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Financial incentives increase abstinence rates among low-income smokers, research shows

Financial incentives increase abstinence rates among low-income smokers, research shows

Paying smokers to quit with payments that increased with the length of abstinence led one third of participants in a study to stop smoking for six months, according to research published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. [More]
Lisinopril oral solution approved for treatment of hypertension in children and adults

Lisinopril oral solution approved for treatment of hypertension in children and adults

Silvergate Pharmaceuticals, Inc., leader in the development and commercialization of innovative and safe medicines for children, today announced that the United States Food and Drug Administration approved Qbrelis (Lisinopril) Oral Solution, the first and only FDA-approved Lisinopril oral solution. [More]
Experts recommend several measures to reduce firearm suicide rates in the U.S.

Experts recommend several measures to reduce firearm suicide rates in the U.S.

Researchers from Columbia University Medical Center nd New York State Psychiatric Institute have found that legislation reducing access to firearms has lowered firearm suicide rates in other countries. [More]
Teenagers who smoke daily report higher levels of health complaints

Teenagers who smoke daily report higher levels of health complaints

As fewer teens overall take up smoking, those who do smoke daily are reporting more health complaints than in years past, a new study indicates. [More]
Smoking reduces lifespans and overall chances of kidney transplantation in dialysis patients

Smoking reduces lifespans and overall chances of kidney transplantation in dialysis patients

Dialysis patients who smoke are much less likely to receive a life-saving kidney transplant and much more likely to die sooner according to researchers from the Health Research Institute (HRI) at the University of Limerick and UL’s Graduate Entry Medical School. [More]
Lifestyle choices more likely to influence quality of life for ARDS survivors

Lifestyle choices more likely to influence quality of life for ARDS survivors

A new study of patients who survive the once-nearly fatal Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) finds their subsequent quality of life has more to do with lifestyle factors than how sick they were in the hospital. [More]
Use of nicotine patches or Zyban drug during pregnancy benefits both mother and child

Use of nicotine patches or Zyban drug during pregnancy benefits both mother and child

The results of a study conducted by Dr. Anick Bérard, Professor and Fonds de recherche du Québec - Santé Research Chair on Medications and Pregnancy, at the University of Montreal's Faculty of Pharmacy and the Ste-Justine University Hospital demonstrate that the use of nicotine patches or the drug Zyban has positive effects for the unborn child and allows pregnant women to stop smoking during and after pregnancy. [More]
Study finds sex differences in smoking cessation with medications

Study finds sex differences in smoking cessation with medications

A new study led by Assistant Medical Professor Philip Smith of The City College of New York's Sophie Davis Biomedical Education/CUNY School of Medicine, and conducted in collaboration with researchers at Yale University and Yeshiva University, found important differences between women and men in their ability to quit smoking when taking medications commonly prescribed to help smokers quit. [More]
UNC experts advise against routine recommendation of e-cigarettes for smokers

UNC experts advise against routine recommendation of e-cigarettes for smokers

The health benefits of quitting smoking are widely accepted, but researchers from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have taken issue with the suggestion that doctors should routinely recommend e-cigarettes as an alternative to cigarettes for their patients who smoke. [More]
New study aims to measure behaviors, attitudes of smokers who use both cigarettes and e-cigarettes

New study aims to measure behaviors, attitudes of smokers who use both cigarettes and e-cigarettes

The use of electronic cigarettes ("e-cigarettes") has increased dramatically in recent years. The majority of new "vapers" were already cigarette smokers. [More]
NCX1 protein could help prevent progression of heart failure

NCX1 protein could help prevent progression of heart failure

A protein known to be crucial for maintaining the balance of calcium in cells could prove useful in halting the progression of heart failure. [More]
Young cancer survivors more likely to be current cigarette smokers

Young cancer survivors more likely to be current cigarette smokers

Researchers at The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston have found that cancer survivors who were diagnosed at adolescent and young adult ages are more likely to be current cigarette smokers than people who have not had cancer. The findings of this study are currently available in Cancer. [More]
One-third of osteoporotic women taking oral bisphosphonates have elevated risk for bone fracture

One-third of osteoporotic women taking oral bisphosphonates have elevated risk for bone fracture

More than 53 million Americans age 50 and older, primarily women, have osteoporosis or are at high risk for the condition due to low bone density. A recent study of oral bisphosphonates, the most commonly prescribed osteoporosis treatment, found that approximately a third of women prescribed these drugs continue to be at elevated risk for bone fracture, an outcome that may have several origins. [More]
REGARDS study shows persistence of racial disparities in stroke incidence, mortality

REGARDS study shows persistence of racial disparities in stroke incidence, mortality

Blacks between the ages of 45 and 54 die of strokes at a rate that is three times greater than their white counterparts, according to the Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) study, which looked at stroke incidence and mortality of nearly 30,000 participants over the age of 45 from an ethnically and demographically diverse sample of the U.S. population. [More]
Luteal phase of menstrual cycle may help thwart smoking behavior in women

Luteal phase of menstrual cycle may help thwart smoking behavior in women

Women who want to quit smoking may have better success by carefully timing their quit date with optimal days within their menstrual cycle, according to a new study from researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
Hospital-initiated smoking cessation interventions may improve patient outcomes, decrease re-hospitalization

Hospital-initiated smoking cessation interventions may improve patient outcomes, decrease re-hospitalization

A new study from the University of Ottawa Heart Institute, in collaboration with the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, has established that greater adoption of hospital-initiated tobacco cessation interventions improve patient outcomes and decrease further healthcare utilization. [More]
Telephone-based intervention helps reduce menopause-related insomnia, hot flashes

Telephone-based intervention helps reduce menopause-related insomnia, hot flashes

Chatting on the phone with a "sleep coach" and keeping a nightly sleep diary significantly improve sleep quality and reduce insomnia in women through all stages of menopause, according to a new study published today in JAMA Internal Medicine. [More]
Text messaging intervention may help smokers abstain from smoking relative to controls

Text messaging intervention may help smokers abstain from smoking relative to controls

A new study from The Miriam Hospital's Centers for Behavioral and Preventive Medicine found that smokers who received a text messaging intervention were more likely to abstain from smoking relative to controls. The paper is published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research mHealth and uHealth. [More]
Counseling on child's second hand smoke exposure helps parents quit smoking

Counseling on child's second hand smoke exposure helps parents quit smoking

Parents who smoke are more likely to quit smoking after receiving motivational smoking cessation counseling following a "teachable moment" (TM) such as witnessing their child experience an asthma attack. [More]
Exercise may significantly lessen cervical cancer risk in women

Exercise may significantly lessen cervical cancer risk in women

Even 30 minutes of exercise per week has the potential to significantly reduce a woman's risk of developing cervical cancer, according to a study from scientists at Roswell Park Cancer Institute (RPCI). The case-control study was recently published in the Journal of Lower Genital Tract Disease. [More]
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