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Gastric bypass surgery linked to long-term survival for patients over age 35

Gastric bypass surgery linked to long-term survival for patients over age 35

New research from Brigham Young University finds that patients who undergo gastric bypass surgery after the age of 35 see a major improvement in long-term survival. [More]
Alcohol appears to impair the body's ability to keep gut bacteria in check

Alcohol appears to impair the body's ability to keep gut bacteria in check

Alcohol itself can directly damage liver cells. Now researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine report evidence that alcohol is also harmful to the liver for a second reason — it allows gut bacteria to migrate to the liver, promoting alcohol-induced liver disease. [More]
BioLineRx's BL-7010 confirmed as Class IIb medical device in European Union

BioLineRx's BL-7010 confirmed as Class IIb medical device in European Union

BioLineRx Ltd., a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company dedicated to identifying, in-licensing and developing promising therapeutic candidates, announced today that it has received confirmation from the European Notified Body regarding the classification of BL-7010, a novel polymer for the treatment of celiac disease, as a Class IIb medical device in the European Union. [More]
First trials of smart gas sensing pills offer new clues for development of gut disorder treatments

First trials of smart gas sensing pills offer new clues for development of gut disorder treatments

Researchers have conducted the first ever trials of smart pills that can measure intestinal gases inside the body, with surprising results revealing some unexpected ways that fibre affects the gut. [More]
Cancer mortality continues to drop in the U.S.

Cancer mortality continues to drop in the U.S.

Steady reductions in smoking combined with advances in cancer prevention, early detection, and treatment have resulted in a 23% drop in the cancer death rate since its peak in 1991. The drop translates to more than 1.7 million cancer deaths averted through 2012. [More]
Common antibiotics can promote C. diff infections by killing off bile acid-altering microbes

Common antibiotics can promote C. diff infections by killing off bile acid-altering microbes

New research from North Carolina State University and the University of Michigan finds that bile acids which are altered by bacteria normally living in the large intestine inhibit the growth of Clostridium difficile, or C. diff. C. diff is a harmful bacterium that can cause painful and sometimes fatal infections. [More]
Drug-microbe interactions may contribute to adverse effects, lessen effectiveness of NSAID

Drug-microbe interactions may contribute to adverse effects, lessen effectiveness of NSAID

A nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) changed the composition and diversity of gut microbes, which in turn shaped how the drug is broken down and ultimately, cut its effectiveness, according to an animal study from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
Soligenix reports positive results from SGX942 Phase 2 trial in patients with head and neck cancer

Soligenix reports positive results from SGX942 Phase 2 trial in patients with head and neck cancer

Soligenix, Inc., a late-stage biopharmaceutical company focused on developing and commercializing products to treat rare diseases where there is an unmet medical need, announced today positive results in its Phase 2 clinical trial, in which SGX942, a first-in-class Innate Defense Regulator (IDR), at a dose of 1.5 mg/kg, successfully reduced the median duration of severe oral mucositis by 50% in all patients and by 67% in patients receiving the most aggressive chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for treatment of their head and neck cancer. [More]
Synthetic Biologics announces positive results from first SYN-004 Phase 2a study for prevention of CDI, AAD

Synthetic Biologics announces positive results from first SYN-004 Phase 2a study for prevention of CDI, AAD

Synthetic Biologics, Inc.), a clinical stage company focused on developing therapeutics to protect the gut microbiome while targeting pathogen specific diseases, announced positive topline results from the first Phase 2a study of SYN-004, the Company's candidate designed to protect the gut microbiome from the unintended effects of certain commonly used intravenous (IV) beta-lactam antibiotics for the prevention C. difficile infection (CDI) and antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD). [More]
New insulin pill shows promise as novel form of therapy for diabetes

New insulin pill shows promise as novel form of therapy for diabetes

An insulin pill being developed by researchers at UC Santa Barbara may in the near future give another blood sugar management option to those who suffer from diabetes. The novel drug delivery technology may also apply to a wide spectrum of other therapies. [More]
Intake of gluten increases risk of celiac disease in children

Intake of gluten increases risk of celiac disease in children

Intake of gluten up until two years of age increases risk of celiac disease at least two-fold in children with genetic risk factors for this disease, according a study published in Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology the official clinical practice journal of the American Gastroenterological Association. [More]
Study demonstrates efficacy of everolimus in treating nonfunctional neuroendocrine tumours of the lung

Study demonstrates efficacy of everolimus in treating nonfunctional neuroendocrine tumours of the lung

The results of the international, multicenter, Phase 3 RADIANT-4 study clearly demonstrate the efficacy of the agent everolimus in treating nonfunctional neuroendocrine tumours of lung or gastrointestinal origin. [More]
Study shows how dietary fatty acids affect development and progression of multiple sclerosis

Study shows how dietary fatty acids affect development and progression of multiple sclerosis

Dietary fatty acids affect the development and progression of autoimmune chronic-inflammatory diseases such as multiple sclerosis. In a collaborative study between the Departments of Neurology at the Ruhr-Universität Bochum (St. Josef-Hospital) and the Friedrich Alexander Universtiy Erlangen, researchers now found that long-chain fatty acids promote the development and propagation of CNS reactive immune cells in the intestinal wall. On the contrary, short-chain fatty acids promote the development and propagation of regulatory cells in the immune system. [More]
Study could lead to better understanding of metabolic processes behind type 2 diabetes

Study could lead to better understanding of metabolic processes behind type 2 diabetes

Scientists in Sweden have discovered that human intestinal flora regulates the levels of the body's main antioxidant, glutathione, which fights a host of diseases. The findings could lead to new probiotic-delivering foods, and a better understanding of the metabolic processes behind diseases such as type 2 diabetes. [More]
Research finding could lead to new treatments for celiac disease

Research finding could lead to new treatments for celiac disease

A team of researchers has discovered that bacteria found in the gut may contribute to the body's response to gluten, an important finding that could lead to new treatments for celiac disease. [More]
Gut microbiome can play significant role in the body's response to gluten

Gut microbiome can play significant role in the body's response to gluten

Investigators interested in celiac disease, a chronic gastrointestinal disorder caused by an immunologic response to the ingestion of gluten, have wondered why only 2% to 5% of genetically susceptible individuals develop the disease. [More]
New research highlights vitamin E needs for people with metabolic syndrome

New research highlights vitamin E needs for people with metabolic syndrome

New research shows that the estimated one-third of Americans who have a cluster of health problems that add up to metabolic syndrome don't absorb dietary vitamin E as effectively as healthy people. [More]
Mercy open new Endoscopy Suite to promote and practice gastrointestinal health

Mercy open new Endoscopy Suite to promote and practice gastrointestinal health

Mercy Medical Center has announced the opening of a new, state-of-the-art Endoscopy Suite to promote and practice gastrointestinal health. The unique, high-tech suite is located on the 2nd floor of Mercy's Mary Catherine Bunting Center at 345 St. Paul Place. Bunting Endoscopy will be under the direction of Dr. Paul J. Thuluvath, Medical Director of The Melissa L. Posner Institute for Digestive Health & Liver Disease at Mercy. [More]
Researchers develop new blood test to diagnose coeliac disease

Researchers develop new blood test to diagnose coeliac disease

Diagnosis of coeliac disease requires a tissue sample from the small intestine, which can be extremely unpleasant. Researchers at the Faculty of Medicine have developed a blood test which provides a rapid, painless answer. [More]
New cell type appears to drive life-threatening food allergies

New cell type appears to drive life-threatening food allergies

Researchers have discovered a new cell type that appears to drive life-threatening food allergies and may help explain why some people get severe allergic reactions and others do not. [More]
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