Smoking News and Research RSS Feed - Smoking News and Research

New study shows nicotine exposure promotes alcohol dependence

New study shows nicotine exposure promotes alcohol dependence

Why do smokers have a five to ten times greater risk of developing alcohol dependence than nonsmokers? Do smokers have a greater tendency toward addiction in general or does nicotine somehow reinforce alcohol consumption? Now, a study led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute helps provide insight into these questions, showing that, in rat models, nicotine exposure actually promotes alcohol dependence. [More]
NIH-supported clinical trial to test statin use in patients with HIV-related cardiovascular disease

NIH-supported clinical trial to test statin use in patients with HIV-related cardiovascular disease

Researchers have begun enrolling participants in a multicenter international clinical trial to test whether statin administration can reduce the risk for major adverse cardiovascular events, such as heart attacks, strokes, and heart disease, in people with HIV infection. The trial is supported by the National Institutes of Health's National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. [More]
New Forsyth Institute study sheds light on connection between the mouth and heart

New Forsyth Institute study sheds light on connection between the mouth and heart

A new study from the Forsyth Institute is helping to shed more light on the important connection between the mouth and heart. According to research recently published online by the American Heart Association, scientists at Forsyth and Boston University have demonstrated that using an oral topical remedy to reduce inflammation associated with periodontitis, more commonly known as gum disease, also results in the prevention of vascular inflammation and can lower the risk of heart attack. [More]
Researchers call for earlier PAH diagnosis and treatment

Researchers call for earlier PAH diagnosis and treatment

A study has found that treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension in patients younger than 55 years significantly improves their performance on the 6-minute walk test. [More]
Researchers identify phenomenon that explains effects of oxidative stress on immune cells

Researchers identify phenomenon that explains effects of oxidative stress on immune cells

You're up in the mountains, the snow is blindingly white, and the sun is blazing down from the sky: ideal skiing conditions - but any skiers carrying the herpes virus might also have to reckon with the onset of cold sores after their day out. [More]
Challenges involved in tracing the source of Legionnaires’ disease outbreak

Challenges involved in tracing the source of Legionnaires’ disease outbreak

Genetic research helps to explain why tracing the source of an outbreak of Legionnaires' disease that claimed four lives has proven to be more complicated than scientists hoped. [More]
UGR-led scientists defend the role of PE teachers as point of entry to public health system

UGR-led scientists defend the role of PE teachers as point of entry to public health system

An international team of scientists led by the University of Granada has defended the role of physical education (PE) teachers in secondary schools as the point of entry to the public health system. [More]
Indoor UV tanning causes skin cancer

Indoor UV tanning causes skin cancer

The U.S. Surgeon General should declare that indoor ultraviolet radiation tanning causes skin cancer, according to an article published today by the American Journal of Preventive Medicine. [More]
Study finds no strong link between lung cancer risk and reproductive history variables

Study finds no strong link between lung cancer risk and reproductive history variables

The Women's Health Initiative Studies, a large prospective study of lung cancer, found no strong associations between lung cancer risk and a wide range of reproductive history variables and only revealed weak support for a role of hormone use in the incidence of lung cancer. [More]
Changes in height can affect risk of coronary heart disease

Changes in height can affect risk of coronary heart disease

The shorter you are- the more your risk of coronary heart disease. That's the key finding of a new study led by the University of Leicester which discovered that every 2.5 inches change in your height affected your risk of coronary heart disease by 13.5%. For example, compared to a 5ft 6inch tall person, a 5 foot tall person on average has a 32% higher risk of coronary heart disease because of their relatively shorter stature. [More]
Oral, Head & Neck Cancer Awareness Week: Mount Sinai experts to share tips on cancer prevention

Oral, Head & Neck Cancer Awareness Week: Mount Sinai experts to share tips on cancer prevention

Mouth and throat cancers are the fastest rising cancers today. They account for over 40,000 cases per year in the U.S. The American Cancer Society estimates that there will be 121,790 new cases of head and neck cancer diagnosed in 2015 and 14,240 deaths. These numbers include tongue cancer, throat cancers caused by the human papillomavirus or HPV, voice box cancer, melanoma of the face and thyroid cancers. [More]
Harry Folk speaks about successful throat cancer treatment received at St. Luke’s Cancer Center

Harry Folk speaks about successful throat cancer treatment received at St. Luke’s Cancer Center

It’s been nine years since Harry Folk of Palmer Township had a scare with throat cancer. He is able to talk about his journey, literally, thanks to the treatment he received at St. Luke’s. The treatment plan recommended by his cancer team not only removed his cancer, but preserved his voice and ability to swallow without difficulty. [More]
Researchers examine catheter-related bloodstream infections in patients receiving home parenteral nutrition

Researchers examine catheter-related bloodstream infections in patients receiving home parenteral nutrition

Catheter-related bloodstream infection is the most prevalent and severe complication for patients who receive parenteral nutrition therapy at home. [More]
CVS Health Foundation announces new grant recipients to increase access to health care

CVS Health Foundation announces new grant recipients to increase access to health care

The CVS Health Foundation, a private foundation created by CVS Health Corporation (NYSE: CVS), today announced 55 new grant recipients as part of its multi-year, $5 million commitment to increase access to health care in communities nationwide. [More]
Mylan announces the U.S. launch of first generic version of Generess Fe tablets

Mylan announces the U.S. launch of first generic version of Generess Fe tablets

Mylan N.V. today announced the U.S. launch of Norethindrone and Ethinyl Estradiol Tablets (Chewable) 0.8 mg/0.025 mg and Ferrous Fumarate Tablets, 75 mg (Chewable), which is the generic version of Warner Chilcott's Generess Fe Tablets. [More]
Younger patients can benefit from ACL surgery

Younger patients can benefit from ACL surgery

A new study appearing in the April issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery (JBJS), found that most patients who underwent surgery to repair and rebuild an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear, showed significant improvement in physical function at two years, which continued for at least six years following surgery. [More]
Graphic warning labels can motivate smokers to quit

Graphic warning labels can motivate smokers to quit

Young adults are more likely to appreciate the dangers of smoking when warnings are presented in images as well as text, according to a new study by a Washington State University Vancouver psychologist. [More]
Cardiovascular deaths continue to rise globally despite gains in prevention, treatment

Cardiovascular deaths continue to rise globally despite gains in prevention, treatment

As the global population pushes past 7 billion and more people reach old age, the number of deaths from cardiovascular diseases is on the rise. Cardiovascular diseases, the leading cause of premature death in the world, include heart attacks, strokes, and other circulatory diseases. [More]
MRSA bacteria exposed to cigarette smoke become more resistant to antimicrobial peptides

MRSA bacteria exposed to cigarette smoke become more resistant to antimicrobial peptides

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), an antibiotic-resistant superbug, can cause life-threatening skin, bloodstream and surgical site infections or pneumonia. Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine now report that cigarette smoke may make matters worse. [More]
Egg consumption may lower type 2 diabetes risk

Egg consumption may lower type 2 diabetes risk

Egg consumption may reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes, according to new research from the University of Eastern Finland. The findings were published in American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. [More]
Advertisement