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Stem cells have the remarkable potential to develop into many different cell types in the body during early life and growth. In addition, in many tissues they serve as a sort of internal repair system, dividing essentially without limit to replenish other cells as long as the person or animal is still alive. When a stem cell divides, each new cell has the potential either to remain a stem cell or become another type of cell with a more specialized function, such as a muscle cell, a red blood cell, or a brain cell.

Stem cells are distinguished from other cell types by two important characteristics. First, they are unspecialized cells capable of renewing themselves through cell division, sometimes after long periods of inactivity. Second, under certain physiologic or experimental conditions, they can be induced to become tissue- or organ-specific cells with special functions. In some organs, such as the gut and bone marrow, stem cells regularly divide to repair and replace worn out or damaged tissues. In other organs, however, such as the pancreas and the heart, stem cells only divide under special conditions.
MIT engineers find new strategy to combat superbugs

MIT engineers find new strategy to combat superbugs

In recent years, new strains of bacteria have emerged that resist even the most powerful antibiotics. Each year, these superbugs, including drug-resistant forms of tuberculosis and staphylococcus, infect more than 2 million people nationwide, and kill at least 23,000. Despite the urgent need for new treatments, scientists have discovered very few new classes of antibiotics in the past decade. [More]
Researchers discover new molecule that allows for multiplication of stem cells in cord blood

Researchers discover new molecule that allows for multiplication of stem cells in cord blood

Investigators from the Institute for Research in Immunology and Cancer at the Université de Montréal have just published, in the prestigious magazine Science, the announcement of the discovery of a new molecule, the first of its kind, which allows for the multiplication of stem cells in a unit of cord blood. [More]
New finding could accelerate research to regenerate damaged tissue

New finding could accelerate research to regenerate damaged tissue

Scientists at NYU Langone Medical Center have found a way to boost dramatically the efficiency of the process for turning adult cells into so-called pluripotent stem cells by combining three well-known compounds, including vitamin C. [More]
New market research report on global and Chinese stem cell industry

New market research report on global and Chinese stem cell industry

Research and Markets has announced the addition of the "Global and Chinese Stem Cell Industry Report, 2014-2017" report to their offering. [More]
UCSD researchers launch phase 1 trial to assess novel monoclonal antibody for CLL patients

UCSD researchers launch phase 1 trial to assess novel monoclonal antibody for CLL patients

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have launched a phase 1 human clinical trial to assess the safety and efficacy of a new monoclonal antibody for patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), the most common form of blood cancer in adults. [More]
Zebrafish may hold key to unlocking a leading cause of respiratory diseases

Zebrafish may hold key to unlocking a leading cause of respiratory diseases

A small freshwater fish found in many tropical aquariums may hold the key to unlocking one of the leading causes of respiratory diseases in humans. [More]
Complete analysis of the global stem cell market

Complete analysis of the global stem cell market

BCC Research reveals in its new report, THE GLOBAL MARKET FOR STEM CELLS, the global market for stem cells is expected to grow to nearly $10.6 billion by 2018, with a five-year compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 13.6%. [More]
Human stem cells can be reset to their native undifferentiated state

Human stem cells can be reset to their native undifferentiated state

Scientists at the Babraham Institute, in collaboration with colleagues at the Cambridge Stem Cell Institute and the European Bioinformatics Institute, have made a breakthrough in stem cell research. Their paper, published today in Cell, describes how human stem cells can be reverted back to non-specialised cells. [More]
Gastroenterologist hopes to achieve healthy growth and development in children around the world

Gastroenterologist hopes to achieve healthy growth and development in children around the world

Why is it harder for kids in low- and middle-income countries to grow as well as kids in wealthy countries? Food security, or access to good nutrition, remains a major challenge. The issue is not just food supply but poor sanitation - a problem exacerbated by local infrastructure and cultural mores. [More]
Cancer Research UK, CRT partner with Asterias to trail novel immunotherapy treatment for lung cancer

Cancer Research UK, CRT partner with Asterias to trail novel immunotherapy treatment for lung cancer

CANCER RESEARCH UK and Cancer Research Technology , the charity's development and commercialisation arm, have reached an agreement with Asterias Biotherapeutics, Inc., a biotechnology company in the emerging field of regenerative medicine, to take forward Asterias' novel immunotherapy treatment AST-VAC2 into clinical trials in subjects with non-small cell lung cancer. [More]
Scientists crack genetic code of liver fluke parasite

Scientists crack genetic code of liver fluke parasite

Singapore-An international team of scientists from Singapore, Thailand, China and Australia has cracked the genetic code of the liver fluke parasite, Opisthorchis viverrini, using a unique DNA analysis technique developed at A*STAR's Genome Institute of Singapore (GIS). [More]
New book brings awareness to debate surrounding stem cell research

New book brings awareness to debate surrounding stem cell research

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., leading publisher of over 80 science, technology, and medical publications, announced today the launch of first time hard cover title Inevitable Collision: The Inspiring Story that Brought Stem Cell Research to Conservative America, in an effort to bring awareness to the growing conversation and debate surrounding stem cell research and regenerative medicine. [More]
Clinical trial of stem cell-derived therapy for patients with Type 1 diabetes

Clinical trial of stem cell-derived therapy for patients with Type 1 diabetes

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, in partnership with ViaCyte, Inc., a San Diego-based biotechnology firm specializing in regenerative medicine, have launched the first-ever human Phase I/II clinical trial of a stem cell-derived therapy for patients with Type 1 diabetes. [More]
Researchers infuse antibody-studded iron nanoparticles into bloodstream to treat heart attack damage

Researchers infuse antibody-studded iron nanoparticles into bloodstream to treat heart attack damage

Researchers at the Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute infused antibody-studded iron nanoparticles into the bloodstream to treat heart attack damage. [More]
Study reveals how stem cells work to improve lung function in ARDS

Study reveals how stem cells work to improve lung function in ARDS

A new study has revealed how stem cells work to improve lung function in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). [More]
Belgian receives research grant from Jeffrey Modell to help cure IPEX syndrome

Belgian receives research grant from Jeffrey Modell to help cure IPEX syndrome

For the first time the Jeffrey Modell Foundation is giving a research grant to a Belgian laboratory. The team of Adrian Liston from VIB-KU Leuven will use the grant to develop a gene therapy to cure children that suffer from IPEX syndrome, a rare and fatal autoimmune disorder in which the immune system attacks the body's own tissues and organs. [More]
Canada funds 22 inventive ideas for improving health in low-resource countries

Canada funds 22 inventive ideas for improving health in low-resource countries

Grand Challenges Canada, funded by the Government of Canada, today announced $2.4 million in seed funds shared between 22 projects from Canada and nine developing nations, to pursue inventive new ideas for improving health in low-resource countries. [More]
Researchers examine why stem cells lose their capacity to repair damage as age increases

Researchers examine why stem cells lose their capacity to repair damage as age increases

As we age, stem cells throughout our bodies gradually lose their capacity to repair damage, even from normal wear and tear. [More]
New antifungal drug effective against invasive mold disease in cancer patients with less adverse effects

New antifungal drug effective against invasive mold disease in cancer patients with less adverse effects

A newly developed antifungal, isavuconazole, is as effective as an existing drug, voriconazole, against invasive mold disease in cancer patients with less adverse effects, according to phase 3 clinical data presented at the 54th Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, an infectious disease meeting of the American Society for Microbiology. [More]
PHI collaborates with Northeastern University for establishing novel cell analysis applications

PHI collaborates with Northeastern University for establishing novel cell analysis applications

Phase Holographic Imaging (PHI) today announces a collaboration agreement with Northeastern University of Boston. [More]