Skin Cancer News and Research RSS Feed - Skin Cancer News and Research

Skin cancer is the most common type of cancer in the U.S. It occurs in more than a million people each year, including many older people. There are three main types of skin cancer: basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and melanoma. Of the three, melanoma is the most serious. Skin cancer occurs when abnormal cells form and multiply in an uncontrolled way in the epidermis, or abnormal cells from the epidermis invade the dermis of the skin. Basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and melanoma are skin cancers that are named for the epidermal cells from which they develop.
Anti-TNF therapy linked to ‘modest’ extra SCC risk

Anti-TNF therapy linked to ‘modest’ extra SCC risk

A Swedish population-based study shows that treatment with tumour necrosis factor inhibitors significantly increases the risk of developing squamous cell carcinoma, but not basal cell carcinoma, in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. [More]
Study looks at post-treatment resources for prostate cancer patients transitioning to survivorship

Study looks at post-treatment resources for prostate cancer patients transitioning to survivorship

The System Partner of Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Meridian Health is joining forces with Rutgers Cancer Institute in offering access to a research study aimed at prostate cancer patients who are transitioning to survivorship. [More]
To reduce skin cancer risk, Vitamin D deficient Aussies should supplement

To reduce skin cancer risk, Vitamin D deficient Aussies should supplement

Health pioneers BetterYou are advising those looking to boost their levels of the ‘sunshine vitamin’ to supplement orally as a safer alternative to lengthy UV exposure. [More]
New process for altering ingredients in sunscreen enables the body to produce vitamin D

New process for altering ingredients in sunscreen enables the body to produce vitamin D

For the first time researchers have developed a process for altering the ingredients in a sunscreen that does not impact its sun protection factor (SPF), but does allow the body to produce vitamin D. The findings, published in the peer reviewed journal PLOS ONE, has led to the production of a new sunscreen called Solar D. [More]
MGH study may lead to first nonsurgical treatment for seborrheic keratoses

MGH study may lead to first nonsurgical treatment for seborrheic keratoses

An investigation into the molecular mechanisms responsible for the most common type of benign skin lesion may lead to the first nonsurgical treatment for the growths called seborrheic keratoses (SKs), which in addition to being cosmetically unattractive are often worrisome to patients. [More]
Sirolimus chemoprevention supported in organ transplant recipients

Sirolimus chemoprevention supported in organ transplant recipients

In solid-organ transplant recipients diagnosed with cancer post-transplant, treatment with sirolimus reduces the risk of developing a subsequent skin cancer, US investigators report in JAMA Dermatology. [More]
Access for new melanoma treatment remains uncertain for patients despite UK launch

Access for new melanoma treatment remains uncertain for patients despite UK launch

Novartis announced today that Tafinlar (dabrafenib) + Mekinist (trametinib), the first oral combination therapy to be licensed for advanced melanoma, is now available in the UK for the treatment of adult patients with unresectable or metastatic melanoma with a BRAF V600 mutation. [More]
Study provides evidence for use of inherited genetic markers to improve melanoma prognostication

Study provides evidence for use of inherited genetic markers to improve melanoma prognostication

Melanoma is the most dangerous and lethal form of skin cancer. But just how long will a patient survive following the removal of a melanoma tumor? A more definitive answer to that question could come from new studies at NYU Langone Medical Center and its Laura and Isaac Perlmutter Cancer Center. Researchers there have discovered an inherited genetic marker that might provide clinicians with a personalized tool to gauge an individual's survival and determine which patients require closer monitoring in the years following surgery. [More]
Rockefeller University researchers identify new mechanism involved in early stem cell development

Rockefeller University researchers identify new mechanism involved in early stem cell development

Stem cells work throughout our lives as a sort of handyman, repairing damaged tissues and renewing some normal ones, like the skin we shed. Scientists have come to understand much about how stem cells function when we are adults, but less is known about where these stem cells come from to begin with, as an embryo is developing. [More]
Physicians may soon have new tool to closely track severity, potential spread of metastatic melanoma

Physicians may soon have new tool to closely track severity, potential spread of metastatic melanoma

Physicians treating patients with metastatic melanoma — one of the most aggressive forms of skin cancer — may soon have a superior tool in their efforts to closely track the disease. [More]
Wistar Institute scientists use revolutionary method to block melanoma progression

Wistar Institute scientists use revolutionary method to block melanoma progression

Melanoma patients who receive treatment with targeted therapies experience an initial response that feels like a cure, but that early excitement is quickly dampened when patients relapse as their cancers find alternative pathways in our cells to grow and spread. With melanoma so good at escaping targeted treatments, there's a dire need to halt these cancers in their tracks to prolong good responses and promote longer, healthier lives. [More]
FAU study shows benefits of regular mammography among elder women

FAU study shows benefits of regular mammography among elder women

Breast cancer is the second most common cancer in women after skin cancer and occurred in 230,000 women in the United States in 2015. Breast cancer afflicts 1 in 8 women in their lifetime and 1 in 25 die from this disease. [More]
New study finds familial risk and heritability of cancer among twins

New study finds familial risk and heritability of cancer among twins

A large new study of twins has found that having a twin sibling diagnosed with cancer poses an excess risk for the other twin to develop any form of cancer. Among the 23 different types of cancer studied, an excess familial risk was seen for almost all of the cancers, including common cancers such as breast and prostate cancer, but also more rare cancers such as testicular cancer, head and neck cancer, melanoma, ovarian and stomach cancer. [More]
One orgasm a day may reduce risk for prostate cancer

One orgasm a day may reduce risk for prostate cancer

According to a new study, one orgasm a day could reduce a man's risk for prostate cancer. Researchers claim that while an orgasm provides pleasure during sex, it may also reduce the risk for prostate cancer. It also provides a number of health benefits such as a boost in your immunity, better sleep, and can even protect against heart disease. [More]

Rutgers scientist provides insight into risks associated with using tanning bed

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has proposed a ban on tanning bed use by those under 18. In 2013, a law was enacted in New Jersey banning those under the age of 17 from using tanning beds. Jerod L. Stapleton, PhD, is a behavioral scientist at Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey and assistant professor of medicine at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, whose research aims to understand why young people frequently engage in indoor tanning. [More]
Study paves way for development of novel cancer therapeutics

Study paves way for development of novel cancer therapeutics

A team of scientists, comprising researchers from the Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology, a research institute under the Agency for Science, Technology and Research, Singapore, and the VIB Laboratory of Molecular Cancer Biology, has revealed the mechanism by which tumor cells elevate levels of MDM4, a protein that is highly expressed in cancer cells but not in normal adult tissues. [More]
Array BioPharma reports top-line results from binimetinib Phase 3 trial in patients with NRAS-mutant melanoma

Array BioPharma reports top-line results from binimetinib Phase 3 trial in patients with NRAS-mutant melanoma

Array BioPharma today reported top-line results from the ongoing Phase 3 clinical trial of binimetinib in patients with advanced NRAS-mutant melanoma, known as the NEMO trial. The study met its primary endpoint of improving progression-free survival (PFS) compared with dacarbazine treatment. [More]

African American men with clinical chronic prostatitis have lower risk of prostate cancer

According to a new study, African American men with clinical chronic prostatitis have a significantly lower risk of prostate cancer. [More]
New three-drug delivery system shows promise for treatment of metastatic melanoma

New three-drug delivery system shows promise for treatment of metastatic melanoma

Researchers have developed a new three-drug delivery system for cancer treatment, especially metastatic melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer - and shown that the system may have particular value with cancers like this that often spread through the lymphatic system. [More]
Dietary sugar may help to treat melanoma

Dietary sugar may help to treat melanoma

New research from scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (SBP) suggests that a rare sugar found in seaweed, mushrooms, seeds and other foods may be able to help treat skin cancer. [More]
Advertisement