Smoking Cessation News and Research RSS Feed - Smoking Cessation News and Research

Study finds ethnic differences in coronary heart disease risk within diverse population

Study finds ethnic differences in coronary heart disease risk within diverse population

In a study of more than 1.3 million Kaiser Permanente members in Northern California that stretched over 10 years, researchers found that blacks, Latinos and Asians generally had lower risk of coronary heart disease compared to whites. [More]
Adult smokers who use e-cigarettes 28% less likely to quit smoking

Adult smokers who use e-cigarettes 28% less likely to quit smoking

Electronic cigarettes are widely promoted and used to help smokers quit traditional cigarettes, but a new analysis from UC San Francisco found that adult smokers who use e-cigarettes are actually 28 percent less likely to stop smoking cigarettes. [More]
JJHWS, Plug and Play Tech Center partner to support companies developing wellness solutions

JJHWS, Plug and Play Tech Center partner to support companies developing wellness solutions

Johnson & Johnson Health and Wellness Solutions, Inc. today announced a collaboration with Plug and Play Tech Center, a global investor and technology accelerator, to support innovative, early-stage companies developing direct-to-consumer solutions that enhance wellness. [More]
SDSU researchers explore ways to eradicate thirdhand smoke

SDSU researchers explore ways to eradicate thirdhand smoke

When cigarette smoke is blown into the environment, its chemical constituents don't just vanish into thin air. Residue from the smoke settles into, accumulates and is stored in the surrounding environment, such as upholstery, carpets, walls, clothing and curtains. [More]
Study reveals effects of plain packaging on tobacco products among Australian Indigenous people

Study reveals effects of plain packaging on tobacco products among Australian Indigenous people

Following the introduction of plain packaging on tobacco products in 2012, Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people were 12 per cent less likely to think certain tobacco brands were less harmful than others, a new study found. [More]
BHF encourages pharmacists to use No Smoking Day as opportunity to promote smoking cessation

BHF encourages pharmacists to use No Smoking Day as opportunity to promote smoking cessation

The British Heart Foundation (BHF) is encouraging pharmacy staff to use to use No Smoking Day as an opportunity to increase participation among patients by promoting resources and local support services. [More]
Childhood family breakup can affect girls more than boys

Childhood family breakup can affect girls more than boys

A childhood family breakup can have long-term negative consequences for the children. Recent University of Illinois research looks at overall health, depression, and smoking as a health-related behavior and finds that, for girls, all three are worse. [More]

ATS Tobacco Action Committee supports regulation to curb exposure to health risks associated with tobacco products

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is expected issue its final ruling soon on the regulation of all tobacco products, including cigars and e-cigarettes, two of the largest sources of unregulated tobacco in the U.S. [More]
Smoking rates remain alarmingly high among American Indians, LGBT smokers and people with mental health issues

Smoking rates remain alarmingly high among American Indians, LGBT smokers and people with mental health issues

While the overall number of people who smoke in the United States is at an all-time low, not everyone is quite ready to celebrate. "We're making great strides, but it's evident that there are large groups of people who continue to struggle with tobacco and the chronic diseases associated with it," said Amy Lukowski, Psy.D., clinical director of Health Initiatives at National Jewish Health in Denver and for its QuitLogix program, the largest non-profit smoking quitline in the country. [More]
New analysis points to use of e-cigarettes as quitting aid among U.S. adults

New analysis points to use of e-cigarettes as quitting aid among U.S. adults

Adding to a growing body of research on patterns of e-cigarette use, researchers from Rutgers School of Public Health and the Steven A. Schroeder Institute for Tobacco Research and Policy Studies at Truth Initiative have found evidence that among U.S. adults, some recent cigarette quitters may have done so with the assistance of electronic cigarettes. [More]
Group therapy helps improve healthy behavior in people with cardiovascular risk factors

Group therapy helps improve healthy behavior in people with cardiovascular risk factors

Peer group support, in the form of group therapy, was found to help improve healthy behavior in people with cardiovascular risk factors, according to a study released today by Valentin Fuster, MD, PhD, Director of Mount Sinai Heart and Physician-in-Chief of The Mount Sinai Hospital. Mount Sinai Heart is ranked No. 7 in the nation by U.S. News & World Report in its 2015 "Best Hospitals" issue. [More]
Study assesses abdominoplasty complication rates, risk factors

Study assesses abdominoplasty complication rates, risk factors

Abdominoplasty—sometimes called "tummy tuck"—has a higher risk of major complications than other cosmetic plastic surgery procedures, reports a study in the November issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons. [More]
Miriam Hospital enrolling local participants for Parachute implant clinical trial to treat heart failure

Miriam Hospital enrolling local participants for Parachute implant clinical trial to treat heart failure

The Miriam Hospital is actively recruiting local participants for a U.S. clinical trial of the Parachute device for treating heart failure. The study is focused on determining if the new minimally invasive catheter-based device can slow the progression of heart failure, reduce repeat hospitalizations and death, and significantly improve quality of life for patients who experience enlargement of the left ventricle after a heart attack. [More]
New research shows that using e-cigarettes related to problematic drinking

New research shows that using e-cigarettes related to problematic drinking

Using e-cigarettes is related to problematic drinking, according to new research published in Addictive Behaviors. In a study involving around 1400 people, researchers also found that more women than men use e-cigarettes socially, opposite to patterns seen in regular cigarette smoking. [More]
Study finds overall decreasing trend in leading causes of death

Study finds overall decreasing trend in leading causes of death

An analysis of deaths in the United States between 1969 and 2013 finds an overall decreasing trend in the age-standardized death rate for all causes combined and for heart disease, cancer, stroke, unintentional injuries, and diabetes, although the rate of decrease appears to have slowed for heart disease, stroke, and diabetes, according to a study in the October 27 issue of JAMA. [More]
Henry Ford Hospital pulmonologist advocates for raising the smoking age to 21

Henry Ford Hospital pulmonologist advocates for raising the smoking age to 21

Henry Ford Hospital pulmonologist Daniel Ouellette, M.D., who during his 31-year career in medicine has seen the harmful effects of smoking on his patients, advocates for raising the smoking age to 21. [More]
Study: Nurses can play pivotal role in helping reduce smoking rates in China

Study: Nurses can play pivotal role in helping reduce smoking rates in China

China has a big smoking problem. Three-hundred-fifty million Chinese people smoke and 1 million deaths a year in China are attributed to smoking-related illnesses. By 2020, that's expected to double to 2 million Chinese people dying annually from using tobacco. [More]
Smoking cessation medication 46% effective in women

Smoking cessation medication 46% effective in women

The most effective prescription drug used to quit smoking initially helps women more than men, according to a Yale School of Medicine study. The study, published Oct. 7 by the journal Nicotine and Tobacco Research, found that varenicline, marketed as Chantix, was more effective earlier in women, and equally effective in women and men after one year. [More]
EU provides €3 million to support research on chronic lung disease

EU provides €3 million to support research on chronic lung disease

Researchers from Plymouth University Peninsula Schools of Medicine and Dentistry are part of an international consortium which has received funding of almost €3 million from the EU Horizon 2020 programme, to investigate methods to prevent, diagnose and treat non-communicable lung disease (such as asthma and chronic pulmonary obstructive disorder - COPD) in low and middle income countries. [More]
The Center for Bariatric Surgery receives MBSAQIP accreditation for safe, high-quality bariatric patient care

The Center for Bariatric Surgery receives MBSAQIP accreditation for safe, high-quality bariatric patient care

The Center for Bariatric Surgery has earned certification for adult and teen weight loss surgery under the Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery Accreditation and Quality Improvement Program (MBSAQIP) which sets standards for safe, high-quality bariatric patient care. [More]
Advertisement