Sepsis News and Research RSS Feed - Sepsis News and Research

Sepsis is a life-threatening illness. Your body's response to a bacterial infection usually causes it. Your immune system goes into overdrive, overwhelming normal processes in your blood. The result is that small blood clots form, blocking blood flow to vital organs. This can lead to organ failure. Babies, old people and those with weakened immune systems are most likely to get sepsis. But even healthy people can become deathly ill from it. A quick diagnosis can be crucial, because one third of people who get sepsis die from it. Sepsis is usually treated in a hospital intensive care unit (ICU). IV antibiotics and fluids may be given to try to knock out the infection and to keep blood pressure from dropping too low. Patients may also need respirators to help them breathe.
Further Reading
New insight provides potential to improve treatment for sepsis

New insight provides potential to improve treatment for sepsis

In a review published in the April issue of Immunity, Kevin J. Tracey, MD, president of The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, says it's time to take a fresh look at the medical community's approach to treating sepsis, which kills millions worldwide every year, including more than 200,000 Americans. [More]

Isansys awarded two SBRI Healthcare contracts to improve patient monitoring services

Isansys Lifecare Limited, the provider of complete real-time physiological patient status services and systems, today announces that it has won two SBRI (Small Business Research Initiative) Healthcare contracts. [More]
1/3 of ICU patients develop depression that typically manifests as physical symptoms

1/3 of ICU patients develop depression that typically manifests as physical symptoms

A third of intensive care patients develop depression that typically manifests as physical, or somatic, symptoms such as weakness, appetite change, and fatigue, rather than psychological symptoms, according to one of the largest studies to investigate the mental health and functional outcomes of survivors of critical care, published in The Lancet Respiratory Medicine. [More]
Astellas, Medivation submit European Marketing Authorization Application for XTANDI capsules

Astellas, Medivation submit European Marketing Authorization Application for XTANDI capsules

Astellas Pharma Inc. and Medivation Inc. today announced the submission of a variation to amend the European Marketing Authorization Application for XTANDIĀ® (enzalutamide) capsules for the treatment of adult men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) who are asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic after failure of androgen deprivation therapy and in whom chemotherapy is not yet clinically indicated. [More]

Fewer blood transfusions reduce infection rates by nearly 20%

Blood transfusions are among the most common treatments for hospitalized patients nationwide, but doing them less often reduces infection rates by nearly 20 percent, according to a study in the Journal of the American Medical Association co-authored by Neil Blumberg, M.D., professor at the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry. [More]

New biomarker test accurately estimates mortality risk in patients with septicemia

Septic shock is a severe systemic infection and major cause of death for the old and young alike. Unfortunately, researchers say testing new drug regimens to stop the infection is confounded because clinical trials include patients who are either too sick to be saved by experimental therapies or not sick enough to warrant the treatments. [More]
Researchers decode effects of antimicrobial peptide on bacterial cells

Researchers decode effects of antimicrobial peptide on bacterial cells

The team of Julia Bandow, who heads the RUB's Junior Research Group Microbial Antibiotic Research, has been studying the MP196 peptide as a representative of a group of very small positively charged peptides that consist of some four to ten amino acids. [More]
AM-Pharma reports positive results from recAP Phase I trial for Acute Kidney Injury

AM-Pharma reports positive results from recAP Phase I trial for Acute Kidney Injury

AM-Pharma B.V., a biopharmaceutical company focused on the development of recAP (recombinant human Alkaline Phosphatase) for inflammatory indications, announces the results of its Phase I trial with both single and multiple ascending doses, which demonstrate that recAP is safe and well tolerated at all doses. [More]

United Therapeutics' Remodulin Injection gets approval in Japan for PAH treatment

United Therapeutics Corporation today announced that Japan's Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare has granted approval for Remodulin (treprostinil) Injection for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) by subcutaneous and intravenous administration. [More]

UC receives grant to better understand how "microparticles" in blood contribute to inflammation, injury

A University of Cincinnati (UC) trauma and critical care researcher has received a National Institutes of Health grant to better understand how "microparticles" in stored blood can contribute to inflammation and injury after resuscitation from traumatic injury. [More]
Study examines events that lead to sepsis by Streptococcus pneumoniae

Study examines events that lead to sepsis by Streptococcus pneumoniae

An international team of academics, including Professor Marco Oggioni from the University of Leicester's Department of Genetics, has studied how localised infections can turn into the dangerous systematic disease sepsis - and has identified for the first time through genetic evidence that a single bacteria could be the cause. [More]
Preterm babies' guts harbor infectious microbes that can cause late-onset sepsis

Preterm babies' guts harbor infectious microbes that can cause late-onset sepsis

Babies born prematurely are surviving in increasing numbers. But many withstand complications of early birth only to suffer late-onset sepsis - life-threatening bloodstream infections that strike after infants reach 72 hours of age. [More]
Scientists describe gut bacteria that cause sepsis in preterm infants

Scientists describe gut bacteria that cause sepsis in preterm infants

Researchers studying intestinal bacteria in newborns have characterized the gut bacteria of premature infants who go on to develop sepsis, a serious and potentially life-threatening condition caused by bacteria in the bloodstream. [More]

Study provides evidence that sepsis-related mortality has steadily decreased over time

In critically ill patients in Australia and New Zealand with severe sepsis or septic shock, there was a decrease in the risk of death from 2000 to 2012, findings that were accompanied by changes in the patterns of discharge of intensive care unit (ICU) patients to home, rehabilitation, and other hospitals, according to a study appearing in JAMA. [More]

Cardiac arrest during childbirth may be 2 times more common than previously reported

Although cardiac arrest during childbirth is rare, it may be two times more common than previously reported in the literature, suggests the first large U.S. study on the potentially deadly condition published in the April issue of Anesthesiology. [More]

Edison Pharmaceuticals begins EPI-743 clinical trial in children with Pearson syndrome

Edison Pharmaceuticals today announced the initiation of a phase 2 study entitled "A Phase 2 Safety and Efficacy Study of EPI-743 (Vincerinoneā„¢) in Children with Pearson Syndrome." The Investigative New Drug application (IND) was approved by the Food and Drug Administration, Office of Hematology and Oncology Products. [More]
Researcher wins grant from NCI to continue developing new therapy for bladder cancer

Researcher wins grant from NCI to continue developing new therapy for bladder cancer

A biomedical engineering researcher at the University of Arkansas will use a $416,897 grant from the National Cancer Institute to continue developing a new therapy for bladder cancer. [More]

Dendreon plans to make PROVENGE available in Europe

Dendreon Corporation today announced that it plans to make PROVENGE (autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells activated with PAP-GM-CSF or sipuleucel-T) available in Europe, beginning with Germany and the United Kingdom. [More]
Nurses in emergency care must be trained to recognise symptoms of meningococcal septicaemia

Nurses in emergency care must be trained to recognise symptoms of meningococcal septicaemia

Nurses working in emergency care environments must be trained to recognise the atypical signs and symptoms of meningococcal septicaemia. [More]
AACN to bring top issues facing critical care into focus in spring conference

AACN to bring top issues facing critical care into focus in spring conference

The American Association of Critical-Care Nurses brings top issues facing critical care into focus with its spring conference, AACN Clinical Priorities. [More]