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Takeda's $2.37 billion settlement over Actos didn't attract enough claimants to participate in the deal

Takeda's $2.37 billion settlement over Actos didn't attract enough claimants to participate in the deal

MT Services LLC, a Lawsuit Settlement News Reporting Company which operates lawsuitsettlementnews.com, announced today that Takeda Pharmaceutical Co.'s $2.37 billion settlement didn't attract enough claimants to participate in the deal, which said the company would fund the deal after 95% of claimants joined it. [More]
New prescription smoking-cessation drug not helping smokers quit

New prescription smoking-cessation drug not helping smokers quit

The introduction of a new prescription smoking-cessation aid, varenicline, in 2006 has had no significant impact on the rate at which Americans age 18 and older successfully quit smoking, according to a study led by researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine. [More]
Scientists map 3-D atomic structure of protein complex that controls neurotransmitter release from brain cells

Scientists map 3-D atomic structure of protein complex that controls neurotransmitter release from brain cells

Scientists have revealed never-before-seen details of how our brain sends rapid-fire messages between its cells. They mapped the 3-D atomic structure of a two-part protein complex that controls the release of signaling chemicals, called neurotransmitters, from brain cells. Understanding how cells release those signals in less than one-thousandth of a second could help launch a new wave of research on drugs for treating brain disorders. [More]
Anti-smoking laws lead to decrease in stillbirths

Anti-smoking laws lead to decrease in stillbirths

Stillbirths have dropped by almost eight per cent in England since the smoking ban was introduced, research shows. [More]
Maximum weight gain seen in obese smokers, heavy smokers after smoking cessation

Maximum weight gain seen in obese smokers, heavy smokers after smoking cessation

For smokers, the number of cigarettes smoked per day and current body mass index are predictive of changes in weight after quitting smoking, according to researchers at Penn State College of Medicine. [More]
Low birth weight, preterm birth increase schizophrenia risk in individuals with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

Low birth weight, preterm birth increase schizophrenia risk in individuals with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

Low birth weight and preterm birth appear to increase the risk of schizophrenia among individuals with a genetic condition called the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, a new study from the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) shows. [More]
Breakdown of fibrin protein essential for bone fracture repair

Breakdown of fibrin protein essential for bone fracture repair

A team of Vanderbilt investigators has discovered that fibrin, a protein that was thought to play a key role in fracture healing, is not required. Instead, the breakdown of fibrin is essential for fracture repair. [More]
Sexting, Internet safety climb higher on list of major health concerns for children

Sexting, Internet safety climb higher on list of major health concerns for children

With more kids online and using cell phones at increasingly younger ages, two issues have quickly climbed higher on the public's list of major health concerns for children across the U.S: sexting and Internet safety. [More]
Education intervention can improve physicians’ understanding of transgender issues

Education intervention can improve physicians’ understanding of transgender issues

The term "transgender" has made its way into mainstream media thanks to Caitlyn Jenner, previously known as Bruce Jenner, who came out as a transgender woman earlier this year. [More]
Meta-analysis confirms oral contraceptives reduce endometrial cancer risk

Meta-analysis confirms oral contraceptives reduce endometrial cancer risk

Oral contraceptive use protects against endometrial cancer, with effects persisting for decades after cessation of use, shows a meta-analysis of individual patient data published in The Lancet Oncology. [More]
TSRI study explores bacterial enzyme that may help people to quit smoking

TSRI study explores bacterial enzyme that may help people to quit smoking

A new study from scientists at The Scripps Research Institute explores a bacterial enzyme that might be used as a drug candidate to help people quit smoking. [More]
Swedish study reveals combined effects of smoking and early menopause on overall mortality

Swedish study reveals combined effects of smoking and early menopause on overall mortality

Women may now have yet another reason to quit smoking given the results of a new study that is being reported online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society. The Swedish study involving 25,474 women is the first to quantify the combined effects of smoking and age at menopause on overall mortality in terms of survival time by investigating the role of smoking as a possible effect modifier. [More]
Research finds no link between teen marijuana use and later mental health issues

Research finds no link between teen marijuana use and later mental health issues

Chronic marijuana use by teenage boys does not appear to be linked to later physical or mental health issues such as depression, psychotic symptoms or asthma, according to a study published by the American Psychological Association. [More]
Study examines how local factors increase odds of smoking during pregnancy

Study examines how local factors increase odds of smoking during pregnancy

Women are more likely to smoke during pregnancy when they live in areas where socio-economic resources are lower but also where smoking is more socially accepted, according to new study from Rice University's Kinder Institute for Urban Research. [More]

NAM, FDA's CTP name 2015-2016 class of FDA Tobacco Regulatory Science Fellows

The National Academy of Medicine, formerly the Institute of Medicine, along with the Food and Drug Administration's Center for Tobacco Products (CTP) have named the 2015-2016 class of the FDA Tobacco Regulatory Science Fellows. The five individuals were chosen through a highly selective national competition based on their exceptional, diverse professional qualifications to contribute to the work of CTP. [More]
PHI model helps identify top health risks associated with chronic diseases

PHI model helps identify top health risks associated with chronic diseases

Public health agencies across the globe are challenged with preventing the spread of chronic diseases while dealing with limited funds and devastating budget cuts. [More]
Research shows specific routes of administration can predict risk of drug addiction

Research shows specific routes of administration can predict risk of drug addiction

Abstinence is the best way to avoid drug addiction. But in many societies, drug use is the norm, not the exception, especially by youth. [More]

Major new review shows that every country in the world can afford to help citizens quit smoking

That is the conclusion of a major new review, written by leading world experts and published in the medical journal, Addiction. The review examined a wide range of measures that healthcare systems in different countries can adopt to help smokers to stop. [More]
Researchers develop evidence-based model that can predict amount of nicotine released from e-cigarette

Researchers develop evidence-based model that can predict amount of nicotine released from e-cigarette

Virginia Commonwealth University Massey Cancer Center researchers at the VCU Center for the Study of Tobacco Products (CSTP) have developed the first ever, evidence-based model that can predict with up to 90 percent accuracy the amount of nicotine emitted by an electronic cigarette (e-cigarette). [More]
New national survey finds lack of COPD knowledge among patients

New national survey finds lack of COPD knowledge among patients

In a new national survey of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients, Health Union reveals a surprising lack of awareness of risk factors and knowledge of diagnosis stage among patients. Results demonstrate a severe impact on quality of life, employment, and ability to afford treatment. [More]
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