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Sepsis is a life-threatening illness. Your body's response to a bacterial infection usually causes it. Your immune system goes into overdrive, overwhelming normal processes in your blood. The result is that small blood clots form, blocking blood flow to vital organs. This can lead to organ failure. Babies, old people and those with weakened immune systems are most likely to get sepsis. But even healthy people can become deathly ill from it. A quick diagnosis can be crucial, because one third of people who get sepsis die from it. Sepsis is usually treated in a hospital intensive care unit (ICU). IV antibiotics and fluids may be given to try to knock out the infection and to keep blood pressure from dropping too low. Patients may also need respirators to help them breathe.
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Soligenix completes enrolment in SGX942 Phase 2 trial for oral mucositis in cancer patients

Soligenix completes enrolment in SGX942 Phase 2 trial for oral mucositis in cancer patients

Soligenix, Inc., a late-stage biopharmaceutical company developing products that address unmet medical needs in the areas of inflammation, oncology and biodefense, announced today it has completed enrollment of the additional subjects, as directed by the Data Review Committee (DRC) earlier this year, into the company's Phase 2 study for SGX942. [More]
Brain scans may help predict patients' response to antipsychotic drug treatment

Brain scans may help predict patients' response to antipsychotic drug treatment

Investigators at The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research have discovered that brain scans can be used to predict patients' response to antipsychotic drug treatment. The findings are published online in the latest issue of The American Journal of Psychiatry. [More]
FDA, EMA accept filing applications for Boehringer Ingelheim's afatinib to treat patients with advanced SCC of the lung

FDA, EMA accept filing applications for Boehringer Ingelheim's afatinib to treat patients with advanced SCC of the lung

Boehringer Ingelheim today announced that both the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency have accepted filing applications for afatinib for the treatment of patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the lung progressing after treatment with first-line chemotherapy. [More]
Researchers report new breakthrough in countering deadly effects of radiation exposure

Researchers report new breakthrough in countering deadly effects of radiation exposure

An interdisciplinary research team led by The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston reports a new breakthrough in countering the deadly effects of radiation exposure. A single injection of a regenerative peptide was shown to significantly increase survival in mice when given 24 hours after nuclear radiation exposure. [More]
Wyss Institute scientists develop improved blood-cleansing therapeutic device to treat sepsis

Wyss Institute scientists develop improved blood-cleansing therapeutic device to treat sepsis

Last year, a Wyss Institute team of scientists described the development of a new device to treat sepsis that works by mimicking our spleen. It cleanses pathogens and toxins from blood circulating through a dialysis-like circuit. Now, the Wyss Institute team has developed an improved device that synergizes with conventional antibiotic therapies and that has been streamlined to better position it for near-term translation to the clinic. [More]
Hospira announces TGA approval of Inflectra (infliximab) for treatment of eight inflammatory conditions

Hospira announces TGA approval of Inflectra (infliximab) for treatment of eight inflammatory conditions

Hospira today announced that Inflectra (infliximab), the first monoclonal antibody (mAb) biosimilar therapy, has been registered in Australia. This registration paves the way for the Federal Government to reduce the cost of some of the most expensive medicines on the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS). [More]
Pitt unveils research-based guidance to improve compliance while treating sepsis

Pitt unveils research-based guidance to improve compliance while treating sepsis

As hospitals nationwide brace for rigorous mandates for care of septic patients that will be adopted by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services in October, a University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine review unveils research-based guidance to improve compliance when treating this common and deadly syndrome. [More]
Early exposure to inflammatory cytokines can paralyze CD4 T cells

Early exposure to inflammatory cytokines can paralyze CD4 T cells

In a discovery that is likely to rewrite immunology text books, researchers at UC Davis have found that early exposure to inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin 2, can "paralyze" CD4 T cells, immune components that help orchestrate the body's response to pathogens and other invaders. [More]
U-M microbiome research may lead to new ways to prevent, fight lung infections in patients

U-M microbiome research may lead to new ways to prevent, fight lung infections in patients

With every breath you take, microbes have a chance of making it into your lungs. But what happens when they get there? And why do dangerous lung infections like pneumonia happen in some people, but not others? Researchers at the University of Michigan Medical School have started to answer these questions by studying the microbiome of the lungs - the community of microscopic organisms that are in constant contact with our respiratory system. [More]
Researchers describe new Lab-on-a-Disc device for fast and reliable diagnostics of urinary tract infections

Researchers describe new Lab-on-a-Disc device for fast and reliable diagnostics of urinary tract infections

Urinary tract infections can quickly move from being a merely miserable experience to a life-threatening condition. Untreated cases may trigger sepsis, which occurs when the immune system, in an attempt to fight off the infection, inadvertently activates body-wide inflammation that can cause blood clots and leaky blood vessels. [More]
Johns Hopkins researchers report on more effective way to spot patients at risk of septic shock

Johns Hopkins researchers report on more effective way to spot patients at risk of septic shock

For a patient with sepsis - which kills more Americans every year than AIDS and breast and prostate cancer combined - hours can make the difference between life and death. [More]
Coordinated, two-part approach could help reduce hospital-acquired infections

Coordinated, two-part approach could help reduce hospital-acquired infections

By coordinating with state health departments and communicating with each other about patients with C. difficile and antibiotic-resistant infections, hospitals, long-term acute-care facilities and nursing homes could reduce the number of such hospital-acquired infections (HAIs) by an estimated 619,000 cases in the next five years, a new Centers for Disease Control 9 (CDC)-led report has found. [More]
California Initiative to Advance Precision Medicine selects two demonstration projects

California Initiative to Advance Precision Medicine selects two demonstration projects

Two demonstration projects that aim to yield quick results for patients have been selected by the new California Initiative to Advance Precision Medicine, a public-private effort launched by Governor Edmund G. Brown Jr. [More]
Study shows link between liver-produced molecules, pneumonia susceptibility during sepsis

Study shows link between liver-produced molecules, pneumonia susceptibility during sepsis

New evidence highlights the importance of the liver in immunity against bacterial pneumonia. The study is the first of its kind to directly show such a link between liver-produced molecules and pneumonia susceptibility during sepsis. [More]
CHOP surgeons successfully complete world's first bilateral hand transplant on child

CHOP surgeons successfully complete world's first bilateral hand transplant on child

Surgeons at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia joined with colleagues from Penn Medicine recently to complete the world's first bilateral hand transplant on a child. Earlier this month, the surgical team successfully transplanted donor hands and forearms onto eight-year-old Zion Harvey who, several years earlier, had undergone amputation of his hands and feet and a kidney transplant following a serious infection. [More]
Biologists identify genetic mechanisms behind anti-inflammatory impact of cortisone

Biologists identify genetic mechanisms behind anti-inflammatory impact of cortisone

There's no time to lose when an emergency doctor diagnoses ā€˛Shock lung!" at the accident scene. What physicians know as "acute lung injury" (ALI) otherwise leads to death by suffocation without immediate treatment. [More]
UVA partners with MITRE to develop better health data analysis tools

UVA partners with MITRE to develop better health data analysis tools

University of Virginia Health System and The MITRE Corporation are partnering to develop better health data analysis tools to help prevent patients from getting sick and improving care while reducing healthcare costs. [More]
Scientists discover new variant of streptococcal bacteria that contributes to severe infections

Scientists discover new variant of streptococcal bacteria that contributes to severe infections

Scientists have discovered a new variant of streptococcal bacteria that has contributed to a rise in disease cases in the UK over the last 17 years. [More]

University of Liverpool researchers discover common cause of cardiac injury in sepsis patients

Researchers at the University of Liverpool's Institute of Infection and Global Health (IGH) have discovered a common cause of heart damage in patients with sepsis. [More]
Severe burns dramatically change bacteria populations, study finds

Severe burns dramatically change bacteria populations, study finds

A study published in PLOS ONE has found that burn patients experience dramatic changes in the 100 trillion bacteria inside the gastrointestinal tract. [More]
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