Spinal Cord Injury News and Research RSS Feed - Spinal Cord Injury News and Research

A spinal cord injury usually begins with a sudden, traumatic blow to the spine that fractures or dislocates vertebrae. The damage begins at the moment of injury when displaced bone fragments, disc material, or ligaments bruise or tear into spinal cord tissue. Most injuries to the spinal cord don't completely sever it. Instead, an injury is more likely to cause fractures and compression of the vertebrae, which then crush and destroy the axons, extensions of nerve cells that carry signals up and down the spinal cord between the brain and the rest of the body. An injury to the spinal cord can damage a few, many, or almost all of these axons. Some injuries will allow almost complete recovery. Others will result in complete paralysis.
HKUST scientists find way to stimulate growth of corticospinal tract axons

HKUST scientists find way to stimulate growth of corticospinal tract axons

Researchers at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology have found a way to stimulate the growth of axons, which may spell the dawn of a new beginning on chronic SCI treatments. [More]
Study: Peripheral nerve stimulation therapy can reverse SCI-associated nerve deterioration

Study: Peripheral nerve stimulation therapy can reverse SCI-associated nerve deterioration

Approximately 12,000 spinal cord injuries (SCI) happen every year in the U.S., the majority caused by car accidents, falls, sporting accidents and gunshot wounds. [More]
Asterias Biotherapeutics added to Russell indexes

Asterias Biotherapeutics added to Russell indexes

Asterias Biotherapeutics, Inc., a biotechnology company focused on the emerging field of regenerative medicine, today announced that it has been added to the Russell 2000, Russell 3000, Russell Global and Russell Microcap indexes following Russell Investments' ("Russell") reconstitution of its comprehensive set of U.S. and global equity indexes after the close of the U.S. markets on June 26, 2015. [More]
Neuralstem's HK532-IGF-1 neural stem cells therapy for Alzheimer's disease presented at ISSCR Annual Meeting

Neuralstem's HK532-IGF-1 neural stem cells therapy for Alzheimer's disease presented at ISSCR Annual Meeting

Neuralstem, Inc., a biopharmaceutical company using neural stem cell technology to develop small molecule and cell therapy treatments for central nervous system diseases, announced that the poster "Human Neural Stem Cells Expressing IGF-1: A Novel Cellular Therapy for Alzheimer's Disease" was presented yesterday at the International Society for Stem Cell Research (ISSCR) Annual Meeting in Stockholm, Sweden. [More]
Researchers develop new implantable drug-delivery system using nanowire

Researchers develop new implantable drug-delivery system using nanowire

A team of researchers has created a new implantable drug-delivery system using nanowires that can be wirelessly controlled. [More]
Incidence rate of acute traumatic spinal cord injury remains relatively stable in U.S.

Incidence rate of acute traumatic spinal cord injury remains relatively stable in U.S.

Between 1993 and 2012, the incidence rate of acute traumatic spinal cord injury remained relatively stable in the U.S., although there was an increase among older adults, mostly associated with an increase in falls, according to a study in the June 9 issue of JAMA, a theme issue on the Americans with Disabilities Act. [More]
NYU Langone Medical Center celebrates 65th anniversary of Rusk Rehabilitation

NYU Langone Medical Center celebrates 65th anniversary of Rusk Rehabilitation

Howard A. Rusk, MD (1901-1989), a tall, soft-spoken physician from NYU Langone Medical Center and widely considered "the father of rehabilitation medicine," set about to establish a facility founded on the belief that care should focus on the whole person—not just on their physical illness or disability, but also on their emotional, psychological, and social needs as well. [More]
Stem cell transplant restores sensory functions in injured spinal cord

Stem cell transplant restores sensory functions in injured spinal cord

New research from Uppsala University shows promising progress in the use of stem cells for treatment of spinal cord injury. The results, which are published in the scientific journal Scientific Reports, show that human stem cells that are transplanted to the injured spinal cord contribute to restoration of some sensory functions. [More]
Study suggests new approaches to improve assessment of obesity in teens with physical disabilities

Study suggests new approaches to improve assessment of obesity in teens with physical disabilities

New approaches, based on body mass index (BMI) or other simple measures, are needed to improve assessment of obesity in adolescents with physical disabilities, reports a paper in the American Journal of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, the official journal of the Association of Academic Physiatrists. [More]
New study shows stem cell treatments promote faster healing in primates with spinal cord injury

New study shows stem cell treatments promote faster healing in primates with spinal cord injury

A new study appearing today in STEM CELLS Translational Medicine, designed to test how stem cell injections affect primates with spinal cord injury (SCI), showed the treatments significantly improved the animals’ motor function recovery and promoted faster healing, too. The researchers call their findings a step forward toward the goal of improving outcomes for humans with chronic SCI. [More]
Simple blood test can predict evidence of TBI on radiographic imaging, injury severity

Simple blood test can predict evidence of TBI on radiographic imaging, injury severity

New study results show that a simple blood test to measure brain-specific proteins released after a person suffers a traumatic brain injury (TBI) can reliably predict both evidence of TBI on radiographic imaging and injury severity. [More]
UofL receives NIH REACH award to create new ExCITE Hub program

UofL receives NIH REACH award to create new ExCITE Hub program

The University of Louisville announced today that a grant from the National Institutes of Health will combine with matching funds from the university to create a new $6.1 million initiative to commercialize discoveries made by UofL researchers. [More]
Peripheral inflammatory cells play role in Parkinson's disease

Peripheral inflammatory cells play role in Parkinson's disease

A small area in the midbrain known as the substantia nigra is the control center for all bodily movement. Increasing loss of dopamine-generating neurons in this part of the brain therefore leads to the main symptoms of Parkinson's disease - slowness of movement, rigidity and shaking. [More]
New UH research shows how non-invasive brain-machine interface can help control prosthetic hand

New UH research shows how non-invasive brain-machine interface can help control prosthetic hand

A research team from the University of Houston has created an algorithm that allowed a man to grasp a bottle and other objects with a prosthetic hand, powered only by his thoughts. [More]
Laura De Laporte receives ERC grant to develop minimally invasive therapy for spinal cord injury

Laura De Laporte receives ERC grant to develop minimally invasive therapy for spinal cord injury

The research objective of Dr.-Ing. Laura De Laporte, junior group leader at DWI - Leibniz Institute for Interactive Materials in Aachen, is to develop a minimally invasive therapy for spinal cord injury. Her goal and her scientific approach to develop an injectable material with the ability to provide biochemical and physical guidance for regenerating nerves across the injury site, was selected by the European Research Council. [More]
MIS TLIF surgery results in less pain, shorter hospital stay and faster recovery

MIS TLIF surgery results in less pain, shorter hospital stay and faster recovery

A minimally invasive spinal fusion back surgery results in less blood loss, less postoperative pain, smaller incisions, a shorter hospital stay and faster recovery and return to work. [More]
Loyola surgeon describes the immense benefits of minimally invasive spinal fusion surgery

Loyola surgeon describes the immense benefits of minimally invasive spinal fusion surgery

A minimally invasive spinal fusion back surgery results in less blood loss, less postoperative pain, smaller incisions, a shorter hospital stay and faster recovery and return to work. [More]
Cancer drug promotes neuronal regeneration after spinal cord injury

Cancer drug promotes neuronal regeneration after spinal cord injury

Damage to the spinal cord rarely heals because the injured nerve cells fail to regenerate. The regrowth of their long nerve fibers is hindered by scar tissue and molecular processes inside the nerves. [More]
Neuralstem reports top line data from NSI-566 Phase II trial for treatment of ALS

Neuralstem reports top line data from NSI-566 Phase II trial for treatment of ALS

Neuralstem, Inc. announced top line data from the Phase II trial of NSI-566 spinal cord-derived neural stem cells under development for the treatment of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The study met primary safety endpoints. The maximum tolerated dose of 16 million transplanted cells and the surgery was well tolerated. [More]

Wings for Life World Run to fund breakthrough clinical study on spinal cord injury

It all started with a single toe. Even today, Dr. Susan Harkema recalls the words spoken by one of the research participants: "Look Susie, I can move my toe." The patient's name was Rob Summers and he was completely paralyzed from the neck down. After a car accident he was told he would never be able to walk again. [More]
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