Skin Cancer News and Research RSS Feed - Skin Cancer News and Research

Skin cancer is the most common type of cancer in the U.S. It occurs in more than a million people each year, including many older people. There are three main types of skin cancer: basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and melanoma. Of the three, melanoma is the most serious. Skin cancer occurs when abnormal cells form and multiply in an uncontrolled way in the epidermis, or abnormal cells from the epidermis invade the dermis of the skin. Basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and melanoma are skin cancers that are named for the epidermal cells from which they develop.
Men need to brush up on their knowledge of skin cancer

Men need to brush up on their knowledge of skin cancer

Skin cancer can affect anyone, regardless of age, race or gender. When it comes to skin cancer prevention and detection, however, it seems that men need to brush up on their knowledge. [More]
Curve along edge of tumor may play major role in cancer cell metastasis

Curve along edge of tumor may play major role in cancer cell metastasis

Only a few cells in a cancerous tumor are able to break away and spread to other parts of the body, but the curve along the edge of the tumor may play a large role in activating these tumor-seeding cells, according to a new University of Illinois study. [More]
Low levels of vitamin D, methylation in black teens may increase cancer risk

Low levels of vitamin D, methylation in black teens may increase cancer risk

Low levels of vitamin D in black teens correlates with low activity of a major mechanism for controlling gene expression that may increase their risk of cancer and other disease, researchers report. [More]
Scientists aim to identify marker that could indicate aggressive basal cell skin cancer

Scientists aim to identify marker that could indicate aggressive basal cell skin cancer

Most basal cell skin cancers are easily removed -- those on the arm, leg or back. But when the cancer is on the eyelid or when it starts to invade surrounding tissue, it's no longer straightforward. [More]
EADV's Global Call to Action urges policy makers to protect Europe’s outdoor workers from UV-induced skin cancer

EADV's Global Call to Action urges policy makers to protect Europe’s outdoor workers from UV-induced skin cancer

The European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology launched a Global Call to Action urging policy makers, employers, workers’ organisations and physicians to protect Europe’s outdoor workers from skin cancer caused by solar UV-radiation. [More]
PerkinElmer’s Phenoptics solution has potential to predict biomarker for anti-PD1 therapies for Merkel cell carcinoma

PerkinElmer’s Phenoptics solution has potential to predict biomarker for anti-PD1 therapies for Merkel cell carcinoma

PerkinElmer, Inc., a global leader focused on improving the health and safety of people and the environment, today announced that its Phenoptics™ quantitative pathology research system was an important component in skin cancer research published online in the April 19 edition of the New England Journal of Medicine. [More]
KEYNOTE-001 findings add support to pembrolizumab for advanced melanoma

KEYNOTE-001 findings add support to pembrolizumab for advanced melanoma

A third of patients with advanced or metastatic melanoma will achieve an objective response to treatment with the programmed cell death protein inhibitor pembrolizumab, suggest KEYNOTE-001 findings, regardless of whether they have previously been treated with ipilimumab. [More]
Immunotherapy drug pembrolizumab shrinks tumors in patients with Merkel cell carcinoma

Immunotherapy drug pembrolizumab shrinks tumors in patients with Merkel cell carcinoma

In a clinical trial of the immunotherapy drug pembrolizumab, half of 25 patients with a rare type of virus-linked skin cancer called Merkel cell carcinoma experienced substantial tumor shrinkage lasting nearly three times as long, on average, than with conventional chemotherapy. [More]
Mouse model can help identify new, more effective melanoma-preventing agents

Mouse model can help identify new, more effective melanoma-preventing agents

Application of sun protection factor 30 (SPF30) sunscreen prior to exposure to ultraviolet-B (UVB) light delayed melanoma onset in a mouse model of the disease, according to data from a team at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center Comprehensive Cancer Center - Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute. This data suggest that the mouse model can be used to identify new, more effective melanoma-preventing agents, according to principal investigator Christin Burd, PhD. [More]
Researchers identify protein that helps cancer cells to spread

Researchers identify protein that helps cancer cells to spread

Aggressive cancer cells spread from a tumour to another part of the body through the blood vessel. To be able get in and out of the blood vessel, the cancer cell needs to penetrate tissue. Researchers from The University of Bergen have discovered a protein that the cancer cell uses like scissors to cut up tissue, so it can spread from a tumour to a new organ. [More]

Bonn mathematicians develop new model for cancer immunotherapy

Mathematicians and physicians at the University of Bonn have developed a new model for immunotherapy of cancer. The method could help to develop new treatment strategies and to understand why some approaches do not work with certain tumors. The study is now appearing in the technical journal "Scientific Reports". [More]
Novel metabolic pathways help cancer cells thrive under certain conditions

Novel metabolic pathways help cancer cells thrive under certain conditions

Scientists at the Children's Medical Center Research Institute at UT Southwestern (CRI) have identified a novel metabolic pathway that helps cancer cells thrive in conditions that are lethal to normal cells. [More]
Aged tumor cells in melanoma behave in a different way than younger tumor cells

Aged tumor cells in melanoma behave in a different way than younger tumor cells

Cancer risk increases with one's age as accumulated damage to our cells and chronic inflammation occur over time. Now, an international team of scientists led by The Wistar Institute have shown that aged tumor cells in melanoma behave differently than younger tumor cells, according to study results published in the journal Nature. [More]
Research suggests ibuprofen does not increase bleeding risk after plastic surgery

Research suggests ibuprofen does not increase bleeding risk after plastic surgery

Patients are often instructed not to take ibuprofen and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs before or after surgery because of increased bleeding risk. But available evidence suggests that ibuprofen does not increase the risk of bleeding after plastic surgery procedures, according to a research review in the April issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons. [More]
Mom needs to get more vitamin D during second trimester to reduce child's asthma risk

Mom needs to get more vitamin D during second trimester to reduce child's asthma risk

The best way to reduce a child's chances of developing asthma might be making sure Mom had enough vitamin D during the second trimester, a new study from the University of Kansas shows. [More]

Outdoor workers in Europe at increased risk of developing non-melanoma skin cancer

There are almost 14.5 million workers in Europe, who spend at least 75% of their working time under the sun. [More]
Microneedle-embedded patch delivers cancer immunotherapy directly to melanoma

Microneedle-embedded patch delivers cancer immunotherapy directly to melanoma

Biomedical engineering researchers at North Carolina State University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have developed a technique that uses a patch embedded with microneedles to deliver cancer immunotherapy treatment directly to the site of melanoma skin cancer. In animal studies, the technique more effectively targeted melanoma than other immunotherapy treatments. [More]
TSRI scientists develop new process to synthesize naturally occurring compound phorbol

TSRI scientists develop new process to synthesize naturally occurring compound phorbol

In a landmark feat of chemical synthesis, scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have developed a 19-step process for making the naturally occurring compound phorbol in the laboratory, in quantities that are useful for pharmaceutical research. [More]
New research links active sun exposure habits of women with longer life expectancy

New research links active sun exposure habits of women with longer life expectancy

New research looks into the paradox that women who sunbathe are likely to live longer than those who avoid the sun, even though sunbathers are at an increased risk of developing skin cancer. [More]
UGA investigators find viable treatment for prostate cancer

UGA investigators find viable treatment for prostate cancer

Researchers at the University of Georgia have created a new therapeutic for prostate cancer that has shown great efficacy in mouse models of the disease. They published their findings recently in the journal Nanomedicine: Nanotechnology, Biology and Medicine. [More]
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