Skin Cancer News and Research RSS Feed - Skin Cancer News and Research

Skin cancer is the most common type of cancer in the U.S. It occurs in more than a million people each year, including many older people. There are three main types of skin cancer: basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and melanoma. Of the three, melanoma is the most serious. Skin cancer occurs when abnormal cells form and multiply in an uncontrolled way in the epidermis, or abnormal cells from the epidermis invade the dermis of the skin. Basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and melanoma are skin cancers that are named for the epidermal cells from which they develop.
Superficial radiotherapy e-learning portal launched by Xstrahl

Superficial radiotherapy e-learning portal launched by Xstrahl

Xstrahl officially launch the Xstra Learning Portal, an online educational platform providing an invaluable source of information for all clinical personnel treating patients using superficial radiotherapy. The website, formerly known as STEP, was created by leading clinical professionals and Xstrahl, a world leader in radiation therapy. [More]
Study finds no significant decline in indoor tanning use among school children after under-17 ban

Study finds no significant decline in indoor tanning use among school children after under-17 ban

Research from Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey and Rutgers School of Public Health shows no significant decline in indoor tanning rates among children under age 17 following a ban on such use in New Jersey enacted in 2013. [More]
Researchers identify genetic causes underlying higher rate of melanoma in men

Researchers identify genetic causes underlying higher rate of melanoma in men

A study led by researchers at Universitat Jaume I de Castellón has identified one of the genetic causes underlying the higher rate of melanoma in men. The results have been published in Biology of Sex Differences. [More]
Researchers identify unique mechanism to suppress colorectal cancer tumors in mice

Researchers identify unique mechanism to suppress colorectal cancer tumors in mice

A new scientific study has identified why colorectal cancer cells depend on a specific nutrient, and a way to starve them of it. Over one million men and women are living with colorectal cancer in the United States. [More]
Study shows many nonmelanoma skin cancer patients still get sunburned

Study shows many nonmelanoma skin cancer patients still get sunburned

A recent study by researchers at Johns Hopkins concludes that a substantial number of people with a history of the most frequent kind of nonmelanoma skin cancers still get sunburned at the same rate as those without previous history, probably because they are not using sun-protective methods the right way or in the right amounts. [More]
Researcher aims to make early detection of melanoma faster, cheaper without need for biopsy

Researcher aims to make early detection of melanoma faster, cheaper without need for biopsy

Melanoma is a form of skin cancer that becomes dangerous when it spreads, but is treatable in its early stages. Doctors diagnose melanoma by cutting away a piece of a suspicious skin lesion -- a procedure known as a biopsy -- and testing it for malignant cells. [More]
UCLA scientists identify mechanisms of tumor resistance to immunotherapy in advanced melanoma

UCLA scientists identify mechanisms of tumor resistance to immunotherapy in advanced melanoma

UCLA researchers have for the first time identified mechanisms that determine how advanced melanoma can become resistant to immune checkpoint inhibitors, a discovery that could lead to the development of new and improved treatments for the deadliest type of skin cancer. [More]
FAU researchers aim to find new ways of detecting cancer micrometastases

FAU researchers aim to find new ways of detecting cancer micrometastases

What is the likelihood of a patient developing cancer again after having a tumour removed? This is the question that experts in medicine and medical informatics at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität aim to find answers to in a new research project in which they will be researching micrometastases that can form new tumours years after skin cancer, for example, has been treated successfully. [More]
New study finds no significant harm in melanoma screenings by primary care providers

New study finds no significant harm in melanoma screenings by primary care providers

A new study of more than 1,000 primary care melanoma screenings in the western Pennsylvania area in 2014 suggests that overall the practice complies with the old medical maxim to "first do no harm." [More]
Scientists detect first cell from which tumour grows in skin cancers

Scientists detect first cell from which tumour grows in skin cancers

Scientists have identified for the first time the 'cell of origin' - in other words, the first cell from which the cancer grows - in basal cell carcinoma, the most common form of skin cancer, and followed the chain of events that lead to the growth of these invasive tumours. [More]
Researchers identify non-coding RNA NEAT1 as potential drug target to combat cancer

Researchers identify non-coding RNA NEAT1 as potential drug target to combat cancer

A team of researchers led by professor Jean-Christophe Marine has identified NEAT1, a non-coding RNA, as a potential therapeutic target in the fight against cancer. [More]
Study helps identify traits that may cause elders to need help with medications

Study helps identify traits that may cause elders to need help with medications

As age increases, older adults can develop problems taking their medications. But until now, few studies have examined the traits that might cause elders to need help with their medications, or how widespread a problem this might be. [More]
Women working long hours may be working themselves sick

Women working long hours may be working themselves sick

Research published this week shows that women working long hours for many years are at increased risk of developing life-threatening illnesses. Diabetes, cancer, heart trouble and arthritis were three times more common among women who worked an average of 60 hours or more per week for 30 years compared with women working fewer hours. [More]
Long work hours may triple risk of life-threatening illnesses in women

Long work hours may triple risk of life-threatening illnesses in women

Women who put in long hours for the bulk of their careers may pay a steep price: life-threatening illnesses, including heart disease and cancer. [More]
Interdisciplinary approach to improve cancer treatments

Interdisciplinary approach to improve cancer treatments

Whether it focuses on determining why certain cancers develop drug resistance, finding a way to improve individual's immune systems or better understanding cancer cell evolution, fundamental scientific research will "stand up to cancer" with three new awards from the National Science Foundation. [More]
PCP screening could be effective way to improve early melanoma diagnosis

PCP screening could be effective way to improve early melanoma diagnosis

Skin cancer screenings performed by primary care physicians (PCPs) during routine office visits improve the detection of potentially deadly melanomas and find them in earlier stages, according to new research from the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. [More]
Gene dysregulation makes immune therapies less effective against metastatic melanoma

Gene dysregulation makes immune therapies less effective against metastatic melanoma

Patients who don't respond to treatments that use their own immune cells to destroy tumors, called tumor infiltrating lymphocytes, share changes in mechanisms that switch genes on or off in those cells, according to study results presented at the annual meeting of the American Society for Clinical Oncology on June 4 in Chicago. [More]
Researchers prove existence of olfactory receptor in pigment-producing skin cells

Researchers prove existence of olfactory receptor in pigment-producing skin cells

Researchers at Ruhr-Universität Bochum were the first ones to prove the existence of an olfactory receptor in pigment-producing cells in human skin, the so-called melanocytes. The team headed by Prof Dr Dr Dr habil. Hanns Hatt demonstrated that the violet-like scent Beta-Ionone can activate the receptor. [More]
New treatment shows promise against hard-to-treat eye cancer

New treatment shows promise against hard-to-treat eye cancer

Eye cancer took the life of author and neurologist Oliver Sacks last year, bringing attention to the rare and deadly disease. Scientists have tried to develop precision treatments against cancers like this one, but the mutations that cause them have proven difficult to block with drugs. [More]
Using proteomic mass spectrometry imaging to detect malignant melanoma: an interview with Stephen Turner

Using proteomic mass spectrometry imaging to detect malignant melanoma: an interview with Stephen Turner

Today, using anatomic pathology, the differences in appearance of a normal or a malignant lesion can be difficult to tell when just using light microscopy. [More]
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