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Sepsis is a life-threatening illness. Your body's response to a bacterial infection usually causes it. Your immune system goes into overdrive, overwhelming normal processes in your blood. The result is that small blood clots form, blocking blood flow to vital organs. This can lead to organ failure. Babies, old people and those with weakened immune systems are most likely to get sepsis. But even healthy people can become deathly ill from it. A quick diagnosis can be crucial, because one third of people who get sepsis die from it. Sepsis is usually treated in a hospital intensive care unit (ICU). IV antibiotics and fluids may be given to try to knock out the infection and to keep blood pressure from dropping too low. Patients may also need respirators to help them breathe.
Research offers new clues to prolong lifespan of the body's disease-fighting NK cells

Research offers new clues to prolong lifespan of the body's disease-fighting NK cells

A team of researchers from Australia and France have uncovered new insights into how to prolong the lifespan of the body's disease-fighting natural killer (NK) cells. [More]
Better fungal disease diagnostics could be critical to fight against antimicrobial resistance

Better fungal disease diagnostics could be critical to fight against antimicrobial resistance

Poor diagnosis worldwide of fungal disease causes doctors to overprescribe antibiotics, increasing harmful resistance to antimicrobial drugs, according to a paper published today in Emerging Infectious Diseases. [More]
Mayo Clinic scientists identify key molecule that helps protect the central nervous system against sepsis

Mayo Clinic scientists identify key molecule that helps protect the central nervous system against sepsis

No effective therapy exists today for sepsis, an inflammatory storm that afflicts about 3 million Americans a year - killing up to half. [More]
Archaeologist discovers 800-year-old genomes from bacterial infection in Byzantine skeleton

Archaeologist discovers 800-year-old genomes from bacterial infection in Byzantine skeleton

Eight hundred years ago, in a hardscrabble farming community on the outskirts of what was once one of the fabled cities of the ancient world, Troy, a 30-year-old woman was laid to rest in a stone-lined grave. [More]
PCT screening could be promising tool to help shorten hospital stays, reduce costs for sepsis patients

PCT screening could be promising tool to help shorten hospital stays, reduce costs for sepsis patients

Each year, over $20 billion dollars is spent on sepsis care, making it the most expensive condition managed in U.S. hospitals. [More]
New study from Veterans Health Administration finds significant decline in MRSA HAI rates

New study from Veterans Health Administration finds significant decline in MRSA HAI rates

The Department of Veterans Affairs' Veterans Health Administration's campaign to limit healthcare facility-associated infections (HAIs) of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) continues to make significant progress, according to a study published in the January issue of the American Journal of Infection Control, the official journal of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology . [More]
Gun violence is least-researched and underfunded cause of death, study shows

Gun violence is least-researched and underfunded cause of death, study shows

Funding and publication of gun violence research are disproportionately low compared to other leading causes of death in the United States, according to new research from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai published online today in the Journal of the American Medical Association. [More]
Hospitals eliminate bedsore occurrence using early detection technology

Hospitals eliminate bedsore occurrence using early detection technology

Using technology adapted from NASA's Mars lander as part of a large-scale bedsore reduction program, over half of the 13 participating hospitals were able to eliminate the occurrence of new bedsores completely; an additional 3 hospitals achieved reductions ranging from 11% to 90%. [More]
Study examines mechanisms for measuring and reporting postoperative infection complications

Study examines mechanisms for measuring and reporting postoperative infection complications

How do medical professionals determine whether or not a patient has experienced a post-operative complication? A team of Mayo Clinic physicians and researchers has published results of a three-year study examining mechanisms for measuring and reporting postoperative infection complications. [More]
ANTRUK's new research finds promising leads to combat antibiotic resistance

ANTRUK's new research finds promising leads to combat antibiotic resistance

Antibiotic resistant infections are predicted to lead to 10 million deaths per year globally by 2050 at a cost of up to $100 trillion to the world economy. In the UK, at least 5,000 people per year die from resistant infections. [More]
UCLA researchers develop simple smartphone attachment for antimicrobial susceptibility testing

UCLA researchers develop simple smartphone attachment for antimicrobial susceptibility testing

A team of UCLA researchers has developed an automated diagnostic test reader for antimicrobial resistance using a smartphone. The technology could lead to routine testing for antimicrobial susceptibility in areas with limited resources. [More]
Empa researchers developing solution to magnetically remove bacteria from blood

Empa researchers developing solution to magnetically remove bacteria from blood

Blood poisoning is still fatal in more than 50% of cases, but can be cured if treated at an early stage. The highest priority is therefore to act quickly. [More]
Research unlocks potential new therapies for inflammatory diseases

Research unlocks potential new therapies for inflammatory diseases

Macrophages are frontline cells in our immune system. They detect microbial invaders and also tissue injury and then mount an appropriate response needed to clear the infection and repair the damaged tissue. [More]
Study suggests new approach to treat white blood cells of sepsis patients

Study suggests new approach to treat white blood cells of sepsis patients

New research findings published in the Journal of Leukocyte Biology, suggest that treating the white blood cells of sepsis patients with antibodies that block programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) and programmed cell death ligand (PD-L1) molecules may restore their function and ultimately their ability to eradicate deadly bacteria. [More]
Over-the-counter and prescription pain medications linked to drug-induced liver injury

Over-the-counter and prescription pain medications linked to drug-induced liver injury

More than 1,000 medications, with acetaminophen being the most common, have been associated with drug-induced liver injury. [More]
New report highlights global burden of maternal, newborn and young child deaths

New report highlights global burden of maternal, newborn and young child deaths

Today FIGO, ICM, ICN and IPA announce the publication of a report showing the global burden of maternal, newborn and young child deaths and launch the Together We Can campaign to tackle it. [More]
New research shows immune paralysis in sepsis patients can be reversed

New research shows immune paralysis in sepsis patients can be reversed

Failure of the immune system during blood poisoning (sepsis) can be reversed by a specific sugar. [More]
Research supports re-introduction of penicillin-type antibiotics as adjunct therapeutic for MRSA infections

Research supports re-introduction of penicillin-type antibiotics as adjunct therapeutic for MRSA infections

Microbiologists have identified how MRSA may be more effectively treated by modern-day antibiotics, if old-fashioned penicillin is also used. [More]
International scientists unravel mystery of newly discovered type of controlled cell death

International scientists unravel mystery of newly discovered type of controlled cell death

A multidisciplinary international team of scientists solved the mystery of a recently discovered type of controlled cell death, mapping the path to potential therapies for conditions ranging from radiation injury to cancer. [More]
Many people wrongly believe that sepsis is less deadly than breast cancer, research reveals

Many people wrongly believe that sepsis is less deadly than breast cancer, research reveals

Most people do not know how deadly sepsis is, with four out offive wrongly believingthe condition is less deadly than breast cancer, according to the latest research. [More]
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