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Stem cells have the remarkable potential to develop into many different cell types in the body during early life and growth. In addition, in many tissues they serve as a sort of internal repair system, dividing essentially without limit to replenish other cells as long as the person or animal is still alive. When a stem cell divides, each new cell has the potential either to remain a stem cell or become another type of cell with a more specialized function, such as a muscle cell, a red blood cell, or a brain cell.

Stem cells are distinguished from other cell types by two important characteristics. First, they are unspecialized cells capable of renewing themselves through cell division, sometimes after long periods of inactivity. Second, under certain physiologic or experimental conditions, they can be induced to become tissue- or organ-specific cells with special functions. In some organs, such as the gut and bone marrow, stem cells regularly divide to repair and replace worn out or damaged tissues. In other organs, however, such as the pancreas and the heart, stem cells only divide under special conditions.
Marker identified for population of renal cancer cells with stem-cell-like features

Marker identified for population of renal cancer cells with stem-cell-like features

Researchers have identified a population of clear cell renal cell carcinoma cells positive for the CTR2 marker that possess some stem-cell-like features and are able to induce an angiogenic response in vivo. [More]
Marker identified for population of renal cancer cells with stem-cell-like features

Marker identified for population of renal cancer cells with stem-cell-like features

Researchers have identified a population of clear cell renal cell carcinoma cells positive for the CTR2 marker that possess some stem-cell-like features and are able to induce an angiogenic response in vivo. Targeting CTR2 was shown to decrease drug resistance to cisplatin. [More]
Researchers collaborate to tackle rare diseases

Researchers collaborate to tackle rare diseases

Support from a network of leading researchers across Europe specialised in a rare auto-immune disease with unmet medical needs could help test several novel treatments [More]
Viewpoints: Problems in training docs; impact of HHS' territory decision; what Halbig decision might mean

Viewpoints: Problems in training docs; impact of HHS' territory decision; what Halbig decision might mean

ast week's burst of world disorder was ideal for a news dump, and the White House didn't disappoint: On no legal basis, all 4.5 million residents of the five U.S. territories were quietly released from ObamaCare. [More]
Researchers identify group of cells in brain that plays important role in Down syndrome

Researchers identify group of cells in brain that plays important role in Down syndrome

Researchers from UC Davis School of Medicine and Shriners Hospitals for Children - Northern California have identified a group of cells in the brain that they say plays an important role in the abnormal neuron development in Down syndrome. [More]
Three leading universities join forces to find better solutions for patients with craniofacial defects

Three leading universities join forces to find better solutions for patients with craniofacial defects

One in every 2,000 babies is born with a skull that can't grow normally. Various sections of these babies' skulls are fused together at joints called sutures, constricting the developing brain and disrupting vision, sleep, eating and IQ. For these young patients, risky skull-expanding surgeries become an almost annual event. [More]
Researchers develop new single-cell technique to study environmental effects on DNA

Researchers develop new single-cell technique to study environmental effects on DNA

Researchers at the BBSRC-funded Babraham Institute, in collaboration with the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute Single Cell Genomics Centre, have developed a powerful new single-cell technique to help investigate how the environment affects our development and the traits we inherit from our parents. [More]
RPCI redesignated as Blue Distinction Center for delivering quality transplant care

RPCI redesignated as Blue Distinction Center for delivering quality transplant care

BlueCross BlueShield of Western New York today has redesignated Roswell Park Cancer Institute (RPCI) as a Blue Distinction Center® for delivering quality transplant care as part of the Blue Distinction Centers for Specialty Care® program. [More]
Study illustrates how domino effect of one genetic error can contribute to hydrocephalus

Study illustrates how domino effect of one genetic error can contribute to hydrocephalus

The mysterious condition once known as "water on the brain" became just a bit less murky this week thanks to a global research group led in part by a Case Western Reserve researcher. [More]
Zhichan decoction promotes dopaminergic neurons following NSC transplantation in PD rats

Zhichan decoction promotes dopaminergic neurons following NSC transplantation in PD rats

There is an increasing interest in Parkinson's disease (PD) treatment by increasing dopamine content and reducing dopaminergic metabolites in the brain. [More]
Study: Stress can disrupt process of fat tissue development

Study: Stress can disrupt process of fat tissue development

Using experimental models, researchers at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) showed that adenosine, a metabolite released when the body is under stress or during an inflammatory response, stops the process of adipogenesis, when adipose (fat) stem cells differentiate into adult fat cells. [More]
Study reveals way to alleviate memory deficits for Alzheimer's disease patients

Study reveals way to alleviate memory deficits for Alzheimer's disease patients

A new study from the Gladstone Institutes has revealed a way to alleviate the learning and memory deficits caused by apoE4, the most important genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease, improving cognition to normal levels in aged mice. [More]
Personalized medicine for breast cancer patients may be just around the corner

Personalized medicine for breast cancer patients may be just around the corner

For breast cancer patients, the era of personalized medicine may be just around the corner, thanks to recent advances by USC Stem Cell researcher Min Yu and scientists at Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School. [More]
Advanced Cell Diagnostics’ in situ hybridization technology reaches two major milestones

Advanced Cell Diagnostics’ in situ hybridization technology reaches two major milestones

Advanced Cell Diagnostics Inc. (ACD), a leader in the field of molecular pathology and developer of cell and tissue-based analysis tools, has announced that its RNAscope® RNA in situ hybridization technology has reached two major milestones. In just three years, over 100 peer-reviewed papers featuring the technology have been published, and with the significant increase in use of RNAscope, ACD has now built a library of over 4000 target probes for numerous species. Probes are designed to order in under two weeks, and in just six months the library has grown by over 1500, reflecting the wide interest in ACD’s breakthrough technology. [More]
A*STAR, Roche partner to identify novel drug targets for cancer treatment

A*STAR, Roche partner to identify novel drug targets for cancer treatment

A*STAR's Bioprocessing Technology Institute has entered into an agreement with one of the world's largest pharmaceutical company, Roche, to identify novel drug candidates for the detection and treatment of cancer. [More]
ADSC transplantation promotes adult neurogenesis in brains of Alzheimer's disease mice

ADSC transplantation promotes adult neurogenesis in brains of Alzheimer's disease mice

Recent evidence has demonstrated that transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells can stimulate neurogenesis in the brain of adult rat or mouse models of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and improve tissue and function injury under the condition of cerebral ischemia. [More]
New genetic programs for taking blank-slate stem cells and turning them into human blood

New genetic programs for taking blank-slate stem cells and turning them into human blood

The ability to reliably and safely make in the laboratory all of the different types of cells in human blood is one key step closer to reality. [More]

New mouse model supports transplantation of human blood stem cells without need for irradiation

A novel mouse model allows for the transplantation of human blood-forming stem cells without the need for irradiation therapy.For many years scientists have been trying to unravel mechanisms that guide function and differentiation of blood stem cells, those cells that generate all blood cells including our immune system. [More]
New approach for developing personalized gene therapies to treat retinitis pigmentosa

New approach for developing personalized gene therapies to treat retinitis pigmentosa

Columbia University Medical Center researchers have created a way to develop personalized gene therapies for patients with retinitis pigmentosa (RP), a leading cause of vision loss. [More]
New gene therapy may be effective for fighting fungal infections in cancer patients

New gene therapy may be effective for fighting fungal infections in cancer patients

Sleeping Beauty and fungal infections - not two items one would normally associate together, but for immunocompromised cancer patients they may prove to be a helpful combination. [More]