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Staphylococcus aureus is a spherical bacterium (coccus) which on microscopic examination appears in pairs, short chains, or bunched, grape-like clusters. These organisms are Gram-positive. Some strains are capable of producing a highly heat-stable protein toxin that causes illness in humans.
Hog workers carrying livestock-related, drug-resistant bacteria may be developing skin infections

Hog workers carrying livestock-related, drug-resistant bacteria may be developing skin infections

New Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health-led research suggests that some workers at industrial hog production facilities are not only carrying livestock-associated, antibiotic-resistant bacteria in their noses, but may also be developing skin infections from these bacteria. [More]
International travellers may spread antimicrobial-resistant bacteria in their home countries, study reveals

International travellers may spread antimicrobial-resistant bacteria in their home countries, study reveals

Airports are international travel hubs visited by large numbers of people. London Heathrow, for example, has an average of 205,400 travellers every day and saw 75 million people arriving and departing from all over the world in 2015. [More]
Researchers engineer new weapon to destroy antibiotic-resistant bacteria

Researchers engineer new weapon to destroy antibiotic-resistant bacteria

Over the past few decades, many bacteria have become resistant to existing antibiotics, and few new drugs have emerged. [More]
Two widely prescribed antibiotics may combat bacteria differently than previously thought

Two widely prescribed antibiotics may combat bacteria differently than previously thought

Two widely prescribed antibiotics -- chloramphenicol and linezolid -- may fight bacteria in a different way from what scientists and doctors thought for years, University of Illinois at Chicago researchers have found. [More]
Self-healing slippery surface coatings for medical devices could help thwart infection

Self-healing slippery surface coatings for medical devices could help thwart infection

Implanted medical devices like catheters, surgical mesh and dialysis systems are ideal surfaces on which bacteria can colonize and form hard-to-kill sheets called biofilms. [More]
Study yields insights into shifts in epidemiology of multi-drug resistant organisms

Study yields insights into shifts in epidemiology of multi-drug resistant organisms

A first-of-its-kind study of 900,000 hospital admissions from an integrated health system has yielded insights into shifts in the epidemiology of multi-drug resistant organisms (MDROs) in the community. [More]
Bad bugs spread from ICU patients to nurses' scrubs, research shows

Bad bugs spread from ICU patients to nurses' scrubs, research shows

Bad bugs readily spread from patients in the intensive care unit to nurses' scrubs and the room, according to research being presented at IDWeek 2016. The sleeves and pockets of the scrubs and the bed railing were the most likely to be contaminated. [More]
CSIC project aims to study new genetic regulatory mechanisms in pathogenic bacteria

CSIC project aims to study new genetic regulatory mechanisms in pathogenic bacteria

A project led by the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) researcher, Alejandro Toledo-Arana, at the Institute of Agro biotechnology (a centre shared between CSIC, the Public University of Navarra and The Regional Government of Navarra), is studying new genetic regulatory mechanisms in pathogenic bacteria. [More]
Novel nanofiber coating shows potential to prevent bacterial infections of orthopaedic prostheses

Novel nanofiber coating shows potential to prevent bacterial infections of orthopaedic prostheses

In a proof-of-concept study with mice, scientists at The Johns Hopkins University show that a novel coating they made with antibiotic-releasing nanofibers has the potential to better prevent at least some serious bacterial infections related to total joint replacement surgery. [More]
Antimicrobial copper touch surfaces may help fight global threat of antibiotic resistance

Antimicrobial copper touch surfaces may help fight global threat of antibiotic resistance

A key presentation at the Infection Control show within the Patient First conference on 22 November will look at a simple engineering solution to help fight the global threat of antibiotic resistance: antimicrobial copper touch surfaces. [More]
Many children living with hog workers carry antibiotic-resistant S. aureus in nasal passages, study finds

Many children living with hog workers carry antibiotic-resistant S. aureus in nasal passages, study finds

Young children who reside with adults who work on large industrial hog operations in rural North Carolina had a higher prevalence of antibiotic-resistant in their nasal passages than children who live with adults who live in the same community but do not work on such operations, a new study suggests. [More]
Penn Medicine awarded CDC grant to develop new approaches to combat antibiotic resistance

Penn Medicine awarded CDC grant to develop new approaches to combat antibiotic resistance

The Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania has been awarded more than $1 million by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to develop new approaches to combat antibiotic resistance. [More]
UV disinfection device effectively reduces risk of C. difficile infections

UV disinfection device effectively reduces risk of C. difficile infections

Ultraviolet C light disinfection to clean unoccupied patient rooms significantly reduced C. difficile infections (CDI) in high-risk patients who later occupied those rooms, according to a study published today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. [More]
New portable adhesive patch drives small electrical current to promote wound healing

New portable adhesive patch drives small electrical current to promote wound healing

Good news for the millions of people who suffer from skin wounds that won't heal. A team of researchers at The Ohio State University has brought a potentially transformative solution to the problem by creating a portable adhesive patch that drives a continuous, small electrical current to stimulate healing and reduce the risk of infection. [More]
Contaminated poultry may be source of human exposure to MRSA, research shows

Contaminated poultry may be source of human exposure to MRSA, research shows

A new study offers compelling evidence that a novel form of the dangerous superbug Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) can spread to humans through consumption or handling of contaminated poultry. [More]
Study reveals risk factors and outcomes of infective endocarditis after TAVR

Study reveals risk factors and outcomes of infective endocarditis after TAVR

Among patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement, younger age, male sex, history of diabetes mellitus, and moderate to severe residual aortic regurgitation were significantly associated with an increased risk of infective endocarditis, and patients who developed endocarditis had high rates of in-hospital mortality and 2-year mortality, according to a study appearing in the September 13 issue of JAMA. [More]
MRSA correlated to eczema? An interview with Dr Bjorn Herpers

MRSA correlated to eczema? An interview with Dr Bjorn Herpers

There is a lot of evidence that Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is involved in eczema. Eczema is now thought to be caused by a barrier dysfunction of the skin that allows external triggers to cause an overshoot of inflammation. [More]
Study finds 10% of patients admitted into hospitals colonised with dreaded pathogens

Study finds 10% of patients admitted into hospitals colonised with dreaded pathogens

According to National Reference Center for Surveillance of Nosocomial Infections esti-mates, up to 15,000 patients die of hospital-acquired infections in Germany every year. [More]
Research provides insight into how harmless nasal bacteria help protect from diseases

Research provides insight into how harmless nasal bacteria help protect from diseases

Staphylococcus aureus is a common colonizer of the human body. Although, one quarter of the U.S. population live with the bacteria and never get sick, having S. aureus present in the nostrils is a risk for infections that range in severity from mild skin to life- threatening MRSA infections. [More]
Researchers find new way to kill Staphylococcus aureus bacteria

Researchers find new way to kill Staphylococcus aureus bacteria

Scientists have discovered a new way to attack Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. The team, from Imperial College London, have revealed how the bacteria regulates its salt levels. [More]
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