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Stem cells have the remarkable potential to develop into many different cell types in the body during early life and growth. In addition, in many tissues they serve as a sort of internal repair system, dividing essentially without limit to replenish other cells as long as the person or animal is still alive. When a stem cell divides, each new cell has the potential either to remain a stem cell or become another type of cell with a more specialized function, such as a muscle cell, a red blood cell, or a brain cell.

Stem cells are distinguished from other cell types by two important characteristics. First, they are unspecialized cells capable of renewing themselves through cell division, sometimes after long periods of inactivity. Second, under certain physiologic or experimental conditions, they can be induced to become tissue- or organ-specific cells with special functions. In some organs, such as the gut and bone marrow, stem cells regularly divide to repair and replace worn out or damaged tissues. In other organs, however, such as the pancreas and the heart, stem cells only divide under special conditions.
CHLA physician discusses urological issues in children

CHLA physician discusses urological issues in children

Children's Hospital Los Angeles physician-scientist Roger E. De Filippo, MD, an associate professor of urology and director of Pediatric Urology Stem Cell Research at the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California discusses how science, technology and parental care can lead to improved pediatric urological health. [More]
Esophageal tissue can be grown in vivo from human and mouse cells, say researchers

Esophageal tissue can be grown in vivo from human and mouse cells, say researchers

In a first step toward future human therapies, researchers at The Saban Research Institute of Children's Hospital Los Angeles have shown that esophageal tissue can be grown in vivo from both human and mouse cells. The study has been published online in the journal Tissue Engineering, Part A. [More]
Research findings could provide new insights into esophageal cancer, Barrett's esophagus

Research findings could provide new insights into esophageal cancer, Barrett's esophagus

Despite previous indications to the contrary, the esophagus does have its own pool of stem cells, said researchers from the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine in an animal study published online today in Cell Reports. [More]
Melbourne researchers suggest new mechanism for bowel cancer development

Melbourne researchers suggest new mechanism for bowel cancer development

Melbourne researchers have challenged conventional thinking on how the bowel lining develops and, in the process, suggested a new mechanism for how bowel cancer starts. [More]
NIH presents 2014 New Innovator Award to Penn Medicine researcher

NIH presents 2014 New Innovator Award to Penn Medicine researcher

Roberto Bonasio, PhD, an assistant professor of Cell and Developmental Biology, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, and a core member of the Penn Epigenetics Program is one of the recipients of a 2014 New Innovator Award from the National Institutes of Health (NIH). [More]
New treatment strategy may improve repair process after heart attack

New treatment strategy may improve repair process after heart attack

In a study that could point the way toward a new strategy for treating patients after a heart attack, UCLA stem cell researchers led by associate professor of medicine (cardiology) and Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research member Dr. Arjun Deb have discovered that some scar-forming cells in the heart, known as fibroblasts, have the ability to become endothelial cells (the cells that form blood vessels). [More]
NYSCF names six promising scientists as 2014 NYSCF – Robertson Investigators

NYSCF names six promising scientists as 2014 NYSCF – Robertson Investigators

The New York Stem Cell Foundation today named six of the most promising scientists as its 2014 NYSCF – Robertson Investigators. [More]
Researchers discover new kind of stem cell that may hold clues to origins of liver cancer

Researchers discover new kind of stem cell that may hold clues to origins of liver cancer

A Mount Sinai-led research team has discovered a new kind of stem cell that can become either a liver cell or a cell that lines liver blood vessels, according to a study published today in the journal Stem Cell Reports. The existence of such a cell type contradicts current theory on how organs arise from cell layers in the embryo, and may hold clues to origins of, and future treatment for, liver cancer. [More]
Scientists receive BBSRC funding to study how neural stem cells differ from each other

Scientists receive BBSRC funding to study how neural stem cells differ from each other

A team of scientists led by a researcher from Plymouth University has received funding of more than £400,000 from the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council to investigate how neural stem cells differ from each other. The study's findings could hold the key to the future use of neural stem cells in treatments to eradicate neurological conditions such as dementia and brain tumours. [More]

Discovery could prolong life of people living with glioblastoma

Researchers at the University of Calgary's Hotchkiss Brain Institute and Southern Alberta Cancer Research Institute have made a discovery that could prolong the life of people living with glioblastoma – the most aggressive type of brain cancer. Samuel Weiss, PhD, Professor and Director of the HBI, and Research Assistant Professor Artee Luchman, PhD, and colleagues, published their work today in Clinical Cancer Research, which is leading researchers to start a human phase I/II clinical trial as early as Spring 2015. [More]
Research opens door to potential new treatments for peripheral artery disease

Research opens door to potential new treatments for peripheral artery disease

Researchers have developed a technique to jump-start the body's systems for creating blood vessels, opening the door for potential new treatments for diseases whose impacts include amputation and blindness. [More]
Four UCLA researchers receive NIH Director's New Innovator Award

Four UCLA researchers receive NIH Director's New Innovator Award

Four scientists from the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA have received a National Institutes of Health Director's New Innovator Award that will forward revolutionary stem cell and neuro-science in medicine. [More]
New UCLA study reveals why people with autism experience neural stem cell overgrowth after birth

New UCLA study reveals why people with autism experience neural stem cell overgrowth after birth

People with autism spectrum disorder often experience a period of accelerated brain growth after birth. No one knows why, or whether the change is linked to any specific behavioral changes. [More]
New research reveals innovative way to classify severity of stroke

New research reveals innovative way to classify severity of stroke

New research conducted at the Florida State University-based National High Magnetic Field Laboratory has revealed a new, innovative way to classify the severity of a stroke, aid in diagnosis and evaluate potential treatments. [More]
UC Berkeley, UCSF researchers team up to create center for neurodegenerative disease research

UC Berkeley, UCSF researchers team up to create center for neurodegenerative disease research

Researchers at UC San Francisco and UC Berkeley have teamed up to create an innovative, integrated center for research on neurodegenerative diseases. Supported by a $3 million grant from the Glenn Foundation for Medical Research, the new center aims to pave the way to developing novel treatments for diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease by investigating the many ways that proteins can malfunction within cells. [More]
UCI to receive $8 million from NIH to study brain cell activity in motor neuron disorders

UCI to receive $8 million from NIH to study brain cell activity in motor neuron disorders

UC Irvine will receive $8 million from the National Institutes of Health to establish one of six national centers dedicated to creating a database of human cellular responses that will accelerate efforts to develop new therapies for many diseases. [More]
USC researchers develop new methods to advance study of human brains, epilepsy

USC researchers develop new methods to advance study of human brains, epilepsy

USC biomedical engineers, neurologists and neurosurgeons develop new methods to advance the study of human brains and epilepsy. Studying the human brain is logistically complicated. Living samples of the complex and sensitive organ are limited and difficult to preserve, which means that research on them must be conducted quickly before they expire. [More]
FDA designates NurOwn as Fast Track product for ALS treatment

FDA designates NurOwn as Fast Track product for ALS treatment

BrainStorm Cell Therapeutics Inc., a leading developer of adult stem cell technologies for neurodegenerative diseases, announced today that the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has designated NurOwn as a Fast Track product for the treatment of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, or Lou Gehrig's Disease). [More]
UC Irvine scientist receives New Innovator Award to create stem cell-based treatments for cancer

UC Irvine scientist receives New Innovator Award to create stem cell-based treatments for cancer

UC Irvine scientist Weian Zhao will receive a prestigious National Institutes of Health Director's New Innovator Award to further his efforts to create stem cell-based detection methods and treatments for cancer. [More]
Bristol-Myers Squibb, MD Anderson partner to evaluate multiple immunotherapies

Bristol-Myers Squibb, MD Anderson partner to evaluate multiple immunotherapies

Bristol-Myers Squibb Company and The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center today announced a novel clinical research collaboration to evaluate multiple immunotherapies, including Opdivo (nivolumab), Yervoy (ipilimumab) and three early-stage clinical immuno-oncology assets from Bristol-Myers Squibb, as potential treatment options for acute and chronic leukemia as well as other hematologic malignancies. [More]