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Staphylococcus aureus is a spherical bacterium (coccus) which on microscopic examination appears in pairs, short chains, or bunched, grape-like clusters. These organisms are Gram-positive. Some strains are capable of producing a highly heat-stable protein toxin that causes illness in humans.
Study: E-cigarettes appear to increase virulence of drug- resistant and life-threatening bacteria

Study: E-cigarettes appear to increase virulence of drug- resistant and life-threatening bacteria

Despite being touted by their manufacturers as a healthy alternative to cigarettes, e-cigarettes appear in a laboratory study to increase the virulence of drug- resistant and potentially life-threatening bacteria, while decreasing the ability of human cells to kill these bacteria [More]
New expert guidance encourages healthcare institutions to implement prevention efforts infectious diarrhea

New expert guidance encourages healthcare institutions to implement prevention efforts infectious diarrhea

With rates of Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) now rivaling drug-resistant Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) as the most common bacteria to cause healthcare-associated infections, new expert guidance encourages healthcare institutions to implement and prioritize prevention efforts for this infectious diarrhea. [More]
Researchers identify novel vancomycin-resistant MRSA superbug in Brazil

Researchers identify novel vancomycin-resistant MRSA superbug in Brazil

An international research team led by Cesar A. Arias, M.D., Ph.D., at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston has identified a new superbug that caused a bloodstream infection in a Brazilian patient. The report appeared in the April 17 issue of The New England Journal of Medicine. [More]
Scientists report new approach to restore penicillin's combat effectiveness against bacterial infections

Scientists report new approach to restore penicillin's combat effectiveness against bacterial infections

Penicillin, one of the scientific marvels of the 20th century, is currently losing a lot of battles it once won against bacterial infections. But scientists at the University of South Carolina have just reported a new approach to restoring its combat effectiveness, even against so-called "superbugs." [More]
Daylight Medical releases SKY 6Xi disinfection technology for mobile devices

Daylight Medical releases SKY 6Xi disinfection technology for mobile devices

Daylight Medical, manufacturer and provider of innovative medical products, is pleased to announce its rollout of SKY 6Xi, disinfection technology for mobile devices. SKY 6Xi uses high intensity (254 nanometer wavelength) ultraviolet light in the "C" spectrum (UVC) at close proximity to thoroughly disinfect a mobile device. The unique power of SKY reduces the risk that Hospital-acquired infections (HAIs) are transmitted to patients while improving safety for healthcare workers. [More]
Scientists discover promising agents to fight antibiotic-resistant bacteria

Scientists discover promising agents to fight antibiotic-resistant bacteria

In the fight against "superbugs," scientists have discovered a class of agents that can make some of the most notorious strains vulnerable to the same antibiotics that they once handily shrugged off. The report on the promising agents called metallopolymers appears in the Journal of the American Chemical Society. [More]
Study provides insights into why alcohol has negative effect on wound healing

Study provides insights into why alcohol has negative effect on wound healing

People who are injured while binge drinking are much slower to heal from wounds suffered in car accidents, shootings, fires, etc. [More]
Expert guidance highlights strategies to prevent catheter-associated urinary tract infections

Expert guidance highlights strategies to prevent catheter-associated urinary tract infections

New expert guidance highlights strategies for implementing and prioritizing efforts to prevent catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTI) in hospitals. [More]
Antimicrobial agent in personal care products boosts colonization of bacteria inside human noses

Antimicrobial agent in personal care products boosts colonization of bacteria inside human noses

An antimicrobial agent found in common household soaps, shampoos and toothpastes may be finding its way inside human noses where it promotes the colonization of Staphylococcus aureus bacteria and could predispose some people to infection. [More]
Trimethoprim is more effective against streptococci than expected, says research

Trimethoprim is more effective against streptococci than expected, says research

The focus of his team was also on samples, in which the bacteria failed to respond to the agent. They discovered two types of resistance. "Spontaneous mutations can occur in the gene for dihydrofolate reductase rendering trimethoprim no longer able to attack the changed enzyme, which means it becomes ineffective," Nitsche-Schmitz explained. [More]
Honey helps fight antibiotic resistance, says study

Honey helps fight antibiotic resistance, says study

Honey, that delectable condiment for breads and fruits, could be one sweet solution to the serious, ever-growing problem of bacterial resistance to antibiotics, researchers said here today. [More]
TFDA approves TaiGen's Taigexyn NDA for treatment of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia

TFDA approves TaiGen's Taigexyn NDA for treatment of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia

TaiGen Biotechnology Company, Limited today announced that the Taiwan Food and Drug Administration has approved the new drug application (NDA) of Taigexyn (nemonoxacin) oral formulation (500 mg) for the treatment of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CAP). With this NDA approval, Taiwan is the first region to grant marketing approval to Taigexyn. [More]
Food picked up just few seconds after being dropped is less likely to contain bacteria

Food picked up just few seconds after being dropped is less likely to contain bacteria

Food picked up just a few seconds after being dropped is less likely to contain bacteria than if it is left for longer periods of time, according to the findings of research carried out at Aston University's School of Life and Health Sciences. [More]
Research roundup: Health care and prisoners; hospitalized patients' surrogates; suicides in the army

Research roundup: Health care and prisoners; hospitalized patients' surrogates; suicides in the army

As a group, jail-involved individuals, which we define here as people with a history of arrest and jail admission in the recent past, carry a heavy illness burden, with high rates of infectious and chronic disease as well as mental illness and substance use. [More]
Inconsistent definition and management of deadly pathogens could contribute to spread of infections

Inconsistent definition and management of deadly pathogens could contribute to spread of infections

​Infection control practices for detecting and treating patients infected with emerging multidrug-resistant gram-negative bacteria (MDR-GNB) vary significantly between hospitals. [More]

Berkeley Lab scientists explore bacteria-resistant materials as a line of defense against Staph infection

The bacterium Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a common source of infections that occur after surgeries involving prosthetic joints and artificial heart valves. The grape-shaped microorganism adheres to medical equipment, and if it gets inside the body, it can cause a serious and even life-threatening illness called a Staph infection. The recent discovery of drug-resistant strains of S. aureus makes matters even worse. [More]
Deficient hygiene routines make it difficult to eradicate multi-resistant bacterium

Deficient hygiene routines make it difficult to eradicate multi-resistant bacterium

A previously unknown multi-resistant bacterium has been sticking around at a Swedish University Hospital for ten years. [More]
Research findings may help combat MRSA

Research findings may help combat MRSA

A research team from Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, Tenn., is the first to decipher the 3-D structure of a protein that confers antibiotic resistance from one of the most worrisome disease agents: a strain of bacteria called methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), which can cause skin and other infections. The Vanderbilt team's findings may be an important step in combatting the MRSA public health threat over the next 5 to 10 years. [More]
NIAID awards Soligenix SBIR grant to further develop SGX943 for treatment of melioidosis

NIAID awards Soligenix SBIR grant to further develop SGX943 for treatment of melioidosis

Soligenix, Inc., a clinical stage biopharmaceutical company focused on developing products to treat serious inflammatory diseases where there remains an unmet medical need, as well as developing several biodefense vaccines and therapeutics, announced today that the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases has awarded Soligenix a Small Business Innovation Research grant to support further preclinical development of SGX943 as a treatment for melioidosis. [More]
Two new mechanisms open alternative approaches to antibiotics development

Two new mechanisms open alternative approaches to antibiotics development

​The first mechanism disrupts the arrangement of amino acids required for the cohesion of the protease subunits. As a result the protease breaks into two parts. The second acts directly on the core of the active center. [More]