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Sepsis is a life-threatening illness. Your body's response to a bacterial infection usually causes it. Your immune system goes into overdrive, overwhelming normal processes in your blood. The result is that small blood clots form, blocking blood flow to vital organs. This can lead to organ failure. Babies, old people and those with weakened immune systems are most likely to get sepsis. But even healthy people can become deathly ill from it. A quick diagnosis can be crucial, because one third of people who get sepsis die from it. Sepsis is usually treated in a hospital intensive care unit (ICU). IV antibiotics and fluids may be given to try to knock out the infection and to keep blood pressure from dropping too low. Patients may also need respirators to help them breathe.
Further Reading
Free online World Sepsis Congress sponsored by Radiometer

Free online World Sepsis Congress sponsored by Radiometer

Radiometer is proud to announce that it is sponsoring the 1st World Sepsis Congress, from the 8th to the 9th of September 2016. Organized by the Global Sepsis Alliance, this free online event will give participants the chance to hear experts from around the world discuss the challenges and opportunities in the battle against this life-threatening illness. [More]
Scientists undertake major biomedical research initiative to escalate problem of sepsis

Scientists undertake major biomedical research initiative to escalate problem of sepsis

A multidisciplinary team of scientists -- including two UC Santa Barbara faculty members -- is poised to undertake a major biomedical research initiative focused on the escalating problem of sepsis, the body's abnormal response to severe infections. [More]
UAB receives NIH grants in three perinatal networks to improve maternal and infant health

UAB receives NIH grants in three perinatal networks to improve maternal and infant health

The University of Alabama at Birmingham is the only university to be awarded grants in all three perinatal networks from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development to improve maternal and infant health. [More]
Tourists returning from India import multidrug-resistant superbugs

Tourists returning from India import multidrug-resistant superbugs

Many tourists returning from India were found colonized with multidrug-resistant superbugs. Microbiologists at the Institute for Infectious Diseases of the University of Bern, Switzerland, also isolated a strain possessing a gene which can make these life-threatening bacteria resistant to the last active antibiotic option. [More]
Scientists detect gut bacteria in deepest reaches of failing lungs

Scientists detect gut bacteria in deepest reaches of failing lungs

No one knows for sure how they got there. But the discovery that bacteria that normally live in the gut can be detected in the lungs of critically ill people and animals could mean a lot for intensive care patients. [More]
Researchers design inhibitory peptide to unleash defence mechanisms against fungal pathogens

Researchers design inhibitory peptide to unleash defence mechanisms against fungal pathogens

For most people, a simple case of thrush or athlete's foot can be quickly and easily treated using over-the-counter anti-fungal creams and pills. [More]
Experts call on UN to implement four-part global action plan to increase access to effective antibiotics

Experts call on UN to implement four-part global action plan to increase access to effective antibiotics

Today some of the world's foremost experts on antibiotic resistance called on the United Nations General Assembly to decisively act to reduce the growing number of deaths due to limited access to effective antibiotics. [More]
New technology can help in rapid diagnosis and treatment of sepsis

New technology can help in rapid diagnosis and treatment of sepsis

Sepsis patients can be diagnosed and treated earlier with the help of new technology available for hospitals and homecare settings. [More]
AHSN already working to tackle sepsis across North East and North Cumbria

AHSN already working to tackle sepsis across North East and North Cumbria

Doctors and nurses in the region have been working collaboratively for over a year to ensure the effective recognition and response to sepsis. [More]
iMDsoft launches new mobile e-obs solution for early detection of sepsis and AKI

iMDsoft launches new mobile e-obs solution for early detection of sepsis and AKI

iMDsoft announced that they will be featuring new and advanced tools for detecting patient deterioration at Patient Safety Congress in Manchester, 5 - 6 July 2016. [More]
New test strip can rapidly, cost-effectively detect disease pathogens

New test strip can rapidly, cost-effectively detect disease pathogens

At present, bacteria, fungi or viruses can generally only be detected with certainty by way of elaborate laboratory tests or animal experiments. The food and pharmaceutical industries would like to have faster tests to check their products. [More]
Researchers design E. coli-based transport capsule to help fight pneumococcal disease

Researchers design E. coli-based transport capsule to help fight pneumococcal disease

Most people recoil at the thought of ingesting E. coli. But what if the headline-grabbing bacteria could be used to fight disease? [More]
'Comprehensive' management approach needed for AF

'Comprehensive' management approach needed for AF

Death is a bigger risk than stroke among patients with atrial fibrillation, particularly during the first 4 months after diagnosis, research shows. [More]
Researchers reveal novel mechanism by which viral protein VII suppresses immune alarm signals

Researchers reveal novel mechanism by which viral protein VII suppresses immune alarm signals

Viruses must avoid a host's immune system to establish successful infections—and scientists have discovered another tool that viruses use to frustrate host defenses. [More]
New test may help predict sepsis risk in patients with severe burn injuries

New test may help predict sepsis risk in patients with severe burn injuries

Birmingham researchers have created a potentially life-saving new test that will allow clinicians to predict which burn victims will develop sepsis during their treatment. [More]
Researchers find new way for treating GBS infection in neonates

Researchers find new way for treating GBS infection in neonates

Researchers have discovered how the bacteria Group B streptococcus (GBS) avoids detection by the immune system during pregnancy. [More]
New device may enable painless, effective diagnosis of Helicobacter in exhaled air

New device may enable painless, effective diagnosis of Helicobacter in exhaled air

In the future, several illnesses can be quickly and painlessly diagnosed by the optical analysis of isotopes contained in exhaled air. VTT developed its first prototype for this purpose. [More]
New FcMBL-based pathogen-detecting assay could rapidly detect systemic infections

New FcMBL-based pathogen-detecting assay could rapidly detect systemic infections

To date, there are no methods that can quickly and accurately detect pathogens in blood to allow the diagnosis of systemic bloodstream infections that can lead to life-threatening sepsis. [More]
New stem cell treatment may halt clinical relapses, development of new brain lesions in patients MS

New stem cell treatment may halt clinical relapses, development of new brain lesions in patients MS

A new use of chemotherapy followed by autologous haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (aHSCT) has fully halted clinical relapses and development of new brain lesions in 23 of 24 patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) for a prolonged period without the need for ongoing medication, according to a new phase 2 clinical trial, published in The Lancet. [More]
New vaccine found safe, effective against Toxic Shock Syndrome

New vaccine found safe, effective against Toxic Shock Syndrome

Toxic Shock Syndrome (TSS) is a severe circulatory and organ failure caused by bacterial toxins, usually triggered by bacteria from the Staphylococcus group. Researchers from MedUni Vienna's Department of Clinical Pharmacology, in collaboration with the company Biomedizinische Forschungsgesellschaft mbH in Vienna, have now developed the world's first safe and effective vaccine against this disease and successfully tested it in a Phase I trial. [More]
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