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New frozen faecal bank increases chances of curing a chronic health condition

New frozen faecal bank increases chances of curing a chronic health condition

A new frozen faecal bank that could save hundreds of lives and dramatically improve the quality of life of many more has been established at a Portsmouth hospital. [More]
High levels of secretin hormone may play vital role in management of chronic liver diseases

High levels of secretin hormone may play vital role in management of chronic liver diseases

High levels of a digestive hormone called secretin may play an important role in the management of certain chronic liver diseases, according to new research published in the journal Hepatology. These findings could result in new ways to treat cholestatic liver diseases, a condition that impairs the movement of bile, the fluid produced by the liver to digest fats. [More]
Celiac disease more common among Americans with Punjabi ancestry, study shows

Celiac disease more common among Americans with Punjabi ancestry, study shows

About 1.8 million Americans have celiac disease, an immune-based condition brought on by the consumption of gluten in genetically susceptible patients. Among patients diagnosed with celiac disease by small intestinal biopsy in the U.S., those from the Punjab region of India have the highest rates of disease, according to new research published in Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology,1 the official clinical practice journal of the American Gastroenterological Association. [More]
Researchers reveal how bile component taurine attracts Vibrio cholera

Researchers reveal how bile component taurine attracts Vibrio cholera

A group of researchers from Osaka University, Hosei University, and Nagoya University have revealed the molecular mechanism that Vibrio cholerae, the etiological agent of cholera, is attracted by bile. This group has also successfully detected the ligand binding to the bacteria chemoreceptor in vivo for the first time. These results may significantly advance research on mechanism and control of V. cholerae. [More]
Newly identified molecular pathway could lead to new treatments for reflux, incontinence disorders

Newly identified molecular pathway could lead to new treatments for reflux, incontinence disorders

Researchers at UMass Medical School have identified a new molecular pathway critical for maintaining the smooth muscle tone that allows the passage of materials through the digestive system. [More]
Researchers identify gene crucial to development of coeliac disease

Researchers identify gene crucial to development of coeliac disease

Coeliac disease is a chronic, immunological disease that is manifested as intolerance to gluten proteins present in wheat, rye and barley. This intolerance leads to an inflammatory reaction in the small intestine that hampers the absorption of nutrients. The only treatment is a strict, life-long, gluten-free diet. [More]
Certain malignant gastrointestinal stromal tumors more deadly than previously reported

Certain malignant gastrointestinal stromal tumors more deadly than previously reported

Researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have determined that certain gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are more deadly than previously reported in medical literature. Findings are published online in the Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery. [More]
Evolocumab could be more effective than ezetimibe in lowering cholesterol in statin-intolerant patients

Evolocumab could be more effective than ezetimibe in lowering cholesterol in statin-intolerant patients

In the first major trial of its kind, Cleveland Clinic researchers used a blinded rechallenge with atorvastatin or placebo to objectively confirm the presence of muscle-related symptoms in patients with a history of intolerance to multiple statins and found that evolocumab (a PCSK9 inhibitor) was a more effective option to lower cholesterol than ezetimibe in these patients. [More]
Mice with lymphatic defects develop obesity late in life

Mice with lymphatic defects develop obesity late in life

Lymphatic vessels play multifaceted roles in the body, including the absorption of dietary lipid in the intestines as well as the movement of immune cells throughout the body. Previous work by Guillermo Oliver and colleagues showed that mice with lymphatic defects due to loss of one copy of the Prox1 gene developed obesity late in life. [More]
Excessive growth of bacteria in small intestine could lead to stunting in young children

Excessive growth of bacteria in small intestine could lead to stunting in young children

Excessive growth of bacteria in the small intestine could be damaging the guts of young children, leading to stunting, scientists from the U.S. and Bangladesh have discovered. [More]
Researchers take major step towards developing a cystic fibrosis drug

Researchers take major step towards developing a cystic fibrosis drug

Researchers from Eindhoven University of Technology and McGill University in Montreal (Canada) have taken an important step towards developing a drug against cystic fibrosis. [More]
Isomaltulose more suitable than table sugar for people with type 2 diabetes

Isomaltulose more suitable than table sugar for people with type 2 diabetes

Potsdam-Rehbruecke - Like sucrose (table sugar), the natural disaccharide isomaltulose (PalatinoseTM) consists of glucose and fructose, but it is apparently more suitable for people with type 2 diabetes with regard to regulating blood glucose levels. [More]
Confirming nasogastric tube placement through an assay? An interview with Ian Fotheringham

Confirming nasogastric tube placement through an assay? An interview with Ian Fotheringham

Nasogastric tubes are placed directly into the stomach in order to feed or medicate patients. If an NG tube accidentally goes into the lung instead, which can happen, it can cause serious harm to the patient, with food, liquid or medication potentially entering the lung. [More]
Gastric bypass surgery linked to long-term survival for patients over age 35

Gastric bypass surgery linked to long-term survival for patients over age 35

New research from Brigham Young University finds that patients who undergo gastric bypass surgery after the age of 35 see a major improvement in long-term survival. [More]
Alcohol appears to impair the body's ability to keep gut bacteria in check

Alcohol appears to impair the body's ability to keep gut bacteria in check

Alcohol itself can directly damage liver cells. Now researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine report evidence that alcohol is also harmful to the liver for a second reason — it allows gut bacteria to migrate to the liver, promoting alcohol-induced liver disease. [More]
BioLineRx's BL-7010 confirmed as Class IIb medical device in European Union

BioLineRx's BL-7010 confirmed as Class IIb medical device in European Union

BioLineRx Ltd., a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company dedicated to identifying, in-licensing and developing promising therapeutic candidates, announced today that it has received confirmation from the European Notified Body regarding the classification of BL-7010, a novel polymer for the treatment of celiac disease, as a Class IIb medical device in the European Union. [More]
First trials of smart gas sensing pills offer new clues for development of gut disorder treatments

First trials of smart gas sensing pills offer new clues for development of gut disorder treatments

Researchers have conducted the first ever trials of smart pills that can measure intestinal gases inside the body, with surprising results revealing some unexpected ways that fibre affects the gut. [More]
Cancer mortality continues to drop in the U.S.

Cancer mortality continues to drop in the U.S.

Steady reductions in smoking combined with advances in cancer prevention, early detection, and treatment have resulted in a 23% drop in the cancer death rate since its peak in 1991. The drop translates to more than 1.7 million cancer deaths averted through 2012. [More]
Common antibiotics can promote C. diff infections by killing off bile acid-altering microbes

Common antibiotics can promote C. diff infections by killing off bile acid-altering microbes

New research from North Carolina State University and the University of Michigan finds that bile acids which are altered by bacteria normally living in the large intestine inhibit the growth of Clostridium difficile, or C. diff. C. diff is a harmful bacterium that can cause painful and sometimes fatal infections. [More]
Drug-microbe interactions may contribute to adverse effects, lessen effectiveness of NSAID

Drug-microbe interactions may contribute to adverse effects, lessen effectiveness of NSAID

A nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) changed the composition and diversity of gut microbes, which in turn shaped how the drug is broken down and ultimately, cut its effectiveness, according to an animal study from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
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