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Drinking coffee may lower risk of developing multiple sclerosis

Drinking coffee may lower risk of developing multiple sclerosis

Drinking coffee may be associated with a lower risk of developing multiple sclerosis (MS), according to a study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 67th Annual Meeting in Washington, DC, April 18 to 25, 2015. [More]
Researchers find that people with disabilities have unmet medical needs, poorer overall health

Researchers find that people with disabilities have unmet medical needs, poorer overall health

People with disabilities have unmet medical needs and poorer overall health throughout their lives, and as a result should be recognized as a health disparity group so more attention can be directed to improving their quality of life, a team of policy researchers has found. [More]
New online tool helps educate practicing oncologists with therapeutic decision-making for NSCLC

New online tool helps educate practicing oncologists with therapeutic decision-making for NSCLC

A new interactive online tool helps educate practicing oncologists worldwide with therapeutic decision-making for advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) based on a patient's molecular and clinical characteristics by providing feedback from an expert panel. [More]
Smokers who quit early does not qualify for lung cancer screening, say Mayo Clinic researchers

Smokers who quit early does not qualify for lung cancer screening, say Mayo Clinic researchers

A decline in smoking rates may mean that many people who could have benefited from early detection of lung cancer are dying because they don't qualify for low-dose CT scans, according to a group of Mayo Clinic researchers. [More]
People who use snus are at increased risk of developing alcohol dependency

People who use snus are at increased risk of developing alcohol dependency

People who use snus run twice the risk of developing alcohol dependency compared with non-users, and the more one uses snus, the higher the risk. This has been found in a study from UmeƄ University which was published in the journal Drug and Alcohol Dependence. [More]
Teen girls from rural areas have undiagnosed asthma, face higher risk of depression

Teen girls from rural areas have undiagnosed asthma, face higher risk of depression

Teen girls who live in rural areas are more likely than their male counterparts to have undiagnosed asthma, and they often are at a higher risk of depression, according to researchers at the Medical College of Georgia at Georgia Regents University. [More]
Hair sample tests reveal underreported exposure to tobacco smoke among preemies with lung disease

Hair sample tests reveal underreported exposure to tobacco smoke among preemies with lung disease

Public health experts have long known that tobacco smoke exposure (TSE) can be harmful for children with bronchopulmonary dysplasia, a lung disease that often accompanies premature birth. [More]
Tobacco smoke exposure common among children with bronchopulmonary dysplasia

Tobacco smoke exposure common among children with bronchopulmonary dysplasia

Public health experts have long known that tobacco smoke exposure (TSE) can be harmful for children with bronchopulmonary dysplasia, a lung disease that often accompanies premature birth. [More]
RepliCel submits CTA for RCS-01 study to treat patients suffering from aged, UV-damaged skin

RepliCel submits CTA for RCS-01 study to treat patients suffering from aged, UV-damaged skin

RepliCel Life Sciences Inc., a clinical stage regenerative medicine company focused on the development of autologous cell therapies, today announced the submission of a Clinical Trial Application (CTA) to the German Competent Authority, the Paul-Ehrlich-Institut (PEI), requesting clearance to initiate a Phase 1 clinical trial investigating the use of RCS-01 to treat patients suffering from aged and UV-damaged skin. [More]
Beneficial effects of statin treatment exaggerated, say researchers

Beneficial effects of statin treatment exaggerated, say researchers

Hailed as miracle drugs when they hit the market two decades ago, statins, the cholesterol-lowering drugs prescribed to prevent heart attacks, are not as effective nor as safe as we have been led to believe, say Dr. David M. Diamond, a professor of psychology, molecular pharmacology and physiology at the University of South Florida, and Dr. Uffe Ravnskov, an independent health researcher and an expert in cholesterol and cardiovascular disease. [More]
MD Anderson awarded more than $22 million in research grants from CPRIT

MD Anderson awarded more than $22 million in research grants from CPRIT

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center has received more than $22 million in research grants this week from the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas. Approximately half of the funds awarded for Individual Investigator Research Awards went to MD Anderson faculty as well as 40 percent of total IIRA awards that include those for children's and adolescent cancer and early detection and prevention. [More]
Mobile devices may help better diagnose patients with chronic health issues

Mobile devices may help better diagnose patients with chronic health issues

Smartphones and tablets may hold the key to getting more nurses to diagnose patients with chronic health issues like obesity, smoking, and depression -- three of the leading causes of preventable death and disability. [More]
Targeted nanomedicines could help prevent heart attacks caused by atherosclerosis

Targeted nanomedicines could help prevent heart attacks caused by atherosclerosis

Nanometer-sized "drones" that deliver a special type of healing molecule to fat deposits in arteries could become a new way to prevent heart attacks caused by atherosclerosis, according to a study in pre-clinical models by scientists at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Columbia University Medical Center. [More]
New Danish study suggests that proactive labour induction practice can improve perinatal outcomes

New Danish study suggests that proactive labour induction practice can improve perinatal outcomes

A proactive labour induction practice once women are full term can improve perinatal outcomes suggests a new Danish study, published today (18 February) in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology (BJOG). [More]
Nicotine metabolite supports learning, memory by amplifying action of primary chemical messenger

Nicotine metabolite supports learning, memory by amplifying action of primary chemical messenger

Nicotine's primary metabolite supports learning and memory by amplifying the action of a primary chemical messenger involved in both, researchers report. [More]
Nicotine addiction medication produces greater reductions in smoking prior to quitting

Nicotine addiction medication produces greater reductions in smoking prior to quitting

Among cigarette smokers not willing or able to quit smoking in the next month but willing to reduce with the goal of quitting in the next 3 months, use of the nicotine addiction medication varenicline for 24 weeks compared with placebo produced greater reductions in smoking prior to quitting and increased smoking cessation rates at the end of treatment and at 1 year, according to a study in the February 17 issue of JAMA. [More]
Postmenopausal women susceptible to bone fractures may be at increased risk for gum disease

Postmenopausal women susceptible to bone fractures may be at increased risk for gum disease

Postmenopausal women susceptible to bone fractures may also be a higher risk for gum disease, according to researchers at Case Western Reserve University School of Dental Medicine and Case/Cleveland Clinic Postmenopausal Health Collaboration. [More]
Researchers say that cancer experience can lead to healthy lifestyle in survivors and family members

Researchers say that cancer experience can lead to healthy lifestyle in survivors and family members

After studying cancer survivors and their family caregivers, researchers at Case Western Reserve University conclude that the period between the final cancer treatment and first post-treatment checkup may be an ideal time for the entire household to jumpstart a healthy lifestyle. [More]
The growing evidence on  standardised packaging of tobacco products

The growing evidence on standardised packaging of tobacco products

The scientific journal Addiction has today published a collection of peer-reviewed research papers and commentaries that bring together key parts of the evidence base for standardised packaging of tobacco products from 2008 to 2015. [More]
Study: Most risk calculators used by clinicians overestimate risk of heart attack

Study: Most risk calculators used by clinicians overestimate risk of heart attack

Most "risk calculators" used by clinicians to gauge a patient's chances of suffering a heart attack and guide treatment decisions appear to significantly overestimate the likelihood of a heart attack, according to results of a study by investigators at Johns Hopkins and other institutions. [More]