Sepsis News and Research RSS Feed - Sepsis News and Research

Sepsis is a life-threatening illness. Your body's response to a bacterial infection usually causes it. Your immune system goes into overdrive, overwhelming normal processes in your blood. The result is that small blood clots form, blocking blood flow to vital organs. This can lead to organ failure. Babies, old people and those with weakened immune systems are most likely to get sepsis. But even healthy people can become deathly ill from it. A quick diagnosis can be crucial, because one third of people who get sepsis die from it. Sepsis is usually treated in a hospital intensive care unit (ICU). IV antibiotics and fluids may be given to try to knock out the infection and to keep blood pressure from dropping too low. Patients may also need respirators to help them breathe.
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Brain network measures placebo effects in Parkinson's disease patients

Brain network measures placebo effects in Parkinson's disease patients

Investigators at The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research have utilized a new image-based strategy to identify and measure placebo effects in randomized clinical trials for brain disorders. The findings are published in the August issue of The Journal of Clinical Investigation. [More]
First publication describing use of CytoSorb during cardiac surgery

First publication describing use of CytoSorb during cardiac surgery

CytoSorbents Corporation, a critical care immunotherapy company commercializing its CytoSorb® cytokine adsorber in multiple countries worldwide, announced the PDF availability of the first publication describing the use of CytoSorb® intra-operatively during cardiac surgery at the Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich Hospital - Grosshadern Campus, in Germany. [More]
Researchers release evidence substantiating unexpected dual role of immune system

Researchers release evidence substantiating unexpected dual role of immune system

University of Leicester researchers have released evidence substantiating an unexpected dual role of an important component of the immune system. [More]
'Pure mass of HES molecules' explains toxicity to renal tubule cells

'Pure mass of HES molecules' explains toxicity to renal tubule cells

The increased risk of kidney injury related to the use of hydroxyethyl starch (HES) in resuscitation fluids reflects the mass of HES molecules, according to a report in Anesthesia & Analgesia, official journal of the International Anesthesia Research Society (IARS). [More]
Study: Minimally invasive aortic repair procedure safer for patients

Study: Minimally invasive aortic repair procedure safer for patients

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have documented the safety benefits of aortic stent grafts inserted during minimally invasive surgery to repair abdominal aortic aneurysms - weaknesses in the body's largest artery that can rupture, causing potentially lethal internal bleeding. [More]
Keck Medicine of USC study identifies potential therapeutic target for inflammation

Keck Medicine of USC study identifies potential therapeutic target for inflammation

Molecular microbiologists from the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California have discovered that mice lacking a specific component of the immune system are completely resistant to sepsis, a potentially fatal complication of infection. [More]
Scientists uncover mechanisms that can protect against lethal bacteria

Scientists uncover mechanisms that can protect against lethal bacteria

An important development in understanding how the bacterium that causes pneumonia, meningitis and septicaemia remains harmlessly in the nose and throat has been discovered at the University of Liverpool's Institute of Infection and Global Health. [More]
Researcher describes possible implications of increased gravity effect on immunity

Researcher describes possible implications of increased gravity effect on immunity

Before you swat away the next fruit fly, consider instead just how similar its biological complexities are to our own. [More]
Clinicians need to be sensitive to women's reproductive health needs in times of conflict

Clinicians need to be sensitive to women's reproductive health needs in times of conflict

Clinicians need to be sensitive and aware of the unique challenges of women's reproductive health needs in times of conflict, suggests a new review published today (4 July) in The Obstetrician & Gynaecologist. [More]
UCB, Dermira enter into licensing agreement for development, commercialization of Cimzia

UCB, Dermira enter into licensing agreement for development, commercialization of Cimzia

UCB, a global biopharmaceutical leader, and Dermira, Inc., a privately held US-based dermatology company, announced today that they have entered into an exclusive licensing agreement for the development and future commercialization of Cimzia (certolizumab pegol) in dermatology. [More]
New technology could revolutionize treatment and prevention of sepsis

New technology could revolutionize treatment and prevention of sepsis

The National Science Foundation has just awarded $200,000 to engineers at Oregon State University who have developed a new technology that they believe could revolutionize the treatment and prevention of sepsis. [More]
Adding MM-398 to standard treatment improves survival in metastatic pancreatic cancer patients

Adding MM-398 to standard treatment improves survival in metastatic pancreatic cancer patients

Adding the novel MM-398 to standard treatment for metastatic pancreatic cancer patients who have already received gemcitabine improves survival, researchers said at the ESMO 16th World Congress on Gastrointestinal Cancer in Barcelona. [More]
St. Mary's Medical Center honored with Healthgrades 2014 Women's Health Excellence Award

St. Mary's Medical Center honored with Healthgrades 2014 Women's Health Excellence Award

Dignity Health St. Mary's Medical Center has received the 2014 Women's Health Excellence Award from Healthgrades, the leading online resource for comprehensive information about physicians and hospitals. [More]
First Edition: June 12, 2014

First Edition: June 12, 2014

Today's headlines include stories examining how Eric Cantor's primary defeat will change the House GOP leadership and the Republican strategy to replace the health law. [More]
New data on Gilotrif and investigational compounds to be presented at 50th ASCO annual meeting

New data on Gilotrif and investigational compounds to be presented at 50th ASCO annual meeting

Boehringer Ingelheim today announced that new data will be presented from 7 abstracts for Gilotrif (afatinib) and investigational compounds, including nintedanib and BI 836845, from its oncology pipeline at the 50th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) in Chicago, IL, on May 30 – June 3, 2014. [More]
Study reveals how BTK mutation triggers drug resistance in CLL patients

Study reveals how BTK mutation triggers drug resistance in CLL patients

A multi-institutional team of researchers has pinpointed exactly what goes wrong when chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients develop resistance to ibrutinib, a highly effective, precisely targeted anti-cancer drug. [More]
Sanofi presents Phase II trial results for investigational vaccine for prevention of CDI

Sanofi presents Phase II trial results for investigational vaccine for prevention of CDI

Sanofi Pasteur, the vaccines division of Sanofi, presented Phase II (H-030-012) trial results for an investigational vaccine for the prevention of Clostridium difficile infection at the 114th General Meeting of the American Society for Microbiology. [More]
Current smoking heralds worse outcomes in pneumococcal CAP

Current smoking heralds worse outcomes in pneumococcal CAP

Hospital patients with pneumococcal community-acquired pneumonia have worse outcomes if they are current smokers than if they are non- or ex-smokers, results of a large observational study suggest. [More]
Specific Technologies unveils SpecID blood culture system at General Meeting of the American Society for Microbiology

Specific Technologies unveils SpecID blood culture system at General Meeting of the American Society for Microbiology

Specific Technologies, developer of the SpecID™ system to rapidly detect and identify bacterial species and strain via a metabolomic fingerprint, today announced that for the first time it will showcase its transformative SpecID blood culture system at the 114th General Meeting of the American Society for Microbiology, May 17-20, 2014 in Boston, Massachusetts at the Boston Convention and Exhibition Center. [More]
Scientist wins 2014 Maurice Hilleman/Merck Award for developing vaccine against meningococcal disease

Scientist wins 2014 Maurice Hilleman/Merck Award for developing vaccine against meningococcal disease

Dan Granoff, MD, of UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital Oakland's research arm CHORI, has been named the 2014 Maurice Hilleman/Merck Award Laureate by the American Society for Microbiology (ASM). [More]