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A spinal cord injury usually begins with a sudden, traumatic blow to the spine that fractures or dislocates vertebrae. The damage begins at the moment of injury when displaced bone fragments, disc material, or ligaments bruise or tear into spinal cord tissue. Most injuries to the spinal cord don't completely sever it. Instead, an injury is more likely to cause fractures and compression of the vertebrae, which then crush and destroy the axons, extensions of nerve cells that carry signals up and down the spinal cord between the brain and the rest of the body. An injury to the spinal cord can damage a few, many, or almost all of these axons. Some injuries will allow almost complete recovery. Others will result in complete paralysis.
Person with chronic, complete paralysis regains voluntary control to work with robotic device

Person with chronic, complete paralysis regains voluntary control to work with robotic device

A 39-year-old man who had had been completely paralyzed for four years was able to voluntarily control his leg muscles and take thousands of steps in a "robotic exoskeleton" device during five days of training -- and for two weeks afterward -- a team of UCLA scientists reports this week. [More]
Global urinary catheters market to expand at 4.1% CAGR between 2015 and 2021

Global urinary catheters market to expand at 4.1% CAGR between 2015 and 2021

According to a new market report published by Persistence Market Research titled "Global Market Study on Urinary Catheters: Intermittent Catheters Segment to Witness Highest Growth by 2021", the urinary catheters market is expected to be valued at US$1,377.5 Mn by the end of 2015. It is anticipated to expand at a CAGR of4.1% from 2015 to 2021, to reach US$1,755.0 Mn by 2021. [More]
Kentucky, Oklahoma and Rhode Island researchers awarded NSF grant to develop innovative brain imaging technologies

Kentucky, Oklahoma and Rhode Island researchers awarded NSF grant to develop innovative brain imaging technologies

The National Science Foundation has awarded $6 million to researchers in Kentucky, Oklahoma and Rhode Island to develop innovative and broadly accessible brain imaging technologies to provide insight into how the nervous system functions in health and disease. [More]
Rush researchers explore new stem cell therapy to treat spinal cord injuries

Rush researchers explore new stem cell therapy to treat spinal cord injuries

Researchers at Rush University Medical Center are exploring a new therapy using stem cells to treat spinal cord injuries within the first 14 to 30 days of injury. Rush is only the second center in the country currently studying this new approach. [More]
Einstein and Montefiore researchers receive $1.2 million grant to advance spinal cord injury research

Einstein and Montefiore researchers receive $1.2 million grant to advance spinal cord injury research

Researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Montefiore Health System have received a $1.2 million grant from New York State to advance their promising technology for treating paralysis and other effects of spinal cord injuries (SCI). [More]
Brain-controlled prosthesis could improve quality of life in people with spinal cord injuries

Brain-controlled prosthesis could improve quality of life in people with spinal cord injuries

When we type or perform other precise tasks, our brains and muscles usually work together effortlessly. But when a neurological disease or spinal cord injury severs the connection between the brain and limbs, once-easy motions become difficult or impossible. [More]
New non-invasive spinal cord stimulation helps paralyzed men voluntarily move their legs

New non-invasive spinal cord stimulation helps paralyzed men voluntarily move their legs

Five men with complete motor paralysis were able to voluntarily generate step-like movements thanks to a new strategy that non-invasively delivers electrical stimulation to their spinal cords, according to a new study funded in part by the National Institutes of Health. The strategy, called transcutaneous stimulation, delivers electrical current to the spinal cord by way of electrodes strategically placed on the skin of the lower back. [More]
UAB researchers find therapeutic target for treatment of acute spinal cord injuries

UAB researchers find therapeutic target for treatment of acute spinal cord injuries

UAB researchers have identified a therapeutic target for the treatment of acute spinal cord injuries. According to this research, conducted on mice, the administration of a drug that prevents loss of myelin - the insulating sheath around nerve fibres that allows signals to be transmitted - increases the mobility of the mice after an injury. [More]
Scientists propose new spinal cord stimulation strategy to activate motor neurons

Scientists propose new spinal cord stimulation strategy to activate motor neurons

Patients, doctors and researchers look with great expectations to epidural electrostimulation, a medical technique that could alleviate the condition of subjects affected by paralysis due to spinal cord injury. Although still relatively rudimentary, the technique is constantly being improved thanks to research. [More]
ReWalk Robotics unveils latest edition of Personal powered exoskeleton system

ReWalk Robotics unveils latest edition of Personal powered exoskeleton system

ReWalk Robotics Ltd., the leading global exoskeleton manufacturer, unveiled today the latest edition of its Personal powered exoskeleton system—the ReWalk Personal 6.0—marking the company's sixth generation community use product. The ReWalk Personal 6.0 offers those in the spinal cord injured community the most functional exoskeleton system with the fastest walking speed and the most precise fit, among many other key benefits. [More]
Activating bacterial receptors boosts macrophage response, limits damage to spinal cord following injury

Activating bacterial receptors boosts macrophage response, limits damage to spinal cord following injury

Macrophages are cellular sentinels in the body, assigned to identify "attacks" from viruses, bacteria, or fungi and sound the alarm when they are present. However, these cells are a "double edged sword" in spinal cord injury, providing both neural repair-promoting properties and pathological functions that destroy neuronal tissue [More]

Traumatic spinal cord injuries on the rise among older people

Traumatic spinal cord injuries are increasing with the population, and incidence is higher in older individuals, according to a Vanderbilt study that was published in the June 9 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association. [More]
Surgery delays for elderly patients with traumatic spinal cord injury

Surgery delays for elderly patients with traumatic spinal cord injury

Older patients with traumatic spinal cord injury experience significant delays in being transferred to a specialist treatment centre and receiving surgery, compared with younger patients, study findings show. [More]

Older patients with traumatic spinal cord injury less likely to get surgical treatment compared with younger patients

Older patients with traumatic spinal cord injury are less likely than younger patients to receive surgical treatment and experience a significant lag between injury and surgery, according to new research in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). [More]
HKUST scientists find way to stimulate growth of corticospinal tract axons

HKUST scientists find way to stimulate growth of corticospinal tract axons

Researchers at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology have found a way to stimulate the growth of axons, which may spell the dawn of a new beginning on chronic SCI treatments. [More]
Study: Peripheral nerve stimulation therapy can reverse SCI-associated nerve deterioration

Study: Peripheral nerve stimulation therapy can reverse SCI-associated nerve deterioration

Approximately 12,000 spinal cord injuries (SCI) happen every year in the U.S., the majority caused by car accidents, falls, sporting accidents and gunshot wounds. [More]
Asterias Biotherapeutics added to Russell indexes

Asterias Biotherapeutics added to Russell indexes

Asterias Biotherapeutics, Inc., a biotechnology company focused on the emerging field of regenerative medicine, today announced that it has been added to the Russell 2000, Russell 3000, Russell Global and Russell Microcap indexes following Russell Investments' ("Russell") reconstitution of its comprehensive set of U.S. and global equity indexes after the close of the U.S. markets on June 26, 2015. [More]
Neuralstem's HK532-IGF-1 neural stem cells therapy for Alzheimer's disease presented at ISSCR Annual Meeting

Neuralstem's HK532-IGF-1 neural stem cells therapy for Alzheimer's disease presented at ISSCR Annual Meeting

Neuralstem, Inc., a biopharmaceutical company using neural stem cell technology to develop small molecule and cell therapy treatments for central nervous system diseases, announced that the poster "Human Neural Stem Cells Expressing IGF-1: A Novel Cellular Therapy for Alzheimer's Disease" was presented yesterday at the International Society for Stem Cell Research (ISSCR) Annual Meeting in Stockholm, Sweden. [More]
Researchers develop new implantable drug-delivery system using nanowire

Researchers develop new implantable drug-delivery system using nanowire

A team of researchers has created a new implantable drug-delivery system using nanowires that can be wirelessly controlled. [More]
Incidence rate of acute traumatic spinal cord injury remains relatively stable in U.S.

Incidence rate of acute traumatic spinal cord injury remains relatively stable in U.S.

Between 1993 and 2012, the incidence rate of acute traumatic spinal cord injury remained relatively stable in the U.S., although there was an increase among older adults, mostly associated with an increase in falls, according to a study in the June 9 issue of JAMA, a theme issue on the Americans with Disabilities Act. [More]
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