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Stem cells have the remarkable potential to develop into many different cell types in the body during early life and growth. In addition, in many tissues they serve as a sort of internal repair system, dividing essentially without limit to replenish other cells as long as the person or animal is still alive. When a stem cell divides, each new cell has the potential either to remain a stem cell or become another type of cell with a more specialized function, such as a muscle cell, a red blood cell, or a brain cell.

Stem cells are distinguished from other cell types by two important characteristics. First, they are unspecialized cells capable of renewing themselves through cell division, sometimes after long periods of inactivity. Second, under certain physiologic or experimental conditions, they can be induced to become tissue- or organ-specific cells with special functions. In some organs, such as the gut and bone marrow, stem cells regularly divide to repair and replace worn out or damaged tissues. In other organs, however, such as the pancreas and the heart, stem cells only divide under special conditions.
BCC Research report provides detailed analyses of global stem cell market

BCC Research report provides detailed analyses of global stem cell market

Reportlinker.com announces that a new market research report is available in its catalogue: The Global Market for Stem Cells. [More]
Novogen receives funding support to commence studies in muscular dystrophy

Novogen receives funding support to commence studies in muscular dystrophy

The Australian biotechnology company, Novogen Limited today announced receipt of funding from the FSHD Global Research Foundation as part of the Company’s efforts to find effective treatments for a range of musculo-degenerative diseases including facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD). [More]
Schizophrenia-linked genetic variations and the developing brain: an interview with Prof. Guo-li Ming

Schizophrenia-linked genetic variations and the developing brain: an interview with Prof. Guo-li Ming

How much is currently known about what happens in the developing brain that puts people at risk of schizophrenia? [More]
CRI researchers identify gene linked to several childhood cancers

CRI researchers identify gene linked to several childhood cancers

Researchers at the Children-s Medical Center Research Institute at UT Southwestern have identified a gene that contributes to the development of several childhood cancers, in a study conducted with mice designed to model the cancers. [More]
Study reveals stem cell therapy as a new potential avenue of treatment for stroke

Study reveals stem cell therapy as a new potential avenue of treatment for stroke

A stroke therapy using stem cells extracted from patients' bone marrow has shown promising results in the first trial of its kind in humans. [More]
Scientists find new clues to early detection, personalised treatment of ovarian cancer

Scientists find new clues to early detection, personalised treatment of ovarian cancer

Scientists at A*STAR's Institute of Medical Biology and the Bioinformatics Institute have found new clues to early detection and personalised treatment of ovarian cancer, currently one of the most difficult cancers to diagnose early due to the lack of symptoms that are unique to the illness. [More]
Scientists uncover new information on how stem cells in human bowel behave

Scientists uncover new information on how stem cells in human bowel behave

For the first time, scientists have uncovered new information on how stem cells in the human bowel behave, revealing vital clues about the earliest stages in bowel cancer development and how we may begin to prevent it. [More]
High school recipients receive $2,500 to support digestive disease research projects

High school recipients receive $2,500 to support digestive disease research projects

The American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) Research Foundation has announced the 2014 AGA-Eli and Edythe Broad Student Research Fellowship Award recipients. This award stimulates interest in digestive disease research among high school students by supporting budding scientists' research projects. [More]
Neurons derived from human iPSC and grafted into rats after spinal cord injury produce cells

Neurons derived from human iPSC and grafted into rats after spinal cord injury produce cells

Building upon previous research, scientists at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and Veteran's Affairs San Diego Healthcare System report that neurons derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) and grafted into rats after a spinal cord injury produced cells with tens of thousands of axons extending virtually the entire length of the animals' central nervous system. [More]
Longer looks: Kentucky is health law poster child; how to negotiate a lower medical bill; the Ebola outbreak up close

Longer looks: Kentucky is health law poster child; how to negotiate a lower medical bill; the Ebola outbreak up close

About a year ago, on Aug. 22, a team of inspectors from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) unit of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services arrived in Frankfort, Ky., to see if the people working out of a nondescript warehouse there were going to be able to pull off the launch of Kentucky's Obamacare health-insurance exchange. [More]
New method of growing human cells may help develop tailor-made therapies for GI conditions

New method of growing human cells may help develop tailor-made therapies for GI conditions

A method of growing human cells from tissue removed from a patient's gastrointestinal (GI) tract eventually may help scientists develop tailor-made therapies for inflammatory bowel disease and other GI conditions. [More]
Elbit Imaging announces additional updates regarding 2 proposals on agenda of annual general meeting

Elbit Imaging announces additional updates regarding 2 proposals on agenda of annual general meeting

​Elbit Imaging Ltd. announced today further to the Company's announcement dated August 5, 2014, additional updates regarding two proposals on the agenda of its annual general meeting of shareholders scheduled to be held on August 14, 2014 (the "Meeting"). [More]
UCSF researchers identify novel molecular features within the developing human brain

UCSF researchers identify novel molecular features within the developing human brain

UC San Francisco researchers have identified cells' unique features within the developing human brain, using the latest technologies for analyzing gene activity in individual cells, and have demonstrated that large-scale cell surveys can be done much more efficiently and cheaply than was previously thought possible. [More]
Researchers take major step forward in developing real ALS treatments

Researchers take major step forward in developing real ALS treatments

A series of studies begun by Harvard Stem Cell Institute scientists eight years ago has lead to a report published today that may be a major step forward in the quest to develop real treatments for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, ALS, or Lou Gehrig's disease. [More]
Induced immunorejection may eliminate tumors post-cell transplantation

Induced immunorejection may eliminate tumors post-cell transplantation

Recent studies have shown that transplanting induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neural stem cells (iPS-NSCs) can promote functional recovery after spinal cord injury in rodents and non-human primates. However, a serious drawback to the transplantation of iPS-NSCs is the potential for tumor growth, or tumorogenesis, post-transplantation. [More]
New technique for studying lifecycle of hepatitis B virus can help develop cure for disease

New technique for studying lifecycle of hepatitis B virus can help develop cure for disease

A new technique for studying the lifecycle of the hepatitis B virus could help researchers develop a cure for the disease. [More]
5-LO enzyme plays important role in the survival of leukaemic AML stem cells

5-LO enzyme plays important role in the survival of leukaemic AML stem cells

Despite improved therapy, only one out of every two adult patients survive acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). The mean survival time for this disease, which predominantly occurs in the elderly, is less than a year for patients over 65 years. It is assumed that leukaemic stem cells, which cannot be completely eliminated during treatment, are the origin of relapse. [More]
Neuralstem doses final patient with NSI-566 stem cells in Phase II trial

Neuralstem doses final patient with NSI-566 stem cells in Phase II trial

Neuralstem, Inc. announced that the final patient was treated in its Phase II trial using NSI-566 spinal cord-derived neural stem cells in the treatment of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS or Lou Gehrig's disease). [More]
New molecular test kit predicts survival outcomes in kidney cancer patients

New molecular test kit predicts survival outcomes in kidney cancer patients

Researchers and doctors at the Institute of Bioengineering and Nanotechnology (IBN), Singapore General Hospital (SGH) and National Cancer Centre Singapore (NCCS) have co-developed the first molecular test kit that can predict treatment and survival outcomes in kidney cancer patients. This breakthrough was recently reported in European Urology, the world's top urology journal. [More]
Review of recent advances in stem cell biology

Review of recent advances in stem cell biology

Advances in stem cell research will provide enormous opportunities for both biological and future clinical applications. [More]