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Sepsis is a life-threatening illness. Your body's response to a bacterial infection usually causes it. Your immune system goes into overdrive, overwhelming normal processes in your blood. The result is that small blood clots form, blocking blood flow to vital organs. This can lead to organ failure. Babies, old people and those with weakened immune systems are most likely to get sepsis. But even healthy people can become deathly ill from it. A quick diagnosis can be crucial, because one third of people who get sepsis die from it. Sepsis is usually treated in a hospital intensive care unit (ICU). IV antibiotics and fluids may be given to try to knock out the infection and to keep blood pressure from dropping too low. Patients may also need respirators to help them breathe.
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Amgen to present clinical data on multiple blood cancer treatments at EHA 2015

Amgen to present clinical data on multiple blood cancer treatments at EHA 2015

Amgen today announced that it will present data from multiple Kyprolis (carfilzomib) for Injection, BLINCYTO (blinatumomab), oprozomib and Nplate (romiplostim)‎ studies at the 20th Congress of the European Hematology Association taking place in Vienna, June 11 - 14, 2015. [More]
Verax Biomedical obtains FDA clearance to expand use of Verax Platelet PGD test

Verax Biomedical obtains FDA clearance to expand use of Verax Platelet PGD test

Verax Biomedical today announced that the company has gained FDA clearance to expand the use of its Verax Platelet PGD test—a rapid test for the detection of bacterial contamination in platelets intended for transfusion. The new FDA clearance makes the Verax Platelet PGD test the only rapid test on the market cleared by the FDA to check every commonly distributed platelet type in the United States. [More]
Second-generation antibiotic shows promise against common bacterial infections

Second-generation antibiotic shows promise against common bacterial infections

Researchers led by St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists have developed a second-generation antibiotic that shows early effectiveness against common bacterial infections that pose a serious health threat to children and adults. [More]
Kidney function plays critical role in sepsis patients

Kidney function plays critical role in sepsis patients

Researchers at Duke Medicine have determined that kidney function plays a critical role in the fate of patients being treated for sepsis, a potentially life-threatening complication of an infection. [More]
Toxin pneumolysin causes progressive and fatal heart complications

Toxin pneumolysin causes progressive and fatal heart complications

Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major human pathogen and is known to be associated with increased risk of fatal heart complications including heart failure and heart attacks. [More]
UCB sponsoring several presentations on Cimzia for Crohn's disease at DDW 2015

UCB sponsoring several presentations on Cimzia for Crohn's disease at DDW 2015

UCB, a global biopharmaceutical company focusing on immunology and neurology treatment and research, is sponsoring several data presentations on Cimzia (certolizumab pegol) at Digestive Disease Week 2015, taking place in Washington, DC from May 16-19. [More]
Researchers explore how low-level electrical stimulation reduces inflammation

Researchers explore how low-level electrical stimulation reduces inflammation

The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, the research arm of the North Shore-LIJ Health System, and SetPoint Medical Inc., a biomedical technology company, today released the results of research on the therapeutic potential of vagus nerve stimulation. In a paper published by Bioelectronic Medicine, Kevin J. Tracey, MD, and his colleagues at the Feinstein Institute, explore how low-level electrical stimulation interacts with the body's nerves to reduce inflammation, a fundamental goal of bioelectronic medicine. [More]
Cardiome signs commercialization agreement with AOP for ESMOCARD products

Cardiome signs commercialization agreement with AOP for ESMOCARD products

Cardiome Pharma Corp. today announced that the company has entered a commercialization agreement with AOP Orphan Pharma to sell AOP's cardiovascular products, ESMOCARD and ESMOCARD LYO (esmolol hydrochloride) in Italy, France, Spain and Belgium. [More]
Enhanced recovery program for patients undergoing colorectal operations speeds patients' recovery

Enhanced recovery program for patients undergoing colorectal operations speeds patients' recovery

Patients undergoing colorectal operations who participated in an enhanced recovery program left the hospital sooner and had significantly lower hospital costs than patients who had the traditional approach to their care, according to a new study, which also found further postoperative improvements after adding an infection prevention protocol. [More]
EKF introduces specific biomarker test for early sepsis identification

EKF introduces specific biomarker test for early sepsis identification

EKF Diagnostics, the global diagnostics company, announces that it has introduced the Stanbio Chemistry Procalcitonin (PCT) LiquiColor® Assay. This new test enables the quantitative determination of PCT in serum samples, EDTA or lithium heparin plasma samples by latex enhanced immunoturbidimetric methodology. Procalcitonin is a marker for bacterial infection and sepsis and has been recognized as an important adjunct marker in the diagnosis of sepsis. [More]
Bone-marrow-derived MSCs can promote fracture healing

Bone-marrow-derived MSCs can promote fracture healing

Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been transplanted to successfully treat a variety of diseases and conditions. The benefit of using MSCs is their ability to self-renew and differentiate into a variety of specialized cell types, such as osteoblasts (cells contributing to bone formation), chondrocytes (cartilage cells), adipocytes (fat cells), myocardiocytes (the muscle cells that make up the cardiac muscle), and neurons (nervous system cells). [More]
Lilly receives fourth FDA approval for CYRAMZA (ramucirumab)

Lilly receives fourth FDA approval for CYRAMZA (ramucirumab)

Eli Lilly and Company has received its fourth U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval for CYRAMZA (ramucirumab). CYRAMZA (ramucirumab injection 10 mg/mL solution) is now also indicated in combination with FOLFIRI (irinotecan, folinic acid, and 5-fluorouracil) chemotherapy for the treatment of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) with disease progression on or after prior therapy with bevacizumab, oxaliplatin, and a fluoropyrimidine. [More]
Ebola survivors face long-term adverse health effects: Study

Ebola survivors face long-term adverse health effects: Study

Ebola survivors experienced negative health effects that persisted more than two years after the 2007-2008 Bundibugyo ebolavirus (BDBV) outbreak in Uganda that claimed 39 lives. These findings are detailed in a paper published online today in Lancet ID. [More]
UCLA-led stroke study selected as one of 10 most outstanding research papers by CRF

UCLA-led stroke study selected as one of 10 most outstanding research papers by CRF

A UCLA-led study on improving stroke care was selected by the Clinical Research Forum (CRF) as one of the 10 most outstanding research papers written by teams from across the nation in 2014. The organization highlighted the papers at its fourth annual awards ceremony in Washington, D.C. on April 16. [More]
New Commission outlines current state of research into sepsis

New Commission outlines current state of research into sepsis

Leading doctors today [Monday 20 April, 2015] warn that medical and public recognition of sepsis--thought to contribute to between a third and a half of all hospital deaths--must improve if the number of deaths from this common and potentially life-threatening condition are to fall. [More]
Genetically modified Salmonella can help kill cancer cells

Genetically modified Salmonella can help kill cancer cells

A new study has demonstrated that genetically modified Salmonella can be used to kill cancer cells. The study is published in this week's issue of mBio, an American Society for Microbiology online-only, open access journal. [More]
New study describes economic consequences of using T2Candida Panel for detection of candidemia

New study describes economic consequences of using T2Candida Panel for detection of candidemia

A new study describes a model that estimates the economic consequences of using the T2Candida Panel (a novel diagnostic product that provides Candida detection) as an adjunct to the current blood culture-based diagnostic strategy in a high-risk hospital patient cohort. [More]
Amgen's Vectibix (panitumumab) receives EC approval for treatment patients with WT RAS mCRC

Amgen's Vectibix (panitumumab) receives EC approval for treatment patients with WT RAS mCRC

Amgen today announced that the European Commission approved a new use of Vectibix (panitumumab) as first-line treatment in combination with FOLFIRI for the treatment of adult patients with wild-type (WT) RAS metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). [More]
Outpatient treatments with fewer injections produce similar results to standard treatment course

Outpatient treatments with fewer injections produce similar results to standard treatment course

Giving fewer antibiotic injections to young infants in the developing world with severe infections such as pneumonia and sepsis is just as safe and effective as the standard course of twice daily injections over the course of a week, according to new Johns Hopkins School of Public Health research conducted in Bangladesh. [More]
BP monitoring essential for early diagnosis, management of hypertensive disorders in pregnancy

BP monitoring essential for early diagnosis, management of hypertensive disorders in pregnancy

Accurate blood pressure measurement (BP) is fundamental to the early diagnosis of hypertensive disorders in pregnancy, says a review published 1 April, 2015, in The Obstetrician & Gynaecologist (TOG). [More]
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