Spinal Cord Injury News and Research RSS Feed - Spinal Cord Injury News and Research

A spinal cord injury usually begins with a sudden, traumatic blow to the spine that fractures or dislocates vertebrae. The damage begins at the moment of injury when displaced bone fragments, disc material, or ligaments bruise or tear into spinal cord tissue. Most injuries to the spinal cord don't completely sever it. Instead, an injury is more likely to cause fractures and compression of the vertebrae, which then crush and destroy the axons, extensions of nerve cells that carry signals up and down the spinal cord between the brain and the rest of the body. An injury to the spinal cord can damage a few, many, or almost all of these axons. Some injuries will allow almost complete recovery. Others will result in complete paralysis.
Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation announces Quality of Life grants for 75 nonprofit organizations

Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation announces Quality of Life grants for 75 nonprofit organizations

The Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation, a leading nonprofit dedicated to improving quality of life for individuals living with paralysis, announced it has awarded $600,137 in Quality of Life grants to 75 nonprofit organizations nationwide. [More]
Patient questionnaire can help measure disability risk following surgery

Patient questionnaire can help measure disability risk following surgery

Freedom from disability is one of the most important patient-centered outcomes after surgery, but there is currently no validated instrument to measure postoperative disability. [More]
Kessler Institute for Rehabilitation offers tips to help caregivers cope with challenges

Kessler Institute for Rehabilitation offers tips to help caregivers cope with challenges

Husbands and wives, parents and children, siblings and others are taking on the role of caregiver for family members who are unable to care for themselves due to disabilities, chronic health conditions or the challenges related to aging. In fact, more than 90 million caregivers – two out of five adults – are now providing that daily care, an increase of 30% since 2010. [More]
New NIH grant to help restore function after spinal cord injury

New NIH grant to help restore function after spinal cord injury

Restoring function after spinal cord injury, which damages the connections that carry messages from the brain to the body and back, depends on forming new connections between the surviving nerve cells. While there are some delicate surgical techniques that reconnect the nerves, researchers are also looking at ways to restore the connections themselves at a cellular level. [More]
UVA researchers find biological trigger for protective form of immune response to spinal cord injury

UVA researchers find biological trigger for protective form of immune response to spinal cord injury

Hot on the heels of discovering a protective form of immune response to spinal cord injury, researchers at the University of Virginia School of Medicine have pinpointed the biological trigger for that response - a vital step toward being able to harness the body's defenses to improve treatment for spine injuries, brain trauma, Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative conditions. [More]
Research findings could lead to improved treatments for brain and spinal cord injuries

Research findings could lead to improved treatments for brain and spinal cord injuries

Hot on the heels of discovering a protective form of immune response to spinal cord injury, researchers at the University of Virginia School of Medicine have pinpointed the biological trigger for that response - a vital step toward being able to harness the body's defenses to improve treatment for spine injuries, brain trauma, Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative conditions. [More]
Findings may lay foundation for treatment of neurodegenerative diseases

Findings may lay foundation for treatment of neurodegenerative diseases

This story starts in 1955, upon the death of Albert Einstein, when the pathologist charged with performing the famous scientist's autopsy stole his brain. [More]
Scientists identify how 'mini-brain' in spinal cord helps keep our body balanced

Scientists identify how 'mini-brain' in spinal cord helps keep our body balanced

Walking across an icy parking lot in winter--and remaining upright--takes intense concentration. But a new discovery suggests that much of the balancing act that our bodies perform when faced with such a task happens unconsciously, thanks to a cluster of neurons in our spinal cord that function as a "mini-brain" to integrate sensory information and make the necessary adjustments to our muscles so that we don't slip and fall. [More]

Muscle spindle sensory feedback promotes functional recovery after spinal cord injury

After an incomplete spinal cord injury, the body can partially recover basic motor function. So-called muscle spindles and associated sensory circuits back to the spinal cord promote the establishment of novel neuronal connections after injury. [More]
New study compares usefulness of two biomarkers released into the blood after TBI

New study compares usefulness of two biomarkers released into the blood after TBI

In cases of traumatic brain injury (TBI), predicting the likelihood of a cranial lesion and determining the need for head computed tomography (CT) can be aided by measuring markers of bone injury in the blood. [More]
New drug offers hope for victims of spinal cord injury

New drug offers hope for victims of spinal cord injury

Scientist in the U.S have developed a drug that could help paralysed victims of spinal cord injury regain their ability to move. [More]
New chemical compound shows promise in restoring function lost to spinal cord injury

New chemical compound shows promise in restoring function lost to spinal cord injury

Case Western Reserve scientists have developed a new chemical compound that shows extraordinary promise in restoring function lost to spinal cord injury. The compound, which the researchers dubbed intracellular sigma peptide (ISP), allowed paralyzed muscles to activate in more than 80 percent of the animals tested. [More]
Tobacco smoke toxin could increase pain in people with spinal cord injury

Tobacco smoke toxin could increase pain in people with spinal cord injury

A neurotoxin called acrolein found in tobacco smoke that is thought to increase pain in people with spinal cord injury has now been shown to accumulate in mice exposed to the equivalent of 12 cigarettes daily over a short time period. [More]
Researchers find way to prevent noise-induced hearing loss

Researchers find way to prevent noise-induced hearing loss

Researchers from Weill Cornell Medical College and the Gladstone Institutes have found a way to prevent noise-induced hearing loss in a mouse using a simple chemical compound that is a precursor to vitamin B3. This discovery has important implications not only for preventing hearing loss, but also potentially for treating some aging-related conditions that are linked to the same protein. [More]
Ligand indazole chloride improves motor function, study shows

Ligand indazole chloride improves motor function, study shows

Multiple sclerosis (MS), an autoimmune disease of the brain and spinal cord, affects about 2.3 million people worldwide (400,000 in the United States). Affecting more women than men, it can be seen at any age, although it is most commonly diagnosed between the ages of 20 and 40. [More]
TSRI scientists find simple method to convert human skin cells into sensory neurons

TSRI scientists find simple method to convert human skin cells into sensory neurons

A team led by scientists from The Scripps Research Institute has found a simple method to convert human skin cells into the specialized neurons that detect pain, itch, touch and other bodily sensations. These neurons are also affected by spinal cord injury and involved in Friedreich's ataxia, a devastating and currently incurable neurodegenerative disease that largely strikes children. [More]
Kristjan T. Ragnarsson receives Frank H. Krusen, MD, Lifetime Achievement Award

Kristjan T. Ragnarsson receives Frank H. Krusen, MD, Lifetime Achievement Award

Kristjan T. Ragnarsson, MD, the Lucy G. Moses Professor and Chairman of the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine for the Mount Sinai Health System received the Frank H. Krusen, MD, Lifetime Achievement Award from the American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation during a ceremony which took place on Saturday, November 15, in San Diego, California. [More]
Research breakthrough offers hope for patients with severe spinal cord injuries

Research breakthrough offers hope for patients with severe spinal cord injuries

Case Western Reserve researchers have developed a procedure that restores function to muscles involved in the control of breathing - even when they have been paralyzed for more than a year. The breakthrough offers hope that one day patients with severe spinal cord injuries will be able to breathe again without the assistance of a ventilator. [More]
Spinal cord injuries can cause brain degeneration, find UM SOM researchers

Spinal cord injuries can cause brain degeneration, find UM SOM researchers

Most research on spinal cord injuries has focused on effects due to spinal cord damage and scientists have neglected the effects on brain function. University of Maryland School of Medicine researchers have found for the first time that spinal cord injuries (SCI) can cause widespread and sustained brain inflammation that leads to progressive loss of nerve cells, with associated cognitive problems and depression. [More]
Electrical stimulation technology can help SCI patients regain bladder control

Electrical stimulation technology can help SCI patients regain bladder control

When individuals suffer a spinal cord injury, paralysis is only a part of the major impact on quality of life. Often they also lose bladder control, which frequently causes infections that can lead to kidney damage. [More]