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New diagnostic method shows COPD risk higher for women

New diagnostic method shows COPD risk higher for women

Researchers from Lund University Sweden have through a new diagnostic method been able to show that the risk of developing Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease could be twice as high for women as it is for men. [More]
Age-related macular degeneration: an interview with Cathy Yelf, Macular Society

Age-related macular degeneration: an interview with Cathy Yelf, Macular Society

Age-related macular degeneration is a condition of the macula, a tiny area of the retina at the back of the eye. Your macula is only about the size of the grain of rice, that’s about four millimeters across. [More]
TSRI scientists discover molecular ‘switch’ that could reduce nicotine addiction

TSRI scientists discover molecular ‘switch’ that could reduce nicotine addiction

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have discovered that a lipid in brain cells may act as a “switch” to increase or decrease the motivation to consume nicotine. [More]
Mount Sinai Heart starts TANSNIP-PESA study to determine how workplace-based lifestyle intervention reduces CV risk

Mount Sinai Heart starts TANSNIP-PESA study to determine how workplace-based lifestyle intervention reduces CV risk

World-renowned cardiologist Valentin Fuster, MD, PhD, Director of Mount Sinai Heart and Physician-in-Chief of The Mount Sinai Hospital, is undertaking a three-year study, known as the TANSNIP-PESA study, to determine whether a workplace-based lifestyle intervention, accompanied by imaging data, will lead to a reduction in the prevalence of cardiovascular (CV) disease risk factors related to lifestyle. [More]
New report reveals striking variation in cancer burden within AANHPI population

New report reveals striking variation in cancer burden within AANHPI population

A new report describes cancer among Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians, and Pacific Islanders (AANHPIs), and reports striking variation in the cancer burden within this population, reflecting vast differences in exposure to cancer risk factors. [More]
Adult smokers who use e-cigarettes 28% less likely to quit smoking

Adult smokers who use e-cigarettes 28% less likely to quit smoking

Electronic cigarettes are widely promoted and used to help smokers quit traditional cigarettes, but a new analysis from UC San Francisco found that adult smokers who use e-cigarettes are actually 28 percent less likely to stop smoking cigarettes. [More]
Millercare offers tips to prevent onset of deep vein thrombosis

Millercare offers tips to prevent onset of deep vein thrombosis

We’re set to have one of the coldest Januarys in years. As winds batter the UK, it can be tempting to stay indoors and hide from the chill, particularly for the elderly. [More]
Topiramate drug curbs marijuana use among young smokers, but with serious side effects

Topiramate drug curbs marijuana use among young smokers, but with serious side effects

Combining the drug topiramate with psychological counseling curbed marijuana use among young smokers significantly more than did counseling alone, according to newly published results of a small randomized, controlled trial at Brown University. The results come with a caveat, however: many study volunteers couldn't tolerate the medicine's side effects. [More]
CPMC study discovers six genes that affect sleep duration

CPMC study discovers six genes that affect sleep duration

The Coriell Personalized Medicine Collaborative, a research initiative exploring the utility of genetic information in the clinical setting, has published a study and identified six noteworthy genes that affect human sleep duration. [More]
Sedentary behavior associated with poor cardiovascular health, diabetes in people with severe obesity

Sedentary behavior associated with poor cardiovascular health, diabetes in people with severe obesity

Sedentary behavior is associated with poor cardiovascular health and diabetes in adults with severe obesity, independent of how much exercise they perform, a University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health-led study showed for the first time. [More]
Malaysian scientists join forces with Harvard experts to help revolutionize lung disease treatment

Malaysian scientists join forces with Harvard experts to help revolutionize lung disease treatment

Malaysian scientists are joining forces with Harvard University experts to help revolutionize the treatment of lung diseases -- the delivery of nanomedicine deep into places otherwise impossible to reach. [More]
3 out of 4 young adults with stroke symptoms delay trip to hospital

3 out of 4 young adults with stroke symptoms delay trip to hospital

Up to three hours after a person experiences the first symptom of a stroke is often referred to as the "golden window." That's the period of time doctors say is crucial for patients to get to a hospital to receive medical care in order to restore blood flow to the brain and minimize or reverse damage. [More]
Small differences in specific genetic variant could alter nicotine consumption

Small differences in specific genetic variant could alter nicotine consumption

Nicotine is an addictive substance and genetic factors are known to play a role in smoking behaviors. Recently, a team of researchers at Penn State and the University of Colorado determined how small differences in a particular region of the mouse genome can alter nicotine consumption. [More]
Screening smokers with community-acquired pneumonia could facilitate early diagnosis of lung cancer

Screening smokers with community-acquired pneumonia could facilitate early diagnosis of lung cancer

Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality in the United States, with a five-year survival rate of just 17 percent. Smoking causes approximately 85 percent of all lung cancer cases, only 15 percent of which are diagnosed at an early stage. Most efforts to obtain early diagnosis have been unsuccessful, largely due to the highly aggressive nature of the disease. [More]
Cancer mortality continues to drop in the U.S.

Cancer mortality continues to drop in the U.S.

Steady reductions in smoking combined with advances in cancer prevention, early detection, and treatment have resulted in a 23% drop in the cancer death rate since its peak in 1991. The drop translates to more than 1.7 million cancer deaths averted through 2012. [More]
E-cigarettes share similar short-term safety profile as Nicorette products

E-cigarettes share similar short-term safety profile as Nicorette products

A new study, published in the Journal of Regulatory Toxicology and Pharmacology, found that e-cigarettes share a similar short-term safety profile as Nicorette products and are comparable in reducing tobacco withdrawal symptoms. [More]
People with low sunlight exposure and vitamin D deficiency at greater risk of developing leukemia

People with low sunlight exposure and vitamin D deficiency at greater risk of developing leukemia

Epidemiologists at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine report that persons residing at higher latitudes, with lower sunlight/ultraviolet B (UVB) exposure and greater prevalence of vitamin D deficiency, are at least two times at greater risk of developing leukemia than equatorial populations. [More]
FAU study shows benefits of regular mammography among elder women

FAU study shows benefits of regular mammography among elder women

Breast cancer is the second most common cancer in women after skin cancer and occurred in 230,000 women in the United States in 2015. Breast cancer afflicts 1 in 8 women in their lifetime and 1 in 25 die from this disease. [More]
JJHWS, Plug and Play Tech Center partner to support companies developing wellness solutions

JJHWS, Plug and Play Tech Center partner to support companies developing wellness solutions

Johnson & Johnson Health and Wellness Solutions, Inc. today announced a collaboration with Plug and Play Tech Center, a global investor and technology accelerator, to support innovative, early-stage companies developing direct-to-consumer solutions that enhance wellness. [More]
Researchers identify mechanism that allows cancer cells to grow rapidly when blood sugar levels rise

Researchers identify mechanism that allows cancer cells to grow rapidly when blood sugar levels rise

Researchers have identified a mechanism that allows cancer cells to respond and grow rapidly when levels of sugar in the blood rise. This may help to explain why people who develop conditions in which they have chronically high sugar levels in their blood, such as obesity, also have an increased risk of developing certain types of cancer. [More]
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