Spinal Cord Injury News and Research RSS Feed - Spinal Cord Injury News and Research

A spinal cord injury usually begins with a sudden, traumatic blow to the spine that fractures or dislocates vertebrae. The damage begins at the moment of injury when displaced bone fragments, disc material, or ligaments bruise or tear into spinal cord tissue. Most injuries to the spinal cord don't completely sever it. Instead, an injury is more likely to cause fractures and compression of the vertebrae, which then crush and destroy the axons, extensions of nerve cells that carry signals up and down the spinal cord between the brain and the rest of the body. An injury to the spinal cord can damage a few, many, or almost all of these axons. Some injuries will allow almost complete recovery. Others will result in complete paralysis.
Researchers develop first clinical practice guidelines for managing pain after spinal cord injury

Researchers develop first clinical practice guidelines for managing pain after spinal cord injury

Researchers at Lawson Health Research Institute are the first in Canada to develop clinical practice guidelines for managing neuropathic pain with patients who have experienced a spinal cord injury (SCI). [More]
Study provides more insight into effects of DBS in treatment of Alzheimer's disease

Study provides more insight into effects of DBS in treatment of Alzheimer's disease

New findings published today by a team of researchers led by Dr. Andres Lozano at the Krembil Neuroscience Centre of Toronto Western Hospital have provided further insight into the effects of Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. [More]
Interim results from clinical trial demonstrate safety of cell-based therapy for retinitis pigmentosa

Interim results from clinical trial demonstrate safety of cell-based therapy for retinitis pigmentosa

Regenerative medicine company jCyte and the Sue & Bill Gross Stem Cell Research Center at the University of California, Irvine report that their investigational therapy for retinitis pigmentosa (RP) has demonstrated a favorable safety and tolerability profile in an ongoing Phase I/II clinical trial. [More]
Transplant drug rapamycin may reduce nerve damage, neuropathic pain after spinal cord injury

Transplant drug rapamycin may reduce nerve damage, neuropathic pain after spinal cord injury

New research in mice indicates that a drug commonly used to suppress the immune system in recipients of organ transplants may also reduce tissue damage and neuropathic pain after spinal cord injury. The findings are published in the Journal of Orthopaedic Research. [More]
Researchers investigate neural patterns underlying development of walking behaviours

Researchers investigate neural patterns underlying development of walking behaviours

Even before they stand up, infants have a rough idea of how to walk; they just need some time to lay down the right neural wiring. Understanding how babies take their first steps can also help us to improve the rehabilitation of patients recovering from spinal cord injury, and children with cerebral palsy. [More]
UL research survey highlights lack of uniformity in wheelchair provision across Ireland

UL research survey highlights lack of uniformity in wheelchair provision across Ireland

The results of a recent UL research survey of wheelchair users and their careers in Ireland will be presented today to Senator John Dolan (CEO, Disability Federation of Ireland) in Leinster House by Dr Rosie Gowran, Department of Clinical Therapies, University of Limerick, who is calling for a national review of wheelchair and seating provision services in Ireland. [More]
New technology could help deliver treatments for brain injuries

New technology could help deliver treatments for brain injuries

A new study led by scientists at the Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute describes a technology that could lead to new therapeutics for traumatic brain injuries. The discovery, published today in Nature Communications, provides a means of homing drugs or nanoparticles to injured areas of the brain. [More]
Vodafone IoT technology to power Ekso GT exoskeletons

Vodafone IoT technology to power Ekso GT exoskeletons

Vodafone will be connecting the world’s first and only exoskeleton that is FDA cleared for use with both stroke patients and spinal cord injuries – the Ekso GT™ from Ekso Bionics. [More]
New, simpler way for encapsulation-free controlled protein release

New, simpler way for encapsulation-free controlled protein release

A U of T Engineering team has designed a simpler way to keep therapeutic proteins where they are needed for long periods of time. The discovery is a potential game-changer for the treatment of chronic illnesses or injuries that often require multiple injections or daily pills. [More]
Taking pregabalin drug during pregnancy could lead to major birth defects

Taking pregabalin drug during pregnancy could lead to major birth defects

A drug commonly used to treat pain, epilepsy, anxiety and other brain health disorders may be associated with an increased risk of major birth defects, according to a study published in the May 18, 2016, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Wyss Institute partners with ReWalk to accelerate development of wearable, soft exosuits

Wyss Institute partners with ReWalk to accelerate development of wearable, soft exosuits

The Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University has entered into a collaboration with ReWalk Robotics Ltd., to accelerate the development of the Institute's lightweight, wearable soft exosuit technologies for assisting people with lower limb disabilities. [More]
Gene therapy could be potential treatment for neuropathic pain in cancer patients

Gene therapy could be potential treatment for neuropathic pain in cancer patients

A study providing new information about neuropathic pain afflicting some 90 percent of cancer patients who have had nerve damage caused by tumors, surgery, chemotherapy or radiation indicates gene therapy as a possible treatment. [More]
Xiao procedure lacks efficacy for bladder control in children

Xiao procedure lacks efficacy for bladder control in children

Researchers at Johns Hopkins All Children's Hospital report the results of a double-blinded randomized controlled trial of the "Xiao procedure" in children with spina bifida. [More]
New article reviews ability of different stem cells to help restore function after spinal cord injuries

New article reviews ability of different stem cells to help restore function after spinal cord injuries

Stem cell therapy is a rapidly evolving and promising treatment for spinal-cord injuries. According to a new literature review, published in the April issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, different types of stem cells vary in their ability to help restore function, and an ideal treatment protocol remains unclear pending further clinical research. [More]
New miniaturized microscope offers unprecedented insight into nervous system function

New miniaturized microscope offers unprecedented insight into nervous system function

A microscope about the size of a penny is giving scientists a new window into the everyday activity of cells within the spinal cord. The innovative technology revealed that astrocytes--cells in the nervous system that do not conduct electrical signals and were traditionally viewed as merely supportive--unexpectedly react to intense sensation. [More]
Scientists discover CD2AP protein that plays key role in nervous system

Scientists discover CD2AP protein that plays key role in nervous system

University of Louisville researchers have discovered that a protein previously known for its role in kidney function also plays a significant role in the nervous system. In an article featured in the April 13 issue of the Journal of Neuroscience, they show that the adaptor protein CD2AP is a key player in a type of neural growth known as collateral sprouting. [More]
Scientists identify underlying cause of immune suppression in people with high level spinal cord injuries

Scientists identify underlying cause of immune suppression in people with high level spinal cord injuries

Scientists report in Nature Neuroscience they have identified an underlying cause of dangerous immune suppression in people with high level spinal cord injuries and they propose a possible treatment. [More]
Inflammation after stroke may help the brain to self-repair

Inflammation after stroke may help the brain to self-repair

After a stroke, there is inflammation in the damaged part of the brain. Until now, the inflammation has been seen as a negative consequence that needs to be abolished as soon as possible. But, as it turns out, there are also some positive sides to the inflammation, and it can actually help the brain to self-repair. [More]
Manipulation of signals in nervous system can enhance recovery after traumatic injury

Manipulation of signals in nervous system can enhance recovery after traumatic injury

Neurobiologists at UC San Diego have discovered how signals that orchestrate the construction of the nervous system also influence recovery after traumatic injury. They also found that manipulating these signals can enhance the return of function. [More]
Aging reduces axonal regeneration after spinal cord injury

Aging reduces axonal regeneration after spinal cord injury

Older Americans are increasingly active, and this lifestyle shift has contributed to the rise in average age of a person experiencing a spinal cord injury. The changing demographic calls for a better understanding of how aging impacts recovery and repair after a spinal cord injury. [More]
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