Smoking News and Research RSS Feed - Smoking News and Research

Scientists aim to explore how gestational diabetes can put babies at lifelong risk for cardiovascular disease

Scientists aim to explore how gestational diabetes can put babies at lifelong risk for cardiovascular disease

Gestational diabetes can put babies at a lifelong risk for cardiovascular disease, and scientists want to better understand how. [More]
E-cigarette use modifies gene expression important for upper airway immune defense

E-cigarette use modifies gene expression important for upper airway immune defense

When we smoke cigarettes, dozens of genes important for immune defense are altered in the epithelial cells that line the respiratory tract. Several of these changes likely increase the risk of bacterial infections, viruses, and inflammation. [More]
Prenatal cannabis exposure could have important effects on brain development in infants

Prenatal cannabis exposure could have important effects on brain development in infants

Compared with unexposed children, those who were prenatally exposed to cannabis had a thicker prefrontal cortex, a region of the brain involved in complex cognition, decision-making, and working memory. [More]
Common breast cancer treatment less effective for smokers compared to non-smokers

Common breast cancer treatment less effective for smokers compared to non-smokers

We know that individuals who smoke take major health risks. Now a new research study from Lund University in Sweden shows that common treatment for breast cancer works less well in patients who smoke, compared to non-smokers. [More]
E-cigarettes play key role in reducing smoking among youngsters

E-cigarettes play key role in reducing smoking among youngsters

A new study from the UK Centre for Substance Use Research, being presented today at the Global Forum on Nicotine, shows e-cigarettes are playing an important role in reducing the likelihood of young people smoking, in many cases acting as a 'roadblock' to combustible tobacco. [More]
Obese teenagers more likely to develop heart failure in early middle age

Obese teenagers more likely to develop heart failure in early middle age

Research that followed more than 1.6 million Swedish men from adolescence onwards between 1968 and 2005 has shown that those who were overweight as teenagers were more likely to develop heart failure in early middle age. [More]
Cerebral microbleeds linked to increased risk of physical, cognitive disability in MS patients

Cerebral microbleeds linked to increased risk of physical, cognitive disability in MS patients

Leaky blood vessels in the brain called cerebral microbleeds are associated with an increased risk of physical and cognitive disability in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), according to a new study by researchers in the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences at the University at Buffalo. [More]
Drinking piping hot beverages may increase risk of esophagus tumors

Drinking piping hot beverages may increase risk of esophagus tumors

Drinking piping hot coffee, tea and the caffeine-infused beverage yerba mate probably causes cancer, the World Health Organization announced Wednesday. [More]
Very hot drinks probably cause cancer, warns WHO

Very hot drinks probably cause cancer, warns WHO

The cancer agency of the World Health Organization says drinking very hot beverages is probably associated with esophageal cancer. [More]
Study links whole grain consumption to positive health effects

Study links whole grain consumption to positive health effects

Eating three more portions of dietary fiber a day--say, two pieces of whole grain bread and a bowl of whole grain breakfast cereal--is associated with a lower risk for all cardiovascular diseases and for dying of cancer, diabetes, and respiratory and infectious diseases, a study just published in the BMJ has shown. [More]
CHD rates decrease significantly in the U.S.

CHD rates decrease significantly in the U.S.

Significant improvements seen across multiple sociodemographic groups, according to a new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine [More]
Many Brazilians not taking advantage of health benefits of exercise

Many Brazilians not taking advantage of health benefits of exercise

As Brazilians make final preparations to host the world's premier showcase of athleticism, the Olympics, a new paper in the Journal of the American Heart Association reports that many citizens of the host country are not taking enough advantage of the health benefits of exercise. [More]
IVR system with brief intervention message encourages patients to talk to doctors about drinking habits

IVR system with brief intervention message encourages patients to talk to doctors about drinking habits

Primary care doctors are reluctant to talk to patients about their drinking habits, for fear of being perceived as judgmental. But a simple, intervention that encourages discussion could resolve this issue, according to a recent study in the Journal of General Internal Medicine. [More]
Young cancer survivors more likely to be current cigarette smokers

Young cancer survivors more likely to be current cigarette smokers

Researchers at The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston have found that cancer survivors who were diagnosed at adolescent and young adult ages are more likely to be current cigarette smokers than people who have not had cancer. The findings of this study are currently available in Cancer. [More]
PET/CT imaging technique may provide way to break perpetual cycle of alcohol abuse

PET/CT imaging technique may provide way to break perpetual cycle of alcohol abuse

Alcoholism is a devastating disorder that too often leads to a perpetual cycle of abuse. An emerging molecular imaging technique may provide a way to break that cycle. [More]
Many family doctors have poor knowledge about LDCT lung cancer screening

Many family doctors have poor knowledge about LDCT lung cancer screening

Although clinical trials have shown that lung cancer screening using low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) can detect lung cancers early and reduce lung cancer mortality, less than half of family physicians in a recent survey agreed that screening reduces lung cancer–related deaths. [More]
Study sheds light on why many RA patients do not adhere to treatment

Study sheds light on why many RA patients do not adhere to treatment

Two new studies presented at the European League Against Rheumatism Annual Congress have shed light on why so many patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) do not adhere to their therapy, even in the early stages of their treatment. [More]
Air pollution becomes leading risk factor for stroke worldwide

Air pollution becomes leading risk factor for stroke worldwide

Air pollution – including environmental and household air pollution - has emerged as a leading risk factor for stroke worldwide, associated with about a third of the global burden of stroke in 2013, according to a new study published in The Lancet Neurology journal. [More]
U.S. study shows adults with diabetes born in 1940s living longer with less disability

U.S. study shows adults with diabetes born in 1940s living longer with less disability

Older Americans with diabetes born in the 1940s are living longer and with less disability performing day to day tasks than those born 10 years earlier, according to new research published in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology journal. [More]
NHS Health Checks may not be best option for preventing CVD in England

NHS Health Checks may not be best option for preventing CVD in England

A University of Liverpool study published in the British Medical Journal has found the UK population's cardiovascular health is not being supported enough by the NHS Health Check programme. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement