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University of Oslo researchers find the cause of coeliac disease

University of Oslo researchers find the cause of coeliac disease

Professor Ludvig M. Sollid and his colleagues at the University of Oslo have found the cause of coeliac disease. To do so required really going into depth, right down to molecular level. [More]
Spouses & Relatives Of Celiac Disease Patients At Risk For Autoimmune Diseases

Spouses & Relatives Of Celiac Disease Patients At Risk For Autoimmune Diseases

Both spouses and first-degree relatives of patients with celiac disease are at increased risk of nonceliac autoimmune disease, according to a study in the July issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, the official clinical practice journal of the American Gastroenterological Association. This risk represents a mixture of genetic, environmental and ascertainment bias mechanisms. [More]
Small intestine causes chronic inflammation in obese patients

Small intestine causes chronic inflammation in obese patients

Obesity is caused by numerous and complex factors, some of which are as yet unsuspected. Scientists from the CNRS, INSERM, UPMC and Université Paris Descartes, working with research clinicians from Paris Public Hospitals (AP-HP) have now shown that severe obesity is accompanied by inflammation of the small intestine and enhanced immune response in that region. [More]
Celimmune to provide oral presentation on AMG 714 antibody at 16th International Coeliac Disease Symposium

Celimmune to provide oral presentation on AMG 714 antibody at 16th International Coeliac Disease Symposium

Celimmune LLC, a clinical development-stage immunotherapy company focused on treating and preventing autoimmune diseases, announced today that Dr. Francisco Leon, CEO and Chief Medical Officer, will provide an oral presentation on an abstract related to the company's lead product candidate, AMG 714, at the 16th International Coeliac Disease Symposium, June 24, 2015, in Prague, Czech Republic. [More]
CHLA researchers provide new hope for infants with short bowel syndrome

CHLA researchers provide new hope for infants with short bowel syndrome

Investigators at Children's Hospital Los Angeles are providing new hope for babies with short bowel syndrome (SBS) by developing a novel model of SBS in zebrafish, described in a paper published online on June 18 by the American Journal of Physiology-Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology. [More]
Nutrinia's NTRA-9620 granted FDA orphan drug designation for treatment of short bowel syndrome

Nutrinia's NTRA-9620 granted FDA orphan drug designation for treatment of short bowel syndrome

Nutrinia, developing therapies to treat rare gastrointestinal disorders, announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) granted orphan drug designation for the company's orally-administered drug for treating short bowel syndrome (SBS) in patients of all ages. Nutrinia plans to begin a pivotal clinical trial in this indication. [More]
NGS mutational testing can help detect patients with Barrett's esophagus

NGS mutational testing can help detect patients with Barrett's esophagus

Barrett's esophagus (BE) develops in a subset of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and can increase the risk of developing cancer of the esophagus. Although periodic surveillance for cancer is recommended for BE patients, these examinations may fail to identify pre-cancerous dysplasia and early cancers. [More]
Mistakes in mismatch repair genes may accurately predict response to certain immunotherapy drugs

Mistakes in mismatch repair genes may accurately predict response to certain immunotherapy drugs

In a report of a proof-of-principle study of patients with colon and other cancers for whom standard therapies failed, researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center say that mistakes in so-called mismatch repair genes, first identified by Johns Hopkins and other scientists two decades ago, may accurately predict who will respond to certain immunotherapy drugs known as PD-1 inhibitors. Such drugs aim to disarm systems developed by cancer cells to evade detection and destruction by immune system cells. [More]
Canadian government improves access to gluten-free diets to mark Celiac Awareness Month

Canadian government improves access to gluten-free diets to mark Celiac Awareness Month

To mark Celiac Awareness Month, the Honourable Rona Ambrose, Minister of Health today announced changes that will result in more safe food choices for Canadians with celiac disease by approving "gluten-free" claims on specially produced oats and foods containing these oats. [More]
Risk prediction model can help target hepatitis C treatment to patients with most urgent need

Risk prediction model can help target hepatitis C treatment to patients with most urgent need

A team of researchers at the University of Michigan Health System has developed a risk prediction model that helps identify which hepatitis C patients have the most urgent need for new anti-viral drugs. [More]
Patients want to take more active role in decision-making process, study finds

Patients want to take more active role in decision-making process, study finds

Patients faced with a choice of surgical options want to engage their physicians and take a more active role in decision-making, according to a study (abstract 567) released at Digestive Disease Week 2015. [More]
UCB sponsoring several presentations on Cimzia for Crohn's disease at DDW 2015

UCB sponsoring several presentations on Cimzia for Crohn's disease at DDW 2015

UCB, a global biopharmaceutical company focusing on immunology and neurology treatment and research, is sponsoring several data presentations on Cimzia (certolizumab pegol) at Digestive Disease Week 2015, taking place in Washington, DC from May 16-19. [More]
Conjoined twin boys undergo successful separation surgery

Conjoined twin boys undergo successful separation surgery

Carter and Conner, conjoined twin boys born Dec. 12, 2014, in Jacksonville, Fla., underwent a successful separation surgery on May 7, 2015. The 12-hour surgery was led by a team of highly skilled pediatric specialists that included Daniel Robie, MD, chief of pediatric general surgery, and Nicholas Poulos, MD, pediatric general surgeon, for Nemours Children's Specialty Care and Wolfson Children's Hospital. [More]
Research highlights value of serological testing for Coeliac disease in anyone with symptoms

Research highlights value of serological testing for Coeliac disease in anyone with symptoms

Coeliac disease is one of the most common life-long conditions in Europe, yet many people remain undiagnosed and lengthy diagnostic delays may be putting lives at risk. Today, doctors are being urged to consider testing for Coeliac disease in anyone showing signs and symptoms of the condition and to consider screening everyone in high-risk groups. [More]
Bacterial imbalance in the gut can lead to inflammation similar to Crohn's disease

Bacterial imbalance in the gut can lead to inflammation similar to Crohn's disease

Crohn's disease is one of a family of chronic inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). While it has already been proven to have genetic causes, scientists have now shown that the presence of certain intestinal bacteria also plays a role. [More]
New treatment shows promise in easing symptoms of Parkinson's disease

New treatment shows promise in easing symptoms of Parkinson's disease

To date, a cure for Parkinson's disease remains elusive for the more than 50,000 Americans diagnosed yearly, despite decades of intensive study. But a newly approved treatment that might help ease the symptoms of Parkinson's has shown remarkable promise. [More]
Maternal diet during pregnancy and lactation may influence weight gain in offspring

Maternal diet during pregnancy and lactation may influence weight gain in offspring

Maternal diet during pregnancy and lactation may prime offspring for weight gain and obesity later in life, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers, who looked at rats whose mothers consumed a high-fat diet and found that the offspring's feeding controls and feelings of fullness did not function normally. [More]
Low-calorie rice could help potentially reduce obesity rates

Low-calorie rice could help potentially reduce obesity rates

Scientists have developed a new, simple way to cook rice that could cut the number of calories absorbed by the body by more than half, potentially reducing obesity rates, which is especially important in countries where the food is a staple. [More]
Scientists find strong association between MAIT lymphocytes and metabolic dysfunctions

Scientists find strong association between MAIT lymphocytes and metabolic dysfunctions

Scientists at Institut Cochin (CNRS/Inserm/Université Paris Descartes) and ICAN - Institute of Cardiometabolism And NutritionInserm/UPMC/AP-HP) have discovered that a class of inflammatory cells, MAIT lymphocytes1, is deregulated in patients suffering from type 2 diabetes and obesity. [More]
Scientists sequence genome of hookworm

Scientists sequence genome of hookworm

In an advance that may potentially lead to new treatments for parasitic hookworms, scientists at the University of Massachusetts Medical School and Cornell University have sequenced the genome of the hookworm, Ancylostoma ceylanicum. [More]
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