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Staphylococcus aureus is a spherical bacterium (coccus) which on microscopic examination appears in pairs, short chains, or bunched, grape-like clusters. These organisms are Gram-positive. Some strains are capable of producing a highly heat-stable protein toxin that causes illness in humans.
Naturally occurring clay exhibits potent antibacterial activity against ESKAPE pathogens

Naturally occurring clay exhibits potent antibacterial activity against ESKAPE pathogens

Naturally occurring clay from British Columbia, Canada -- long used by the region's Heiltsuk First Nation for its healing potential -- exhibits potent antibacterial activity against multidrug-resistant pathogens, according to new research from the University of British Columbia. [More]
E-cigarettes suppress immune defenses, alter inflammation and boost bacterial virulence

E-cigarettes suppress immune defenses, alter inflammation and boost bacterial virulence

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and Veterans Affairs San Diego Healthcare System report data suggesting that e-cigarettes are toxic to human airway cells, suppress immune defenses and alter inflammation, while at the same time boosting bacterial virulence. [More]
UC San Diego researchers develop rapid susceptibility test for Staphylococcus aureus

UC San Diego researchers develop rapid susceptibility test for Staphylococcus aureus

A team of biologists and biomedical researchers at UC San Diego has developed a new method to determine if bacteria are susceptible to antibiotics within a few hours, an advance that could slow the appearance of drug resistance and allow doctors to more rapidly identify the appropriate treatment for patients with life threatening bacterial infections. [More]
FDA approves Allergan's sNDA to update label for DALVANCE (dalbavancin) for injection

FDA approves Allergan's sNDA to update label for DALVANCE (dalbavancin) for injection

Allergan plc, a leading global pharmaceutical company, today announced the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the company's supplemental new drug application (sNDA) to update the label for DALVANCE (dalbavancin) for injection. [More]
Antivirulence antibiotics could evade resistance longer than traditional antibiotics

Antivirulence antibiotics could evade resistance longer than traditional antibiotics

We've all seen the headlines. "Man found to be shedding virulent strain of polio"; "Virulent flu strain in Europe hits the economy"; "Most virulent strain of E. coli ever seen contains DNA sequences from plague bacteria." [More]
Researchers successfully use CRISPR to treat adult mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

Researchers successfully use CRISPR to treat adult mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

Researchers have used CRISPR to treat an adult mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. This marks the first time that CRISPR has successfully treated a genetic disease inside a fully developed living mammal with a strategy that has the potential to be translated to human therapy. [More]
Newly discovered molecular mechanism may provide alternative explanation for antibiotic resistance

Newly discovered molecular mechanism may provide alternative explanation for antibiotic resistance

The bacterium B. cereus had so far been considered to be exclusively endospore-forming. In response to harsh conditions, the bacteria form protective endospores enabling them to remain dormant for extended periods. When conditions are more favourable, the endospores reactivate to become fully functioning bacteria. [More]
Father-daughter duo co-author research paper on new grapefruit cybrids

Father-daughter duo co-author research paper on new grapefruit cybrids

When Jude Grosser's daughter, Melinda, was in elementary school, he would often take her to his laboratory at the University of Florida's Citrus Research and Education Center, where he works as a researcher on citrus diseases and creating new varieties. [More]
Drugs approved for various conditions also have antibiotic properties

Drugs approved for various conditions also have antibiotic properties

A number of drugs already approved to treat parasitic infections, cancers, infertility and other conditions also show promise as antibiotic agents against staph and tuberculosis infections, according to a new study by University of Illinois chemists and collaborators. Because these agents act against multiple targets within the bacteria, it may be harder for bacteria to develop resistance. [More]
New easy-to-use computer program can quickly identify drug-resistant infections

New easy-to-use computer program can quickly identify drug-resistant infections

Scientists have developed an easy-to-use computer program that can quickly analyse bacterial DNA from a patient's infection and predict which antibiotics will work, and which will fail due to drug resistance. The software is currently being trialled in three UK hospitals to see whether it could help speed up diagnosis of drug-resistant infections and enable doctors to better target the prescription of antibiotics. [More]
Novel class of antimicrobials could be effective in fighting drug-resistant MRSA infection

Novel class of antimicrobials could be effective in fighting drug-resistant MRSA infection

A novel class of antimicrobials that inhibits the function of a key disease-causing component of bacteria could be effective in fighting methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), one of the major drug-resistant bacterial pathogens, according to researchers at Georgia State University. [More]
Innovative microbiome technology may help fight certain infections

Innovative microbiome technology may help fight certain infections

Stony Brook University and Ortek Therapeutics, Inc. announced today that two patent applications were filed in the United States and internationally for nutrient based compositions utilizing an innovative microbiome technology that may help combat certain infections. [More]
Coating implants with certain 'activator' can prevent S. aureus infection

Coating implants with certain 'activator' can prevent S. aureus infection

Biofilms frequently coat the surfaces of catheters, and of various medical implants and prostheses, where they can cause life-threatening infections. New research at the Sahlgrenska Academy show that coating implants with a certain "activator" can prevent Staphylococcus aureus, the leading cause of hospital-acquired infections, from forming biofilms. [More]
Some antibiotics may make MRSA more harmful

Some antibiotics may make MRSA more harmful

Treating MRSA with certain first-line antibiotics can actually make MRSA skin infections worse, according to a study published in Cell Host & Microbe. [More]
Certain antibiotic treatment for MRSA may potentially make patients sicker

Certain antibiotic treatment for MRSA may potentially make patients sicker

A new study sheds light on how treatment of the "superbug" known as MRSA with certain antibiotics can potentially make patients sicker. The findings by Cedars-Sinai scientists, published today in the journal Cell Host & Microbe, could have implications for managing the bug, a virulent form of the common staph infection that can be difficult to control. [More]
Common ingredient in sunscreen can prevent infections related to medical implants

Common ingredient in sunscreen can prevent infections related to medical implants

A common ingredient in sunscreen could be an effective antibacterial coating for medical implants such as pacemakers and replacement joints. [More]
Paratek initiates Omadacycline phase 3 clinical study in community acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP)

Paratek initiates Omadacycline phase 3 clinical study in community acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP)

Paratek Pharmaceuticals, Inc. has announced the dosing of the first patient in its Phase 3 clinical study of its lead drug candidate, omadacycline, for the treatment of Community Acquired Bacterial Pneumonia (CABP). This global Phase 3 study will assess the efficacy and safety of omadacycline compared with moxifloxacin in subjects with CABP. [More]
Key part of MRSA vaccine puzzle unearthed

Key part of MRSA vaccine puzzle unearthed

Immunologists from Trinity College Dublin have unearthed a key piece of the MRSA vaccine puzzle by identifying specific ‘helper’ cells whose role in the immune response is critical in affecting infection outcomes. [More]
Coating implants with tissue plasminogen activator can prevent biofilm-related infections

Coating implants with tissue plasminogen activator can prevent biofilm-related infections

Biofilms--mats of bacteria similar to the plaque that grows on teeth--frequently coat the surfaces of catheters, and of various medical implants and prostheses, where they can threaten lives or lead to failure of the implants. Antibiotics are impotent against biofilms. [More]
Tamoxifen drug clears MRSA, reduces mortality

Tamoxifen drug clears MRSA, reduces mortality

Researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences have found that the breast cancer drug tamoxifen gives white blood cells a boost, better enabling them to respond to, ensnare and kill bacteria in laboratory experiments. Tamoxifen treatment in mice also enhances clearance of the antibiotic-resistant bacterial pathogen MRSA and reduces mortality. [More]
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