Sepsis News and Research RSS Feed - Sepsis News and Research

Sepsis is a life-threatening illness. Your body's response to a bacterial infection usually causes it. Your immune system goes into overdrive, overwhelming normal processes in your blood. The result is that small blood clots form, blocking blood flow to vital organs. This can lead to organ failure. Babies, old people and those with weakened immune systems are most likely to get sepsis. But even healthy people can become deathly ill from it. A quick diagnosis can be crucial, because one third of people who get sepsis die from it. Sepsis is usually treated in a hospital intensive care unit (ICU). IV antibiotics and fluids may be given to try to knock out the infection and to keep blood pressure from dropping too low. Patients may also need respirators to help them breathe.
Further Reading
MSD announces EC approval of SIMPONI (golimumab) for treatment of adult patients with nr-axial SpA

MSD announces EC approval of SIMPONI (golimumab) for treatment of adult patients with nr-axial SpA

MSD (Merck & Co., Inc., Kenilworth, New Jersey, USA) today announced that on 22 June the European Commission approved SIMPONI (golimumab) for the treatment of adult patients with severe, active non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis (nr-axial SpA). [More]
University of Pittsburgh surgeon receives Anthony Cerami Award in Translational Medicine

University of Pittsburgh surgeon receives Anthony Cerami Award in Translational Medicine

The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research and Molecular Medicine announced today that the fourth Anthony Cerami Award in Translational Medicine will be conferred to Thomas E. Starzl, MD, PhD, professor of surgery at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. The award is in recognition of his research in organ transplantation and alloengraftment mechanisms. [More]
The Lancet Oncology publishes results of CYRAMZA (ramucirumab) Phase III trial for HCC treatment

The Lancet Oncology publishes results of CYRAMZA (ramucirumab) Phase III trial for HCC treatment

Eli Lilly and Company announced that The Lancet Oncology has published results of the Phase III REACH trial that evaluated CYRAMZA (ramucirumab) as a second-line treatment for people with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), also known as liver cancer. While the REACH trial's primary endpoint of overall survival favored the CYRAMZA arm, it was not statistically significant. [More]
Phase 3 study shows Vectibix meets primary endpoint in patients with chemorefractory wild-type KRAS mCRC

Phase 3 study shows Vectibix meets primary endpoint in patients with chemorefractory wild-type KRAS mCRC

Amgen today announced that a Phase 3 study evaluating Vectibix (panitumumab) and best supportive care (BSC) met its primary endpoint, demonstrating a statistically significant improvement in overall survival (OS) in patients with chemorefractory wild-type KRAS (exon 2) metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) compared to those patients treated with BSC alone. [More]
PAH diagnosis delayed for adult congenital heart disease patients

PAH diagnosis delayed for adult congenital heart disease patients

Pulmonary arterial hypertension is often not diagnosed in adult patients with congenital heart disease until 6 years or more after their symptoms first appear, research shows. [More]
JAMA: Extremely preterm infants enrolled in randomized clinical trials experience neither better nor worse outcomes

JAMA: Extremely preterm infants enrolled in randomized clinical trials experience neither better nor worse outcomes

In a group of more than 5,000 extremely preterm infants, important in-hospital outcomes were neither better nor worse in infants enrolled in randomized clinical trials (RCTs) compared with eligible but nonenrolled infants, findings that may provide reassurance regarding concerns about performing RCTs in this vulnerable population, according to a study in the June 16 issue of JAMA. [More]
Completing sepsis resuscitation bundle in six hours after diagnosis

Completing sepsis resuscitation bundle in six hours after diagnosis

Blood poisoning, known as sepsis, is the most common cause of death in intensive care units, according to the National Institutes of Health. The body's immune response to fight the infection triggers inflammation that restricts blood flow and leads to multiple organ failure. [More]
Researchers discover that extreme exercise can lead to blood poisoning

Researchers discover that extreme exercise can lead to blood poisoning

Researchers have discovered that extreme exercise can cause intestinal bacteria to leak into the bloodstream, leading to blood poisoning. [More]
Switching from Remicade to Inflectra benefits patients with rheumatic diseases

Switching from Remicade to Inflectra benefits patients with rheumatic diseases

Hospira, Inc., a global leader in biosimilars, today announced the results of an independent clinical study, showing patients with rheumatic diseases experienced comparable clinical effectiveness and safety after switching from Remicade™ to Inflectra. [More]
Duration of antibiotic treatment can be cut by half for complicated abdominal infections

Duration of antibiotic treatment can be cut by half for complicated abdominal infections

In a finding important for preventing the development of antibiotic-resistant superbugs, researchers at the University of Virginia School of Medicine and 22 other institutions have determined that the duration of antibiotic treatment for complicated abdominal infections can be cut by half and remain equally effective. [More]
Steven Schiff wins NIH Director's Pioneer Award to reduce infant deaths from neonatal sepsis

Steven Schiff wins NIH Director's Pioneer Award to reduce infant deaths from neonatal sepsis

Steven Schiff, professor of neurosurgery and Brush Chair Professor of Engineering in Engineering Science and Mechanics, has received a $4.1 million National Institutes of Health Director's Pioneer Award, for research aimed at reducing the number of infant deaths from neonatal sepsis in developing countries by identifying the roots of infection, from season of birth to home environment. [More]
Chronic exposure to bacteria may lead to development of Type 2 diabetes

Chronic exposure to bacteria may lead to development of Type 2 diabetes

Bacteria and viruses have an obvious role in causing infectious diseases, but microbes have also been identified as the surprising cause of other illnesses, including cervical cancer (Human papilloma virus) and stomach ulcers (H. pylori bacteria). [More]
Boehringer announces LUX-Lung 8 data that compares efficacy of afatinib, erlotinib in patients with advanced SCC

Boehringer announces LUX-Lung 8 data that compares efficacy of afatinib, erlotinib in patients with advanced SCC

Boehringer Ingelheim today announced overall survival (OS) results from the LUX-Lung 8 trial (NCT01523587) that directly compared the efficacy and safety of two EGFR-directed treatments, afatinib and erlotinib, in patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the lung, progressing after treatment with first-line chemotherapy. Treatment with afatinib significantly reduced the risk of death by 19%, extending the survival of patients to a median of 7.9 months compared to 6.8 months on erlotinib. [More]
Updated data from PROCLAIM national patient registry presented at 51st ASCO

Updated data from PROCLAIM national patient registry presented at 51st ASCO

Prometheus Laboratories, Inc. announced today the presentation of updated data from the PROCLAIM national patient registry in which first-line Proleukin® (aldesleukin for injection) therapy improved survival in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC), compared to patients previously treated with targeted therapies. [More]
Astute Medical's NephroCheck Test obtains measurements of two biomarkers that act as alarm for AKI risk

Astute Medical's NephroCheck Test obtains measurements of two biomarkers that act as alarm for AKI risk

An intervention known as remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC) significantly reduced the occurrence of acute kidney injury (AKI) in cardiac surgery patients and confirmed that post-operative elevations of two kidney biomarkers act as an alarm for risk of AKI, according to a study published online today in the Journal of the American Medical Association. [More]
Amgen to present clinical data on multiple blood cancer treatments at EHA 2015

Amgen to present clinical data on multiple blood cancer treatments at EHA 2015

Amgen today announced that it will present data from multiple Kyprolis (carfilzomib) for Injection, BLINCYTO (blinatumomab), oprozomib and Nplate (romiplostim)‎ studies at the 20th Congress of the European Hematology Association taking place in Vienna, June 11 - 14, 2015. [More]
Verax Biomedical obtains FDA clearance to expand use of Verax Platelet PGD test

Verax Biomedical obtains FDA clearance to expand use of Verax Platelet PGD test

Verax Biomedical today announced that the company has gained FDA clearance to expand the use of its Verax Platelet PGD test—a rapid test for the detection of bacterial contamination in platelets intended for transfusion. The new FDA clearance makes the Verax Platelet PGD test the only rapid test on the market cleared by the FDA to check every commonly distributed platelet type in the United States. [More]
Second-generation antibiotic shows promise against common bacterial infections

Second-generation antibiotic shows promise against common bacterial infections

Researchers led by St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists have developed a second-generation antibiotic that shows early effectiveness against common bacterial infections that pose a serious health threat to children and adults. [More]
Kidney function plays critical role in sepsis patients

Kidney function plays critical role in sepsis patients

Researchers at Duke Medicine have determined that kidney function plays a critical role in the fate of patients being treated for sepsis, a potentially life-threatening complication of an infection. [More]
Toxin pneumolysin causes progressive and fatal heart complications

Toxin pneumolysin causes progressive and fatal heart complications

Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major human pathogen and is known to be associated with increased risk of fatal heart complications including heart failure and heart attacks. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement