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Stem cells have the remarkable potential to develop into many different cell types in the body during early life and growth. In addition, in many tissues they serve as a sort of internal repair system, dividing essentially without limit to replenish other cells as long as the person or animal is still alive. When a stem cell divides, each new cell has the potential either to remain a stem cell or become another type of cell with a more specialized function, such as a muscle cell, a red blood cell, or a brain cell.

Stem cells are distinguished from other cell types by two important characteristics. First, they are unspecialized cells capable of renewing themselves through cell division, sometimes after long periods of inactivity. Second, under certain physiologic or experimental conditions, they can be induced to become tissue- or organ-specific cells with special functions. In some organs, such as the gut and bone marrow, stem cells regularly divide to repair and replace worn out or damaged tissues. In other organs, however, such as the pancreas and the heart, stem cells only divide under special conditions.
Johns Hopkins scientists create statistical model to measure proportion of cancer incidence

Johns Hopkins scientists create statistical model to measure proportion of cancer incidence

Scientists from the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center have created a statistical model that measures the proportion of cancer incidence, across many tissue types, caused mainly by random mutations that occur when stem cells divide. [More]
Study shows that reprogramming stem cells can prevent cancer following full body radiation

Study shows that reprogramming stem cells can prevent cancer following full body radiation

The body has evolved ways to get rid of faulty stem cells. A University of Colorado Cancer Center study published today in the journal Stem Cells shows that one of these ways is a "program" that makes stem cells damaged by radiation differentiate into other cells that can no longer survive forever. [More]
LIBD announces significant advances in identifying causes of schizophrenia, brain disorders

LIBD announces significant advances in identifying causes of schizophrenia, brain disorders

The Lieber Institute for Brain Development (LIBD) announces significant advances in identifying the causes of schizophrenia and related developmental brain disorders and translating these findings into new treatment strategies. [More]
Novastem uses Stemedica's stem cell products to treat patient in ischemic stroke study

Novastem uses Stemedica's stem cell products to treat patient in ischemic stroke study

Novastem, a leader in regenerative medicine, announces the treatment of its first patient in its study for ischemic stroke at Clinica Santa Clarita. [More]
Study reveals why older people are at higher risk for developing cancer

Study reveals why older people are at higher risk for developing cancer

Why are older people at higher risk for developing cancer? Prevailing opinion holds that, over time, your body's cells accumulate DNA damage and that eventually this damage catches up with the body in a way that causes cancer. [More]
C3BS enrols 240th patient in CHART-1 European trial of C-Cure for treatment of congestive heart failure

C3BS enrols 240th patient in CHART-1 European trial of C-Cure for treatment of congestive heart failure

Cardio3 BioSciences, a leader in the discovery and development of regenerative, protective and reconstructive therapies, announces today the enrolment of the 240th patient in its CHART-1 European trial for C-Cure, the first and only stem cell therapeutic using guided stem cells for the treatment of congestive heart failure. [More]
Study reveals why older people are at increased risk for developing cancer

Study reveals why older people are at increased risk for developing cancer

Why are older people at higher risk for developing cancer? Prevailing opinion holds that, over time, your body's cells accumulate DNA damage and that eventually this damage catches up with the body in a way that causes cancer. [More]
Penn study has implications for developing new cell-based treatments for skin disease

Penn study has implications for developing new cell-based treatments for skin disease

As the main component of connective tissue in the body, fibroblasts are the most common type of cell. Taking advantage of that ready availability, scientists from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, the Wistar Institute, Boston University School of Medicine, and New Jersey Institute of Technology have discovered a way to repurpose fibroblasts into functional melanocytes, the body's pigment-producing cells. [More]
Novel marker may help doctors choose most effective treatment for older patients with AML

Novel marker may help doctors choose most effective treatment for older patients with AML

A new study led by researchers at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute describes a novel marker that might help doctors choose the least toxic, most effective treatment for many older patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). [More]
Apheresis: A potent therapeutic in extracorporeal photopherisis

Apheresis: A potent therapeutic in extracorporeal photopherisis

Apheresis, the simple process of drawing blood, becomes a powerful therapeutic in extracorporeal photopherisis (ECP) according to clinicians and scientists who met at the NIH State of the Science Symposium in Therapeutic Apheresis. Nora Ratcliffe, MD, of Dartmouth Hitchcock, looked at current methodology and opportunities for research in a paper recently published in Transfusion Medicine Review, titled "National Institutes of Health State of the Science Symposium in Therapeutic Apheresis: Scientific Opportunities in Extracorporeal Photopheresis." [More]

ETH Zurich, University of Zurich jointly open new translational research centre

ETH Zurich and the University of Zurich are taking their long-standing partnership to a new level with a new translational research centre. The two universities are founding the Wyss Translational Center Zurich (WTZ) with funds donated by Hansjörg Wyss to the ETH Zurich Foundation. [More]
AMSBIO announces DNA-In™ Neuro Transfection Reagent

AMSBIO announces DNA-In™ Neuro Transfection Reagent

AMSBIO announces DNA-In™ Neuro- a new generation transfection reagent developed specifically for maximum nucleic acid delivery into neurons, typically achieving a 2-fold or greater improvement in efficiency over currently available competing reagents. [More]
New therapeutic approach for women with estrogen-receptor-positive breast cancer

New therapeutic approach for women with estrogen-receptor-positive breast cancer

Loyola researchers and collaborators have reported promising results from a novel therapeutic approach for women with estrogen-receptor-positive breast cancer. [More]
NYSCF, CMTA partner to advance research on genetic neuropathies

NYSCF, CMTA partner to advance research on genetic neuropathies

The New York Stem Cell Foundation Research Institute, a non-profit organization dedicated to accelerating cures through stem cell research, announced a collaboration today with the Charcot-Marie-Tooth Association, a patient-led disease foundation with the mission to advance research on genetic neuropathies that leads to the development of new therapies. [More]
CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing: an interview with Maja Petkovic

CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing: an interview with Maja Petkovic

RNA guided CRISPR nucleases have a great potential for genome modification in many different organisms. [More]

Ponatinib ‘superior’ to sequential second-generation TKI treatment in CML

Patients with chronic myelogenous leukaemia resistant or intolerant to at least one second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor have a higher probability of achieving a response to the third-generation TKI ponatinib than to a further second-generation TKI, research indicates. [More]
Study finds that disarray in methylation helps tumors adapt to changing circumstances

Study finds that disarray in methylation helps tumors adapt to changing circumstances

The genetic tumult within cancerous tumors is more than matched by the disorder in one of the mechanisms for switching cells' genes on and off, scientists at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard report in a new study. [More]
CTI BioPharma presents data from Phase 3 trial of pacritinib in AML patients at ASH 2014

CTI BioPharma presents data from Phase 3 trial of pacritinib in AML patients at ASH 2014

CTI BioPharma Corp. today announced data showing treatment with pacritinib, an investigational oral multikinase inhibitor in Phase 3 clinical development, preferentially killed acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells with FLT3 mutations, overcame stromal protection and suppressed leukemic outgrowth from stroma adherent AML cells in both medium-term (7-14 days) and long-term (5-6 weeks) assays. [More]
Kiadis Pharma reports positive interim data from ATIR Phase II clinical study

Kiadis Pharma reports positive interim data from ATIR Phase II clinical study

Kiadis Pharma B.V., a clinical stage biopharmaceutical company developing T-cell immunotherapy treatments for blood cancers, today announces positive interim data from the ongoing Phase II clinical study with its lead product ATIR. [More]
Amgen announces new data from BLINCYTO Phase 2 study for treatment of patients with ALL

Amgen announces new data from BLINCYTO Phase 2 study for treatment of patients with ALL

Amgen today announced that new data from a pivotal Phase 2 study evaluating BLINCYTO (blinatumomab) for the treatment of adult patients with relapsed/refractory B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) was presented at the 56th American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting and Exposition. [More]