediatric psoriasis

Amgen today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the supplemental Biologics License Application for the expanded use of ENBREL (etanercept), making it the first and only systemic therapy to treat pediatric patients (ages 4-17) with chronic moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis. [More]
Researchers engineer new weapon to destroy antibiotic-resistant bacteria

Researchers engineer new weapon to destroy antibiotic-resistant bacteria

Over the past few decades, many bacteria have become resistant to existing antibiotics, and few new drugs have emerged. [More]
Scientists find new way to significantly reduce detection time for sepsis

Scientists find new way to significantly reduce detection time for sepsis

What do Casey Kasem, Christopher Reeve and Muhammad Ali have in common? They all died of sepsis: a rapid, potentially deadly reaction that affects about 1 million Americans each year. [More]
iMDsoft proud to collaborate with two of NHS’s global digital exemplars

iMDsoft proud to collaborate with two of NHS’s global digital exemplars

iMDsoft, a leader in clinical information systems, is proud to be working with two of the NHS’s global digital exemplars, University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust (UHS) and West Suffolk Hospital. [More]
Study shows physicians in pediatric ICUs do not use newest guidelines to diagnose AKI in children

Study shows physicians in pediatric ICUs do not use newest guidelines to diagnose AKI in children

A study by University at Buffalo researchers has shown that physicians in pediatric intensive care units are not using the newest guidelines to diagnose acute kidney injury (AKI) in critically ill children, a practice that could affect their patients' long-term health. [More]
Research could pave way for new approaches to kill antibiotic-resistant E. coli bacteria

Research could pave way for new approaches to kill antibiotic-resistant E. coli bacteria

Research by bioscientists at the University of Kent and the University of Queensland is expected to pave the way for new approaches to kill bacteria that no longer respond to conventional antibiotics. [More]
Study estimates impact of six common healthcare-associated infections

Study estimates impact of six common healthcare-associated infections

A study published today by PLOS Medicine, estimates the combined burden of six healthcare-associated infections as being higher than that of diseases such as influenza, HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis together. [More]
Researchers describe novel host-oriented therapeutic approach for preventing lethal immune responses

Researchers describe novel host-oriented therapeutic approach for preventing lethal immune responses

Staphylococcal and streptococcal infections affect millions of individuals each year. They are a leading cause of sepsis and account for many cases of pneumonia and post-surgical infections. [More]
Antiseptic used for umbilical cord care ineffective in reducing newborn deaths in Africa

Antiseptic used for umbilical cord care ineffective in reducing newborn deaths in Africa

Despite significant reductions in neonatal mortality previously reported in south Asia, applying a chlorhexidine wash to newborns' umbilical cords in sub-Saharan Africa did not reduce deaths, a study led by researchers from the Boston University School of Public Health shows. [More]
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