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COPD patients receiving home oxygen have higher risk of burn injury

COPD patients receiving home oxygen have higher risk of burn injury

Researchers from the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston have found that patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease receiving home oxygen have a higher risk of burn injury. This study was published on March 30 in Mayo Clinic Proceedings. [More]
Experts call for a tobacco-free world by 2040

Experts call for a tobacco-free world by 2040

Leading public health researchers have called for the sale of tobacco to be phased out by 2040, showing that with sufficient political support and stronger evidence-based action against the tobacco industry, a tobacco-free world – where less than 5% of adults use tobacco – could be possible in less than three decades. [More]
New NCCN Guidelines for Smoking Cessation published

New NCCN Guidelines for Smoking Cessation published

Tobacco-related diseases are the most preventable cause of death worldwide; smoking cessation leads to improvement in cancer treatment outcomes, as well as decreased recurrence. According to the American Cancer Society, in 2015, nearly 171,000 of the estimated 589,430 cancer deaths in the United States--more than 25 percent--will be caused by tobacco smoking. [More]
Repeatedly exposing children to secondhand smoke is child abuse, argues Adam Goldstein

Repeatedly exposing children to secondhand smoke is child abuse, argues Adam Goldstein

Purposefully and repeatedly exposing children to secondhand smoke — a known human carcinogen — is child abuse, according to an opinion piece written by Adam Goldstein, MD, MPH, a professor in the Department of Family Medicine at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine. [More]
New study finds that fetus exposed to tobacco smoke faces diabetes risk in adulthood

New study finds that fetus exposed to tobacco smoke faces diabetes risk in adulthood

A fetus exposed to tobacco smoke may be at increased risk for diabetes in adulthood, a new study of adult daughters finds. [More]
People who quit smoking have improved metabolic effects, new study finds

People who quit smoking have improved metabolic effects, new study finds

People who quit smoking have improved metabolic effects, a new study finds. The results will be presented in a poster Thursday, March 5, at ENDO 2015, the annual meeting of the Endocrine Society in San Diego. [More]
16th WCTOH announces new speakers, programme and scientific highlights

16th WCTOH announces new speakers, programme and scientific highlights

The World Conference on Tobacco or Health (WCTOH) announced today that South Africa Minister of Health Dr Aaron Motsoaledi will address conference delegates during a ministerial plenary on the linkages between tobacco use and non-communicable diseases. [More]
Study finds that Twitter helpful for smoking cessation program

Study finds that Twitter helpful for smoking cessation program

When subjects in a smoking cessation program tweet each other regularly, they're more successful at kicking the habit, according to a study by UC Irvine and Stanford University researchers. Specifically, daily "automessages" that encourage and direct the social media exchanges may be more effective than traditional social media interventions for quitting smoking. [More]

Chrono Therapeutics gets support to develop SmartStop device for smoking cessation

Chrono Therapeutics, a pioneer in digital drug products, today announced an investment by Rock Health, the leading seed fund in digital health, to support the advancement of Chrono's SmartStop programmable transdermal drug delivery system and real-time behavioral support program for smoking cessation. [More]
Extending use of bupropion before quitting reduces smoking behavior

Extending use of bupropion before quitting reduces smoking behavior

Smokers may be more likely to successfully quit their habit if simple adjustments were made to how an existing anti-smoking medication is prescribed, according to a new study by a University at Buffalo research team. [More]
Researchers find that people with disabilities have unmet medical needs, poorer overall health

Researchers find that people with disabilities have unmet medical needs, poorer overall health

People with disabilities have unmet medical needs and poorer overall health throughout their lives, and as a result should be recognized as a health disparity group so more attention can be directed to improving their quality of life, a team of policy researchers has found. [More]
Smokers who quit early does not qualify for lung cancer screening, say Mayo Clinic researchers

Smokers who quit early does not qualify for lung cancer screening, say Mayo Clinic researchers

A decline in smoking rates may mean that many people who could have benefited from early detection of lung cancer are dying because they don't qualify for low-dose CT scans, according to a group of Mayo Clinic researchers. [More]
MD Anderson awarded more than $22 million in research grants from CPRIT

MD Anderson awarded more than $22 million in research grants from CPRIT

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center has received more than $22 million in research grants this week from the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas. Approximately half of the funds awarded for Individual Investigator Research Awards went to MD Anderson faculty as well as 40 percent of total IIRA awards that include those for children's and adolescent cancer and early detection and prevention. [More]
Targeted nanomedicines could help prevent heart attacks caused by atherosclerosis

Targeted nanomedicines could help prevent heart attacks caused by atherosclerosis

Nanometer-sized "drones" that deliver a special type of healing molecule to fat deposits in arteries could become a new way to prevent heart attacks caused by atherosclerosis, according to a study in pre-clinical models by scientists at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Columbia University Medical Center. [More]
Nicotine addiction medication produces greater reductions in smoking prior to quitting

Nicotine addiction medication produces greater reductions in smoking prior to quitting

Among cigarette smokers not willing or able to quit smoking in the next month but willing to reduce with the goal of quitting in the next 3 months, use of the nicotine addiction medication varenicline for 24 weeks compared with placebo produced greater reductions in smoking prior to quitting and increased smoking cessation rates at the end of treatment and at 1 year, according to a study in the February 17 issue of JAMA. [More]
Researchers say that cancer experience can lead to healthy lifestyle in survivors and family members

Researchers say that cancer experience can lead to healthy lifestyle in survivors and family members

After studying cancer survivors and their family caregivers, researchers at Case Western Reserve University conclude that the period between the final cancer treatment and first post-treatment checkup may be an ideal time for the entire household to jumpstart a healthy lifestyle. [More]
The growing evidence on  standardised packaging of tobacco products

The growing evidence on standardised packaging of tobacco products

The scientific journal Addiction has today published a collection of peer-reviewed research papers and commentaries that bring together key parts of the evidence base for standardised packaging of tobacco products from 2008 to 2015. [More]
Large majority of coronary patients fail to meet lifestyle, risk factor targets

Large majority of coronary patients fail to meet lifestyle, risk factor targets

The large majority of coronary patients in Europe are failing to achieve their lifestyle, risk factor and therapeutic targets as set out in the latest prevention guidelines. [More]
New study suggests that e-cigarette vapors can damage lungs

New study suggests that e-cigarette vapors can damage lungs

Do electronic cigarettes help people quit smoking? As the debate continues on that point, a new University of Rochester study suggests that e-cigarettes are likely a toxic replacement for tobacco products. [More]
Electronic cigarettes and smoking cessation: an interview with Professor Peter Hajek

Electronic cigarettes and smoking cessation: an interview with Professor Peter Hajek

The electronic cigarette has been invented by Chinese pharmacist Hon Lik in 2003. The rise in electronic cigarettes (EC) popularity was initially a grass root phenomenon. EC are estimated to be at least 95% safer than cigarettes and they appeal to smokers who cannot or do not want to stop smoking, but who want to reduce the risks smoking poses to their health. [More]
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