Sepsis News and Research RSS Feed - Sepsis News and Research

Sepsis is a life-threatening illness. Your body's response to a bacterial infection usually causes it. Your immune system goes into overdrive, overwhelming normal processes in your blood. The result is that small blood clots form, blocking blood flow to vital organs. This can lead to organ failure. Babies, old people and those with weakened immune systems are most likely to get sepsis. But even healthy people can become deathly ill from it. A quick diagnosis can be crucial, because one third of people who get sepsis die from it. Sepsis is usually treated in a hospital intensive care unit (ICU). IV antibiotics and fluids may be given to try to knock out the infection and to keep blood pressure from dropping too low. Patients may also need respirators to help them breathe.
Further Reading
Hospital bed positioning can affect outcomes of stroke patients

Hospital bed positioning can affect outcomes of stroke patients

During the first 24 hours after a stroke, attention to detail --such as hospital bed positioning -- is critical to patient outcomes. [More]
Influential colleagues convince doctors to try new therapies

Influential colleagues convince doctors to try new therapies

Doctors are more likely to try a new therapy when they are persuaded to do so by an influential colleague, reports a new Northwestern University study whose findings on adopting innovations also have relevance for business, education and research. [More]
Sepsis biomarker and POC hemoglobin analyzer to be launched by EKF Diagnostics at Medica 2014

Sepsis biomarker and POC hemoglobin analyzer to be launched by EKF Diagnostics at Medica 2014

EKF Diagnostics, the global diagnostics company, announces that it will be introducing two new diagnostic tests at Medica 2014, 12-15th November, Düsseldorf, Germany. In Hall 3 on Stand C70, visitors can see EKF’s novel assay for early sepsis detection, as well its new hand-held point of care hemoglobin analyzer. Alongside these new products, EKF will also be exhibiting a new version of its Hemo Control hemoglobin analyzer, the industry-leading Biosen glucose and lactate analyzer, as well as previewing SensPoint, a new lactate analyzer designed for use in professional medical settings. [More]
New test could help physicians predict people who are at early stages of sepsis

New test could help physicians predict people who are at early stages of sepsis

A new test, developed by University of British Columbia researchers, could help physicians predict within an hour if a patient will develop severe sepsis so they can begin treatment immediately. [More]
ECMO improves survival, neurological outcomes in patients suffering from cardiac arrest

ECMO improves survival, neurological outcomes in patients suffering from cardiac arrest

A new study shows that survival and neurological outcomes for patients in cardiac arrest can be improved by adding extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) when performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). [More]
Clinical study of Proxima miniature in-line blood gas analyser meets primary end point

Clinical study of Proxima miniature in-line blood gas analyser meets primary end point

Sphere Medical, innovator in critical care monitoring and diagnostics equipment, is pleased to announce the completion of a successful clinical study of its new Proxima miniature in-line blood gas analyser at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham, UK. [More]
MGH, MIT partner to accelerate development of diagnostic tools and therapies

MGH, MIT partner to accelerate development of diagnostic tools and therapies

A novel partnership between Massachusetts General Hospital and Massachusetts Institute of Technology is addressing three major challenges in clinical medicine – improving the diagnosis of disease, developing new approaches to prevent and treat infectious and autoimmune diseases, and developing more accurate methods of diagnosing and treating major neurodegenerative and psychiatric diseases. While individual collaborations between MGH and MIT investigators are nothing new, this formalized strategic partnership is designed to accelerate the development of diagnostic tools and therapies. [More]
New surface coating for medical devices prevents blood from clotting

New surface coating for medical devices prevents blood from clotting

From joint replacements to cardiac implants and dialysis machines, medical devices enhance or save lives on a daily basis. However, any device implanted in the body or in contact with flowing blood faces two critical challenges that can threaten the life of the patient the device is meant to help: blood clotting and bacterial infection. [More]
CytoSorbents named Health sector winner at 2014 GREAT Tech Awards Gala

CytoSorbents named Health sector winner at 2014 GREAT Tech Awards Gala

CytoSorbents Corporation is proud to announce that it was named the Health sector winner at the 2014 GREAT Tech Awards Gala last evening. Sponsored by United Kingdom Trade & Investment and the British Consulate General New York, the GREAT Tech Awards selected one winner in each of six categories from a pool of 120 high growth companies from New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania and Connecticut. [More]
Penn prediction tool increases sepsis identification and care, indicates fewer deaths

Penn prediction tool increases sepsis identification and care, indicates fewer deaths

An automated early warning and response system for sepsis developed by Penn Medicine experts has resulted in a marked increase in sepsis identification and care, transfer to the ICU, and an indication of fewer deaths due to sepsis. A study assessing the tool is published online in the Journal of Hospital Medicine. [More]
Astute Medical to get $30 million from CRG to support commercialization of NephroCheck Test System

Astute Medical to get $30 million from CRG to support commercialization of NephroCheck Test System

Astute Medical, Inc. and CRG today announced that Astute recently achieved a milestone under the terms of its existing term loan agreement with CRG. Under the term loan agreement, CRG will provide up to $30 million to support the commercialization of the NephroCheck Test System. [More]
U-M researchers propose new ways to fight sepsis

U-M researchers propose new ways to fight sepsis

A decade ago, America's health care community took on heart attacks with gusto, harnessing the power of research and data to make sure that every patient got the best possible care. [More]
New partners join Grand Challenges Canada to help protect early brain development

New partners join Grand Challenges Canada to help protect early brain development

Grand Challenges Canada, funded by the Government of Canada, today welcomed three new partners to the Saving Brains Grand Challenge: Aga Khan Foundation Canada, Norlien Foundation and World Vision Canada. These organizations strengthen the existing partnership with the Bernard van Leer Foundation, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, and the Maria Cecilia Souto Vidigal Foundation. [More]
New implantable device can control heart failure

New implantable device can control heart failure

A new, implantable device to control heart failure is showing promising results in the first trial to determine safety and effectiveness in patients, according to lead researcher Dr. William Abraham of The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center. [More]
CytoSorbents announces launch of International CytoSorb Treatment Registry

CytoSorbents announces launch of International CytoSorb Treatment Registry

CytoSorbents Corporation, a critical care immunotherapy company using blood purification to treat life-threatening conditions, announced the launch of its International CytoSorb Treatment Registry, established and managed by the Center of Clinical Trials at the University of Jena, Germany. [More]
Fecal microbiota transplantation officially recommended for effective treatment of C. difficile infection

Fecal microbiota transplantation officially recommended for effective treatment of C. difficile infection

The transplantation of faecal microbiota from a healthy donor has been shown in recent clinical studies to be a safe and highly effective treatment for recurrent Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) infection and is now recommended in European treatment guidelines. [More]
Study provides support for new understanding of the immune system

Study provides support for new understanding of the immune system

A study published in the journal Science provides support for a new-and still controversial-understanding of the immune system. The research was conducted by collaborators in the U.S. and Europe, including Robert Cramer, PhD, an assistant professor of microbiology and immunology at the Geisel School of Medicine and member of the Dartmouth Lung Biology Center, and Kelly Shepherdson, PhD, at the time a graduate student in Cramer's lab. [More]
Single-family room environment can optimize care for preterm infants

Single-family room environment can optimize care for preterm infants

The prevalence of preterm birth - the birth of an infant prior to 37 weeks of pregnancy - is a significant health problem that has increased over the past two decades. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, preterm birth affects nearly 500,000 babies each year, or one of every eight born in the U.S. While medical care has improved survival rates for preterm infants, questions remain about ways to positively impact the neurodevelopmental outcomes of preterm infants. [More]
Common type of hospital-associated infections can be prevented with vaccine

Common type of hospital-associated infections can be prevented with vaccine

The most common type of hospital-associated infection may be preventable with a vaccine, new research in mice suggests. [More]
Abbott technology may help identify severe infections sooner, lower health care costs

Abbott technology may help identify severe infections sooner, lower health care costs

A new study suggests a pioneering testing technology could reduce hospital stays by up to eight days and lower annual health care costs for people with serious infections by approximately $2.2 million (€1.5 million / £1.2 million). [More]