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Staphylococcus aureus is a spherical bacterium (coccus) which on microscopic examination appears in pairs, short chains, or bunched, grape-like clusters. These organisms are Gram-positive. Some strains are capable of producing a highly heat-stable protein toxin that causes illness in humans.
Researchers discover how bacterial enzyme can blunt the body's key immune defenses

Researchers discover how bacterial enzyme can blunt the body's key immune defenses

Scientists have discovered how a unique bacterial enzyme can blunt the body's key weapons in its fight against infection. [More]
UVC machines can cut transmission of four drug-resistant superbugs by 30%, study finds

UVC machines can cut transmission of four drug-resistant superbugs by 30%, study finds

A new tool -- a type of ultraviolet light called UVC -- could aid hospitals in the ongoing battle to keep drug-resistant bacteria from lingering in patient rooms and causing new infections. [More]
UJI researchers develop new light-activated antimicrobial material to combat hospital infections

UJI researchers develop new light-activated antimicrobial material to combat hospital infections

Researchers at the Universitat Jaume I in Castellón, Spain, have developed a new light-activated antimicrobial material for use in the fight against the most common hospital infections. [More]
New research paves way for better strategies to diagnose and manage vascular graft infections

New research paves way for better strategies to diagnose and manage vascular graft infections

A rising prevalence of cardiovascular disease has generated substantial growth in the use of medical implants, such as vascular grafts. [More]
Archaeologist discovers 800-year-old genomes from bacterial infection in Byzantine skeleton

Archaeologist discovers 800-year-old genomes from bacterial infection in Byzantine skeleton

Eight hundred years ago, in a hardscrabble farming community on the outskirts of what was once one of the fabled cities of the ancient world, Troy, a 30-year-old woman was laid to rest in a stone-lined grave. [More]
New study from Veterans Health Administration finds significant decline in MRSA HAI rates

New study from Veterans Health Administration finds significant decline in MRSA HAI rates

The Department of Veterans Affairs' Veterans Health Administration's campaign to limit healthcare facility-associated infections (HAIs) of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) continues to make significant progress, according to a study published in the January issue of the American Journal of Infection Control, the official journal of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology . [More]
Portable detection system can rapidly identify virulent, multi-drug resistant pathogens in remote areas

Portable detection system can rapidly identify virulent, multi-drug resistant pathogens in remote areas

A team of researchers has developed a portable detection system that can rapidly identify some of the most virulent, often multi-drug resistant pathogens. [More]
Hog workers carrying livestock-related, drug-resistant bacteria may be developing skin infections

Hog workers carrying livestock-related, drug-resistant bacteria may be developing skin infections

New Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health-led research suggests that some workers at industrial hog production facilities are not only carrying livestock-associated, antibiotic-resistant bacteria in their noses, but may also be developing skin infections from these bacteria. [More]
International travellers may spread antimicrobial-resistant bacteria in their home countries, study reveals

International travellers may spread antimicrobial-resistant bacteria in their home countries, study reveals

Airports are international travel hubs visited by large numbers of people. London Heathrow, for example, has an average of 205,400 travellers every day and saw 75 million people arriving and departing from all over the world in 2015. [More]
Researchers engineer new weapon to destroy antibiotic-resistant bacteria

Researchers engineer new weapon to destroy antibiotic-resistant bacteria

Over the past few decades, many bacteria have become resistant to existing antibiotics, and few new drugs have emerged. [More]
Two widely prescribed antibiotics may combat bacteria differently than previously thought

Two widely prescribed antibiotics may combat bacteria differently than previously thought

Two widely prescribed antibiotics -- chloramphenicol and linezolid -- may fight bacteria in a different way from what scientists and doctors thought for years, University of Illinois at Chicago researchers have found. [More]
Self-healing slippery surface coatings for medical devices could help thwart infection

Self-healing slippery surface coatings for medical devices could help thwart infection

Implanted medical devices like catheters, surgical mesh and dialysis systems are ideal surfaces on which bacteria can colonize and form hard-to-kill sheets called biofilms. [More]
Study yields insights into shifts in epidemiology of multi-drug resistant organisms

Study yields insights into shifts in epidemiology of multi-drug resistant organisms

A first-of-its-kind study of 900,000 hospital admissions from an integrated health system has yielded insights into shifts in the epidemiology of multi-drug resistant organisms (MDROs) in the community. [More]
Bad bugs spread from ICU patients to nurses' scrubs, research shows

Bad bugs spread from ICU patients to nurses' scrubs, research shows

Bad bugs readily spread from patients in the intensive care unit to nurses' scrubs and the room, according to research being presented at IDWeek 2016. The sleeves and pockets of the scrubs and the bed railing were the most likely to be contaminated. [More]
CSIC project aims to study new genetic regulatory mechanisms in pathogenic bacteria

CSIC project aims to study new genetic regulatory mechanisms in pathogenic bacteria

A project led by the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) researcher, Alejandro Toledo-Arana, at the Institute of Agro biotechnology (a centre shared between CSIC, the Public University of Navarra and The Regional Government of Navarra), is studying new genetic regulatory mechanisms in pathogenic bacteria. [More]
Novel nanofiber coating shows potential to prevent bacterial infections of orthopaedic prostheses

Novel nanofiber coating shows potential to prevent bacterial infections of orthopaedic prostheses

In a proof-of-concept study with mice, scientists at The Johns Hopkins University show that a novel coating they made with antibiotic-releasing nanofibers has the potential to better prevent at least some serious bacterial infections related to total joint replacement surgery. [More]
Antimicrobial copper touch surfaces may help fight global threat of antibiotic resistance

Antimicrobial copper touch surfaces may help fight global threat of antibiotic resistance

A key presentation at the Infection Control show within the Patient First conference on 22 November will look at a simple engineering solution to help fight the global threat of antibiotic resistance: antimicrobial copper touch surfaces. [More]
Many children living with hog workers carry antibiotic-resistant S. aureus in nasal passages, study finds

Many children living with hog workers carry antibiotic-resistant S. aureus in nasal passages, study finds

Young children who reside with adults who work on large industrial hog operations in rural North Carolina had a higher prevalence of antibiotic-resistant in their nasal passages than children who live with adults who live in the same community but do not work on such operations, a new study suggests. [More]
Penn Medicine awarded CDC grant to develop new approaches to combat antibiotic resistance

Penn Medicine awarded CDC grant to develop new approaches to combat antibiotic resistance

The Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania has been awarded more than $1 million by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to develop new approaches to combat antibiotic resistance. [More]
UV disinfection device effectively reduces risk of C. difficile infections

UV disinfection device effectively reduces risk of C. difficile infections

Ultraviolet C light disinfection to clean unoccupied patient rooms significantly reduced C. difficile infections (CDI) in high-risk patients who later occupied those rooms, according to a study published today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. [More]
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