Sepsis News and Research RSS Feed - Sepsis News and Research

Sepsis is a life-threatening illness. Your body's response to a bacterial infection usually causes it. Your immune system goes into overdrive, overwhelming normal processes in your blood. The result is that small blood clots form, blocking blood flow to vital organs. This can lead to organ failure. Babies, old people and those with weakened immune systems are most likely to get sepsis. But even healthy people can become deathly ill from it. A quick diagnosis can be crucial, because one third of people who get sepsis die from it. Sepsis is usually treated in a hospital intensive care unit (ICU). IV antibiotics and fluids may be given to try to knock out the infection and to keep blood pressure from dropping too low. Patients may also need respirators to help them breathe.
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Great Basin Scientific seeks FDA approval for Group B Strep assay

Great Basin Scientific seeks FDA approval for Group B Strep assay

Great Basin Scientific, Inc., a molecular diagnostics company, today announced it has submitted its Group B Strep assay to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for 510(k) clearance. [More]
Experts focus on key issues impeding delivery of cardiac care in resource-limited settings

Experts focus on key issues impeding delivery of cardiac care in resource-limited settings

Critical care is defined by life-threatening conditions, which require close evaluation, monitoring, and treatment by appropriately trained health professionals. Cardiovascular care bears these same requirements. [More]
LSU Health New Orleans professor awarded $1.8 million grant to target intra-abdominal infections

LSU Health New Orleans professor awarded $1.8 million grant to target intra-abdominal infections

Mairi Noverr, PhD, Associate Professor of Prosthodontics at LSU Health New Orleans School of Dentistry's Center of Excellence in Oral Biology, has been awarded a $1.8 million grant by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. [More]
New model explains how immune cells recognize, destroy bacteria

New model explains how immune cells recognize, destroy bacteria

The innate immune system serves as the body's specialized armed forces division, comprised of a host of defense mechanisms used to battle bacterial infections. Among the system's warriors are white blood cells including the specialized macrophages, which maintain constant surveillance for foreign intruders or pathogens, functioning as the body's first line of defense, poised to attack at barrier sites including the skin, lungs and intestines. [More]
Inovio Pharmaceuticals reports Q3 2014 financial results, provides corporate update

Inovio Pharmaceuticals reports Q3 2014 financial results, provides corporate update

Inovio Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today reported financial results for the quarter ended September 30, 2014. [More]
Liposomes can help prevent bacterial toxins from killing human cells

Liposomes can help prevent bacterial toxins from killing human cells

Published in Nature Biotechnology, the study at the University of Liverpool showed that specially engineered lipid (fat) bodies, called liposomes, can be used to prevent bacterial toxins from killing human cells. [More]
Penn researchers show that 23% of patients who survive septic shock return to hospital within 30 days

Penn researchers show that 23% of patients who survive septic shock return to hospital within 30 days

A diagnosis of septic shock was once a near death sentence. At best, survivors suffered a substantially reduced quality of life. [More]
FDA approves CYRAMZA in combination with paclitaxel for advanced adenocarcinoma

FDA approves CYRAMZA in combination with paclitaxel for advanced adenocarcinoma

Eli Lilly and Company announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved CYRAMZA (ramucirumab) in combination with paclitaxel (a type of chemotherapy) as a treatment for people with advanced or metastatic gastric (stomach) or gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) adenocarcinoma whose cancer has progressed on or after prior fluoropyrimidine- or platinum-containing chemotherapy. [More]
Hospital bed positioning can affect outcomes of stroke patients

Hospital bed positioning can affect outcomes of stroke patients

During the first 24 hours after a stroke, attention to detail --such as hospital bed positioning -- is critical to patient outcomes. [More]
Influential colleagues convince doctors to try new therapies

Influential colleagues convince doctors to try new therapies

Doctors are more likely to try a new therapy when they are persuaded to do so by an influential colleague, reports a new Northwestern University study whose findings on adopting innovations also have relevance for business, education and research. [More]
New test could help physicians predict people who are at early stages of sepsis

New test could help physicians predict people who are at early stages of sepsis

A new test, developed by University of British Columbia researchers, could help physicians predict within an hour if a patient will develop severe sepsis so they can begin treatment immediately. [More]
ECMO improves survival, neurological outcomes in patients suffering from cardiac arrest

ECMO improves survival, neurological outcomes in patients suffering from cardiac arrest

A new study shows that survival and neurological outcomes for patients in cardiac arrest can be improved by adding extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) when performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). [More]
Clinical study of Proxima miniature in-line blood gas analyser meets primary end point

Clinical study of Proxima miniature in-line blood gas analyser meets primary end point

Sphere Medical, innovator in critical care monitoring and diagnostics equipment, is pleased to announce the completion of a successful clinical study of its new Proxima miniature in-line blood gas analyser at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham, UK. [More]
MGH, MIT partner to accelerate development of diagnostic tools and therapies

MGH, MIT partner to accelerate development of diagnostic tools and therapies

A novel partnership between Massachusetts General Hospital and Massachusetts Institute of Technology is addressing three major challenges in clinical medicine – improving the diagnosis of disease, developing new approaches to prevent and treat infectious and autoimmune diseases, and developing more accurate methods of diagnosing and treating major neurodegenerative and psychiatric diseases. While individual collaborations between MGH and MIT investigators are nothing new, this formalized strategic partnership is designed to accelerate the development of diagnostic tools and therapies. [More]
New surface coating for medical devices prevents blood from clotting

New surface coating for medical devices prevents blood from clotting

From joint replacements to cardiac implants and dialysis machines, medical devices enhance or save lives on a daily basis. However, any device implanted in the body or in contact with flowing blood faces two critical challenges that can threaten the life of the patient the device is meant to help: blood clotting and bacterial infection. [More]
CytoSorbents named Health sector winner at 2014 GREAT Tech Awards Gala

CytoSorbents named Health sector winner at 2014 GREAT Tech Awards Gala

CytoSorbents Corporation is proud to announce that it was named the Health sector winner at the 2014 GREAT Tech Awards Gala last evening. Sponsored by United Kingdom Trade & Investment and the British Consulate General New York, the GREAT Tech Awards selected one winner in each of six categories from a pool of 120 high growth companies from New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania and Connecticut. [More]
Penn prediction tool increases sepsis identification and care, indicates fewer deaths

Penn prediction tool increases sepsis identification and care, indicates fewer deaths

An automated early warning and response system for sepsis developed by Penn Medicine experts has resulted in a marked increase in sepsis identification and care, transfer to the ICU, and an indication of fewer deaths due to sepsis. A study assessing the tool is published online in the Journal of Hospital Medicine. [More]
Astute Medical to get $30 million from CRG to support commercialization of NephroCheck Test System

Astute Medical to get $30 million from CRG to support commercialization of NephroCheck Test System

Astute Medical, Inc. and CRG today announced that Astute recently achieved a milestone under the terms of its existing term loan agreement with CRG. Under the term loan agreement, CRG will provide up to $30 million to support the commercialization of the NephroCheck Test System. [More]
U-M researchers propose new ways to fight sepsis

U-M researchers propose new ways to fight sepsis

A decade ago, America's health care community took on heart attacks with gusto, harnessing the power of research and data to make sure that every patient got the best possible care. [More]
New partners join Grand Challenges Canada to help protect early brain development

New partners join Grand Challenges Canada to help protect early brain development

Grand Challenges Canada, funded by the Government of Canada, today welcomed three new partners to the Saving Brains Grand Challenge: Aga Khan Foundation Canada, Norlien Foundation and World Vision Canada. These organizations strengthen the existing partnership with the Bernard van Leer Foundation, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, and the Maria Cecilia Souto Vidigal Foundation. [More]