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Stem cells have the remarkable potential to develop into many different cell types in the body during early life and growth. In addition, in many tissues they serve as a sort of internal repair system, dividing essentially without limit to replenish other cells as long as the person or animal is still alive. When a stem cell divides, each new cell has the potential either to remain a stem cell or become another type of cell with a more specialized function, such as a muscle cell, a red blood cell, or a brain cell.

Stem cells are distinguished from other cell types by two important characteristics. First, they are unspecialized cells capable of renewing themselves through cell division, sometimes after long periods of inactivity. Second, under certain physiologic or experimental conditions, they can be induced to become tissue- or organ-specific cells with special functions. In some organs, such as the gut and bone marrow, stem cells regularly divide to repair and replace worn out or damaged tissues. In other organs, however, such as the pancreas and the heart, stem cells only divide under special conditions.
Elsevier launches open access journal Reproductive Biomedicine & Society Online

Elsevier launches open access journal Reproductive Biomedicine & Society Online

Elsevier, a world-leading provider of scientific, technical and medical information products and services, announces the launch of open access journal Reproductive Biomedicine & Society Online. [More]
Energy-burning 'good' fat helps reduce weight gain, lower blood glucose levels in mice

Energy-burning 'good' fat helps reduce weight gain, lower blood glucose levels in mice

Scientists at the University of California, Berkeley, have developed a novel way to engineer the growth and expansion of energy-burning "good" fat, and then found that this fat helped reduce weight gain and lower blood glucose levels in mice. [More]
Blavatnik Biomedical Accelerator funds advanced biomedical research projects

Blavatnik Biomedical Accelerator funds advanced biomedical research projects

A few years ago, Andrew Myers' laboratory discovered a new way to synthesize an important class of antibiotics that could one day tackle the toughest, most resistant infections. [More]
Transplanting mesenchymal stromal cells derived from amniotic membranes can benefit eye diseases

Transplanting mesenchymal stromal cells derived from amniotic membranes can benefit eye diseases

A team of researchers in South Korea has successfully transplanted mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) derived from human amniotic membranes of the placenta (AMSCs) into laboratory mice modeled with oxygen-induced retinopathy (a murine model used to mimic eye disease). [More]
MCRI announces winners of cancer crowdsourcing initiative

MCRI announces winners of cancer crowdsourcing initiative

The Myeloma Crowd Research Initiative (MCRI), an unprecedented collaboration of cancer researchers and patient advocates, today announced the two winners of its first-ever crowdsourcing and patient-led initiative to fund research in high-risk multiple myeloma, a rare malignancy of plasma cells. [More]
Further understanding of genetic influence in ALS to be explored in new partnership

Further understanding of genetic influence in ALS to be explored in new partnership

Biogen, the ALS Association and Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) today announced a new collaboration to better understand the differences and commonalities in the ALS disease process and how genes influence the clinical features of the disease. [More]
Mesenchymal stem cell exosomes offer hope in healing chronic wounds

Mesenchymal stem cell exosomes offer hope in healing chronic wounds

Dr. Badiavas’ research demonstrates how mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) exosomes, cell-derived vesicles that exist in biological fluids, function to repair non-healing wounds. [More]
Johns Hopkins scientists develop novel fish embryo technique to identify potential new treatments for diabetes

Johns Hopkins scientists develop novel fish embryo technique to identify potential new treatments for diabetes

In experiments with 500,000 genetically engineered zebrafish embryos, Johns Hopkins scientists report they have developed a potentially better and more accurate way to screen for useful drugs, and they have used it to identify 24 drug candidates that increase the number of insulin-producing cells in the pancreas. [More]
Omeros reports additional positive data from OMS721 Phase 2 trial for treatment of thrombotic microangiopathies

Omeros reports additional positive data from OMS721 Phase 2 trial for treatment of thrombotic microangiopathies

Omeros Corporation today announced additional positive data in the company's Phase 2 clinical trial of OMS721 for the treatment of thrombotic microangiopathies (TMAs). TMAs are a family of rare, debilitating and life-threatening disorders characterized by excessive thrombi (clots) – aggregations of platelets – in the microcirculation of the body's organs, most commonly the kidney and brain. [More]
TKI outcomes ‘unfavourable’ in young CML patients

TKI outcomes ‘unfavourable’ in young CML patients

Adolescent and young adult patients with chronic myeloid leukaemia may have an unfavourable outcome on tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy compared with their older counterparts, suggests a study of Japanese patients. [More]
HCT not precluded by prior second-generation TKI therapy in chronic, advanced phase CML

HCT not precluded by prior second-generation TKI therapy in chronic, advanced phase CML

Allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation can be considered for chronic- and accelerated-phase chronic myeloid leukaemia patients with prior exposure to second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors, say Polish researchers. [More]
Unituxin (dinutuximab) granted EC Marketing Authorisation for treatment of childhood neuroblastoma

Unituxin (dinutuximab) granted EC Marketing Authorisation for treatment of childhood neuroblastoma

United Therapeutics Corporation announced today that the European Commission (EC) has granted Marketing Authorisation for Unituxin (dinutuximab) for the treatment of high-risk neuroblastoma in patients aged 12 months to 17 years, who have previously received induction chemotherapy and achieved at least a partial response, followed by myeloablative therapy and autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT). [More]
HCT not precluded by prior second-generation TKI therapy in chronic, advanced phase CML

HCT not precluded by prior second-generation TKI therapy in chronic, advanced phase CML

Allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation can be considered for chronic- and accelerated-phase chronic myeloid leukaemia patients with prior exposure to second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors, say Polish researchers. [More]

TKI outcomes ‘unfavourable’ in young CML patients

Adolescent and young adult patients with chronic myeloid leukaemia may have an unfavourable outcome on tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy compared with their older counterparts, suggests a study of Japanese patients. [More]
Cord Blood America’s 2015 second quarter revenue increases 39.0% to $1.41 million

Cord Blood America’s 2015 second quarter revenue increases 39.0% to $1.41 million

Cord Blood America, Inc. today announced financial results for the second quarter ended June 30, 2015. [More]
USC kidney researcher named recipient of ASN-AHA Young Investigator Award

USC kidney researcher named recipient of ASN-AHA Young Investigator Award

Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California kidney researcher Janos Peti-Peterdi is the 2015 recipient of the ASN-AHA Young Investigator Award. [More]
New study explains why statins are more beneficial than others in some cases

New study explains why statins are more beneficial than others in some cases

Statins' success in reducing atherosclerosis-related events has elevated the medications to wonder-drug status, with some researchers advocating for their wider use as a preemptive therapy for cardiovascular disease. [More]
FGF protein may play key role in breast and prostate cancer, shows research

FGF protein may play key role in breast and prostate cancer, shows research

Simply put, cancer is caused by mutations to genes within a cell that lead to abnormal cell growth. Finding out what causes that genetic mutation has been the holy grail of medical science for decades. [More]
Newly developed big data technique may have significant impact on health care

Newly developed big data technique may have significant impact on health care

Rice University scientists have developed a big data technique that could have a significant impact on health care. The Rice lab of bioengineer Amina Qutub designed an algorithm called "progeny clustering" that is being used in a hospital study to identify which treatments should be given to children with leukemia. [More]
First clinical trial to test use of retinal progenitor cells for treating retinitis pigmentosa begins

First clinical trial to test use of retinal progenitor cells for treating retinitis pigmentosa begins

Participants are being enrolled in the first clinical trial that tests the use of retinal progenitor cells to treat retinitis pigmentosa, reported project director Dr. Henry Klassen of UCI's Gavin Herbert Eye Institute and Sue & Bill Gross Stem Cell Research Center. The product of stem cell research at UCI, these retinal progenitors are similar to stem cells in terms of potential regenerative properties, but they're specific to the retina. [More]
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