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Stem cells have the remarkable potential to develop into many different cell types in the body during early life and growth. In addition, in many tissues they serve as a sort of internal repair system, dividing essentially without limit to replenish other cells as long as the person or animal is still alive. When a stem cell divides, each new cell has the potential either to remain a stem cell or become another type of cell with a more specialized function, such as a muscle cell, a red blood cell, or a brain cell.

Stem cells are distinguished from other cell types by two important characteristics. First, they are unspecialized cells capable of renewing themselves through cell division, sometimes after long periods of inactivity. Second, under certain physiologic or experimental conditions, they can be induced to become tissue- or organ-specific cells with special functions. In some organs, such as the gut and bone marrow, stem cells regularly divide to repair and replace worn out or damaged tissues. In other organs, however, such as the pancreas and the heart, stem cells only divide under special conditions.
Researchers one step closer to understanding development of glioblastoma

Researchers one step closer to understanding development of glioblastoma

Glioblastomas are a highly aggressive type of brain tumor, with few effective treatment options. Moffitt Cancer Center researchers are one step closer to understanding glioblastoma development following the identification of a key protein signaling pathway involved in brain tumor stem cell growth and survival. [More]
RowanSOM researcher awarded NINDS grant to develop stem cell-based therapy for Canavan disease

RowanSOM researcher awarded NINDS grant to develop stem cell-based therapy for Canavan disease

Paola Leone, PhD, the director of the Cell and Gene Therapy Center and a professor of Cell Biology at the Rowan University School of Osteopathic Medicine, has been awarded a three-year, $477,000 grant from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke to develop a stem cell-based therapy for Canavan disease, a rare but devastating neurological disorder in children that typically takes a child's life by age 10. [More]
Scientists find new links between inflammation and tissue regeneration

Scientists find new links between inflammation and tissue regeneration

Almost all injuries, even minor skin scratches, trigger an inflammatory response, which provides protection against invading microbes but also turns on regenerative signals needed for healing and injury repair - a process that is generally understood but remains mysterious in its particulars. [More]
Researchers identify previously unknown effect of vitamin A in embryonic development

Researchers identify previously unknown effect of vitamin A in embryonic development

Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have identified a previously unknown effect of vitamin A in human embryonic development. Their findings show that vitamin A affects the formation of blood cells. [More]
New partnership aims to create stem cell resource to study psychiatric disorders

New partnership aims to create stem cell resource to study psychiatric disorders

The New York Stem Cell Foundation and the Stanley Center at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard are partnering to create a foundational stem cell resource to study psychiatric disorders through the production of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell lines from individuals with schizophrenia and other psychiatric disorders. [More]
IUPUI's Jason Meyer awarded $1.8 million NIH grant to explore how glaucoma develops in stem cells

IUPUI's Jason Meyer awarded $1.8 million NIH grant to explore how glaucoma develops in stem cells

Jason Meyer, Ph.D., assistant professor of biology in the School of Science at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, has received a National Institutes of Health grant to study how glaucoma develops in stem cells created from skin cells genetically predisposed to the disease. [More]

Pioneering Separations Company Quad Technologies Set To Revolutionize Cell Isolation Following Successful Investment

Quad Technologies Inc (“Quad”), developer of a novel separation technology, has formally announced its entry into the cell separation market. [More]
Scientists map autism genetic pathway that regulates brain development

Scientists map autism genetic pathway that regulates brain development

Scientists at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have found that mutations that cause autism in children are connected to a pathway that regulates brain development. The research, led by Lilia Iakoucheva, PhD, assistant professor in the Department of Psychiatry, is published in the February 18 issue of Neuron. [More]
New facts provide baseline for future studies of epigenome's role in human development, diseases

New facts provide baseline for future studies of epigenome's role in human development, diseases

While genomics is the study of all of the genes in a cell or organism, epigenomics is the study of all the genomic add-ons and changes that influence gene expression but aren't encoded in the DNA sequence. A variety of new epigenomic information is now available in a collection of studies published Feb. 19 in Nature by the National Institutes of Health Roadmap Epigenomics Program. [More]
Advances in stem cell therapy can improve outcomes for patients with chronic diabetic foot ulcers

Advances in stem cell therapy can improve outcomes for patients with chronic diabetic foot ulcers

According to data presented at the 73rd Annual Scientific Conference of the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons, advances in stem cell therapy can significantly improve outcomes for patients with chronic diabetic foot ulcers. Use of stem cells to treat foot problems like diabetic ulcers may speed up the healing process, preventing infection and hospitalization during recovery. [More]
Sigma-Aldrich announces release of Next-Gen Sequencing Oligos

Sigma-Aldrich announces release of Next-Gen Sequencing Oligos

Sigma-Aldrich Corporation today announced that Sigma Life Science, its innovative biological products and services business, released Next-Gen Sequencing Oligos, custom next-generation sequencing adapters that improve target sequence assembly. [More]
President of MD Anderson selected as new fellow of AACR Academy

President of MD Anderson selected as new fellow of AACR Academy

Ron DePinho, M.D., president of The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, will be inducted as a new fellow of the American Association for Cancer Research Academy. He joins 10 other cancer leaders in the prestigious academy that recognizes people who have made significant contributions to cancer research. [More]
R. Bryan Miller Symposium to spotlight special focus on rare disease research

R. Bryan Miller Symposium to spotlight special focus on rare disease research

The University of California, Davis Department of Chemistry will spotlight a special focus on rare disease research with this year's 15th annual R. Bryan Miller Symposium. Experts in rare diseases will gather at the UC Davis Conference Center March 5 for a conference highlighting the opportunities and challenges in applying cutting edge technologies and "precision medicine" to better treat conditions that together affect millions of people, especially children. [More]
A*STAR's GIS scientists develop new system that can predict treatment targets for cancer

A*STAR's GIS scientists develop new system that can predict treatment targets for cancer

In recent months, several national initiatives for personalized medicine have been announced, including the recently launched precision medicine initiative in the US, driven by rapid advances in genomic technologies and with the promise of cheaper and better healthcare. Significant challenges remain, however, in the management and analysis of genetic information and their integration with patient data. [More]
Biotech experts to establish ethical guidelines in cellular biotechnology at BEINGS 2015

Biotech experts to establish ethical guidelines in cellular biotechnology at BEINGS 2015

In May 2015 Atlanta will host Biotechnology and the Ethical Imagination: A Global Summit (BEINGS), an international summit drawing together the world's thought leaders on the highly debated issues of cellular biotechnology. [More]
Stem cell transplants more effective than mitoxantrone drug for people with severe multiple sclerosis

Stem cell transplants more effective than mitoxantrone drug for people with severe multiple sclerosis

Stem cell transplants may be more effective than the drug mitoxantrone for people with severe cases of multiple sclerosis (MS), according to a new study published in the February 11, 2015, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Longer donor leukocyte telomere length linked to improved survival following HCT

Longer donor leukocyte telomere length linked to improved survival following HCT

Among patients with severe aplastic anemia who received stem cell transplant from an unrelated donor, longer leukocyte (white blood cells) telomere length (a structure at the end of a chromosome) was associated with increased overall survival at 5 years, according to a study in the February 10 issue of JAMA. [More]
Researchers generate new reporter system to study bone regeneration potential of embryonic stem cells

Researchers generate new reporter system to study bone regeneration potential of embryonic stem cells

A new reporter system used to study the bone regeneration potential of human embryonic stem cells has been generated in research led by the University of Minnesota. The new reporter system is the first of its kind for human pluripotent stem cells and is important for identifying certain agents and pathways that mediate early stages of human bone development. [More]
Magnetizing biomolecules: an interview with Dr. Fred Whipple, AMSBIO

Magnetizing biomolecules: an interview with Dr. Fred Whipple, AMSBIO

Nanoparticle technology was originally developed in the 1980s and 1990s. As the technology evolved, it soon became possible to produce uniform nanoscopic beads that are magnetic, and that also have a variety of specific surface chemistries. It was immediately evident that such beads could be used to great advantage for biochemical separations. [More]
Japanese researchers explore use of bone marrow transplants to treat hypophosphatasia

Japanese researchers explore use of bone marrow transplants to treat hypophosphatasia

Recent research carried out by a team of researchers in Japan has investigated the use of bone marrow transplants (BMTs) to treat hypophosphatasia (HPP). In this study, the researchers carried out BMT for two infants with HPP in combination with allogenic (other-donated) mesenchymal stem cell transplants (MSCTs). The allogenic MSC donors were a parent of the infant. [More]