Sepsis News and Research RSS Feed - Sepsis News and Research

Sepsis is a life-threatening illness. Your body's response to a bacterial infection usually causes it. Your immune system goes into overdrive, overwhelming normal processes in your blood. The result is that small blood clots form, blocking blood flow to vital organs. This can lead to organ failure. Babies, old people and those with weakened immune systems are most likely to get sepsis. But even healthy people can become deathly ill from it. A quick diagnosis can be crucial, because one third of people who get sepsis die from it. Sepsis is usually treated in a hospital intensive care unit (ICU). IV antibiotics and fluids may be given to try to knock out the infection and to keep blood pressure from dropping too low. Patients may also need respirators to help them breathe.
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Researchers reveal novel mechanism by which viral protein VII suppresses immune alarm signals

Researchers reveal novel mechanism by which viral protein VII suppresses immune alarm signals

Viruses must avoid a host's immune system to establish successful infections—and scientists have discovered another tool that viruses use to frustrate host defenses. [More]
New test may help predict sepsis risk in patients with severe burn injuries

New test may help predict sepsis risk in patients with severe burn injuries

Birmingham researchers have created a potentially life-saving new test that will allow clinicians to predict which burn victims will develop sepsis during their treatment. [More]
Researchers find new way for treating GBS infection in neonates

Researchers find new way for treating GBS infection in neonates

Researchers have discovered how the bacteria Group B streptococcus (GBS) avoids detection by the immune system during pregnancy. [More]
New device may enable painless, effective diagnosis of Helicobacter in exhaled air

New device may enable painless, effective diagnosis of Helicobacter in exhaled air

In the future, several illnesses can be quickly and painlessly diagnosed by the optical analysis of isotopes contained in exhaled air. VTT developed its first prototype for this purpose. [More]
New FcMBL-based pathogen-detecting assay could rapidly detect systemic infections

New FcMBL-based pathogen-detecting assay could rapidly detect systemic infections

To date, there are no methods that can quickly and accurately detect pathogens in blood to allow the diagnosis of systemic bloodstream infections that can lead to life-threatening sepsis. [More]
New stem cell treatment may halt clinical relapses, development of new brain lesions in patients MS

New stem cell treatment may halt clinical relapses, development of new brain lesions in patients MS

A new use of chemotherapy followed by autologous haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (aHSCT) has fully halted clinical relapses and development of new brain lesions in 23 of 24 patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) for a prolonged period without the need for ongoing medication, according to a new phase 2 clinical trial, published in The Lancet. [More]
New vaccine found safe, effective against Toxic Shock Syndrome

New vaccine found safe, effective against Toxic Shock Syndrome

Toxic Shock Syndrome (TSS) is a severe circulatory and organ failure caused by bacterial toxins, usually triggered by bacteria from the Staphylococcus group. Researchers from MedUni Vienna's Department of Clinical Pharmacology, in collaboration with the company Biomedizinische Forschungsgesellschaft mbH in Vienna, have now developed the world's first safe and effective vaccine against this disease and successfully tested it in a Phase I trial. [More]
Immunoablation strengthens haemopoietic stem-cell transplantation effects in MS

Immunoablation strengthens haemopoietic stem-cell transplantation effects in MS

Intensifying current transplant conditioning to remove rather than suppress immune cells ahead of autologous haematopoietic stem cell transplantation may result in long-term remission of multiple sclerosis, phase II trial findings show. [More]
New method helps speed up bacterial identification

New method helps speed up bacterial identification

Pinpointing the type of bacteria that are at the root of an infection in clinical samples removed from living tissues, such as blood, urine or joint fluids, to quickly identify the best anti-microbial therapy still poses a formidable challenge. [More]
New immunization approach may one day wipe out pneumonia, meningitis

New immunization approach may one day wipe out pneumonia, meningitis

A new vaccine allows pneumonia-causing bacteria to colonize inside the body, springing into action only if the bacteria pose a threat. [More]
Researchers explore phenomenon that causes late mortality in sepsis patients

Researchers explore phenomenon that causes late mortality in sepsis patients

It's known that many patients die in the months and years after sepsis. But no one has known if this increased risk of death (in the 30 days to 2 years after sepsis) is because of sepsis itself, or because of the pre-existing health conditions the patient had before acquiring the complication. [More]
HbA1C test can effectively detect hidden diabetes among hyperglycemia patients

HbA1C test can effectively detect hidden diabetes among hyperglycemia patients

A retrospective review of medical records found the HbA1C test, commonly used to diagnose and manage diabetes, can effectively detect hidden disease among hospital patients with hyperglycemia, commonly known as high blood sugar. [More]
New method helps scavenge inflammatory molecules that mediate sepsis in mice

New method helps scavenge inflammatory molecules that mediate sepsis in mice

Sepsis is a life-threatening complication of infection in which the molecules that the body releases to fight an infection trigger widespread inflammatory responses, resulting in damage to multiple organ systems. [More]
Overnight extubations in ICU patients linked to higher mortality

Overnight extubations in ICU patients linked to higher mortality

Adult patients who were admitted to U.S. intensive care units had higher mortality if they were extubated overnight. The results reported at the ATS 2016 International Conference may discourage hospital administrators from expanding the practice of overnight extubations in ICUs, which the lead author noted are rapidly being transformed to provide continuity of care. [More]
Automated process uses EMR to identify patients with potential for clinical deterioration

Automated process uses EMR to identify patients with potential for clinical deterioration

Hospitalized patients can deteriorate quickly, requiring prompt identification and treatment, especially since each hour of treatment delay can increase the risk of mortality. [More]
Risk factors for hospital readmission after pediatric neurosurgical procedures

Risk factors for hospital readmission after pediatric neurosurgical procedures

Researchers at The University of Alabama at Birmingham have determined specific risk factors associated with hospital readmission following pediatric neurosurgery. [More]
Innovative technology in NICU can predict risk of major infections in premature or critically ill babies

Innovative technology in NICU can predict risk of major infections in premature or critically ill babies

A new technology in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at UC San Diego Health is able to predict the risk of life-threatening infections up to 24 hours before they appear in severely premature or critically ill infants. Infection is the leading cause of death in this fragile patient population. [More]
Research shows spleen MZ B cells produce signaling proteins involved in inflammatory responses

Research shows spleen MZ B cells produce signaling proteins involved in inflammatory responses

The inability to adequately respond to infection can cause a whole-body state of inflammation known as sepsis. This can eventually lead to systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), and even death. [More]
Small doses of cancer drug may be potential treatment for sepsis and other pandemics

Small doses of cancer drug may be potential treatment for sepsis and other pandemics

Results from laboratory experiments and mouse studies suggest that small doses of drugs from a specific class of approved cancer medications called topoisomerase 1 (top1) inhibitors may protect against the overwhelming immune response to infection that sometimes leads to sepsis, a bacterial condition that kills as many as 500,000 people in the United States each year. [More]
Therapies based on alpha defensins could help treat rheumatoid arthritis

Therapies based on alpha defensins could help treat rheumatoid arthritis

Arthritis and other inflammatory conditions could be helped by new insights into how the immune response is switched off. [More]
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