Skin Cancer News and Research RSS Feed - Skin Cancer News and Research

Skin cancer is the most common type of cancer in the U.S. It occurs in more than a million people each year, including many older people. There are three main types of skin cancer: basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and melanoma. Of the three, melanoma is the most serious. Skin cancer occurs when abnormal cells form and multiply in an uncontrolled way in the epidermis, or abnormal cells from the epidermis invade the dermis of the skin. Basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and melanoma are skin cancers that are named for the epidermal cells from which they develop.
British Lung Foundation announces funding for IPF research

British Lung Foundation announces funding for IPF research

Britons are officially three times more likely to die of the incurable lung condition idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), than in a road accident. Despite this, the disease is so unheard of and underfunded in research doctors still don’t know what causes it. [More]
Mount Sinai and TJU researchers awarded grant for UM research

Mount Sinai and TJU researchers awarded grant for UM research

Uveal melanoma (UM) is the second most common type of skin cancer. Approximately 50 percent of patients will develop metastasis or spread of their cancer, most commonly to the liver. [More]
Study finds nonwhite transplant recipients at risk for skin cancer

Study finds nonwhite transplant recipients at risk for skin cancer

A new study from Drexel University College of Medicine suggests all organ transplant recipients, regardless of race, should receive routine, total-body screenings for skin cancer. [More]
Researchers discover how mineral ion leaked from dying tumour tissue stops work of immune cells

Researchers discover how mineral ion leaked from dying tumour tissue stops work of immune cells

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute in the USA and the Babraham Institute, UK, have discovered how a mineral ion leaked from tumour tissue as it dies acts to stop the work of anti-tumour immune cells. [More]
Diet high in calcium, low in lactose may decrease risk of ovarian cancer in African-American women

Diet high in calcium, low in lactose may decrease risk of ovarian cancer in African-American women

Research from Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey and and other U.S. health and academic institutions shows a diet high in calcium and low in lactose may reduce the risk of ovarian cancer in African-American women. [More]
Innovative procedure combining MRI and ultrasound can accurately diagnose prostate cancer

Innovative procedure combining MRI and ultrasound can accurately diagnose prostate cancer

New research confirms that an innovative procedure combining MRI and ultrasound to create a 3D image of the prostate can more accurately locate suspicious areas and help diagnose whether it's prostate cancer. [More]
Nanomechanical microcantilevers can quickly detect mutations in patients with malignant melanoma

Nanomechanical microcantilevers can quickly detect mutations in patients with malignant melanoma

Changes in the genetic make-up of tissue samples can be detected quickly and easily using a new method based on nanotechnology. [More]
Research findings pave way to better tailored treatment for oesophageal cancer

Research findings pave way to better tailored treatment for oesophageal cancer

Scientists have discovered that oesophageal cancer can be classified into three different subtypes, paving the way for testing targeted treatments tailored to patients' disease for the first time. [More]
Plastic surgeon from New Jersey shares lesser-known details about tummy tuck surgery

Plastic surgeon from New Jersey shares lesser-known details about tummy tuck surgery

A tummy tuck can dramatically improve a person's body contours, flattening and firming the belly, tightening muscles, and eliminating sagging skin, but for those of us who are not plastic surgeons, what goes into creating great tummy tuck results has largely remained a mystery—until now. [More]
People with albinism suffer severe discrimination and social stigmatization, study reveals

People with albinism suffer severe discrimination and social stigmatization, study reveals

People with albinism face major health problems, including skin cancer, involuntary eye movements, and poor eyesight. [More]
New MRI method detects low zinc levels to help identify healthy prostate tissue from cancer

New MRI method detects low zinc levels to help identify healthy prostate tissue from cancer

A novel MRI method that detects low levels of zinc ion can help distinguish healthy prostate tissue from cancer, UT Southwestern Medical Center radiologists have determined. [More]
Tel Aviv University researchers unravel how melanoma spreads to distant organs

Tel Aviv University researchers unravel how melanoma spreads to distant organs

In a landmark discovery, researchers at Tel Aviv University have unraveled the metastatic mechanism of melanoma, the most aggressive of all skin cancers. [More]
Young adult women support stricter regulations, but against total ban of indoor tanning

Young adult women support stricter regulations, but against total ban of indoor tanning

Most young adult women who regularly visit indoor tanning salons support the introduction of policies to make it safer, but are against a total ban. This is according to a study led by Darren Mays of Georgetown University Medical Center in the US, in the journal Translational Behavioral Medicine: Practice, Policy, Research, published by Springer. [More]
Cold plasma could help bones heal faster, study shows

Cold plasma could help bones heal faster, study shows

Cold plasma looks like the glow from the "Star Wars" blue light saber but this beam of energy, made of electrons that change polarity at micro-second or nanosecond speeds, could help bones heal faster, according to a study published August 11th in the Journal of Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine. [More]
Study sheds new light on how medical diagnostics can be enhanced by obtaining several opinions

Study sheds new light on how medical diagnostics can be enhanced by obtaining several opinions

Methods of collective intelligence can result in considerably more accurate medical diagnoses, but only under certain conditions. [More]
New study shows hedgehog signalling offers protection against colon cancer

New study shows hedgehog signalling offers protection against colon cancer

Many types of cancer are caused by gene mutations in the signalling pathways that control cell growth, such as the hedgehog signalling pathway. [More]
Research finding opens door to potential clinical approaches that may boost body's ability to battle cancer

Research finding opens door to potential clinical approaches that may boost body's ability to battle cancer

The microenvironment that supports a cancerous tumor also starves the immune cells that the body sends in to destroy the cancer, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute scientists revealed in a discovery that holds the potential to significantly boost the performance of breakthrough immunotherapy drugs. [More]
One in four dermatology nurses likely to be the only regular home visitor for patients, survey reveals

One in four dermatology nurses likely to be the only regular home visitor for patients, survey reveals

Almost one in four nurses reported that they were likely to be the only regular visitor for around half of the patients they see at home in a recent survey by the British Skin Foundation. [More]
Researchers develop new approach for visualizing oxygen in tissue

Researchers develop new approach for visualizing oxygen in tissue

Learning how to look inside a body without having to cut it open is still an important part of medical research. One of the great challenges in imaging remains the visualization of oxygen in tissue. [More]
Study shows patients with skin of color less likely to survive melanoma

Study shows patients with skin of color less likely to survive melanoma

Because Caucasians have a higher skin cancer risk than the general population, people with skin of color may believe that they don't need to be concerned about this disease — but new research reveals this to be a dangerous misconception. [More]
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