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Statins are drugs used to lower cholesterol. Your body needs some cholesterol to work properly. But if you have too much in your blood, it can stick to the walls of your arteries, narrowing or even blocking them.
Cardiovascular conditions may be overlooked in bipolar disorder

Cardiovascular conditions may be overlooked in bipolar disorder

Cardiovascular comorbidities may be going under-recognized and undertreated in patients with bipolar disorder, say UK researchers. [More]
Crowdsourcing fungal metabolites with antitumor activity: an interview with Dr. Robert H. Cichewicz, University of Oklahoma

Crowdsourcing fungal metabolites with antitumor activity: an interview with Dr. Robert H. Cichewicz, University of Oklahoma

Fungi have played a large role in the development of many important drugs that are in wide use today. The most well-known of these are the penicillins. [More]
Study: Cholesterol levels linked to early signs of Alzheimer's disease in the brain

Study: Cholesterol levels linked to early signs of Alzheimer's disease in the brain

High levels of "good" cholesterol and low levels of "bad" cholesterol are correlated with lower levels of the amyloid plaque deposition in the brain that is a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease, in a pattern that mirrors the relationship between good and bad cholesterol in cardiovascular disease, UC Davis researchers have found. [More]
CAC screening plays more prominent role in determining risk for heart attack and stroke

CAC screening plays more prominent role in determining risk for heart attack and stroke

A new study shows that coronary artery calcium (CAC) screening, an assessment tool that is not currently recommended for people considered at low risk, should play a more prominent role in helping determine a person’s risk for heart attack and heart disease-related death, as well as the need for angioplasty or bypass surgery. [More]
Study shows CAC screening plays prominent role in determining person's risk for heart attack and stoke

Study shows CAC screening plays prominent role in determining person's risk for heart attack and stoke

A new study shows that coronary artery calcium (CAC) screening, an assessment tool that is not currently recommended for people considered at low risk, should play a more prominent role in helping determine a person's risk for heart attack and heart disease-related death, as well as the need for angioplasty or bypass surgery. [More]
Amgen reports that Phase 3 DESCARTES study for high cholesterol meets primary endpoint

Amgen reports that Phase 3 DESCARTES study for high cholesterol meets primary endpoint

Amgen today announced that the Phase 3 DESCARTES (Durable Effect of PCSK9 Antibody CompARed wiTh PlacEbo Study) study evaluating the long-term 52-week safety and efficacy of evolocumab for the treatment of high cholesterol met its primary endpoint of percent reduction from baseline in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) at week 52. [More]
Possible mechanism behind elevated risk of cardiovascular disease discovered in HIV-infected women

Possible mechanism behind elevated risk of cardiovascular disease discovered in HIV-infected women

A Massachusetts General Hospital research team has discovered a possible mechanism behind the elevated risk of cardiovascular disease in women infected with HIV, a risk even higher than that of HIV-infected men. In the Dec. 1 issue of the Journal of Infectious Diseases the investigators report finding that HIV-infected women had a greater prevalence of the type of coronary artery plaque most vulnerable to rupture than did uninfected women. [More]
Angioplasty may not provide additional benefits compared to drug therapy for patients with stable CAD

Angioplasty may not provide additional benefits compared to drug therapy for patients with stable CAD

For patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD) who are not experiencing a heart attack and an abnormal stress test, treatment of their narrowed arteries by the common procedure of angioplasty may not provide additional benefits compared to drug therapy alone. [More]
NPS MedicineWise publishes set of FAQs on statins and heart disease

NPS MedicineWise publishes set of FAQs on statins and heart disease

With the statins group of cholesterol-lowering medicines continuing to make headlines this week, independent organisation NPS MedicineWise has reviewed the latest clinical evidence and published a set of Frequently Asked Questions on its website addressing people’s key concerns. [More]
Genetics and cardiovascular drugs: an interview with Nancy Lurker, CEO of PDI and Paul Kinnon, CEO of Transgenomic, Inc.

Genetics and cardiovascular drugs: an interview with Nancy Lurker, CEO of PDI and Paul Kinnon, CEO of Transgenomic, Inc.

People inherit different versions of any particular gene, and some genes affect how patients process and metabolize medicines. This especially holds true for people with cardiovascular (CV) disease. They may be fast, slow or non-metabolizers and might also react badly (with serious adverse events) to certain drug therapies or not at all. [More]

Drug interactions impact use of cholesterol-lowering statin drugs

A new study has found that many people who stopped taking cholesterol-lowering statin drugs were also taking an average of three other drugs that interfered with the normal metabolism of the statins. [More]

Study finds patients treated with varespladib drug more likely to experience cardiovascular events

Patients with acute coronary syndrome who were treated with the experimental drug varespladib were more likely to experience additional cardiovascular events - including sudden death, heart attack and stroke - than those treated with placebo, according to research from the Cleveland Clinic Coordinating Center for Clinical Research (C5Research). [More]
Viewpoints: Obamacare has resisted death throes before; website success stories from 3 governors; health law taking a toll on choice of doctors in Medicare Advantage

Viewpoints: Obamacare has resisted death throes before; website success stories from 3 governors; health law taking a toll on choice of doctors in Medicare Advantage

The first time Obamacare seemed finished, doomed, doornail-dead, the voters of Massachusetts played the would-be executioner. In January 2010, they sent a pickup-driving Republican to the Senate to fill Ted Kennedy's seat, apparently depriving the health care bill of its crucial 60th vote and sending Democrats scrambling for a Plan B. ... the deeper force at work, the reason that these near-death experiences keep happening, isn't a website or a broken presidential promise. It's a problem inherent to contemporary liberalism, which is that liberals' proudest achievement, the modern welfare state, tends to resist, corrupt and baffle their efforts at comprehensive reform (Ross Douthat, 11/16). [More]

New cholesterol guidelines represent the biggest change in more than 25 years

New cholesterol guidelines for identifying adults at risk for heart disease represent the biggest change in such expert advice in more than 25 years, according to Loyola University Health System preventive cardiology experts. [More]
Study finds few beneficial effects of metformin drug for cardiovascular disease in people without diabetes

Study finds few beneficial effects of metformin drug for cardiovascular disease in people without diabetes

Despite high expectations for the commonly used diabetes drug metformin to improve risk factors for heart disease in people without diabetes, few beneficial effects have been found in a randomised trial of patients with established cardiovascular disease, published in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology. [More]

Use of effective, risky drug therapies by Medicare patients varies across US

A new report from the Dartmouth Atlas Project shows that the use of both effective and risky drug therapies by Medicare patients varies widely across U.S. regions, offering further evidence that location is a key determinant in the quality and cost of the medical care that patients receive. [More]
Statins may increase risk of cataracts among individuals above 30 years old

Statins may increase risk of cataracts among individuals above 30 years old

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, cataracts are the number one cause of vision loss in the United States. Nearly 22 million Americans age 40 and over have cataracts, while more than half of individuals age 80 and over suffer from this condition. In a recent study released in JAMA Ophthalmology, it was confirmed that statins, which are typically prescribed to reduce cholesterol and also prevent heart disease, may cause an increased risk for cataracts among individuals ages 30 through 85. [More]
Study: Statin do not improve VAP outcomes

Study: Statin do not improve VAP outcomes

Laurent Papazian, M.D., Ph.D., of H-pital Nord, Marseille, France, and colleagues conducted a study to determine whether statin therapy decreased day-28 mortality among intensive care unit patients with ventilator-associated pneumonia. [More]

High-dose statins could have added benefit of reducing gum inflammation

The use of high-dose statins to lower cholesterol in heart disease patients appears to have the added benefit of reducing gum inflammation, according to research published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. [More]
Cholesterol-lowering drugs could be alternative treatment for people who take statins

Cholesterol-lowering drugs could be alternative treatment for people who take statins

A new class of cholesterol-lowering drugs that target a recently discovered regulator of harmful cholesterol could be an alternative or complementary treatment for the 30 million people who take statins, after the first trial in humans confirms the technique’s feasibility and safety. [More]