Sepsis News and Research RSS Feed - Sepsis News and Research

Sepsis is a life-threatening illness. Your body's response to a bacterial infection usually causes it. Your immune system goes into overdrive, overwhelming normal processes in your blood. The result is that small blood clots form, blocking blood flow to vital organs. This can lead to organ failure. Babies, old people and those with weakened immune systems are most likely to get sepsis. But even healthy people can become deathly ill from it. A quick diagnosis can be crucial, because one third of people who get sepsis die from it. Sepsis is usually treated in a hospital intensive care unit (ICU). IV antibiotics and fluids may be given to try to knock out the infection and to keep blood pressure from dropping too low. Patients may also need respirators to help them breathe.
Further Reading
Small doses of cancer drug may be potential treatment for sepsis and other pandemics

Small doses of cancer drug may be potential treatment for sepsis and other pandemics

Results from laboratory experiments and mouse studies suggest that small doses of drugs from a specific class of approved cancer medications called topoisomerase 1 (top1) inhibitors may protect against the overwhelming immune response to infection that sometimes leads to sepsis, a bacterial condition that kills as many as 500,000 people in the United States each year. [More]
Therapies based on alpha defensins could help treat rheumatoid arthritis

Therapies based on alpha defensins could help treat rheumatoid arthritis

Arthritis and other inflammatory conditions could be helped by new insights into how the immune response is switched off. [More]
Researchers develop novel method to store microfluidic devices for CD4 T cell testing

Researchers develop novel method to store microfluidic devices for CD4 T cell testing

Providing vital health care services to people in developing countries without reliable electricity, refrigeration and state-of-the-art medical equipment poses a number of challenges. Inspired by pregnancy tests, researchers from Florida Atlantic University, Stanford University, and Baskent University in Turkey, have developed a novel method to store microfluidic devices for CD4 T cell testing in extreme weather conditions for up to six months without refrigeration. [More]
Tackling superbugs with antibiotic resistance breakers: an interview with Professor Colin Garner, Chief Executive, Antibiotic Research UK

Tackling superbugs with antibiotic resistance breakers: an interview with Professor Colin Garner, Chief Executive, Antibiotic Research UK

Superbugs – or to give them their correct name, antibiotic resistant bacteria – arise on repeated exposure to antibiotics. In any population of bacteria there will be a few that are antibiotic resistant (approximately 1 in 100 million bacteria). If these bacteria are allowed to grow and multiply, an antibiotic resistant infection results. [More]
Weekend effect in hospitals affect kidney stone treatment, outcomes

Weekend effect in hospitals affect kidney stone treatment, outcomes

Patients with severe cases of kidney stones are 26 percent less likely to receive timely treatment when they're admitted to the hospital on the weekend, according to a study by researchers at Loyola Medicine and Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine. [More]
Researchers find evidence that protein involved in regulating inflammation has anti-septic effects

Researchers find evidence that protein involved in regulating inflammation has anti-septic effects

Sepsis represents a serious complication of infection and is one of the leading causes of death and critical illness worldwide due in part to the lack of effective therapies. A report in the American Journal of Pathology provides evidence from both mouse and human studies that SHARPIN, a protein involved in regulating inflammation, has anti-septic effects. These findings may spur development of novel sepsis treatments. [More]
Spending less than $5 per person could save millions of maternal, child lives every year

Spending less than $5 per person could save millions of maternal, child lives every year

By spending less than $5 per person on essential health care services such as contraception, medication for serious illnesses and nutritional supplements, millions of maternal and child lives could be saved every year, according to a new analysis led by the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. [More]
New study suggests that Neanderthals across Europe may have diseases carried out of Africa

New study suggests that Neanderthals across Europe may have diseases carried out of Africa

A new study suggests that Neanderthals across Europe may well have been infected with diseases carried out of Africa by waves of anatomically modern humans, or Homo sapiens. As both were species of hominin, it would have been easier for pathogens to jump populations, say researchers. This might have contributed to the demise of Neanderthals. [More]
Inflectra (infliximab-dyyb) approved for multiple indications

Inflectra (infliximab-dyyb) approved for multiple indications

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Inflectra (infliximab-dyyb) for multiple indications. Inflectra is administered by intravenous infusion. This is the second biosimilar approved by the FDA. [More]
UAM implements family-centered care model to provide better patient outcomes

UAM implements family-centered care model to provide better patient outcomes

Family presence when a child is undergoing tracheal intubation in a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) can safely be implemented as part of a family-centered care model, reported a research team led by a University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences professor in the March 7 issue of JAMA Pediatrics. [More]
Caloric restriction leads to fatale weakening of the immune system

Caloric restriction leads to fatale weakening of the immune system

It's already well known that a diet may have a life-extending effect. Researchers from Leibniz Institute on Aging - Fritz Lipmann Institute in Jena, Germany, now showed that besides improving the functionality of stem cells in mice, a caloric restriction also leads to a fatale weakening of their immune system - counteracting the life-lengthening effect of a diet. [More]
New study demonstrates role of hospital nurses in ensuring safe outcomes for surgical patients

New study demonstrates role of hospital nurses in ensuring safe outcomes for surgical patients

A new study from the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing's Center for Health Outcomes and Policy Research (CHOPR) shows that patients, who undergo elective hip and knee surgery in hospitals with inadequate nurse staffing and poor nurse work environments, are more likely to require re-hospitalization. [More]
FDA clearance expands clinical claims of Thermo Scientific B•R•A•H•M•S PCT biomarker for sepsis risk assessment

FDA clearance expands clinical claims of Thermo Scientific B•R•A•H•M•S PCT biomarker for sepsis risk assessment

Thermo Fisher Scientific Inc., the world leader in serving science, today announced it has received clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration that expands the clinical claims of the Thermo Scientific B·R·A·H·M·S PCT biomarker assay for sepsis risk assessment. [More]
New smart seat cushion may relieve painful pressure ulcers for wheelchair users

New smart seat cushion may relieve painful pressure ulcers for wheelchair users

Modern-day wheelchairs provide a full range of mobility solutions to those who cannot walk, but many users still battle an unwanted side effect: painful ulcers caused by sitting for long periods in the same position. [More]
New definitions and clinical criteria for sepsis, septic shock

New definitions and clinical criteria for sepsis, septic shock

Clifford S. Deutschman, MS, MD, vice chair of research in the Department of Pediatrics at Cohen Children's Medical Center and an investigator at The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research , presented new definitions and clinical criteria for sepsis and septic shock at the Society of Critical Care Medicine's 45th Critical Care Congress in Orlando, FL. [More]
UMMC surgeons develop a program to direct critically ill patients to appropriate treatment location

UMMC surgeons develop a program to direct critically ill patients to appropriate treatment location

A team of surgeons at the University of Maryland Medical Center has developed a program that utilizes its Shock Trauma Center (STC) model to direct critically ill non-trauma patients to the appropriate treatment location and get them into an operating room and hospital intensive care unit (ICU) bed as quickly as possible. [More]
Study: Delirium, muscle weakness and other neurological complications of sepsis poorly understood

Study: Delirium, muscle weakness and other neurological complications of sepsis poorly understood

Delirium, muscle weakness and other neurological complications of sepsis often are overlooked and poorly understood, according to a study published in the journal Current Neurology and Neurosciences Reports. [More]
Variations in Tie2 gene play significant role in patient responses to infections

Variations in Tie2 gene play significant role in patient responses to infections

Major infections such as influenza and bacterial sepsis kill millions of people each year, often resulting fro dangerous complications that impair the body's blood vessels. But the reasons why some patients experience these dramatic responses to infections -- and others don't -- have been unclear. [More]
Australian researchers identify genetic map of human parasitic scabies mite

Australian researchers identify genetic map of human parasitic scabies mite

Australian researchers have used cutting-edge genome technologies to reveal the genetic makeup of a widespread skin parasite causing serious health problems in Aboriginal communities. [More]
Clinical observations: replacing paper with mobiles? An interview with Eran David

Clinical observations: replacing paper with mobiles? An interview with Eran David

Replacing paper with technology has significant safety ramifications. Using a mobile device for electronic observations increases the accuracy of documentation and score calculations. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement