Smoking News and Research RSS Feed - Smoking News and Research

BronchoGen genomic test meets primary endpoint in AEGIS-2 clinical trial

BronchoGen genomic test meets primary endpoint in AEGIS-2 clinical trial

Allegro Diagnostics Corp. today announced that the AEGIS-2 clinical trial has met its primary endpoint, demonstrating that the BronchoGen genomic test improves the accuracy of lung cancer diagnosis when used in combination with bronchoscopy. [More]
Fathers who started smoking before 11 tend to have obese sons

Fathers who started smoking before 11 tend to have obese sons

Men who started smoking regularly before the age of 11 had sons who, on average, had 5-10kg more body fat than their peers by the time they were in their teens, according to new research from the Children of the 90s study at the University of Bristol. [More]
Study finds that stress can make allergies worse

Study finds that stress can make allergies worse

Stress doesn't cause allergies, but easing your mind might mean less allergy flare-ups this spring. According to a study published in the April issue of Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology, the scientific journal of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, allergy sufferers with persistent stress experience more allergy flares. [More]
Study shows important parallels between epidemic of HIV/AIDS and opioid addiction

Study shows important parallels between epidemic of HIV/AIDS and opioid addiction

​There are important parallels between the early years of the HIV/AIDS epidemic and the current epidemic of opioid addiction - ones that could trigger a significant shift in opioid addiction prevention, diagnosis and treatment. [More]
Exposure to tobacco websites linked with increased chances of smoking initiation

Exposure to tobacco websites linked with increased chances of smoking initiation

Teens and young adults who are exposed to marketing materials for tobacco products, such as coupons and websites, were far more likely to begin smoking or to be current smokers than those not exposed, finds a new study in the Journal of Adolescent Health. [More]
Mobile phones with tobacco screening guidelines offer cessation counseling

Mobile phones with tobacco screening guidelines offer cessation counseling

Smartphones and tablets may hold the key to getting more clinicians to screen patients for tobacco use and advise smokers on how to quit. Even though tobacco use is the leading cause of preventable disease and death in the U.S., clinicians often don't ask about smoking during patient exams. [More]

Men with long-term HIV infections at higher risk of developing plaque in their coronary arteries

Men with long-term HIV infections are at higher risk than uninfected men of developing plaque in their coronary arteries, regardless of their other risk factors for coronary artery disease, according to results of a study led by Johns Hopkins researchers. A report on the research appears in the April 1 issue of Annals of Internal Medicine. [More]

New study shows anti-anxiety drugs and sleeping pills associated with increased risk of death

Anti-anxiety drugs and sleeping pills have been linked to an increased risk of death, according to new research from the University of Warwick. [More]
Women who drink too many diet drinks a day more likely to have heart problems

Women who drink too many diet drinks a day more likely to have heart problems

It appears healthy postmenopausal women who drink two or more diet drinks a day may be more likely to have a heart attack, stroke or other cardiovascular problems, according to research to be presented at the American College of Cardiology's 63rd Annual Scientific Session. [More]

Celiac disease people may have near two-fold increased risk of coronary artery disease

People with celiac disease may have a near two-fold increased risk of coronary artery disease compared with the general population, according to research to be presented at the American College of Cardiology's 63rd Annual Scientific Session. [More]
Heart problems less likely for spouses than for single people

Heart problems less likely for spouses than for single people

People who are married have lower rates of several cardiovascular diseases compared with those who are single, divorced or widowed, according to research to be presented at the American College of Cardiology's 63rd Annual Scientific Session. The relationship between marriage and lower odds of vascular diseases is especially pronounced before age 50. [More]
New finding reinforces importance of developing healthy eating habits early in life

New finding reinforces importance of developing healthy eating habits early in life

Women who ate a diet high in fresh fruits and vegetables as young adults were much less likely to have plaque build-up in their arteries 20 years later compared with those who consumed lower amounts of these foods, according to research to be presented at the American College of Cardiology's 63rd Annual Scientific Session. [More]
Religion and spirituality have distinct but complementary influences on health

Religion and spirituality have distinct but complementary influences on health

Religion and spirituality have distinct but complementary influences on health, new research from Oregon State University indicates. [More]
Marriage linked to lower risk of cardiovascular disease

Marriage linked to lower risk of cardiovascular disease

Marriage is criticized for many things — justly and unjustly — but not heart disease, according to findings of a recent study conducted by researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center. [More]
Research: Underweight puts people at highest risk of dying, just as obesity does

Research: Underweight puts people at highest risk of dying, just as obesity does

Being underweight puts people at highest risk of dying, just as obesity does, new research has found. The connection between being underweight and the higher risk of dying is true for both adults and fetuses. [More]
High-quality early childhood development programs can help prevent onset of adult chronic disease

High-quality early childhood development programs can help prevent onset of adult chronic disease

High-quality early childhood development programs with health care and nutritional components can help prevent or delay the onset of adult chronic disease, according to a new study by Nobel laureate economist James Heckman and researchers at the University of Chicago, University College London and the Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute at the University of North Carolina. [More]

Marital status affects risk of heart disease, survey shows

Analysis of surveys of more than 3.5 million American men and women, administered at some 20,000 health centers across the country - believed to be the largest analysis of its kind ever performed - found that married people, regardless of age, sex, or even cardiovascular risk factors, had significantly less chances of having any kind of cardiovascular disease than those who were single, divorced or widowed. [More]

Review examining effects of public smoking ban finds large drops in pre-term births and child hospital visits for asthma

The introduction of laws banning smoking in public places and workplaces in North America and Europe has had a positive impact on child health. [More]
Concerns over potential health risks of using e-cigarettes gaining momentum

Concerns over potential health risks of using e-cigarettes gaining momentum

With sales of electronic cigarettes, or "e-cigarettes," on the rise and expected to hit $1.5 billion this year, concerns over potential health risks of using the trendy devices are also gaining momentum and political clout. An article in Chemical & Engineering News, the weekly magazine of the American Chemical Society, delves into what scientists and regulators are doing about e-cigarettes, which are now being cleverly marketed under more appealing names such as hookah pens and vape pipes. [More]

Heart attack survival rates lag behind in the South despite overall improvements nationwide

Although heart attack death has declined across all regions of the United States, it is proportionately higher in the South, possibly related to the uneven distribution of socioeconomic and traditional cardiovascular risk factors, according to research to be presented at the American College of Cardiology's 63rd Annual Scientific Session. [More]