Squamous Cell Carcinoma News and Research RSS Feed - Squamous Cell Carcinoma News and Research

Squamous Cell Carcinoma is cancer that begins in squamous cells, which are thin, flat cells that look like fish scales. Squamous cells are found in the tissue that forms the surface of the skin, the lining of the hollow organs of the body, and the passages of the respiratory and digestive tracts. Also called epidermoid carcinoma.
Dermatologist reveals how smoking can affect the skin

Dermatologist reveals how smoking can affect the skin

Thinking of quitting smoking? Dr Anjali Mahto, Consultant Dermatologist tells us how smoking affects the skin, giving you an extra incentive to ditch the habit for good. [More]
Reduced radiation can maintain high cure rates in patients with HPV-related oropharyngeal cancers

Reduced radiation can maintain high cure rates in patients with HPV-related oropharyngeal cancers

Human papillomavirus-positive oropharynx cancers (cancers of the tonsils and back of the throat) are on rise. [More]
UCLA-led research finds promising results for more personalized head and neck cancer treatment

UCLA-led research finds promising results for more personalized head and neck cancer treatment

Researchers have found that people with advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma and the KRAS-variant inherited genetic mutation have significantly improved survival when given a short course of the drug cetuximab in combination with standard chemotherapy and radiation. [More]
Study reveals impact of histology on SBRT treatment in early-stage NSCLC patients

Study reveals impact of histology on SBRT treatment in early-stage NSCLC patients

Early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with squamous cell carcinoma (SqCC) have a significantly higher rate of local failure after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) than other NSCLC histological subtypes. [More]
Combination therapy holds great promise to clear precancerous skin lesions

Combination therapy holds great promise to clear precancerous skin lesions

A combination of two FDA-approved drugs - a topical chemotherapy and an immune-system-activating compound - was able to rapidly clear actinic keratosis lesions from patients participating in a clinical trial. [More]
UC San Diego scientists reveal surprising role for Hippo pathway in subduing tumor immunogenicity

UC San Diego scientists reveal surprising role for Hippo pathway in subduing tumor immunogenicity

Previous studies identified the Hippo pathway kinases LATS1/2 as a tumor suppressor, but new research led by University of California San Diego School of Medicine scientists reveals a surprising role for these enzymes in subduing cancer immunity. The findings, published in Cell on December 1, could have a clinical role in improving efficiency of immunotherapy drugs. [More]
New ULB study shows how cancer cell of origin controls malignant transition

New ULB study shows how cancer cell of origin controls malignant transition

Researchers at the Université libre de Bruxelles, ULB define for the first time how the cancer cell of origin controls invasive and metastatic properties of tumor cells. [More]
Cancer experts to discuss novel treatment strategies at ESMO Asia 2016 Congress

Cancer experts to discuss novel treatment strategies at ESMO Asia 2016 Congress

The ESMO Asia 2016 Congress announces its press programme today. The meeting brings together cancer experts in Singapore, from 16 to 19 December 2016. [More]
Study shows new drug combination effective in treating precancerous skin lesions

Study shows new drug combination effective in treating precancerous skin lesions

A combination of two topical drugs that have been in use for years triggers a robust immune response against precancerous skin lesions, according to a new study. The research, from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and Harvard Medical School, shows that the therapy activates the immune system's T cells, which then attack the abnormal skin cells. [More]
T cell channel could be potential new target for treating head and neck cancers

T cell channel could be potential new target for treating head and neck cancers

Researchers at the University of Cincinnati have discovered that an ion channel, active within T cells (white blood cells), could be targeted to reduce the growth of head and neck cancers. [More]
Sanford opens new immunotherapy study on colorectal cancer

Sanford opens new immunotherapy study on colorectal cancer

Sanford Health has opened another clinical trial exploring the power of the body's immune system to fight cancer. [More]
Study of pan-FGFR inhibitor uses mRNA in tumours to identify responders

Study of pan-FGFR inhibitor uses mRNA in tumours to identify responders

The first-in-human dose escalation study of the pan-FGFR (fibroblast growth factor receptor) inhibitor BAY 1163877 in patients with treatment-refractory locally advanced or metastatic solid tumours were reported today at the ESMO 2016 Congress in Copenhagen. [More]
Researchers report high response rate with single drug in phase I/II trial of paediatric brain cancer

Researchers report high response rate with single drug in phase I/II trial of paediatric brain cancer

A high response rate with a single drug in a phase I/II trial of paediatric brain tumour has set the stage for combination therapy with higher response and lower toxicity, researchers reported at the ESMO 2016 Congress in Copenhagen. [More]
New study highlights need for routine skin cancer screening for all transplant patients

New study highlights need for routine skin cancer screening for all transplant patients

A new study from Drexel University College of Medicine suggests all organ transplant recipients, regardless of race, should receive routine, total-body screenings for skin cancer. [More]
IMRT linked to reduced xerostomia and feeding tube dependency in oropharyngeal cancer patients

IMRT linked to reduced xerostomia and feeding tube dependency in oropharyngeal cancer patients

Radiation therapy is the main treatment modality in the management of head and neck cancer. [More]
Hypofractionated RT can reduce treatment time by half in stage II and III NSCLC patients

Hypofractionated RT can reduce treatment time by half in stage II and III NSCLC patients

For patients with stage II and III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) unable to receive standard treatments of surgery or chemoradiation (CRT), hypofractionated radiation therapy (RT) results in similar overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) rates, limited severe side effects and shorter treatment times when compared to conventional RT, according to research presented today at the 58th Annual Meeting of the American Society for Radiation Oncology. [More]
Increased use of SBRT linked to improved survival outcomes of NSCLC patients

Increased use of SBRT linked to improved survival outcomes of NSCLC patients

A new analysis of records in the Veteran's Affairs Central Cancer Registry demonstrates a clear positive impact of the increased use of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) to treat patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in recent years, according to research presented today at the 58th Annual Meeting of the American Society for Radiation Oncology. [More]
Approval of PD-1 inhibitor scratches surface of potential immunotherapies in recurrent HNSCC

Approval of PD-1 inhibitor scratches surface of potential immunotherapies in recurrent HNSCC

The recent approval of pembrolizumab (Keytruda) in recurrent or metastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) following progression on a platinum-based chemotherapy was a significant advancement for the disease. [More]
Study finds nonwhite transplant recipients at risk for skin cancer

Study finds nonwhite transplant recipients at risk for skin cancer

A new study from Drexel University College of Medicine suggests all organ transplant recipients, regardless of race, should receive routine, total-body screenings for skin cancer. [More]
Added benefit of lung cancer drug not proven, says IQWiG

Added benefit of lung cancer drug not proven, says IQWiG

Afatinib (trade name: Giotrif) has been approved since April 2016 for the treatment of adults with locally advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) of squamous histology who have already received chemotherapy. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement