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Researchers map B cell response to non-gluten proteins of wheat in celiac disease

Researchers map B cell response to non-gluten proteins of wheat in celiac disease

Researchers at Columbia University Medical Center have found that, in addition to gluten, the immune systems of patients with celiac disease react to specific types of non-gluten protein in wheat. The results were reported online in the Journal of Proteome Research. [More]
New technique could help diagnose cancerous, pre-cancerous conditions

New technique could help diagnose cancerous, pre-cancerous conditions

Since the first "catalog" of the normal bacterial makeup of the human body was published in 2012, numerous connections between illness and disturbances in the human microbiota have been found. This week, scientists report yet another: Cancerous tumors in the ascending colon (the part nearest to the small intestine) are characterized by biofilms, which are dense clumps of bacterial cells encased in a self-produced matrix. [More]
Malnutrition predicts long-term survival in elderly patients undergoing Whipple procedure

Malnutrition predicts long-term survival in elderly patients undergoing Whipple procedure

Malnutrition is an important factor predicting long-term survival in older patients undergoing pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) (commonly called the Whipple procedure) to treat benign tumors and cysts of the pancreas as well as pancreatitis, according to new study results published in the December issue of the Journal of the American College of Surgeons. [More]
New technique measures antioxidant capacities of citrus juices

New technique measures antioxidant capacities of citrus juices

The antioxidant activity of citrus juices and other foods is undervalued. A new technique developed by researchers from the University of Granada for measuring this property generates values that are ten times higher than those indicated by current analysis methods. The results suggest that tables on the antioxidant capacities of food products that dieticians and health authorities use must be revised. [More]
Study compares rates of clinically recorded fertility problems in women with and without celiac disease

Study compares rates of clinically recorded fertility problems in women with and without celiac disease

Women with celiac disease present with fertility problems no more often than women in the general population, according to a new study in Gastroenterology, the official journal of the American Gastroenterological Association. [More]
Researchers warn that Vitamin A deficiency can cause eye problems

Researchers warn that Vitamin A deficiency can cause eye problems

Obese patients who have undergone bariatric surgery to shed weight should take the supplements prescribed to them to protect their eyes. Taking in too little Vitamin A, in particular, could in some cases actually cause night blindness, dry eyes, corneal ulcers, and in extreme cases total blindness. This advice comes from Rui Azevedo Guerreiro and Rui Ribeiro of the Centro Hospitalar de Lisboa Central in Portugal, who reviewed what little research there currently is on the occurrence of eye conditions following bariatric surgery. [More]
University of Chicago obtains GFFS certification from Gluten Intolerance Group

University of Chicago obtains GFFS certification from Gluten Intolerance Group

The University of Chicago has received certification from the Gluten Intolerance Group's Gluten-Free Food Service (GFFS) Accreditation Program for its medical center and campus food service operations. The designation makes UChicago one of three medical centers in the United States to carry the accreditation, and the only academic institution to do so for both its hospital and campus facilities. [More]
New research may help develop drug for celiac disease

New research may help develop drug for celiac disease

Celiac disease patients suffer from gluten intolerance and must adjust to a life without gluten from food sources like wheat, rye and barley. [More]

IntelliCap electronic oral drug delivery technology wins prestigious European ‘High-Tech Innovation Award’

The IntelliCap electronic oral drug delivery technology, created by medtech innovator Medimetrics, has won a prestigious European ‘High-Tech Innovation Award’ from Accenture, the global management consultancy. [More]
Adding ezetimibe to statin therapy reduces cardiovascular events

Adding ezetimibe to statin therapy reduces cardiovascular events

More than a decade ago, researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital demonstrated that a high dose statin, which lowered cholesterol further than a regular dose statin, provided better clinical outcomes. But questions remained about whether further reducing cholesterol would be even more effective in reducing cardiovascular-related events. [More]
World-first transitional pain program aims to stop chronic pain following surgery

World-first transitional pain program aims to stop chronic pain following surgery

A world-first transitional pain program that aims to stop pain from becoming chronic after surgery is being pioneered at Toronto General Hospital, University Health Network. [More]
SQI Diagnostics gets FDA clearance to market Celiac Panel in the US

SQI Diagnostics gets FDA clearance to market Celiac Panel in the US

SQI Diagnostics Inc. today announced that it has received notice that the United States Food and Drug Administration has cleared the Company to market its proprietary Celiac Panel in the United States (US). [More]
Surgical treatment of obesity, diabetes as safe as other commonly performed surgical procedures

Surgical treatment of obesity, diabetes as safe as other commonly performed surgical procedures

Laparoscopic gastric bypass surgery in patients with type 2 diabetes, once considered a high-risk procedure, carries a complication and mortality rate comparable to some of the safest and most commonly performed surgeries in America, including gallbladder surgery, appendectomy, and total knee replacement, according to new research from the Cleveland Clinic Bariatric and Metabolic Institute. [More]
Simple blood test may help spot pancreatic cancer

Simple blood test may help spot pancreatic cancer

Indiana University cancer researchers have found that a simple blood test might help diagnose pancreatic cancer, one of the most deadly forms of the disease. [More]
Obeticholic acid drug shows promise against bile acid diarrhoea

Obeticholic acid drug shows promise against bile acid diarrhoea

A pilot study testing a new type of drug in patients with chronic diarrhoea has shown promising effects on reducing their symptoms. [More]
Four out of ten children in Burkina Faso genetically resistant to virus strains

Four out of ten children in Burkina Faso genetically resistant to virus strains

Every year rotavirus causes half a million diarrhoea-related deaths amongst children in developing countries. Existing vaccines provide poor protection. The reason could be a widespread genetic resistance amongst children, according to virologists at Linköping University. [More]
UCSD researchers define epidemiology of gastrointestinal stromal tumors

UCSD researchers define epidemiology of gastrointestinal stromal tumors

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have, for the first time, clearly defined the epidemiology of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST), which occur primarily in the lining of the stomach and small intestine. [More]
Pinnacle initiates pivotal Phase 3 trial in Germany for rare form of bile duct cancer

Pinnacle initiates pivotal Phase 3 trial in Germany for rare form of bile duct cancer

Pinnacle Biologics, Inc., a subsidiary of Concordia Healthcare Corp., announced today the initiation of the pivotal Phase 3 trial (OPUS) in Germany for a rare form of bile duct cancer for which there is currently no acceptable therapy. [More]
First three recipients of inaugural Harry Winston Fellowships named

First three recipients of inaugural Harry Winston Fellowships named

Harry Winston, Inc. and the UCLA Children's Discovery and Innovation Institute have named the first three recipients of the inaugural Harry Winston Fellowships. [More]
Children who require long-term parenteral nutrition are at risk of IAFLD

Children who require long-term parenteral nutrition are at risk of IAFLD

Children who require long-term parenteral nutrition are at risk of a potentially devastating complication called intestinal failure-associated liver disease (IAFLD). The diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of IAFLD are discussed in a new position paper in the Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, official journal of the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition and the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition. [More]