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Study looks at factors that influence life expectancy of childhood cancer survivors

Study looks at factors that influence life expectancy of childhood cancer survivors

Many factors influence the life expectancy of childhood cancer survivors: not getting enough exercise, being underweight, and being worried about their future health or their health insurance. These are the findings of research led by Cheryl Cox of the St. Jude Children's Research Hospital in the US, published in Springer's Journal of Cancer Survivorship. The study found that, on average, childhood cancer survivors passed away before they were 40 years old. [More]

NextGen earns ONC 2014 Edition criteria certification for Emergency Department Solution

NextGen Healthcare Information Systems, LLC., a wholly owned subsidiary of Quality Systems, Inc. (NASDAQ: QSII) and a leading provider of healthcare information systems and connectivity solutions, announced today that NextGen® Emergency Department Solution version 6.0 is compliant with the ONC 2014 Edition criteria and was certified as an electronic health record (EHR) Module on March 7, 2014 by the Certification Commission for Health Information Technology (CCHIT®), an ONC-ACB, in accordance with the applicable Hospital certification criteria adopted by the Secretary of Health and Human Services. [More]
Studies provide evidence to clarify role of NAFLD as independent risk factor for development of CVD

Studies provide evidence to clarify role of NAFLD as independent risk factor for development of CVD

Two new studies presented today at the International Liver CongressTM 2014 have provided more evidence to clarify the role of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) as an independent risk factor for the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD). [More]
Older people with memory and thinking problems may have lower risk of dying from cancer

Older people with memory and thinking problems may have lower risk of dying from cancer

Older people who are starting to have memory and thinking problems, but do not yet have dementia may have a lower risk of dying from cancer than people who have no memory and thinking problems, according to a study published in the April 9, 2014, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Medison Pharma inks agreement with Brainsway for exclusive marketing of Deep TMS system in Israel

Medison Pharma inks agreement with Brainsway for exclusive marketing of Deep TMS system in Israel

Medison Pharma has concluded an agreement with the medical device company Brainsway for exclusive marketing and distribution of the Deep TMS (Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation) system in Israel. [More]
Study examines links between parental obesity and risk of autism developmental in child

Study examines links between parental obesity and risk of autism developmental in child

Several studies have looked at possible links between maternal obesity during pregnancy and the risk of developmental disorders in the child. However, paternal obesity could be a greater risk factor than maternal obesity, according to a new study from the Norwegian Institute of Public Health. [More]
Women who had radiotherapy for breast cancer may have increased risk of lung tumour

Women who had radiotherapy for breast cancer may have increased risk of lung tumour

Women who have radiotherapy for breast cancer have a small but significantly increased risk of subsequently developing a primary lung tumour, and now research has shown that this risk increases with the amount of radiation absorbed by the tissue. [More]

Study examines link between higher screen time and bone mineral density in adolescents

Results of a study presented today at the World Congress on Osteoporosis, Osteoarthritis and Musculoskeletal Diseases, showed that in boys, higher screen time was adversely associated to bone mineral density (BMD) at all sites even when adjusted for specific lifestyle factors. [More]

Study: Moderate to severe depression increases risk of heart failure by 40%

Moderate to severe depression increases the risk of heart failure by 40%, a study of nearly 63 000 Norwegians has shown. The findings were presented for the first time today at EuroHeartCare 2014. [More]

Cigarette smoking among obese women appears to interfere with ability to taste fats, sweets, says study

Cigarette smoking among obese women appears to interfere with their ability to taste fats and sweets, a new study shows. Despite craving high-fat, sugary foods, these women were less likely than others to perceive these tastes, which may drive them to consume more calories. [More]
Researchers examine risks and benefits of E-cigarettes

Researchers examine risks and benefits of E-cigarettes

Some believe e-cigarettes are less harmful than smoking tobacco since e-cig vapor doesn't contain the chemicals found in tobacco smoke. [More]
Young adults participated in cardio fitness activities may preserve memory, thinking skills in middle age

Young adults participated in cardio fitness activities may preserve memory, thinking skills in middle age

Young adults who run or participate in other cardio fitness activities may preserve their memory and thinking skills in middle age, according to a new study published in the April 2, 2014, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. Middle age was defined as ages 43 to 55. [More]
BronchoGen genomic test meets primary endpoint in AEGIS-2 clinical trial

BronchoGen genomic test meets primary endpoint in AEGIS-2 clinical trial

Allegro Diagnostics Corp. today announced that the AEGIS-2 clinical trial has met its primary endpoint, demonstrating that the BronchoGen genomic test improves the accuracy of lung cancer diagnosis when used in combination with bronchoscopy. [More]

Fathers who started smoking before 11 tend to have obese sons

Men who started smoking regularly before the age of 11 had sons who, on average, had 5-10kg more body fat than their peers by the time they were in their teens, according to new research from the Children of the 90s study at the University of Bristol. [More]

Study finds that stress can make allergies worse

Stress doesn't cause allergies, but easing your mind might mean less allergy flare-ups this spring. According to a study published in the April issue of Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology, the scientific journal of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, allergy sufferers with persistent stress experience more allergy flares. [More]
Study shows important parallels between epidemic of HIV/AIDS and opioid addiction

Study shows important parallels between epidemic of HIV/AIDS and opioid addiction

​There are important parallels between the early years of the HIV/AIDS epidemic and the current epidemic of opioid addiction - ones that could trigger a significant shift in opioid addiction prevention, diagnosis and treatment. [More]
Exposure to tobacco websites linked with increased chances of smoking initiation

Exposure to tobacco websites linked with increased chances of smoking initiation

Teens and young adults who are exposed to marketing materials for tobacco products, such as coupons and websites, were far more likely to begin smoking or to be current smokers than those not exposed, finds a new study in the Journal of Adolescent Health. [More]
Mobile phones with tobacco screening guidelines offer cessation counseling

Mobile phones with tobacco screening guidelines offer cessation counseling

Smartphones and tablets may hold the key to getting more clinicians to screen patients for tobacco use and advise smokers on how to quit. Even though tobacco use is the leading cause of preventable disease and death in the U.S., clinicians often don't ask about smoking during patient exams. [More]

Men with long-term HIV infections at higher risk of developing plaque in their coronary arteries

Men with long-term HIV infections are at higher risk than uninfected men of developing plaque in their coronary arteries, regardless of their other risk factors for coronary artery disease, according to results of a study led by Johns Hopkins researchers. A report on the research appears in the April 1 issue of Annals of Internal Medicine. [More]

New study shows anti-anxiety drugs and sleeping pills associated with increased risk of death

Anti-anxiety drugs and sleeping pills have been linked to an increased risk of death, according to new research from the University of Warwick. [More]