Sepsis News and Research RSS Feed - Sepsis News and Research

Sepsis is a life-threatening illness. Your body's response to a bacterial infection usually causes it. Your immune system goes into overdrive, overwhelming normal processes in your blood. The result is that small blood clots form, blocking blood flow to vital organs. This can lead to organ failure. Babies, old people and those with weakened immune systems are most likely to get sepsis. But even healthy people can become deathly ill from it. A quick diagnosis can be crucial, because one third of people who get sepsis die from it. Sepsis is usually treated in a hospital intensive care unit (ICU). IV antibiotics and fluids may be given to try to knock out the infection and to keep blood pressure from dropping too low. Patients may also need respirators to help them breathe.
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Clinical observations: replacing paper with mobiles? An interview with Eran David

Clinical observations: replacing paper with mobiles? An interview with Eran David

Replacing paper with technology has significant safety ramifications. Using a mobile device for electronic observations increases the accuracy of documentation and score calculations. [More]
NJHF awards 30 grants for NJ researchers working on health-related research

NJHF awards 30 grants for NJ researchers working on health-related research

New Jersey Health Foundation has awarded 30 grants totaling more than $1 million for researchers in New Jersey who are working on health-related research that demonstrates exciting potential. [More]
Use of antenatal steroids during late preterm delivery prevents neonatal respiratory complications

Use of antenatal steroids during late preterm delivery prevents neonatal respiratory complications

In a study to be presented on Feb. 4 in the oral plenary session at 8 a.m. EST, at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine's annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting, in Atlanta, researchers with the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development and Maternal-Fetal Medicine Units Network found that the administration of antenatal steroids in pregnancies at risk for late preterm delivery prevents respiratory and other neonatal complications. [More]
Eisai's Halaven receives FDA approval for treatment of patients with metastatic liposarcoma

Eisai's Halaven receives FDA approval for treatment of patients with metastatic liposarcoma

Eisai Inc. announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Halaven (eribulin mesylate) Injection (0.5 mg per mL) for the treatment of patients with unresectable or metastatic liposarcoma who have received a prior anthracycline-containing regimen. [More]
Results from STRIVE trial of enzalutamide versus bicalutamide in CRPC published in Journal of Clinical Oncology

Results from STRIVE trial of enzalutamide versus bicalutamide in CRPC published in Journal of Clinical Oncology

Astellas US LLC, a United States (U.S.) subsidiary of Tokyo-based Astellas Pharma Inc., and Medivation, Inc. today announced that results from the STRIVE trial of enzalutamide compared to bicalutamide in men with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) were published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. [More]
iMDsoft announces implementation of MetaVision clinical information system in more than 45 units in 2015

iMDsoft announces implementation of MetaVision clinical information system in more than 45 units in 2015

iMDsoft announced that the MetaVision clinical information system was successfully implemented in more than 45 anaesthesia and critical care units across the globe over the past 12 months. [More]
Scientists reveal major players in severe muscle damage caused by sepsis

Scientists reveal major players in severe muscle damage caused by sepsis

Scientists from the Institut Pasteur, Paris Descartes University, Sainte-Anne Hospital and the CNRS have recently published a paper in Nature Communications in which they reveal major players in the severe muscle damage caused by sepsis, or septicemia, which explains why many patients suffer debilitating muscle impairment long-term after recovery. [More]
Soligenix reports positive results from SGX942 Phase 2 trial in patients with head and neck cancer

Soligenix reports positive results from SGX942 Phase 2 trial in patients with head and neck cancer

Soligenix, Inc., a late-stage biopharmaceutical company focused on developing and commercializing products to treat rare diseases where there is an unmet medical need, announced today positive results in its Phase 2 clinical trial, in which SGX942, a first-in-class Innate Defense Regulator (IDR), at a dose of 1.5 mg/kg, successfully reduced the median duration of severe oral mucositis by 50% in all patients and by 67% in patients receiving the most aggressive chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for treatment of their head and neck cancer. [More]
CytoSorbents partners with Hoang Long Pharma to bring CytoSorb to Vietnam

CytoSorbents partners with Hoang Long Pharma to bring CytoSorb to Vietnam

CytoSorbents Corporation, a leader in critical care immunotherapy commercializing its CytoSorb extracorporeal cytokine adsorber to control deadly inflammation using blood purification, today announced an exclusive multi-year distribution agreement with Hoang Long Pharma, a medical distributor in Vietnam specializing in the distribution of innovative pharmaceuticals, biologics, and devices to treat patients suffering from critical illnesses, immunologic disorders and deficiencies, and infections. [More]
Vagus nerve stimulation prevents hemorrhagic complications following surgery

Vagus nerve stimulation prevents hemorrhagic complications following surgery

Stimulating the vagus nerve is a potentially efficacious and safe way to stop the flow of blood and prevent hemorrhagic complications following surgery and other invasive procedures, according to a researcher in the Center for Bioelectronic Medicine at The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research. [More]
Bacteriophage-based method may improve efficiency of bacteria detectors

Bacteriophage-based method may improve efficiency of bacteria detectors

Viruses that attack bacteria - bacteriophages - can be fussy: they only inject their genetic material into the bacteria that suit them. The fussiness of bacteriophages can be exploited in order to detect specific species of bacteria. Scientists from Warsaw have just demonstrated that bacteriophage-based biosensors will be much more efficient if prior to the deposition on the surface of the bacteriophage sensor their orientation is ordered in electric field. [More]
U of T researchers discover mysterious fungus that defends against neighbouring bacteria

U of T researchers discover mysterious fungus that defends against neighbouring bacteria

Researchers at the University of Toronto examined fungi in the mucus of patients with cystic fibrosis and discovered how one particularly cunning fungal species has evolved to defend itself against neighbouring bacteria. [More]
ProMetic, ProThera form strategic partnership to develop and commercialize Inter-alpha Inhibitor Proteins

ProMetic, ProThera form strategic partnership to develop and commercialize Inter-alpha Inhibitor Proteins

ProMetic Life Sciences Inc. announced today that it has entered into a strategic partnership with ProThera Biologics Inc. for the development and commercialization of human plasma-derived Inter-alpha Inhibitor Proteins. [More]
Promising new treatment for sepsis on the horizon

Promising new treatment for sepsis on the horizon

A promising new drug for sepsis is on the horizon thanks to new funding from the British Heart Foundation, which could help take the laboratory discovery into the clinic. [More]
Birmingham researchers identify how Salmonella infections can lead to life-threatening thrombosis

Birmingham researchers identify how Salmonella infections can lead to life-threatening thrombosis

Researchers from the University of Birmingham have, for the first time, identified how Salmonella infections that have spread to our blood and organs can lead to life-threatening thrombosis. [More]

New study aims to explore sexual and reproductive health issues in disaster-prone countries

New research led by Dr Nibedita S Ray-Bennett at the University of Leicester will look into the sexual and reproductive health issues in disaster-prone areas during times of humanitarian crisis. [More]
Circulating protein predicts risk of chronic kidney disease

Circulating protein predicts risk of chronic kidney disease

Make room, cholesterol. A new disease marker is entering the medical lexicon: suPAR, or soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor. [More]
University of Leicester awarded BBSRC grant to explore three key areas that impact human health

University of Leicester awarded BBSRC grant to explore three key areas that impact human health

The University of Leicester has been awarded over £1.5 million in order to advance knowledge and understanding in three key areas that impact on health. [More]
Deaths from avoidable risk factors: an interview with Dr Ali Mokdad, IHME

Deaths from avoidable risk factors: an interview with Dr Ali Mokdad, IHME

The study showed that about thirty percent to maybe half of the leading causes of death in the world are preventable. These are risk factors that you could manage and thus you could prevent a lot of premature deaths. [More]
FDA approves Yondelis (trabectedin) for treatment of specific soft tissue sarcomas

FDA approves Yondelis (trabectedin) for treatment of specific soft tissue sarcomas

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Yondelis (trabectedin), a chemotherapy, for the treatment of specific soft tissue sarcomas (STS) – liposarcoma and leiomyosarcoma – that cannot be removed by surgery (unresectable) or is advanced (metastatic). [More]
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