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Stem cells have the remarkable potential to develop into many different cell types in the body during early life and growth. In addition, in many tissues they serve as a sort of internal repair system, dividing essentially without limit to replenish other cells as long as the person or animal is still alive. When a stem cell divides, each new cell has the potential either to remain a stem cell or become another type of cell with a more specialized function, such as a muscle cell, a red blood cell, or a brain cell.

Stem cells are distinguished from other cell types by two important characteristics. First, they are unspecialized cells capable of renewing themselves through cell division, sometimes after long periods of inactivity. Second, under certain physiologic or experimental conditions, they can be induced to become tissue- or organ-specific cells with special functions. In some organs, such as the gut and bone marrow, stem cells regularly divide to repair and replace worn out or damaged tissues. In other organs, however, such as the pancreas and the heart, stem cells only divide under special conditions.
Spotlight Innovation, FSU collaborate to support development of novel therapies for Zika virus infection

Spotlight Innovation, FSU collaborate to support development of novel therapies for Zika virus infection

Spotlight Innovation Inc. has entered into a Sponsored Research Agreement with Florida State University to support research directed by FSU Prof. Hengli Tang aimed at developing safe and effective drugs to treat patients infected with Zika virus (ZIKV). [More]
Scientists grow noroviruses in laboratory cultures of human intestinal epithelial cells

Scientists grow noroviruses in laboratory cultures of human intestinal epithelial cells

Human noroviruses - the leading viral cause of acute diarrhea around the world - have been difficult to study because scientists had not found a way to grow them in the lab. [More]
Researchers find new way for early prediction of leukemic relapse

Researchers find new way for early prediction of leukemic relapse

Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and Moores Cancer Center have identified RNA-based biomarkers that distinguish between normal, aging hematopoietic stem cells and leukemia stem cells associated with secondary acute myeloid leukemia (sAML), a particularly problematic disease that typically afflicts older patients who have often already experienced a bout with cancer. [More]
Novel small-molecule Wnt inhibitor may provide new treatment option for colorectal cancer patients

Novel small-molecule Wnt inhibitor may provide new treatment option for colorectal cancer patients

A team including the National Cancer Center, the RIKEN Center for Life Science Technologies , and Carna Biosciences Inc., has jointly announced the development of a novel small-molecule Wnt inhibitor named NCB-0846. [More]
New biomaterial allows scientists to study how stem cells sense stiffness of surrounding environment

New biomaterial allows scientists to study how stem cells sense stiffness of surrounding environment

A new biomaterial can be used to study how and when stem cells sense the mechanics of their surrounding environment, found a team led by Robert Mauck, PhD, the Mary Black Ralston Professor for Education and Research in Orthopaedic Surgery, in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
Researchers develop new method to culture norovirus in intestinal cells

Researchers develop new method to culture norovirus in intestinal cells

Researchers have succeeded in culturing norovirus in human intestinal cells, a breakthrough that could help scientists develop novel therapeutics and vaccines against the debilitating effects of the virus. [More]
Breakthrough in cancer cell screening advances personalised treatment of childhood leukaemia

Breakthrough in cancer cell screening advances personalised treatment of childhood leukaemia

Researchers at Newcastle University have been able to accurately predict how children whose cancer returns after treatment for leukaemia are likely to respond to further treatment. [More]
UCSF researchers identify new strategy to cultivate beneficial energy-burning fat

UCSF researchers identify new strategy to cultivate beneficial energy-burning fat

UC San Francisco researchers studying beige fat — a calorie-burning tissue that can help to ward off obesity and diabetes — have discovered a new strategy to cultivate this beneficial blubber. [More]
Protein complex could play key role in natural development of stem cells into healthy blood cells

Protein complex could play key role in natural development of stem cells into healthy blood cells

A group of proteins best known for helping to activate all mammalian genes has been found to play a particularly commanding role in the natural development of specialized stem cells into healthy blood cells, a process known as hematopoiesis. [More]
Stem cells contribute to origin of cancer in different organs of mice

Stem cells contribute to origin of cancer in different organs of mice

The idea that stem cells - special cells that divide to repair and generate tissues - might be the major determinant of cancer risk has provoked great debate in the scientific community. [More]
Salk researchers develop new method to create unlimited numbers of precursor kidney cells

Salk researchers develop new method to create unlimited numbers of precursor kidney cells

Salk Institute scientists have discovered the holy grail of endless youthfulness--at least when it comes to one type of human kidney precursor cell. [More]
Assigning barcode to stem cells makes it possible to monitor large blood cell populations

Assigning barcode to stem cells makes it possible to monitor large blood cell populations

By assigning a barcode to stem cells, researchers at Lund University in Sweden have made it possible to monitor large blood cell populations as well as individual blood cells, and study the changes over time. [More]
AMSBIO introduces Organoid Progenitor Cells for use in gene editing techniques

AMSBIO introduces Organoid Progenitor Cells for use in gene editing techniques

AMSBIO has introduced Cultrex Organoid Progenitor Cells that have been derived from normal, healthy mouse small intestine tissue and are continuously cultured using Reduced Growth Factor BME R1 and BME 2. [More]
MDI Biological Laboratory researchers receive patent for novel heart disease drug

MDI Biological Laboratory researchers receive patent for novel heart disease drug

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office has announced that it will grant a patent to MDI Biological Laboratory scientists Voot P. Yin, Ph.D., and Kevin Strange, Ph.D., and their collaborator Michael Zasloff, M.D., Ph.D., for use of the small molecule MSI-1436 to stimulate the repair and regeneration of heart tissue damaged by injuries such as a heart attack. [More]
Melatonin appears to suppress growth of breast cancer stem cells

Melatonin appears to suppress growth of breast cancer stem cells

Melatonin, a hormone produced in the human brain, appears to suppress the growth of breast cancer tumors. [More]
Novel scaffolds may open new avenues in stem and cancer cell manipulation

Novel scaffolds may open new avenues in stem and cancer cell manipulation

A discovery in the field of biomaterials may open new frontiers in stem and cancer cell manipulation and associated advanced therapy development. [More]
Researchers unravel mechanism by which hippocampal stem cells regulate their own fate

Researchers unravel mechanism by which hippocampal stem cells regulate their own fate

To date, it has been assumed that the differentiation of stem cells depends on the environment they are embedded in. [More]
Penn researchers uncover strategy to reverse effects of dyskeratosis congenita

Penn researchers uncover strategy to reverse effects of dyskeratosis congenita

Dyskeratosis congenita, or DC, is a rare, inherited disease for which there are limited treatment options and no cure. [More]

Tulane professor receives three-year grant to improve survival of mesenchymal stem cells

Kim O'Connor, a professor in Tulane University's Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, received a three-year $599,638 grant from the National Science Foundation to study ways to improve the survival of mesenchymal stem cells once they are implanted in patients. [More]
Stem cells derived from bone marrow provide better quality of life to transplant patients

Stem cells derived from bone marrow provide better quality of life to transplant patients

A large, nationwide study published in the journal JAMA Oncology found that people who received transplants of cells collected from a donor's bone marrow the original source for blood stem cell transplants, developed decades ago had better self-reported psychological well-being, experienced fewer symptoms of a common post-transplant side effect called graft-vs.-host disease and were more likely to be back at work five years after transplantation than those whose transplanted cells were taken from the donor's bloodstream. [More]
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