Small Intestine News and Research RSS Feed - Small Intestine News and Research

QOL Medical to introduce new disease awareness-raising tool at WCPGHAN 2016

QOL Medical to introduce new disease awareness-raising tool at WCPGHAN 2016

QOL Medical, LLC announced today they will introduce a ground breaking hyper-targeted marketing tool at the 5th Annual World Congress of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, from October 5th-8th 2016 in Montreal, Canada. [More]
Scientists grow noroviruses in laboratory cultures of human intestinal epithelial cells

Scientists grow noroviruses in laboratory cultures of human intestinal epithelial cells

Human noroviruses - the leading viral cause of acute diarrhea around the world - have been difficult to study because scientists had not found a way to grow them in the lab. [More]
Researchers develop new method to culture norovirus in intestinal cells

Researchers develop new method to culture norovirus in intestinal cells

Researchers have succeeded in culturing norovirus in human intestinal cells, a breakthrough that could help scientists develop novel therapeutics and vaccines against the debilitating effects of the virus. [More]
AMSBIO introduces Organoid Progenitor Cells for use in gene editing techniques

AMSBIO introduces Organoid Progenitor Cells for use in gene editing techniques

AMSBIO has introduced Cultrex Organoid Progenitor Cells that have been derived from normal, healthy mouse small intestine tissue and are continuously cultured using Reduced Growth Factor BME R1 and BME 2. [More]
Researchers develop model to predict mortality risk for celiac disease patients

Researchers develop model to predict mortality risk for celiac disease patients

An international research team led by Mayo Clinic has developed a first-of-its-kind model to predict mortality in patients suffering from celiac disease (CD). [More]
Study finds biological basis for gastrointestinal symptoms in people with non-celiac wheat sensitivity

Study finds biological basis for gastrointestinal symptoms in people with non-celiac wheat sensitivity

A new study may explain why people who do not have celiac disease or wheat allergy nevertheless experience a variety of gastrointestinal and extra-intestinal symptoms after ingesting wheat and related cereals. [More]
Spinach-like nanoparticle juice may improve doctor's ability to examine gastrointestinal tract

Spinach-like nanoparticle juice may improve doctor's ability to examine gastrointestinal tract

The pigment that gives spinach and other plants their verdant color may improve doctors' ability to examine the human gastrointestinal tract. [More]
Researchers find main cause of necrotizing enterocolitis-related lung damage in preemies

Researchers find main cause of necrotizing enterocolitis-related lung damage in preemies

Johns Hopkins researchers report they have figured out a root cause of the lung damage that occurs in up to 10 percent of premature infants who develop necrotizing enterocolitis, a disorder that damages and kills the lining of the intestine. [More]
Study sheds new light on how overeating may lead to more eating

Study sheds new light on how overeating may lead to more eating

Research is finally beginning to shed light on some of the reasons that extra weight is difficult to shed permanently. Now, a new study has uncovered another method by which the gut senses how much food a person eats and relays that to the brain. [More]
Study highlights role of intestinal calcium absorption in kidney stone formation

Study highlights role of intestinal calcium absorption in kidney stone formation

Measuring intestinal calcium absorption may help to identify individuals who are prone to develop kidney stones, according to a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. [More]
New frozen faecal bank increases chances of curing a chronic health condition

New frozen faecal bank increases chances of curing a chronic health condition

A new frozen faecal bank that could save hundreds of lives and dramatically improve the quality of life of many more has been established at a Portsmouth hospital. [More]
High levels of secretin hormone may play vital role in management of chronic liver diseases

High levels of secretin hormone may play vital role in management of chronic liver diseases

High levels of a digestive hormone called secretin may play an important role in the management of certain chronic liver diseases, according to new research published in the journal Hepatology. These findings could result in new ways to treat cholestatic liver diseases, a condition that impairs the movement of bile, the fluid produced by the liver to digest fats. [More]
Celiac disease more common among Americans with Punjabi ancestry, study shows

Celiac disease more common among Americans with Punjabi ancestry, study shows

About 1.8 million Americans have celiac disease, an immune-based condition brought on by the consumption of gluten in genetically susceptible patients. Among patients diagnosed with celiac disease by small intestinal biopsy in the U.S., those from the Punjab region of India have the highest rates of disease, according to new research published in Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology,1 the official clinical practice journal of the American Gastroenterological Association. [More]
Researchers reveal how bile component taurine attracts Vibrio cholera

Researchers reveal how bile component taurine attracts Vibrio cholera

A group of researchers from Osaka University, Hosei University, and Nagoya University have revealed the molecular mechanism that Vibrio cholerae, the etiological agent of cholera, is attracted by bile. This group has also successfully detected the ligand binding to the bacteria chemoreceptor in vivo for the first time. These results may significantly advance research on mechanism and control of V. cholerae. [More]
Newly identified molecular pathway could lead to new treatments for reflux, incontinence disorders

Newly identified molecular pathway could lead to new treatments for reflux, incontinence disorders

Researchers at UMass Medical School have identified a new molecular pathway critical for maintaining the smooth muscle tone that allows the passage of materials through the digestive system. [More]
Researchers identify gene crucial to development of coeliac disease

Researchers identify gene crucial to development of coeliac disease

Coeliac disease is a chronic, immunological disease that is manifested as intolerance to gluten proteins present in wheat, rye and barley. This intolerance leads to an inflammatory reaction in the small intestine that hampers the absorption of nutrients. The only treatment is a strict, life-long, gluten-free diet. [More]
Certain malignant gastrointestinal stromal tumors more deadly than previously reported

Certain malignant gastrointestinal stromal tumors more deadly than previously reported

Researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have determined that certain gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are more deadly than previously reported in medical literature. Findings are published online in the Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery. [More]
Evolocumab could be more effective than ezetimibe in lowering cholesterol in statin-intolerant patients

Evolocumab could be more effective than ezetimibe in lowering cholesterol in statin-intolerant patients

In the first major trial of its kind, Cleveland Clinic researchers used a blinded rechallenge with atorvastatin or placebo to objectively confirm the presence of muscle-related symptoms in patients with a history of intolerance to multiple statins and found that evolocumab (a PCSK9 inhibitor) was a more effective option to lower cholesterol than ezetimibe in these patients. [More]
Mice with lymphatic defects develop obesity late in life

Mice with lymphatic defects develop obesity late in life

Lymphatic vessels play multifaceted roles in the body, including the absorption of dietary lipid in the intestines as well as the movement of immune cells throughout the body. Previous work by Guillermo Oliver and colleagues showed that mice with lymphatic defects due to loss of one copy of the Prox1 gene developed obesity late in life. [More]
Excessive growth of bacteria in small intestine could lead to stunting in young children

Excessive growth of bacteria in small intestine could lead to stunting in young children

Excessive growth of bacteria in the small intestine could be damaging the guts of young children, leading to stunting, scientists from the U.S. and Bangladesh have discovered. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement