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Stem cells have the remarkable potential to develop into many different cell types in the body during early life and growth. In addition, in many tissues they serve as a sort of internal repair system, dividing essentially without limit to replenish other cells as long as the person or animal is still alive. When a stem cell divides, each new cell has the potential either to remain a stem cell or become another type of cell with a more specialized function, such as a muscle cell, a red blood cell, or a brain cell.

Stem cells are distinguished from other cell types by two important characteristics. First, they are unspecialized cells capable of renewing themselves through cell division, sometimes after long periods of inactivity. Second, under certain physiologic or experimental conditions, they can be induced to become tissue- or organ-specific cells with special functions. In some organs, such as the gut and bone marrow, stem cells regularly divide to repair and replace worn out or damaged tissues. In other organs, however, such as the pancreas and the heart, stem cells only divide under special conditions.
Scientists find new way to convert blood cells into sensory neurons

Scientists find new way to convert blood cells into sensory neurons

Scientists at McMaster University have discovered how to make adult sensory neurons from human patients simply by having them roll up their sleeve and providing a blood sample. [More]
Johns Hopkins scientists safely use immune cells to treat multiple myeloma

Johns Hopkins scientists safely use immune cells to treat multiple myeloma

In a report on what is believed to be the first small clinical trial of its kind, researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center say they have safely used immune cells grown from patients' own bone marrow to treat multiple myeloma, a cancer of white blood cells. [More]
hESC-derived cells offer source of macular tissue repair and replacement

hESC-derived cells offer source of macular tissue repair and replacement

Subretinal transplantation of retinal pigment epithelium derived from human embryonic stem cells appears to be a well-tolerated means of treating age-related macular degeneration and Stargardt’s macular dystrophy, suggest two open-label phase I/II studies. [More]
ORIG3N, LabCorp form strategic partnership

ORIG3N, LabCorp form strategic partnership

ORIG3N, Inc., a pioneer in regenerative medicine and provider of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) storage, called LifeCapsule, today announced a strategic collaboration with Laboratory Corporation of America Holdings. [More]
NAS, NAM launch major initiative to guide decision making on human gene-editing research

NAS, NAM launch major initiative to guide decision making on human gene-editing research

The National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Medicine are launching a major initiative to guide decision making about controversial new research involving human gene editing. Human gene-editing technologies, such as CRISPR-Cas9, may lead to promising new treatments for disease. [More]
Discovery has clear implications in the quest for new epilepsy treatments

Discovery has clear implications in the quest for new epilepsy treatments

The mission of neural stem cells located in the hippocampus, one of the main regions of the brain, is to generate new neurons during the adult life of mammals, including human beings, of course, and their function is to participate in certain types of learning and responses to anxiety and stress. [More]
Chemical drug safely controls side effects associated with haploidentical stem cell transplantation

Chemical drug safely controls side effects associated with haploidentical stem cell transplantation

Researchers in the Center for Cell and Gene Therapy at Baylor College of Medicine, Houston Methodist and Texas Children's Hospital have found that a single dose of an otherwise harmless drug can safely control the severe and often lethal side effects associated with haploidentical stem cell transplantation. [More]
APS announces recipients of prestigious achievement awards during annual scientific meeting

APS announces recipients of prestigious achievement awards during annual scientific meeting

The American Pain Society (APS), www.americanpainsociety.org, today announced the recipients of its prestigious achievement awards during the organization's annual scientific meeting. [More]
Small-molecule drug simultaneously rejuvenates old muscles, aging brains

Small-molecule drug simultaneously rejuvenates old muscles, aging brains

Whether you're brainy, brawny or both, you may someday benefit from a drug found to rejuvenate aging brain and muscle tissue. Researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, have discovered that a small-molecule drug simultaneously perks up old stem cells in the brains and muscles of mice, a finding that could lead to drug interventions for humans that would make aging tissues throughout the body act young again. [More]
BrainStorm Cell Therapeutics reports financial results for Q1 2015, provides business update

BrainStorm Cell Therapeutics reports financial results for Q1 2015, provides business update

BrainStorm Cell Therapeutics Inc., a leading developer of adult stem cell technologies for neurodegenerative diseases, today announced financial results and provided a business update for the first quarter ended March 31, 2015. [More]
Scientists discover way to regrow bone tissue using proteins produced by stem cells

Scientists discover way to regrow bone tissue using proteins produced by stem cells

Scientists have discovered a way to regrow bone tissue using the protein signals produced by stem cells. This technology could help treat victims who have experienced major trauma to a limb, like soldiers wounded in combat or casualties of a natural disaster. The new method improves on older therapies by providing a sustainable source for fresh tissue and reducing the risk of tumor formation that can arise with stem cell transplants. [More]
New study discovers master switch that drives heart cell maturation process

New study discovers master switch that drives heart cell maturation process

A molecular switch that seems to be essential for embryonic heart cells to grow into more mature, adult-like heart cells has been discovered. [More]

Orthocell’s Ortho-ATI therapy improves clinical outcomes in patients with tennis elbow degeneration

Regenerative medicine company Orthocell Limited is pleased to announce positive 3-5 year data from a study of its tendon cell treatment for tennis elbow has been presented at the International Cartilage Repair Society annual scientific meeting. [More]
MD Anderson researchers discover link between telomere degeneration and MDS

MD Anderson researchers discover link between telomere degeneration and MDS

A study revealing fresh insight about chromosome "tails" called telomeres may provide scientists with a new way to look at developing treatments or even preventing a group of blood cell disorders known as myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). [More]
DNMT1 gene essential to maintain breast and cancer stem cells

DNMT1 gene essential to maintain breast and cancer stem cells

The gene and hormone soup that enables women to breastfeed their newborns also can be a recipe for breast cancer, particularly when the first pregnancy is after age 30. [More]
Dana-Farber/Boston Children's joins immunotherapy clinical trial for children with ALL

Dana-Farber/Boston Children's joins immunotherapy clinical trial for children with ALL

Dana-Farber/Boston Children's Cancer and Blood Disorders Center has joined a clinical trial of immunotherapy for children with relapsed or treatment-resistant acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Led by Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, the trial is one of several nationally that are evaluating cancer immunotherapy, a treatment approach -- hailed by Science magazine as their Breakthrough of the Year in 2013 -- that triggers a patient's immune system to attack his or her cancer cells. [More]
GenVec reports net loss of $1.5 million for first quarter 2015

GenVec reports net loss of $1.5 million for first quarter 2015

GenVec, Inc. today reported financial results for the first quarter ended March 31, 2015. For the three months ended March 31, 2015, GenVec reported a net loss of $1.5 million, or $0.09 per share, on revenues of $0.4 million, compared with a net loss of $1.0 million, or $0.07 per share, on revenues of $2.1 million, for the same period in the prior year. [More]
UCI receives FDA consent to study stem cell-based treatment for retinitis pigmentosa in clinical trial

UCI receives FDA consent to study stem cell-based treatment for retinitis pigmentosa in clinical trial

A first-of-its-kind stem cell-based treatment for retinitis pigmentosa developed by UC Irvine's Dr. Henry Klassen, Dr. Jing Yang and colleagues has received consent from the U.S. Food & Drug Administration for use in a clinical trial. [More]
Comprehensive stroke centers reduce mortality risk in patients treated for hemorrhagic stroke

Comprehensive stroke centers reduce mortality risk in patients treated for hemorrhagic stroke

New research published today in the Journal of the American Heart Association indicates that patients who are treated for hemorrhagic stroke at a comprehensive stroke center are more likely to receive specialized treatment, reducing the risk of mortality. [More]
Cardiff scientists develop novel anti-cancer stem cell compound

Cardiff scientists develop novel anti-cancer stem cell compound

Cardiff University scientists have developed a novel anti-cancer stem cell agent capable of targeting aggressive tumour forming cells common to breast, pancreas, colon and prostate cancers. [More]
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