Spinal Cord Injury News and Research RSS Feed - Spinal Cord Injury News and Research

A spinal cord injury usually begins with a sudden, traumatic blow to the spine that fractures or dislocates vertebrae. The damage begins at the moment of injury when displaced bone fragments, disc material, or ligaments bruise or tear into spinal cord tissue. Most injuries to the spinal cord don't completely sever it. Instead, an injury is more likely to cause fractures and compression of the vertebrae, which then crush and destroy the axons, extensions of nerve cells that carry signals up and down the spinal cord between the brain and the rest of the body. An injury to the spinal cord can damage a few, many, or almost all of these axons. Some injuries will allow almost complete recovery. Others will result in complete paralysis.
UAB study shows IL-37 protein suppresses inflammatory response after spinal cord injury

UAB study shows IL-37 protein suppresses inflammatory response after spinal cord injury

Spinal cord injuries cause severe functional disabilities in those who sustain them, including paraplegia or tetraplegia, depending on the scale of the injury. This is due to the degeneration of the spinal pathways that carry nerve signals from the brain to the different parts of the body and vice versa, resulting in loss of mobility and sensitivity underneath the injured area. [More]
Dartmouth researchers discover rare natural products that promote regeneration of injured nerve cells

Dartmouth researchers discover rare natural products that promote regeneration of injured nerve cells

Nerve damage from neurodegenerative disease and spinal cord injury has largely been considered irreversible, but Dartmouth researchers report progress in the effort to synthesize rare natural products that promote regeneration and growth of injured nerve cells. [More]
New Georgia Tech research center launched to manufacture living cells for cell-based therapies

New Georgia Tech research center launched to manufacture living cells for cell-based therapies

A $15.7 million grant from the Atlanta-based Marcus Foundation has helped launch a new Georgia Institute of Technology research center that will develop processes and techniques for ensuring the consistent, low-cost, large-scale manufacture of high-quality living cells used in cell-based therapies. [More]
EarlySense Patient Monitoring System saves 332 lives in 2015

EarlySense Patient Monitoring System saves 332 lives in 2015

EarlySense, the market leader in contact-free, health sensing and analytics, announced today year-end achievements for 2015, highlighted by key impact statistics. [More]
UW-led effort aims to develop implantable devices that promote brain plasticity, reanimate paralyzed limbs

UW-led effort aims to develop implantable devices that promote brain plasticity, reanimate paralyzed limbs

In the next decade, people who have suffered a spinal cord injury or stroke could have their mobility improved or even restored through a radically new technology: implantable devices that can send signals between regions of the brain or nervous system that have been disconnected due to injury. [More]
Novoron Bioscience receives NIH grant to study novel therapeutic approach for multiple sclerosis

Novoron Bioscience receives NIH grant to study novel therapeutic approach for multiple sclerosis

Novoron Bioscience, Inc., a private biotech company dedicated to developing new therapeutics for disorders of the central nervous system, today announced that the company has been awarded a National Institutes of Health grant under the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program. [More]
Wearable exoskeletons: what interactions are possible? An interview with Dr Juan C. Moreno

Wearable exoskeletons: what interactions are possible? An interview with Dr Juan C. Moreno

Wearable exoskeletons are coming to stay. Technological advancements in embedded computation and wearable mechatronics are enabling the production of new wearable exoskeletons that were not feasible a decade ago [More]
DZNE molecular biologist to receive Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz Prize for research on neurons

DZNE molecular biologist to receive Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz Prize for research on neurons

The molecular biologist Frank Bradke (46), group leader at the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE) and professor for neurobiology at the University of Bonn, will be awarded the "Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz Prize", which is endowed with 2.5 million euros. [More]
Research paves way for clinical trials of cell therapies to treat Parkinson's disease, spinal cord injury

Research paves way for clinical trials of cell therapies to treat Parkinson's disease, spinal cord injury

Stem cells that have been specifically developed for use as clinical therapies are fit for use in patients, an independent study of their genetic make-up suggests. [More]
ISCT launches publication and reference guide on Use of Unproven Cellular Therapies

ISCT launches publication and reference guide on Use of Unproven Cellular Therapies

The International Society for Cellular Therapy, the global society of clinicians, researchers, regulators, technologists, and industry partners dedicated to the translation of cellular therapy into safe and effective therapies to improve patients’ lives, today announces the launch of its publication and reference guide on the Use of Unproven Cellular Therapies. [More]
PRN Course for rehabilitation nurses now available online

PRN Course for rehabilitation nurses now available online

The PRN Course is an intensive, online course covering the major areas of care that a rehabilitation nurse provides and is conveniently accessible from anywhere. Recorded at the recent live course, this valuable educational opportunity addresses comprehensive care for the rehabilitation patient, including how professionals can incorporate 36 rehabilitation nursing concepts and skills into their practice. [More]
Restoring memory in aging mice

Restoring memory in aging mice

A new study, led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI), the Veterans Affairs San Diego Healthcare System (VA) and University of California (UC) San Diego School of Medicine shows that increasing a crucial cholesterol-binding membrane protein in nerve cells (neurons) within the brain can improve learning and memory in aged mice. [More]
Asterias’ Phase 1/2a study evaluates dose escalation of AST-OPC1 for cervical spinal cord injury

Asterias’ Phase 1/2a study evaluates dose escalation of AST-OPC1 for cervical spinal cord injury

Asterias Biotherapeutics, Inc. (NYSE MKT: AST), a biotechnology company focused on the emerging field of regenerative medicine, today announced that its Data Monitoring Committee has reviewed the initial safety data from all three patients in the first cohort and has recommended dose escalation to the second cohort. [More]
Study reveals gene mutation that increases risk of SUDEP in patients with mild forms of disease

Study reveals gene mutation that increases risk of SUDEP in patients with mild forms of disease

Researchers in the Adult Genetic Epilepsy Program of the Krembil Neuroscience Centre have discovered a gene mutation that increases the risk of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) in patients with mild forms of the disease. [More]
Synapse Biomedical, IFR to commercialize implantable systems that restore muscle function in paralyzed patients

Synapse Biomedical, IFR to commercialize implantable systems that restore muscle function in paralyzed patients

Case Western Reserve University's Institute for Functional Restoration (IFR) and Synapse Biomedical Inc. have entered a partnership to commercialize fully implantable systems that restore muscle function in paralyzed patients. [More]
Pioneering surgical technique restores hand and arm movement to quadriplegic patients

Pioneering surgical technique restores hand and arm movement to quadriplegic patients

A pioneering surgical technique has restored some hand and arm movement to patients immobilized by spinal cord injuries in the neck, reports a new study at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. [More]
Novel brain-computer interface technology allows paralyzed man to walk

Novel brain-computer interface technology allows paralyzed man to walk

Novel brain-computer interface technology created by University of California, Irvine researchers has allowed a paraplegic man to walk for a short distance. [More]
World Scientific's latest book to be launched on Stem Cell Awareness Day

World Scientific's latest book to be launched on Stem Cell Awareness Day

While the world knows the $3 billion California Institute for Regenerative Medicine sprang from the citizen's initiative, Proposition 71, few people know the struggle required, nor what happened after California said "Yes!" [More]
Coloplast announces launch of most compact catheter for men in the U.S.

Coloplast announces launch of most compact catheter for men in the U.S.

Coloplast announced the U.S. launch of SpeediCath Compact Male, the most compact catheter for men, designed so users can do more. The new product is less than half the size of a standard male catheter and may be stored, carried, used and disposed of more discreetly. [More]
VA Spinal Cord Injury Center reports positive clinical results with EarlySense Monitoring System

VA Spinal Cord Injury Center reports positive clinical results with EarlySense Monitoring System

A VA Spinal Cord Injury Center has reported significant positive clinical results achieved with the EarlySense Monitoring System. The Scientific Poster was presented at the Academy of Spinal Cord Injury Professionals 2015 Educational Conference. [More]
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