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Survival benefits with erlotinib plus bevacizumab in EGFR-Mutated NSCLC

Survival benefits with erlotinib plus bevacizumab in EGFR-Mutated NSCLC

Combining erlotinib with bevacizumab could prolong progression-free survival in patients being treated for epidermal growth factor receptor-mutated non-small-cell lung cancer, phase II trial results suggest. [More]
Catecholamine polymorphism influences opioid use

Catecholamine polymorphism influences opioid use

The catechol-O-methyltransferase rs4680 single nucleotide polymorphism could affect postoperative opioid consumption, study findings show. [More]
Lobectomy and segmentectomy have similar efficacy in stage I NSCLC

Lobectomy and segmentectomy have similar efficacy in stage I NSCLC

Lobectomy and anatomic segmentectomy appear to offer similar perioperative and oncological outcomes in patients with stage I non-small-cell lung cancer, analysis suggests. [More]
Current smokers at increased risk of developing SPLC

Current smokers at increased risk of developing SPLC

Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) survivors who never smoked or who are former smokers at the time of diagnosis have a lower risk of developing secondary primary lung cancers (SPLC) compared to those who are current smokers, suggesting that increased tobacco exposure is associated with a higher risk of SPLC, according to research presented today at the American Society for Radiation Oncology's 56th Annual Meeting. [More]
New study sheds light on relationship between schizophrenia and smoking stems

New study sheds light on relationship between schizophrenia and smoking stems

Schizophrenia is associated with increased rates and intensity of tobacco smoking. A growing body of research suggests that the relationship between schizophrenia and smoking stems, in part, from an effort by patients to use nicotine to self-medicate symptoms and cognitive impairment associated with the disease. [More]
New report outlines cholesterol-targeted approach to treat people at risk for cardiovascular disease

New report outlines cholesterol-targeted approach to treat people at risk for cardiovascular disease

A recent guideline for using statins to reduce atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease has wavered too far from the simple cholesterol goals that have saved thousands of lives in the past decade, and doesn't adequately treat patients as individuals, experts said today in a national report. [More]
Positive messages more effective at persuading smokers to quit

Positive messages more effective at persuading smokers to quit

Which is more likely to convince a smoker to quit? The words, "Warning: cigarettes cause cancer" beneath the image of an open mouth with a cancerous lesion and rotten teeth, or the same image with the words, "Warning: Quitting smoking reduces the risk of cancer"? [More]
The Miriam Hospital receives Primary Stroke Center certification for fifth consecutive year

The Miriam Hospital receives Primary Stroke Center certification for fifth consecutive year

The Miriam Hospital has for the fifth time been designated by the Joint Commission as a Primary Stroke Center. [More]
Benefits of blood pressure lowering drugs for low risk patients 'still open to question'

Benefits of blood pressure lowering drugs for low risk patients 'still open to question'

Dr Stephen Martin and colleagues argue that this strategy is failing patients and wasting healthcare resources. They call for a re-examination of the threshold and urge clinicians to be cautious about treating low risk patients with blood pressure lowering drugs. [More]
Scientists measure responses to rewards during nicotine withdrawal across species

Scientists measure responses to rewards during nicotine withdrawal across species

Cigarette smoking is a leading cause of preventable death worldwide and is associated with approximately 440,000 deaths in the United States each year, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, but nearly 20 percent of the U.S. population continues to smoke cigarettes. [More]
Viewpoints: Ebola takes us to 'uncharted waters'; the failure of workplace 'wellness' programs

Viewpoints: Ebola takes us to 'uncharted waters'; the failure of workplace 'wellness' programs

There have been more than 4,300 cases and 2,300 deaths over the past six months. Last week, the World Health Organization warned that, by early October, there may be thousands of new cases per week in Liberia, Sierra Leone, Guinea and Nigeria. What is not getting said publicly, despite briefings and discussions in the inner circles of the world's public health agencies, is that we are in totally uncharted waters and that Mother Nature is the only force in charge of the crisis at this time (Michael T. Osterholm, 9/11). [More]
Research roundup: Prevention services for seniors; drug shortages

Research roundup: Prevention services for seniors; drug shortages

This policy brief reports the findings of a systematic review conducted by the Community Health Innovations in Prevention for Seniors (CHIPS) project. ... Clinical preventive services such as colorectal cancer screening and pneumococcal immunization can help reduce rates of premature death and disability. Yet, many older adults are not receiving the full set of clinical preventive services that have been proven effective and are considered "high value" in terms of their costs per life saved. Rates are particularly low among racial and ethnic minority older adults compared to national goals. [More]
People who take antidepressants are twice as likely to have dental implants fail

People who take antidepressants are twice as likely to have dental implants fail

A team from McGill University has discovered that people who take the most common antidepressants (such as Celexa, Paxil, Lexapro, Prozac, and Zoloft, the Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors or SSRIs) are twice as likely to have dental implants fail as those who are not taking SSRIs. [More]
Lung cancer screening could save thousands, study suggests

Lung cancer screening could save thousands, study suggests

Experts from the Centers of Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) have weighed up the pros and cons of lung cancer screening to determine whether Medicare-eligible individuals would actually benefit from annual testing. [More]
FDA approves Contrave extended-release tablets for chronic weight management

FDA approves Contrave extended-release tablets for chronic weight management

Takeda Pharmaceuticals U.S.A., Inc. and Orexigen® Therapeutics, Inc. jointly announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved Contrave® extended-release tablets as an adjunct to a reduced-calorie diet and increased physical activity for chronic weight management in adults with an initial body mass index of 30 kg/m2 or greater (obese), or 27 kg/m2 or greater (overweight) in the presence of at least one weight-related comorbid condition. [More]
Peer pressure influences adherence to hand hygiene

Peer pressure influences adherence to hand hygiene

Nationally, hand hygiene adherence by healthcare workers remains staggeringly low despite its critical importance in infection control. [More]
High sodium intake linked with more than doubled risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis

High sodium intake linked with more than doubled risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis

A new study published online in the journal Rheumatology today indicates that the interaction between high sodium intake and smoking is associated with a more than doubled risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis (RA). [More]
Weekly text message reminder can help many people to make healthy food choices

Weekly text message reminder can help many people to make healthy food choices

Many people are unaware that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's mandated nutrition labels are based on a 2,000-calorie-a-day diet, but a simple weekly text message reminder can greatly improve that awareness, according to a new study from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. [More]
Scientists identify how molecular motor essential for human development works

Scientists identify how molecular motor essential for human development works

Another mystery of the human body has been solved by scientists who have identified how a molecular motor essential for human development works. [More]
Miriam Hospital receives grant from NIH to prevent spread of sexually transmitted HIV in women

Miriam Hospital receives grant from NIH to prevent spread of sexually transmitted HIV in women

The Miriam Hospital is part of a research collaboration that has received a $20 million grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to develop an intravaginal ring (IVR) that can deliver powerful antiretroviral (ARV) drugs to prevent the spread of sexually transmitted HIV in women. [More]