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Sepsis is a life-threatening illness. Your body's response to a bacterial infection usually causes it. Your immune system goes into overdrive, overwhelming normal processes in your blood. The result is that small blood clots form, blocking blood flow to vital organs. This can lead to organ failure. Babies, old people and those with weakened immune systems are most likely to get sepsis. But even healthy people can become deathly ill from it. A quick diagnosis can be crucial, because one third of people who get sepsis die from it. Sepsis is usually treated in a hospital intensive care unit (ICU). IV antibiotics and fluids may be given to try to knock out the infection and to keep blood pressure from dropping too low. Patients may also need respirators to help them breathe.
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Fecal microbiota transplantation officially recommended for effective treatment of C. difficile infection

Fecal microbiota transplantation officially recommended for effective treatment of C. difficile infection

The transplantation of faecal microbiota from a healthy donor has been shown in recent clinical studies to be a safe and highly effective treatment for recurrent Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) infection and is now recommended in European treatment guidelines. [More]
Study provides support for new understanding of the immune system

Study provides support for new understanding of the immune system

A study published in the journal Science provides support for a new-and still controversial-understanding of the immune system. The research was conducted by collaborators in the U.S. and Europe, including Robert Cramer, PhD, an assistant professor of microbiology and immunology at the Geisel School of Medicine and member of the Dartmouth Lung Biology Center, and Kelly Shepherdson, PhD, at the time a graduate student in Cramer's lab. [More]
Single-family room environment can optimize care for preterm infants

Single-family room environment can optimize care for preterm infants

The prevalence of preterm birth - the birth of an infant prior to 37 weeks of pregnancy - is a significant health problem that has increased over the past two decades. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, preterm birth affects nearly 500,000 babies each year, or one of every eight born in the U.S. While medical care has improved survival rates for preterm infants, questions remain about ways to positively impact the neurodevelopmental outcomes of preterm infants. [More]
Common type of hospital-associated infections can be prevented with vaccine

Common type of hospital-associated infections can be prevented with vaccine

The most common type of hospital-associated infection may be preventable with a vaccine, new research in mice suggests. [More]
Abbott technology may help identify severe infections sooner, lower health care costs

Abbott technology may help identify severe infections sooner, lower health care costs

A new study suggests a pioneering testing technology could reduce hospital stays by up to eight days and lower annual health care costs for people with serious infections by approximately $2.2 million (€1.5 million / £1.2 million). [More]
Ortho-oncology team successfully adapts shoulder surgical aid

Ortho-oncology team successfully adapts shoulder surgical aid

An ortho-oncology team at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Norris Cotton Cancer Center successfully adapted a shoulder surgical aid (the Spider Limb Positioner) to conduct a left hip disarticulation on a melanoma patient as described in a case report published online in Medical Devices. [More]
Sepsis patients more likely to survive when treated at hospital with higher volume of cases

Sepsis patients more likely to survive when treated at hospital with higher volume of cases

Patients with sepsis, one of the most time-sensitive and hard-to-detect illnesses in medicine, are more likely to survive the life-threatening condition when treated at a hospital that sees a higher volume of sepsis cases. [More]
BIOCRATES launches first-ever bile acids kit based on targeted metabolite quantitation

BIOCRATES launches first-ever bile acids kit based on targeted metabolite quantitation

Austrian BIOCRATES Life Sciences AG, internationally renowned developer and marketer of innovative targeted metabolomics solutions, further expands its range of metabolomics-based kits with the addition of its assay for the determination of endogenous bile acids, allowing a panel of up to 19 analytes to be simultaneously quantitated from a single 10 µL sample of human or mouse plasma. [More]
Educating clinicians can reduce sepsis patient mortality and lower hospital costs

Educating clinicians can reduce sepsis patient mortality and lower hospital costs

Sepsis is the tenth leading cause of death in the United States, and new research published in the Journal for Healthcare Quality (JHQ) shows that educating clinicians about expediting diagnosis and administration of antibiotics can reduce sepsis patient mortality and lower hospital costs. [More]
UAB scientist receives R01 grant to study transmission of deadly bacteria from mothers to infants

UAB scientist receives R01 grant to study transmission of deadly bacteria from mothers to infants

New research from the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Optometry will study the transmission of a bacteria that up to 40 percent of healthy women carry, which becomes deadly when passed on to infants during birth. [More]
OMRF receives $14.5 million grant from NIH to continue research on anthrax

OMRF receives $14.5 million grant from NIH to continue research on anthrax

The National Institutes of Health has awarded the Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation a five-year, $14.5 million grant to continue its research on anthrax and the bacteria's effects on humans. [More]
Researchers shed light on the dual action of aspirin

Researchers shed light on the dual action of aspirin

Hugely popular non-steroidal anti-inflammation drugs like aspirin, naproxen (marketed as Aleve) and ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) all work by inhibiting or killing an enzyme called cyclooxygenase - a key catalyst in production of hormone-like lipid compounds called prostaglandins that are linked to a variety of ailments, from headaches and arthritis to menstrual cramps and wound sepsis. [More]
Actavis reports positive results from ceftazidime-avibactam Phase III studies in cIAI patients

Actavis reports positive results from ceftazidime-avibactam Phase III studies in cIAI patients

Actavis plc today confirmed positive topline results from RECLAIM-1 and -2, pivotal Phase III studies evaluating the potential for the investigational antibiotic, ceftazidime-avibactam as a treatment for adult hospitalized patients with complicated intra-abdominal infections. [More]
Researchers reveal importance of highly specialised immune cells in killing melanoma cells

Researchers reveal importance of highly specialised immune cells in killing melanoma cells

Melbourne researchers have revealed the critical importance of highly specialised immune cells, called natural killer cells, in killing melanoma cells that have spread to the lungs. [More]
Babies suffering from life-threatening bacterial infections could benefit from improved treatment

Babies suffering from life-threatening bacterial infections could benefit from improved treatment

Babies suffering from life-threatening bacterial infections such as sepsis could benefit from improved treatment, thanks to a ground-breaking study. [More]
Inovio Pharmaceuticals reports increased revenue in second quarter 2014

Inovio Pharmaceuticals reports increased revenue in second quarter 2014

Inovio Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today reported financial results for the quarter ended June 30, 2014. Total revenue was $3.8 million and $6.2 million for the three and six months ended June 30, 2014, compared to $786,000 and $2.2 million for the same periods in 2013. [More]
Receipt of nutrition via feeding tube may be harmful for ICU patients

Receipt of nutrition via feeding tube may be harmful for ICU patients

Among mechanically ventilated intensive care unit (ICU) patients, receipt of high-protein nutrition via a feeding tube enriched with immune-modulating nutrients (such as glutamine, omega-3 fatty acids, and antioxidants) vs standard high-protein nutrition did not result in a significant difference in the incidence of new complications and may be harmful, as suggested by an increased risk of death at 6 months, according to a study in the August 6 issue of JAMA. [More]
Researchers reveal obesity paradox among older Americans suffering from sepsis

Researchers reveal obesity paradox among older Americans suffering from sepsis

University of Michigan Health System researchers revealed an obesity paradox among older Americans suffering from sepsis. [More]
Emergency department closures can affect death rates, finds UCSF research

Emergency department closures can affect death rates, finds UCSF research

In the first analysis of its kind, UC San Francisco research shows that emergency department closures can have a ripple effect on patient outcomes at nearby hospitals. [More]
Astute Medical, OCD partner to expand access to new acute kidney injury test

Astute Medical, OCD partner to expand access to new acute kidney injury test

Astute Medical, Inc. today announced a strategic collaboration with Ortho-Clinical Diagnostics, Inc. that will expand access to a new test that assesses critically ill patients for risk of acute kidney injury (AKI), a prevalent and deadly condition. [More]