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New review provides insights on rates, predictors of relapse after surgery in Crohn's disease patients

New review provides insights on rates, predictors of relapse after surgery in Crohn's disease patients

Some patients with Crohn's disease, a chronic inflammatory disease that affects the lining of the digestive tract, require surgery to remove part or all of the large intestine; however, surgery does not cure the condition and many patients relapse after surgery. [More]
New discovery could help reduce heart disease and boost nutrition security

New discovery could help reduce heart disease and boost nutrition security

A new discovery at the University of Queensland could help reduce heart disease and boost nutrition security - the access to balanced nourishment - globally. [More]
UT Austin researchers develop new oral capsule for treating hemophilia patients

UT Austin researchers develop new oral capsule for treating hemophilia patients

In the near future, hemophiliacs could be able to treat their disease by simply swallowing a capsule. [More]
MGH researchers uncover mechanism revealing why aspartame may not promote weight loss

MGH researchers uncover mechanism revealing why aspartame may not promote weight loss

A team of Massachusetts General Hospital investigators has found a possible mechanism explaining why use of the sugar substitute aspartame might not promote weight loss. [More]
Arthritis drug induces response and remission in patients with Crohn's disease, study finds

Arthritis drug induces response and remission in patients with Crohn's disease, study finds

Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine have shown that ustekinumab, a human antibody used to treat arthritis, significantly induces response and remission in patients with moderate to severe Crohn's disease. [More]
Researchers create tissue-engineered model of lung and trachea to study disease process

Researchers create tissue-engineered model of lung and trachea to study disease process

Scientists at Children's Hospital Los Angeles have developed a tissue-engineered model of lung and trachea which contains the diverse cell types present in the human respiratory tract. [More]
Iron fortification can reduce blood lead levels, study shows

Iron fortification can reduce blood lead levels, study shows

Lead is a toxic heavy metal that was added to petrol for use in cars until as recently as 25 years ago. It is particularly harmful to the developing brains of infants, children and teenagers, and the damage it does is irreversible. [More]
AMSBIO announces new edition of its popular organoid culture handbook

AMSBIO announces new edition of its popular organoid culture handbook

AMSBIO announces an extended and updated edition of its popular Organoid Culture Handbook. Launched at the EMBO Symposium on Organoids: Modelling Organ Development and Disease in 3D Culture, the new 24-page handbook includes valuable information about the latest available products, protocols, example results and research paper citations. [More]
Crohn's disease appears to have two distinct genetic subtypes, study finds

Crohn's disease appears to have two distinct genetic subtypes, study finds

Crohn's disease, a common inflammatory disorder of the intestinal tract, can have devastating consequences for a patient's quality of life and is notoriously hard to treat successfully, in part because its course and severity vary so much from one case to the next. [More]
Ludwig researchers shed more light on key requirement for function of regulatory T cells

Ludwig researchers shed more light on key requirement for function of regulatory T cells

A Ludwig Cancer Research study published online September 5th in Nature Immunology illuminates a key requirement for the function of regulatory T cells—immune cells that play a critical role in many biological processes, from suppressing inflammation and deadly autoimmunity to helping tumors evade immune attack. [More]
Mayo Clinic article provides better understanding on potentially devastating liver disease

Mayo Clinic article provides better understanding on potentially devastating liver disease

An article published today in the New England Journal of Medicine updates the medical community on a potentially devastating liver disease that afflicts approximately 29,000 Americans. [More]
Bile acid transporter inhibitors can prevent NASH in mice, study shows

Bile acid transporter inhibitors can prevent NASH in mice, study shows

Drugs that interfere with bile acid recycling can prevent several aspects of NASH (nonalcoholic steatohepatitis) in mice fed a high-fat diet, scientists from Emory University School of Medicine and Children's Healthcare of Atlanta have shown. [More]
Virginia Mason offers totally laparoscopic advanced surgery for removing tumors from pancreas

Virginia Mason offers totally laparoscopic advanced surgery for removing tumors from pancreas

Virginia Mason now offers the totally laparoscopic Whipple procedure as an advanced surgical option for removing tumors from the head of the pancreas. [More]
Enzyme from oral bacteria could be potential therapy for celiac disease

Enzyme from oral bacteria could be potential therapy for celiac disease

Researchers have isolated an enzyme from bacteria present in human saliva that has potential as a therapy for celiac disease (CD), an autoimmune disorder that causes severe digestive and other health problems among sufferers when they consume gluten. [More]
Researchers identify epigenetic mechanism causing aberrancies in coeliac disease

Researchers identify epigenetic mechanism causing aberrancies in coeliac disease

Researchers at the University of Tampere discovered a mechanism causing aberrancies in coeliac disease and colorectal cancer. [More]
New research may explain why people with blood group O get more severely ill from cholera

New research may explain why people with blood group O get more severely ill from cholera

People with blood type O often get more severely ill from cholera than people of other blood types. New research from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis may explain why. [More]
Engineered gut bacteria may one day help reduce negative health effects of obesity

Engineered gut bacteria may one day help reduce negative health effects of obesity

A new therapy that involves engineered gut bacteria may one day help reduce the health problems that come with obesity. Incorporating the engineered bacteria into the guts of mice both kept them from gaining weight and protected them against some of the negative health effects of obesity. [More]
QOL Medical to introduce new disease awareness-raising tool at WCPGHAN 2016

QOL Medical to introduce new disease awareness-raising tool at WCPGHAN 2016

QOL Medical, LLC announced today they will introduce a ground breaking hyper-targeted marketing tool at the 5th Annual World Congress of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, from October 5th-8th 2016 in Montreal, Canada. [More]
Scientists grow noroviruses in laboratory cultures of human intestinal epithelial cells

Scientists grow noroviruses in laboratory cultures of human intestinal epithelial cells

Human noroviruses - the leading viral cause of acute diarrhea around the world - have been difficult to study because scientists had not found a way to grow them in the lab. [More]
Researchers develop new method to culture norovirus in intestinal cells

Researchers develop new method to culture norovirus in intestinal cells

Researchers have succeeded in culturing norovirus in human intestinal cells, a breakthrough that could help scientists develop novel therapeutics and vaccines against the debilitating effects of the virus. [More]
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