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Stem cells have the remarkable potential to develop into many different cell types in the body during early life and growth. In addition, in many tissues they serve as a sort of internal repair system, dividing essentially without limit to replenish other cells as long as the person or animal is still alive. When a stem cell divides, each new cell has the potential either to remain a stem cell or become another type of cell with a more specialized function, such as a muscle cell, a red blood cell, or a brain cell.

Stem cells are distinguished from other cell types by two important characteristics. First, they are unspecialized cells capable of renewing themselves through cell division, sometimes after long periods of inactivity. Second, under certain physiologic or experimental conditions, they can be induced to become tissue- or organ-specific cells with special functions. In some organs, such as the gut and bone marrow, stem cells regularly divide to repair and replace worn out or damaged tissues. In other organs, however, such as the pancreas and the heart, stem cells only divide under special conditions.
SIRIUS supports single-agent daratumumab in refractory multiple myeloma

SIRIUS supports single-agent daratumumab in refractory multiple myeloma

Phase II trial results show that daratumumab monotherapy elicits responses and has a favourable adverse event profile in heavily-pretreated, refractory multiple myeloma patients. [More]
Stem cell transplantation of neurotrophic factors shows promise in ALS

Stem cell transplantation of neurotrophic factors shows promise in ALS

Mesenchymal stem cells cultured to secrete neurotrophic factors can be administered to patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis without lasting unwanted effects and may have clinical benefits, indicates a phase I/II safety analysis study. [More]
Age-related macular degeneration: an interview with Cathy Yelf, Macular Society

Age-related macular degeneration: an interview with Cathy Yelf, Macular Society

Age-related macular degeneration is a condition of the macula, a tiny area of the retina at the back of the eye. Your macula is only about the size of the grain of rice, that’s about four millimeters across. [More]
New method helps generate cardiac cells for heart disease studies, drug discovery

New method helps generate cardiac cells for heart disease studies, drug discovery

For a team of Vanderbilt investigators trying to generate heart muscle cells from stem cells, a piece of broken equipment turned out to be a good thing. [More]
Findings offer potential new therapeutic target to boost strength of heart muscle contractions

Findings offer potential new therapeutic target to boost strength of heart muscle contractions

Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have identified a previously unrecognized small protein in cells of the human heart that plays a key role in heart muscle contraction. The protein is made from an RNA that was previously believed to be a blank or non-coding RNA, suggesting there may be many other small 'non-coding' segments that play important biological roles. [More]
Rockefeller University researchers identify new mechanism involved in early stem cell development

Rockefeller University researchers identify new mechanism involved in early stem cell development

Stem cells work throughout our lives as a sort of handyman, repairing damaged tissues and renewing some normal ones, like the skin we shed. Scientists have come to understand much about how stem cells function when we are adults, but less is known about where these stem cells come from to begin with, as an embryo is developing. [More]
Quad partners with University of Massachusetts to evaluate performance of novel cell separation solution

Quad partners with University of Massachusetts to evaluate performance of novel cell separation solution

The rapid growth of cell-based immunotherapy research has led to an increase in demand for methods to isolate specific immune cell populations from heterogeneous samples with high viability, purity and recovery efficiency. Quad Technologies ("Quad"), is meeting this need with its MagCloudz™ Streptavidin Cell Separation Kits and has partnered with The University of Massachusetts Medical School to evaluate the performance of its novel cell separation solution for the enrichment and purification of CD3+ T-cells from human umbilical cord blood. [More]
New discovery may help researchers tackle mitochondrial diseases and age-related diseases

New discovery may help researchers tackle mitochondrial diseases and age-related diseases

Buck Institute faculty Judith Campisi, PhD, says age researchers need to stop thinking of cellular senescence, now accepted as an important driver of aging, as a single phenotype that stems from genotoxic stress. Research from her lab reveals that cellular senescence, a process whereby cells permanently lose the ability to divide, is also induced by signaling from dysfunctional mitochondria - and that the arrested cells secrete a distinctly different "stew" of biologically active factors in a process unrelated to the damaging free radicals that are created in mitochondria as part of oxygen metabolism. [More]
New mechanism of differentiation may offer novel therapeutic approaches to blood malignancies, solid tumors

New mechanism of differentiation may offer novel therapeutic approaches to blood malignancies, solid tumors

In humans the differentiation of stem cells into hundreds of specialized cell types is vital. Differentiation drives development from fertilized egg to a newborn, and it underlies the continuous replacement of the 5 billion cells that die every hour in an adult. On the downside, mutations in differentiation pathways of different cell types can be drivers of cancers. [More]
Researchers discover molecular target for DNA repair defects behind Fanconi anemia

Researchers discover molecular target for DNA repair defects behind Fanconi anemia

Researchers have identified a molecular target and experimental treatment strategy for DNA repair defects behind Fanconi anemia – a complex genetic disorder responsible for birth anomalies, organ damage, anemia and cancer. [More]
TRL becomes primary distributor of Kirkstall's QuasiVivo system in the US and Canada

TRL becomes primary distributor of Kirkstall's QuasiVivo system in the US and Canada

Triangle Research Labs, LLC and Kirkstall, Ltd, are pleased to announce TRL as the primary distributor of Kirkstall's 3-D cell fluidic culture system, QuasiVivo, in the US and Canada. [More]
McMaster University researchers take a giant leap in detecting early stages of leukemia

McMaster University researchers take a giant leap in detecting early stages of leukemia

McMaster University researchers have taken a giant leap in identifying the early stages of a deadly cancer and predicting how it will develop in individuals. [More]
Clontech Laboratories launches Guide-it CRISPR/Cas9 Gesicle Production System

Clontech Laboratories launches Guide-it CRISPR/Cas9 Gesicle Production System

Clontech Laboratories, Inc., a wholly-owned subsidiary of Takara Bio Inc., today announced the launch of the Guide-it CRISPR/Cas9 Gesicle Production System. This system provides an innovative method to deliver Cas9/single guide RNA (sgRNA) ribonucleoprotein complexes to a broad range of cell types. [More]
Research could lead to new treatment for Rett Syndrome, other forms of autism

Research could lead to new treatment for Rett Syndrome, other forms of autism

Penn State scientists have discovered a novel drug target and have rescued functional deficits in human nerve cells derived from patients with Rett Syndrome, a severe form of autism-spectrum disorder. [More]
DNA-binding protein acts like genetic traffic signal to orchestrate early stage embryonic development

DNA-binding protein acts like genetic traffic signal to orchestrate early stage embryonic development

New research by UC San Francisco stem cell biologists has revealed that a DNA-binding protein called Foxd3 acts like a genetic traffic signal, holding that ball of undifferentiated cells in a state of readiness for its great transformation in the third week of development. [More]
Anthony Nolan introduces new tissue typing method that could revolutionise stem cell transplantation

Anthony Nolan introduces new tissue typing method that could revolutionise stem cell transplantation

Anthony Nolan has today launched a new tissue typing method that could significantly improve stem cell transplant outcomes. [More]
New class of sound wave could lead to revolution in stem cell therapy

New class of sound wave could lead to revolution in stem cell therapy

Acoustics experts have created a new class of sound wave - the first in more than half a century - in a breakthrough they hope could lead to a revolution in stem cell therapy. [More]
Promising novel approach to treat gynecologic tumors

Promising novel approach to treat gynecologic tumors

UCLA scientists have developed a promising novel method to treat gynecologic tumors. The approach focuses on a protein called p53, which is commonly mutated in women who have high-grade serous ovarian cancer, the deadliest form of reproductive cancer. In many women with the disease, the cancer is very advanced by the time it is diagnosed and is therefore difficult to treat. [More]
Eliminating the 'bad seeds' of liver cancer

Eliminating the 'bad seeds' of liver cancer

Researchers have found the 'bad seeds' of liver cancer and believe they could one day reprogram them to remain responsive to cancer treatment, a new study has found. [More]
Combining NELL-1 with BMP2 therapy may promote bone development

Combining NELL-1 with BMP2 therapy may promote bone development

Bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP2) is used clinically to promote bone repair. However, the high BMP2 concentrations required to stimulate bone growth in humans may produce life-threatening adverse effects such as cervical swelling in spinal fusion procedures, a problem that prompted an FDA warning in 2008. [More]
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