Sepsis News and Research RSS Feed - Sepsis News and Research

Sepsis is a life-threatening illness. Your body's response to a bacterial infection usually causes it. Your immune system goes into overdrive, overwhelming normal processes in your blood. The result is that small blood clots form, blocking blood flow to vital organs. This can lead to organ failure. Babies, old people and those with weakened immune systems are most likely to get sepsis. But even healthy people can become deathly ill from it. A quick diagnosis can be crucial, because one third of people who get sepsis die from it. Sepsis is usually treated in a hospital intensive care unit (ICU). IV antibiotics and fluids may be given to try to knock out the infection and to keep blood pressure from dropping too low. Patients may also need respirators to help them breathe.
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Hospira announces availability of INFLECTRA (infliximab) in Canada

Hospira announces availability of INFLECTRA (infliximab) in Canada

Hospira, Inc., a global leader in biosimilars and the world's leading provider of injectable drugs and infusion technologies, announces the availability of INFLECTRA (infliximab) in Canada, the country's first subsequent entry biologic (SEB) monoclonal antibody (mAb) therapy. [More]
Experts call for global review of sepsis guidelines

Experts call for global review of sepsis guidelines

Experts are calling for a global review of guidelines used to diagnose sepsis, after a study found one in eight patients with infections severe enough to need admission to an Intensive Care Unit in Australia and New Zealand, did not meet current criteria. [More]
Cardiovascular researchers identify MG53 protein necessary for repairing injured kidney cells

Cardiovascular researchers identify MG53 protein necessary for repairing injured kidney cells

Cardiovascular researchers at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center have shown that a protein known as MG53 is not only present in kidney cells, but necessary for the organ to repair itself after acute injury. Results from this animal model study are published in the journal Science Translational Medicine. [More]
New research finds old blood just as good as fresh blood

New research finds old blood just as good as fresh blood

Just like milk and many other foods, blood used for transfusions is perishable. But contrary to popular belief, new research shows that blood stored for three weeks is just as good as fresh blood - findings published today in the New England Journal of Medicine. [More]
Astute Medical hails launch of collaborative global initiative to prevent deaths from AKI by 2025

Astute Medical hails launch of collaborative global initiative to prevent deaths from AKI by 2025

Astute Medical, Inc. today hailed the launch of a collaborative global initiative calling for the elimination of preventable deaths from acute kidney injury (AKI) by 2025. The Company cited the publication of a new Commission from The Lancet and the International Society of Nephrology, along with the release of results from the 0by25 AKI "Global Snapshot" study, as key steps forward in the effort to reduce the global burden of AKI. [More]
Rehospitalizations after severe sepsis may be potentially preventable

Rehospitalizations after severe sepsis may be potentially preventable

In an analysis of about 2,600 hospitalizations for severe sepsis, readmissions within 90 days were common, and approximately 40 percent occurred for diagnoses that could potentially be prevented or treated early to avoid hospitalization, according to a study in the March 10 issue of JAMA. [More]
United Therapeutics announces FDA approval of dinutuximab for treatment of high-risk neuroblastoma

United Therapeutics announces FDA approval of dinutuximab for treatment of high-risk neuroblastoma

United Therapeutics Corporation announced today that the United States Food and Drug Administration has approved Unituxin (dinutuximab) Injection (formerly called ch14.18), in combination with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), interleukin-2 (IL-2), and 13-cis-retinoic acid (RA), for the treatment of pediatric patients with high-risk neuroblastoma who achieve at least a partial response to prior first-line multiagent, multimodality therapy. [More]
European launch of the Proxima miniature in-line blood gas analyser at ISICEM 2015

European launch of the Proxima miniature in-line blood gas analyser at ISICEM 2015

Sphere Medical, innovator in critical care monitoring and diagnostics equipment, will launch its ground-breaking in-line patient dedicated arterial blood gas analyser in Germany, Netherlands and Belgium at ISICEM 2015. [More]
Minihepcidin reverses iron overload of hemochromatosis, stops susceptibility to infections

Minihepcidin reverses iron overload of hemochromatosis, stops susceptibility to infections

Hemochromatosis (HH) is the most common genetic disorder in the western world, and yet is barely known. Only in the US 1 in 9 people carry the mutation (although not necessarily the disease). [More]
FDA approves LILETTA (levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system) to prevent pregnancy

FDA approves LILETTA (levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system) to prevent pregnancy

Actavis plc, a leading global specialty pharmaceutical company, and Medicines360, a nonprofit women's health pharmaceutical company, today announced the approval of LILETTA (levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system) by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for use by women to prevent pregnancy for up to three years. [More]
Trinity scientists reveal new marvel molecule that can block key process in inflammatory diseases

Trinity scientists reveal new marvel molecule that can block key process in inflammatory diseases

Scientists at Trinity College Dublin have uncovered a marvel molecule that blocks a key driver of inflammatory diseases. The finding could meet a major unmet clinical need by inspiring new non-invasive treatments for arthritis, multiple sclerosis and Muckle-Wells syndrome, among a myriad of other inflammatory diseases. [More]
UT Arlington chemist receives NIH's Academic Research Enhancement Award for protein research

UT Arlington chemist receives NIH's Academic Research Enhancement Award for protein research

A University of Texas at Arlington bio-analytical chemist exploring proteins, their structures and functions by using cutting-edge analytical instrumentation called mass spectrometry has received an Academic Research Enhancement Award from the National Institutes of Health. [More]
UMHS opens Massey Emergency Critical Care Center

UMHS opens Massey Emergency Critical Care Center

They come from highway accident scenes and nursing home beds, from factories and farm fields, from suburban homes, downtown sidewalks and small community hospitals. [More]
Hospira announces launch of first biosimilar monoclonal antibody in Europe

Hospira announces launch of first biosimilar monoclonal antibody in Europe

Hospira, Inc., a world leader in the development of biosimilar therapies, today announced the launch of the first biosimilar monoclonal antibody (mAb), Inflectra (infliximab), in major European markets. [More]
Great Basin Scientific begins clinical trial for Shiga toxin-producing E. coli diagnostic test

Great Basin Scientific begins clinical trial for Shiga toxin-producing E. coli diagnostic test

Great Basin Scientific, Inc., today announced it has initiated a clinical trial for its Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) diagnostic test. [More]
Astute Medical previews upcoming AKI & CRRT 2015 conference to be held in San Diego

Astute Medical previews upcoming AKI & CRRT 2015 conference to be held in San Diego

Astute Medical, Inc., developer of the NephroCheck® Test, today previewed the upcoming AKI & CRRT 2015 conference to be held in San Diego from February 17 to February 20. [More]
OSU researchers discover impact of antibiotics on microorganisms that live in animal's gut

OSU researchers discover impact of antibiotics on microorganisms that live in animal's gut

Researchers at Oregon State University have discovered that antibiotics have an impact on the microorganisms that live in an animal's gut that's more broad and complex than previously known. [More]
Balanced blood product ratios can improve outcomes in severe trauma patients

Balanced blood product ratios can improve outcomes in severe trauma patients

Among patients with severe trauma and major bleeding, those who received a transfusion of a balanced ratio of plasma, platelets, and red blood cells (RBCs) were more likely to have their bleeding stopped and less likely to die due to loss of blood by 24 hours compared to patients who received a transfusion with a higher ratio of RBCs, according to a study in the February 3 issue of JAMA. [More]
Hastings Center Report: Latest issues on health and medicine

Hastings Center Report: Latest issues on health and medicine

For two years, a debate has raged over the study known as the Surfactant, Positive Pressure, and Oxygenation Randomized Trial (SUPPORT), which sought to gauge the risks and benefits of different blood oxygen levels currently targeted in the care of premature infants. [More]
Researchers to present report on impact of fetal gender on preterm birth risk at The Pregnancy Meeting

Researchers to present report on impact of fetal gender on preterm birth risk at The Pregnancy Meeting

In a study to be presented on Feb. 7 in an oral concurrent session at 8 a.m. PST, at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine's annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting, in San Diego, researchers will report on the impact of fetal gender on the risk of preterm birth and neonatal outcome. [More]
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