Skin Cancer News and Research RSS Feed - Skin Cancer News and Research

Skin cancer is the most common type of cancer in the U.S. It occurs in more than a million people each year, including many older people. There are three main types of skin cancer: basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and melanoma. Of the three, melanoma is the most serious. Skin cancer occurs when abnormal cells form and multiply in an uncontrolled way in the epidermis, or abnormal cells from the epidermis invade the dermis of the skin. Basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and melanoma are skin cancers that are named for the epidermal cells from which they develop.
UCB sponsoring several presentations on Cimzia for Crohn's disease at DDW 2015

UCB sponsoring several presentations on Cimzia for Crohn's disease at DDW 2015

UCB, a global biopharmaceutical company focusing on immunology and neurology treatment and research, is sponsoring several data presentations on Cimzia (certolizumab pegol) at Digestive Disease Week 2015, taking place in Washington, DC from May 16-19. [More]
Results from four major studies on cancer treatments to be presented at ASCO Annual Meeting

Results from four major studies on cancer treatments to be presented at ASCO Annual Meeting

The American Society of Clinical Oncology today announced results from four major studies to be presented at ASCO's 51st Annual Meeting, May 29-June 2, in Chicago. Findings showed that use of a widely available vitamin pill reduces the risk of non-melanoma skin cancers; that early chemotherapy extends the lives of men with advanced prostate cancers; and that new therapies can improve outcomes for children with a rare form of kidney cancer and adults with relapsed multiple myeloma. [More]
Research paves way for development of individualized immunotherapy for treating cancer

Research paves way for development of individualized immunotherapy for treating cancer

Mainz-based researchers have made significant advances with regard to the development of individualized immunotherapy strategies for treating cancer. They have managed to identify the relevant genetic changes or mutations associated with various types of cancer and have determined their individual blueprints. [More]
Full body dermatological scanner could help diagnose skin conditions in the future

Full body dermatological scanner could help diagnose skin conditions in the future

Melanoma is aggressive and life-threatening. If it is not detected early, the prospects of recovery drop. Screening is complicated, though. Together with several project partners, Fraunhofer researchers have developed an assistance system that helps dermatologists with diagnosis. [More]
UC3M, IRYCIS patent new automated skin biopsy device

UC3M, IRYCIS patent new automated skin biopsy device

Universidad Carlos III de Madrid and the Institute for Health Research of the Hospital "Ramón y Cajal" have patented a new device for performing skin biopsies. With this new tool a skin biopsy can be performed with fewer instruments and the length of the procedure is shortened from thirty minutes to less than five. [More]
Luxembourg biologists provide complete image of human 'miRNome' in blood samples

Luxembourg biologists provide complete image of human 'miRNome' in blood samples

In an elaborate study, biologists of the University of Luxembourg have found out that small molecules named microRNAs are, against many hopes, not yet suitable for early diagnosis of skin cancer, as well as supposedly for other types of cancer, in blood samples. For the first time they analysed all microRNAs in the serum of healthy people and thus provided a first complete image of the human "miRNome" in blood samples, in reference to the better-known "genome". [More]
First patient receives new 'resistance-busting' experimental skin cancer drug

First patient receives new 'resistance-busting' experimental skin cancer drug

A patient has become the first to receive a new 'resistance-busting' experimental skin cancer drug with the launch of a phase I clinical trial. The patient has received a new panRAF inhibitor - a new type of drug under development to address the problem of drug resistance in advanced skin cancer and a number of other cancer types. [More]
Novel Ga-68-PSMA-ligand PET/CT effective for early detection of prostate cancer recurrence

Novel Ga-68-PSMA-ligand PET/CT effective for early detection of prostate cancer recurrence

A recent study reported in The Journal of Nuclear Medicine compared use of the novel Ga-68-PSMA-ligand PET/CT with other imaging methods and found that it had substantially higher detection rates of prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) in patients with biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy. [More]
iCAD announces adoption of Xoft Axxent Electronic Brachytherapy System in Spain

iCAD announces adoption of Xoft Axxent Electronic Brachytherapy System in Spain

iCAD, Inc., an industry-leading provider of advanced image analysis, workflow solutions and radiation therapy for the early identification and treatment of cancer, today announced the first Xoft Axxent Electronic Brachytherapy (eBx) System in Spain is now available at the Hospital Miguel Servet for the treatment of early-stage breast cancer, non-melanoma skin cancer and gynecological cancers. [More]

Xstrahl introduces Phtotoelectric therapy to the European market at ESTRO 2015

Utilising trusted and clinically proven low energy photons, in a dedicated treatment system. Photoelectric Therapy provides a pain free, non-surgical alternative for the treatment of non-melanoma skin cancer, especially those found in sensitive areas of the head and neck... [More]
Study points to TMPRSS2 gene as culprit for aggressive forms of androgen-fuelled cancers

Study points to TMPRSS2 gene as culprit for aggressive forms of androgen-fuelled cancers

A new study led by University of Toronto researcher Dr. David Lam has discovered the trigger behind the most severe forms of cancer pain. Released in top journal Pain this month, the study points to TMPRSS2 as the culprit: a gene that is also responsible for some of the most aggressive forms of androgen-fuelled cancers. [More]
Scientists identify possible new genes that could change benign skin growths into fatal melanomas

Scientists identify possible new genes that could change benign skin growths into fatal melanomas

A Houston Methodist-led team of international scientists has identified hundreds of possible new genes in mice that could transform benign skin growths into deadly melanomas. [More]
Ibrutinib (IMBRUVICA) may be effective for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

Ibrutinib (IMBRUVICA) may be effective for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

Ibrutinib (IMBRUVICA) data presented yesterday by Pharmacyclics, Inc. at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting suggest that ibrutinib may be an effective therapeutic option for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), as shown in both a transgenic mouse model and an in-vivo model of patient-derived xenograft (PDX) mice (grafts of tissue taken from a pancreatic cancer patient and grafted into a mouse). [More]
Immunocore reports clinical trial data from IMCgp100 Phase I/IIa study at AACR 2015

Immunocore reports clinical trial data from IMCgp100 Phase I/IIa study at AACR 2015

Immunocore Limited, a world-leading biotechnology company developing novel biological drugs to treat cancer, viral infections and autoimmune diseases, today announced clinical trial data from the Phase I/IIa study of its lead programme IMCgp100, at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2015, in Philadelphia, USA. [More]
UH Seidman Cancer Center uses SpaceOAR System to perform first-ever prostate cancer treatment

UH Seidman Cancer Center uses SpaceOAR System to perform first-ever prostate cancer treatment

The radiation oncology team at UH Seidman Cancer Center at UH Geauga Medical Center performed the first-ever prostate cancer treatment on April 3 using a newly approved device. The device, called SpaceOAR System, enhances the efficacy of radiation treatment by protecting organs surrounding the prostate. The device, a temporary injectable gel, received FDA clearance on April 1. [More]
Subpopulation of tumor cells make melanoma aggressive

Subpopulation of tumor cells make melanoma aggressive

KU Leuven researchers have zeroed in on what makes cancer cells in melanoma so aggressive. They also succeeded in taming the effect in cell cultures. [More]
Pharmacyclics announces positive results from IMBRUVICA Phase II study in WM patients

Pharmacyclics announces positive results from IMBRUVICA Phase II study in WM patients

Pharmacyclics, Inc. today announced longer-term data from a Phase II investigator-initiated study showing Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia (WM) patients treated with IMBRUVICA (ibrutinib) experienced sustained disease control with an overall response rate (ORR) of 91% after a median of 19.1 months of treatment and a 2-year overall survival (OS) rate of 95%. [More]
Pediatric melanoma incidence rates decrease from 2004-2010

Pediatric melanoma incidence rates decrease from 2004-2010

Melanoma is an aggressive form of skin cancer that has been increasing in incidence in adults over the past 40 years. Although pediatric melanoma is rare (5-6 children per million), most studies indicate that incidence has been increasing. In a new study scheduled for publication in The Journal of Pediatrics, researchers found that the incidence of pediatric melanoma in the United States actually has decreased from 2004-2010. [More]
Indoor UV tanning causes skin cancer

Indoor UV tanning causes skin cancer

The U.S. Surgeon General should declare that indoor ultraviolet radiation tanning causes skin cancer, according to an article published today by the American Journal of Preventive Medicine. [More]
St. Luke’s Cancer Center offers new Phase II oncolytic viral therapy clinical trial for advanced melanoma

St. Luke’s Cancer Center offers new Phase II oncolytic viral therapy clinical trial for advanced melanoma

St. Luke’s Cancer Center is a leader in offering clinical trials for patients with melanoma, the most unusual type of skin cancer and also the most deadly. Physicians such as Sanjiv Agarwala, MD, Chief of Medical Oncology and Hematology for St. Luke’s University Health Network and an internationally recognized melanoma specialist, are committed to bringing the most promising studies to the Lehigh Valley. [More]
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