Skin Cancer News and Research RSS Feed - Skin Cancer News and Research

Skin cancer is the most common type of cancer in the U.S. It occurs in more than a million people each year, including many older people. There are three main types of skin cancer: basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and melanoma. Of the three, melanoma is the most serious. Skin cancer occurs when abnormal cells form and multiply in an uncontrolled way in the epidermis, or abnormal cells from the epidermis invade the dermis of the skin. Basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and melanoma are skin cancers that are named for the epidermal cells from which they develop.
Researchers find way to trigger 'virus alert' that may help boost drug's ability to prevent cancer cells

Researchers find way to trigger 'virus alert' that may help boost drug's ability to prevent cancer cells

Working with human cancer cell lines and mice, researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center and elsewhere have found a way to trigger a type of immune system "virus alert" that may one day boost cancer patients' response to immunotherapy drugs. An increasingly promising focus of cancer research, the drugs are designed to disarm cancer cells' ability to avoid detection and destruction by the immune system. [More]
New research finds five different types of prostate cancer

New research finds five different types of prostate cancer

New research has revealed that five different types of prostate cancer exist. How will this discovery change the outlook of prostate cancer screening? World renowned robotic prostate cancer surgeon, Dr. David Samadi, evaluates. [More]
PSMA PET imaging more precise than MR imaging for detection of high-grade prostate cancer lesions

PSMA PET imaging more precise than MR imaging for detection of high-grade prostate cancer lesions

A molecular imaging biomarker is able to detect fast-growing primary prostate cancer and distinguish it from benign prostate lesions, addressing an unmet clinical need. The new research, published in the July 2015 issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine, is significant for patients with suspected prostate cancer that has not been confirmed by standard biopsy. [More]
Hospira announces TGA approval of Inflectra (infliximab) for treatment of eight inflammatory conditions

Hospira announces TGA approval of Inflectra (infliximab) for treatment of eight inflammatory conditions

Hospira today announced that Inflectra (infliximab), the first monoclonal antibody (mAb) biosimilar therapy, has been registered in Australia. This registration paves the way for the Federal Government to reduce the cost of some of the most expensive medicines on the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS). [More]
Oncolytic virotherapy lends benefits to melanoma patients

Oncolytic virotherapy lends benefits to melanoma patients

Recent study published online by Melanoma Research journal indicates that melanoma patients would significantly benefit from prolonging the survival with oncolytic viroherapy treatment. The study revealed that the early stage melanoma patients treated with oncolytic medicine Rigvir were 4 to 6 times more likely to survive than those who following the current guidelines for the treatment of melanoma were only observed. [More]
First patient enrolled in Phase II trial of ImmunoPulse IL-12 and pembrolizumab combination therapy

First patient enrolled in Phase II trial of ImmunoPulse IL-12 and pembrolizumab combination therapy

OncoSec Medical Incorporated, a company developing DNA-based intratumoral cancer immunotherapies, today announced enrollment of the first patient into the Phase II Investigator Sponsored Trial led by the University of California, San Francisco to assess the anti-tumor activity, safety, and tolerability of the combination of OncoSec's investigational therapy, ImmunoPulse IL-12, and Merck's approved anti-PD-1 agent, KEYTRUDA (pembrolizumab), in patients with unresectable metastatic melanoma. [More]
Organ transplant recipients more likely to develop melanoma

Organ transplant recipients more likely to develop melanoma

Organ transplant recipients are twice as likely to develop melanoma as people who do not undergo a transplant, and three times more likely to die of the dangerous skin cancer, suggests new research led by a Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health student. [More]
VTT develops miniature gas sensor for mobile devices to detect internal air problems

VTT develops miniature gas sensor for mobile devices to detect internal air problems

VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland has developed a miniature gas sensor that can be connected to mobile devices. Gas measurements made with smartphones will make activities such as the detection of internal air problems easier. In addition, sleep quality will be measurable with greater precision, using mobile healthcare applications which gauge carbon dioxide quantities. [More]
Five sun-blocking superheroes teach preschoolers about sun safety

Five sun-blocking superheroes teach preschoolers about sun safety

Five globe-trotting, sun-blocking superheroes teach preschoolers about lifelong sun safety in a new curriculum available this summer based on research at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. [More]
Discovery may lead to new ways to diagnose, treat brain cancer

Discovery may lead to new ways to diagnose, treat brain cancer

Researchers at the Virginia Bioinformatics Institute have uncovered a link between the genomes of cells originating in the neural crest and development of tumors — a discovery that could lead to new ways to diagnose and treat cancer. [More]
CRI commits $29.3 million in new funds to accelerate development of cancer immunotherapies

CRI commits $29.3 million in new funds to accelerate development of cancer immunotherapies

The Cancer Research Institute, a nonprofit organization dedicated to fueling the discovery and development of immunotherapies for all forms of cancer, announced that it has committed more than $29.3 million in new funds to accelerate cancer immunology research and cancer immunotherapy clinical development in the United States, Australia, Canada, France, Sweden, Switzerland, and The Netherlands. [More]
Research: Failure to control early, localized prostate cancer leads to poor clinical outcome

Research: Failure to control early, localized prostate cancer leads to poor clinical outcome

Failure to control early, localized prostate cancer results in a poor clinical outcome, according to research published in the International Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics. [More]
Soldiers returning from combat missions in Iraq and Afghanistan at increased risk of skin cancer

Soldiers returning from combat missions in Iraq and Afghanistan at increased risk of skin cancer

Soldiers who served in the glaring desert sunlight of Iraq and Afghanistan returned home with an increased risk of skin cancer, due not only to the desert climate, but also a lack of sun protection, Vanderbilt dermatologist Jennifer Powers, M.D., reports in a study published recently in the Journal of Investigative Dermatology. [More]
New Tel Aviv University study sheds light on precise trigger of deadly melanoma

New Tel Aviv University study sheds light on precise trigger of deadly melanoma

Skin cancer is the most common of all cancers, and melanoma, which accounts for 2% of skin cancer cases, is responsible for nearly all skin cancer deaths. Melanoma rates in the US have been rising rapidly over the last 30 years, and although scientists have managed to identify key risk factors, melanoma's modus operandi has eluded the world of medical research. [More]
New study on photoaging could minimize risk of skin cancer

New study on photoaging could minimize risk of skin cancer

While all human organs undergo normal, chronological aging, human skin undergoes an additional type of aging because of its direct contact with the environment. [More]

One sunburn increases risk of skin cancer by 50%

Everybody's got a story about that "one bad burn" - the time you fell asleep next to the pool and tattooed a white handprint on your lobster-red chest, or forgot to pack the sunscreen while hiking a Colorado 14er. [More]
Vismodegib therapy effective against medulloblastoma

Vismodegib therapy effective against medulloblastoma

A targeted therapy already used to treat advanced skin cancer is also effective against the most common subtype of the brain tumor medulloblastoma in adults and should be considered for treatment of newly diagnosed patients, according to research led by St. Jude Children's Research Hospital. [More]
Radiation from solar events too weak to cause birth defects down on Earth's surface

Radiation from solar events too weak to cause birth defects down on Earth's surface

Studies find airplane crews at high altitude are exposed to potentially harmful levels of radiation from cosmic rays. [More]
Yale researchers confirm NF1 gene as major player in development of skin cancer

Yale researchers confirm NF1 gene as major player in development of skin cancer

A multidisciplinary team at Yale, led by Yale Cancer Center members, has defined a subgroup of genetic mutations that are present in a significant number of melanoma skin cancer cases. Their findings shed light on an important mutation in this deadly disease, and may lead to more targeted anti-cancer therapies. [More]
Novartis announces FDA approval of Odomzo (sonidegib) 200 mg capsules for treatment of laBCC patients

Novartis announces FDA approval of Odomzo (sonidegib) 200 mg capsules for treatment of laBCC patients

Novartis today announced the US Food and Drug Administration has approved Odomzo (sonidegib, formerly LDE225) 200 mg capsules for the treatment of adult patients with locally advanced basal cell carcinoma (laBCC) that has recurred following surgery or radiation therapy, or those who are not candidates for surgery or radiation therapy. [More]
Advertisement