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Stem cells have the remarkable potential to develop into many different cell types in the body during early life and growth. In addition, in many tissues they serve as a sort of internal repair system, dividing essentially without limit to replenish other cells as long as the person or animal is still alive. When a stem cell divides, each new cell has the potential either to remain a stem cell or become another type of cell with a more specialized function, such as a muscle cell, a red blood cell, or a brain cell.

Stem cells are distinguished from other cell types by two important characteristics. First, they are unspecialized cells capable of renewing themselves through cell division, sometimes after long periods of inactivity. Second, under certain physiologic or experimental conditions, they can be induced to become tissue- or organ-specific cells with special functions. In some organs, such as the gut and bone marrow, stem cells regularly divide to repair and replace worn out or damaged tissues. In other organs, however, such as the pancreas and the heart, stem cells only divide under special conditions.
LSD1 enzyme turns off genes needed to maintain cancer stem cell properties in glioblastoma

LSD1 enzyme turns off genes needed to maintain cancer stem cell properties in glioblastoma

Cancer's ability to grow unchecked is often attributed to cancer stem cells, a small fraction of cancer cells that have the capacity to grow and multiply indefinitely. How cancer stem cells retain this property while the bulk of a tumor's cells do not remains largely unknown. Using human tumor samples and mouse models, researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and Moores Cancer Center discovered that cancer stem cell properties are determined by epigenetic changes -- chemical modifications cells use to control which genes are turned on or off. [More]
Dental pulp stem cell transplants can contribute to peripheral nerve regeneration

Dental pulp stem cell transplants can contribute to peripheral nerve regeneration

Peripheral nerve injuries often are caused by trauma or surgical complications and can result in considerable disabilities. Regeneration of peripheral nerves can be accomplished effectively using autologous (self-donated) nerve grafts, but that procedure may sacrifice a functional nerve and cause loss of sensation in another part of the patient's body. [More]
AOSSM to present awards and grants to encourage cutting-edge research in orthopaedic sports medicine

AOSSM to present awards and grants to encourage cutting-edge research in orthopaedic sports medicine

In order to recognize and encourage cutting-edge research in key areas of orthopaedic sports medicine, the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine will present ten research awards and seven grants during its Annual Meeting, July 9-12 in Orlando, FL. [More]
Study could provide paradigm shift in treatment of age-related disease, cancer

Study could provide paradigm shift in treatment of age-related disease, cancer

Intermittent dosing with rapamycin selectively breaks the cascade of inflammatory events that follow cellular senescence, a phenomena in which cells cease to divide in response to DNA damaging agents, including many chemotherapies. [More]
University of Adelaide research may lead to new treatments for transplant patients

University of Adelaide research may lead to new treatments for transplant patients

Researchers at the University of Adelaide have discovered a new method for culturing stem cells which sees the highly therapeutic cells grow faster and stronger. [More]
Researchers compare effectiveness of two stem cell types in treating retinal degeneration

Researchers compare effectiveness of two stem cell types in treating retinal degeneration

By growing two types of stem cells in a "3-D culture" and measuring their ability to produce retinal cells, a team lead by St. Jude Children's Research Hospital researchers has found one cell type to be better at producing retinal cells. [More]
Researchers explore how Sox9 protein regulates production of cartilage

Researchers explore how Sox9 protein regulates production of cartilage

Cartilage does a lot more than determine the shapes of people's ears and noses. It also enables people to breathe and to form healthy bones -- two processes essential to life. In a study published in Cell Reports, USC Stem Cell researcher Xinjun He and University of Tokyo researcher Shinsuke Ohba explore how a protein called Sox9 regulates the production of cartilage. [More]
Scientists identify mechanism that reveals why stem cells undergo self-renewing divisions

Scientists identify mechanism that reveals why stem cells undergo self-renewing divisions

UT Southwestern Medical Center scientists collaborating with University of Michigan researchers have found a previously unidentified mechanism that helps explain why stem cells undergo self-renewing divisions but their offspring do not. [More]
Certain stem cells use microscopic nanotubes to communicate with neighboring cells, shows research

Certain stem cells use microscopic nanotubes to communicate with neighboring cells, shows research

When it comes to communicating with each other, some cells may be more "old school" than was previously thought. Certain types of stem cells use microscopic, threadlike nanotubes to communicate with neighboring cells, like a landline phone connection, rather than sending a broadcast signal, researchers at University of Michigan Life Sciences Institute and University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center have discovered. [More]
Study of genetic mutations could lead to optimized treatment plans for aplastic anemia patients

Study of genetic mutations could lead to optimized treatment plans for aplastic anemia patients

Scientists have identified a group of genetic mutations in patients with aplastic anemia, which likely will help doctors optimize treatment for this rare and deadly blood condition. The study, appearing in the New England Journal of Medicine, could lead to tailor-made treatment plans for aplastic anemia patients as part of the emerging precision medicine movement. [More]
Researchers complete phase 1 clinical trial of new drug for children suffering from neuroblastoma

Researchers complete phase 1 clinical trial of new drug for children suffering from neuroblastoma

Researchers at Spectrum Health Helen DeVos Children's Hospital have completed the first clinical trial of a new treatment for children suffering from neuroblastoma. In a clinical trial led by Giselle Sholler, MD, pediatric oncologist at Helen DeVos Children's Hospital and the Neuroblastoma and Medulloblastoma Translational Research Consortium (NMTRC), DFMO, an investigational agent, showed minimal side effects with long-term survival of three patients. [More]
Damon Runyon creates new award to increase number of physician-scientists

Damon Runyon creates new award to increase number of physician-scientists

Physician-scientists are crucial to moving scientific discoveries from the lab to patients, but their numbers have been dwindling just when they are needed most, particularly in cancer research, as the number of cancer cases is projected to increase by 45 percent in the next fifteen years and elevate cancer to the leading cause of death in America. [More]
Researchers use pioneering stem cell techniques to better understand causes of Spinal Muscular Atrophy

Researchers use pioneering stem cell techniques to better understand causes of Spinal Muscular Atrophy

New research from the Advanced Gene and Cell Therapy Lab at Royal Holloway, University of London has used pioneering stem cell techniques to better understand why certain cells are more at risk of degenerating in Spinal Muscular Atrophy than others. [More]
Nuclea and Aelan partner to develop, commercialize novel biomarker tests using STEM cells as models

Nuclea and Aelan partner to develop, commercialize novel biomarker tests using STEM cells as models

Nuclea Biotechnologies Inc. announced today that it is partnering with Aelan Cell Technologies Inc. (San Francisco, California) for the development, validation and commercialization of novel biomarker tests and companion diagnostics using human STEM cells as models. [More]
R-Japan receives license for cell processing facility

R-Japan receives license for cell processing facility

R-Japan Co.,Ltd. obtained the license of cell processing facility under the Act on the Safety of Regenerative Medicine from the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare Kinki Bureau of Health and Welfare on June 29, 2015. [More]
Three National Laureates selected for 2015 Blavatnik National Awards for Young Scientists

Three National Laureates selected for 2015 Blavatnik National Awards for Young Scientists

A chemist who has made important discoveries in both the human brain and sustainable energy, a neurosurgeon who has done pioneering work mapping the "blueprint" of how humans speak and hear, and a computer scientist who has changed our understanding of the capacity of wireless networks are the three winners of the 2015 Blavatnik National Awards for Young Scientists. [More]
Asterias Biotherapeutics added to Russell indexes

Asterias Biotherapeutics added to Russell indexes

Asterias Biotherapeutics, Inc., a biotechnology company focused on the emerging field of regenerative medicine, today announced that it has been added to the Russell 2000, Russell 3000, Russell Global and Russell Microcap indexes following Russell Investments' ("Russell") reconstitution of its comprehensive set of U.S. and global equity indexes after the close of the U.S. markets on June 26, 2015. [More]
Elsevier announces highlights of 2014 Impact Factor performance

Elsevier announces highlights of 2014 Impact Factor performance

Elsevier, a world-leading provider of scientific, technical and medical information products and services, today announced the highlights of its journal Impact Factor performance in 2014. According to the 2014 Journal Citation Reports (JCR) published by Thomson Reuters, Elsevier saw 55% of its journal Impact Factors increase from 2013 to 2014, ahead of the aggregate across other journals. [More]
Two physician-scientists in search for better Alzheimer's disease treatment

Two physician-scientists in search for better Alzheimer's disease treatment

Two of the nation's leading physician-scientists in the search to better understand and treat Alzheimer's disease - William Mobley, MD, PhD, and Michael Rafii, MD, PhD - have been named interim co-directors of the Alzheimer's Disease Cooperative Study (ADCS), a major initiative formed in 1991 as a cooperative agreement between the National Institute on Aging (NIA) and the University of California, San Diego. [More]
Neuralstem's HK532-IGF-1 neural stem cells therapy for Alzheimer's disease presented at ISSCR Annual Meeting

Neuralstem's HK532-IGF-1 neural stem cells therapy for Alzheimer's disease presented at ISSCR Annual Meeting

Neuralstem, Inc., a biopharmaceutical company using neural stem cell technology to develop small molecule and cell therapy treatments for central nervous system diseases, announced that the poster "Human Neural Stem Cells Expressing IGF-1: A Novel Cellular Therapy for Alzheimer's Disease" was presented yesterday at the International Society for Stem Cell Research (ISSCR) Annual Meeting in Stockholm, Sweden. [More]
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