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Orexigen Therapeutics provides update on business and financial results for Q1 2015

Orexigen Therapeutics provides update on business and financial results for Q1 2015

Orexigen Therapeutics, Inc. today announced business and financial results for the first quarter ended March 31, 2015. [More]
SLU professor reveals why women have higher rates of strokes than men, suggests steps to reduce risk

SLU professor reveals why women have higher rates of strokes than men, suggests steps to reduce risk

Each year, around 55,000 more women than men will have a stroke. Longer lifespans, pregnancies and hormones all contribute to the disparity, as do illnesses that tend to strike women more frequently. Crunch the numbers and the math adds up to more strokes for women, making it important for women monitor their risk. [More]
Study confirms link between statin drugs and diabetes risk

Study confirms link between statin drugs and diabetes risk

In a database study of nearly 26,000 beneficiaries of Tricare, the military health system, those taking statin drugs to control their cholesterol were 87 percent more likely to develop diabetes. [More]
Psychologists plan to enhance online health information on lung cancer

Psychologists plan to enhance online health information on lung cancer

Psychologists are to improve online health information on lung cancer after research showed that family members are more likely to search online to encourage loved ones to seek help. [More]
Women who gain excessive weight during pregnancy more likely to have overweight children

Women who gain excessive weight during pregnancy more likely to have overweight children

A new study conducted in collaboration between The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston and Harokopio University has found that when an expecting mother gains more weight than recommended, does not exercise or smokes during pregnancy, the probability that her child will be overweight or obese at the age of eight sharply increases. [More]
1 in 5 people to develop heart failure in developed countries

1 in 5 people to develop heart failure in developed countries

One person in five is expected to develop heart failure in developed countries, a disease with no cure but which is largely preventable. [More]
Mylan releases generic version of Seasonale Tablets in the U.S.

Mylan releases generic version of Seasonale Tablets in the U.S.

Mylan N.V. today announced the U.S. launch of Levonorgestrel and Ethinyl Estradiol Tablets USP, 0.15 mg/0.03 mg, which is the generic version of Teva's Seasonale Tablets. Mylan's partner Famy Care Ltd. received final approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for its Abbreviated New Drug Application (ANDA) for this product, which is indicated for the prevention of pregnancy in women who elect to use oral contraceptives as a method of contraception. [More]
Study: Rheumatoid arthritis nearly doubles risk of surprise heart attack

Study: Rheumatoid arthritis nearly doubles risk of surprise heart attack

Patients with rheumatoid arthritis are at increased risk of a surprise heart attack, according to new research presented today at ICNC 12 by Dr Adriana Puente, a cardiologist in the National Medical Centre "20 de Noviembre" ISSSTE in Mexico City, Mexico. [More]
Pancreatic cancer rates higher in countries with less sunlight

Pancreatic cancer rates higher in countries with less sunlight

Writing in the April 30 online issue of the Journal of Steroid Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine report pancreatic cancer rates are highest in countries with the least amount of sunlight. Low sunlight levels were due to a combination of heavy cloud cover and high latitude. [More]
Adult survivors of preterm births at higher risk of developing COPD

Adult survivors of preterm births at higher risk of developing COPD

Adult survivors of preterm births may have a lung capacity that resembles the healthy elderly or casual smokers by the time they reach their early 20s, according to a University of Oregon study. [More]
Researchers describe critical connection associated with environmental cause of silicosis, lung cancer

Researchers describe critical connection associated with environmental cause of silicosis, lung cancer

Researchers at the University of Louisville have detailed a critical connection associated with a major environmental cause of silicosis and a form of lung cancer. Their study is reported in today's Nature Communications. [More]
Lung cancer surgery patients at higher risk of developing venous thromboembolism

Lung cancer surgery patients at higher risk of developing venous thromboembolism

New evidence suggests that lung cancer surgery patients are at higher risk of developing venous thromboembolism, including deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE), than previously thought, with elevated risks of complications or death. When thromboemboli occur, they may be asymptomatic or attributed to post-surgical pain or complications, and may reflect both the lung cancer itself as well as compromised lung function after surgery. [More]
Georgia State partners with five major Chinese cities to reduce smoking

Georgia State partners with five major Chinese cities to reduce smoking

Georgia State University's School of Public Health has named five major municipalities in China that will partner with the school on efforts to improve policies and programs to reduce smoking in a nation that produces more tobacco and has more smokers than any other in the world. [More]
New CU-Boulder study finds that hazardous drinking behaviors increase mortality rates

New CU-Boulder study finds that hazardous drinking behaviors increase mortality rates

A new University of Colorado Boulder study involving some 40,000 people indicates that social and psychological problems caused by drinking generally trump physically hazardous drinking behaviors when it comes to overall mortality rates. [More]
International study finds that two-week diet swap for African-Americans may lower colon cancer risk

International study finds that two-week diet swap for African-Americans may lower colon cancer risk

African-Americans and Africans who swapped their typical diets for just two weeks similarly exchanged their respective risks of colon cancer as reflected by alterations of their gut bacteria, according to an international study led by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine published online today in Nature Communications. [More]
National survey shows that most women don't know risks or symptoms of stroke

National survey shows that most women don't know risks or symptoms of stroke

A national survey released today by The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center shows that most women don't know the risks or symptoms females face when it comes to having a stroke. [More]
Specific altered function in heart's left atrium may signal stroke risk in people with a-fib

Specific altered function in heart's left atrium may signal stroke risk in people with a-fib

Stroke is a frequent and dreaded complication of atrial fibrillation. But predicting which of the estimated six million Americans with a-fib are at highest risk has long challenged physicians weighing stroke risk against the serious side effects posed by lifelong therapy with warfarin and other blood thinners. [More]
Actor Stephen McGann explains how issues of medical accuracy were addressed in Call the Midwife drama

Actor Stephen McGann explains how issues of medical accuracy were addressed in Call the Midwife drama

Actor Stephen McGann, who plays GP Dr Patrick Turner in the hit BBC period drama Call the Midwife, has described the steps taken by the writers, production team and actors to ensure the series has sufficient medical accuracy and authenticity. In an essay published today by the Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine, McGann writes of the unique insight that the role of Dr Turner has given him into questions regarding the way popular culture portrays medics and medicine. [More]
Scientists find genetic link between autism and prodigy

Scientists find genetic link between autism and prodigy

Researchers have uncovered the first evidence of a genetic link between prodigy and autism. The scientists found that child prodigies in their sample share some of the same genetic variations with people who have autism. [More]
Study examines impact of smoking on cardiovascular risk in older people

Study examines impact of smoking on cardiovascular risk in older people

In the most comprehensive study ever on the impact of smoking on cardiovascular disease in older people, epidemiologist Dr. Ute Mons from the German Cancer Research Center (Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, DKFZ) analyzed 25 individual studies, compiling data from over half a million individuals age 60 and older. [More]
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