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Study shows one in five individuals from U.S. military sample have obesity

Study shows one in five individuals from U.S. military sample have obesity

Despite being held to stringent weight and body fat standards, newly published research shows that one in five individuals from a sample of U.S. military personnel from 2001 - 2008 have obesity. [More]
U-M researchers explore new way to improve cognitive issues in MS patients

U-M researchers explore new way to improve cognitive issues in MS patients

Multiple sclerosis looks different from person to person. In many individuals, though, the difficulty in maintaining a sense of self and in keeping up intellectually can be the disease's most devastating manifestations. [More]
New, implantable device offers promise for patients with OSA

New, implantable device offers promise for patients with OSA

Since the 1980s, continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) - in which positive pressure is pushed through the nasal airways to help users breathe while sleeping - has been by far the most widely used treatment for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). [More]
Robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy may reduce risk of blood loss, prolonged hospital stays in obese men

Robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy may reduce risk of blood loss, prolonged hospital stays in obese men

In obese prostate cancer patients, robotic-assisted surgery to remove the prostate reduces the risk of blood loss and prolonged hospital stays, a Loyola Medicine study has found. [More]
Researchers design questionnaire to screen CP patients for sleep apnea

Researchers design questionnaire to screen CP patients for sleep apnea

When people think of sleep disorders such as obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), images of middle aged adults likely come to mind. However, a recent study by Gillette Children's Specialty Healthcare sheds light on another population of people who are affected by the disorder: children who have cerebral palsy (CP). [More]
OSA patients may have 1.57 times more MACCE risk afer unplanned revascularization

OSA patients may have 1.57 times more MACCE risk afer unplanned revascularization

In an ongoing prospective study involving 1,311 patients from five nations, researchers found that untreated obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) was associated with increased risk of a Major Adverse Cardiac and Cerebrovascular Event (MACCE) -- cardiovascular death, non-fatal myocardial infarction (heart attack), non-fatal stroke, and unplanned revascularization such as heart bypass surgery and angioplasty. [More]
Severe obstructive sleep apnea may increase likelihood of cognitive deficits in children

Severe obstructive sleep apnea may increase likelihood of cognitive deficits in children

Sleep assessments in young children showed that, in the context of habitual snoring and enlarged tonsils and adenoids, moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea increased the likelihood and magnitude of cognitive deficits. [More]
Myocardial fibrosis linked to adverse cardiovascular outcomes in OSA patients

Myocardial fibrosis linked to adverse cardiovascular outcomes in OSA patients

Myocardial fibrosis could be a future therapeutic target after researchers found it correlated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) referred for cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR). [More]
Wolff-Parkinson-White patients continue to have atrial fibrillation risk even after catheter ablation, study finds

Wolff-Parkinson-White patients continue to have atrial fibrillation risk even after catheter ablation, study finds

Patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome who receive catheter ablation to cure their abnormal heart rhythms are just as likely as non-ablated patients to develop atrial fibrillation no matter what age they receive ablation, according to a new study. [More]
Endocrine Society urges physicians to increase screening for primary aldosteronism

Endocrine Society urges physicians to increase screening for primary aldosteronism

The Endocrine Society today issued a Clinical Practice Guideline calling on physicians to ramp up screening for primary aldosteronism, a common cause of high blood pressure. [More]
Nocturnal hypoxemia closely linked to diabetic microvascular complications

Nocturnal hypoxemia closely linked to diabetic microvascular complications

Examining the poorly understood link between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and type 2 diabetes complications, researchers identified specific measures of low blood oxygenation that are associated with impaired kidney function and diabetic nephropathy. [More]
MAILES study finds link between fatty diets and sleep

MAILES study finds link between fatty diets and sleep

University of Adelaide researchers have found that men who consume diets high in fat are more likely to feel sleepy during the day, to report sleep problems at night, and are also more likely to suffer from sleep apnea. [More]
Drexel study provides new insight into future treatment of breathing disorders

Drexel study provides new insight into future treatment of breathing disorders

Bringing a steady supply of fresh air to the lungs can seem like a simple task, but breathing is a careful orchestration of brain and body. [More]
Harvard University scientists develop paper-based electrical sensor to monitor a person's respiration rate

Harvard University scientists develop paper-based electrical sensor to monitor a person's respiration rate

A simple but effective sensor for monitoring the respiration rate of individuals has been created. Taking advantage of the hygroscopic character of ordinary paper, scientists at Harvard University have developed an electrical sensor to detect the periodic changes of humidity by breathing in and out. [More]
Crash risk higher among truck drivers not adhering to sleep apnea treatment

Crash risk higher among truck drivers not adhering to sleep apnea treatment

Truck drivers who have obstructive sleep apnea and who do not attempt to adhere to a mandated treatment program have a fivefold increase in the risk of a severe crash, according to a new study co-authored by Virginia Tech Transportation Institute researchers and featured in the March 21 online edition of the journal Sleep. [More]
Daylight saving time can increase stroke risk, study reveals

Daylight saving time can increase stroke risk, study reveals

A recent study out of Finland found the overall rate for stroke was 8% higher in the two days after daylight saving time. Individuals with cancer were 25% more likely to have a stroke during that time, and people older than 65 were 20% more likely to have a stroke. [More]
People with type 2 diabetes, OSA may not experience improved glycemic control with CPAP

People with type 2 diabetes, OSA may not experience improved glycemic control with CPAP

People with type 2 diabetes and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) may not experience improved glycemic control by using continuous positive airway pressure, or CPAP, as some studies have suggested, according to the results of a randomized, controlled trial published online ahead of print in the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. [More]
Vanderbilt sleep specialist provides important tips for easing into seasonal time change

Vanderbilt sleep specialist provides important tips for easing into seasonal time change

The Monday after daylight saving time takes effect doesn't have to be a heart-stressed, mad-dash, car-crash kind of a day. [More]
Oversized tonsils and tongue indentations increase risk for OSA

Oversized tonsils and tongue indentations increase risk for OSA

According to a new study led by University at Buffalo orthodontic researcher Thikriat Al-Jewair, dentists are in the unique position as health care professionals to pinpoint signs of obstructive sleep apnea, a disorder in which breathing repeatedly stops and starts during sleep due to blocked upper airways [More]
Sleeping too much or too little increases risk of dying from heart disease

Sleeping too much or too little increases risk of dying from heart disease

Too much or too little sleep is linked with an increased risk of certain types of cardiovascular disease. Women and the elderly are particularly at risk.Sleeping less than four hours or more than eight hours a night increases the risk of dying from some types of coronary heart disease, such as heart attacks and unstable angina pectoris, according to a study by Norwegian and Taiwanese researchers. [More]
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