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Growth factors present in human breast milk may protect against intestinal damage

Growth factors present in human breast milk may protect against intestinal damage

Studies Suggest that ErbB4 Receptor Activation May Be a Novel Therapeutic Avenue for Intestinal Diseases Involving Epithelial Cell Death, According to Research Published in The American Journal of Pathology [More]
Breast milk may protect premature infants from intestinal destruction

Breast milk may protect premature infants from intestinal destruction

Premature infants are at increased risk for a potentially lethal gastrointestinal disease called necrotizing enterocolitis, or NEC. [More]
Case Western Reserve scientists discover leaky gut as source of non-AIDS complications

Case Western Reserve scientists discover leaky gut as source of non-AIDS complications

Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is no longer a fatal condition, thanks to newer medications inhibiting the retrovirus, but a puzzling phenomenon has surfaced among these patients — non-AIDS complications. Scientists at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have resolved the mystery with their discovery of the leaky gut as the offender. [More]
Study investigates whether function of intestines attacked in MS

Study investigates whether function of intestines attacked in MS

The present study investigates whether the function of the intestines is also attacked in MS. The results, obtained from a disease model of MS in mice, shows inflammation and changes in the barrier function of the intestines early in the course of the disease. [More]
Concordia's subsidiary signs collaboration deal with Orphan Canada for PHOTOFRIN

Concordia's subsidiary signs collaboration deal with Orphan Canada for PHOTOFRIN

Concordia Healthcare Corp., a diverse healthcare company focused on legacy pharmaceutical products, orphan drugs, and medical devices for the diabetic population, today announced that its subsidiary, Pinnacle Biologics, Inc., a biopharmaceutical research and development company specializing in rare diseases, has signed a collaboration agreement for PHOTOFRIN® with Orphan Canada, a Toronto-based specialty pharmaceutical company that in‐licenses therapies for rare disorders and specialty medicines within Canada. [More]
Global Peptic Ulcer Drugs market expected to grow at CAGR of 2.9% over 2013-2018

Global Peptic Ulcer Drugs market expected to grow at CAGR of 2.9% over 2013-2018

Research and Markets has announced the addition of the "Global Peptic Ulcer Drugs Market 2014-2018" report to their offering. [More]
New guideline recommends genetic testing of tumors for colorectal cancer patients

New guideline recommends genetic testing of tumors for colorectal cancer patients

Of the 143,000 patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer annually in the U.S., up to 25 percent have a familial risk of colorectal cancer. A new guideline from the U.S. Multi-Society Task Force on Colorectal Cancer recommends genetic testing of tumors for all newly diagnosed colorectal cancer patients. [More]
Consumption of resistant starch may help reduce colorectal cancer risk linked with high red meat diet

Consumption of resistant starch may help reduce colorectal cancer risk linked with high red meat diet

Consumption of a type of starch that acts like fiber may help reduce colorectal cancer risk associated with a high red meat diet, according to a study published in Cancer Prevention Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research. [More]
Researchers examine effects of bacteria in fighting against obesity

Researchers examine effects of bacteria in fighting against obesity

A probiotic that prevents obesity could be on the horizon. Bacteria that produce a therapeutic compound in the gut inhibit weight gain, insulin resistance and other adverse effects of a high-fat diet in mice, Vanderbilt University investigators have discovered. [More]
Removal of gall bladder benefits patients with common duct stones

Removal of gall bladder benefits patients with common duct stones

Among patients with possible common duct stones, removal of the gall bladder, compared with endoscopic assessment of the common duct followed by gall bladder removal, resulted in a shorter length of hospital stay without increased illness and fewer common duct examinations, according to a study in the July 9 issue of JAMA. [More]
Researchers develop new "nanojuice" to help doctors better identify human gut

Researchers develop new "nanojuice" to help doctors better identify human gut

Located deep in the human gut, the small intestine is not easy to examine. X-rays, MRIs and ultrasound images provide snapshots but each suffers limitations. Help is on the way. [More]
Treating ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease: an interview with Dr. Stephen Hanauer, Medical Director, Digestive Health Center, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine

Treating ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease: an interview with Dr. Stephen Hanauer, Medical Director, Digestive Health Center, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine

Ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease are idiopathic (we don’t know the cause) inflammatory diseases (IBD) of the colon and/or small bowel. They are chronic in that we do not have a medical cure and are differentiated from IBS (irritable bowel syndrome) by inflammation that causes ulcerations of the GI tract. [More]
Screening genetically susceptible infants can help detect celiac disease at a very early age

Screening genetically susceptible infants can help detect celiac disease at a very early age

Physicians from the University of Colorado School of Medicine in collaboration with an international team of researchers have demonstrated that screening of genetically susceptible infants can lead to the diagnosis of celiac disease at a very early age. [More]
Preventing antibiotic side effects: an interview with Florence Séjourné, CEO, Da Volterra

Preventing antibiotic side effects: an interview with Florence Séjourné, CEO, Da Volterra

Like all drugs, antibiotics can have side-effects when administered to people. The most common (and often benign) side effect people experience when taking antibiotics is “associated diarrhea”. This illustrates the fact that antibiotics have an impact on the intestine! [More]
Gelesis100 capsule leads to greater weight loss in overweight, obese individuals

Gelesis100 capsule leads to greater weight loss in overweight, obese individuals

A new "smart pill" called Gelesis100 safely leads to greater weight loss in overweight and obese individuals compared with those who receive an active comparator/placebo capsule, while all subjects have similar diet and exercise instructions, an international multicenter study finds. [More]
New approach promises better drugs for diabetes and osteoporosis

New approach promises better drugs for diabetes and osteoporosis

By swapping replacement parts into the backbone of a synthetic hormone, UW-Madison graduate student Ross Cheloha and his mentor, Sam Gellman, along with collaborators at Harvard Medical School, have built a version of a parathyroid hormone that resists degradation in laboratory mice. [More]
BioLineRx gets Notice of Allowance for patent related to new treatment for celiac disease

BioLineRx gets Notice of Allowance for patent related to new treatment for celiac disease

BioLineRx Ltd., a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company dedicated to identifying, in-licensing and developing promising therapeutic candidates, announced today that a Notice of Allowance has been issued by the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) for a patent claiming the composition of BL-7010, a novel polymer for the treatment of celiac patients. [More]
Bariatric surgery not only helps reduce weight, but lowers cancer risk among obese people

Bariatric surgery not only helps reduce weight, but lowers cancer risk among obese people

Weight loss surgery might have more value than simply helping morbidly obese people to shed unhealthy extra pounds. [More]
Unsterile living conditions, untrained caregivers contribute to infections in home health settings

Unsterile living conditions, untrained caregivers contribute to infections in home health settings

Millions of Americans depend on home health care services to recover from surgeries and hospital stays, as well as to manage daily life with chronic conditions. [More]
ALOXI injection receives FDA approval for prevention of nausea, vomiting associated with cancer chemotherapy

ALOXI injection receives FDA approval for prevention of nausea, vomiting associated with cancer chemotherapy

Eisai Inc. and Helsinn Group today announced the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of ALOXI (palonosetron HCl) injection for the prevention of acute nausea and vomiting associated with initial and repeat courses of emetogenic cancer chemotherapy, including highly emetogenic cancer chemotherapy, in children aged 1 month to less than 17 years. [More]