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Stem cells have the remarkable potential to develop into many different cell types in the body during early life and growth. In addition, in many tissues they serve as a sort of internal repair system, dividing essentially without limit to replenish other cells as long as the person or animal is still alive. When a stem cell divides, each new cell has the potential either to remain a stem cell or become another type of cell with a more specialized function, such as a muscle cell, a red blood cell, or a brain cell.

Stem cells are distinguished from other cell types by two important characteristics. First, they are unspecialized cells capable of renewing themselves through cell division, sometimes after long periods of inactivity. Second, under certain physiologic or experimental conditions, they can be induced to become tissue- or organ-specific cells with special functions. In some organs, such as the gut and bone marrow, stem cells regularly divide to repair and replace worn out or damaged tissues. In other organs, however, such as the pancreas and the heart, stem cells only divide under special conditions.
USC Hospitalist Leadership Fellowship Program launched at ApolloMed

USC Hospitalist Leadership Fellowship Program launched at ApolloMed

Apollo Medical Holdings, Inc., an integrated physician-centric healthcare delivery company, and the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California (USC) Internal Medicine Residency Program today announced the launch of the USC Hospitalist Leadership Fellowship Program at ApolloMed. [More]
Biosafe acquires ACTS do Brasil's biosafe-related business

Biosafe acquires ACTS do Brasil's biosafe-related business

After a successful partnership of 10 years with its local distributor ACTS do Brasil Ltda., effective immediately Biosafe has acquired all ACTS' Biosafe-related business, which has been spun off into a separate operating entity, Biosafe Brasil Distribuidora Ltda. Terms have not been disclosed. [More]
Society for Reproductive Investigation awards two top honors to Dr. Ayman Al-Hendy

Society for Reproductive Investigation awards two top honors to Dr. Ayman Al-Hendy

Dr. Ayman Al-Hendy, an obstetrician-gynecologist and molecular biologist at the Medical College of Georgia at Georgia Regents University and GRHealth, has received two top honors from the Society for Reproductive Investigation. [More]
Fujifilm enters into definitive agreement to acquire Cellular Dynamics International

Fujifilm enters into definitive agreement to acquire Cellular Dynamics International

FUJIFILM Holdings Corporation (President: Shigehiro Nakajima) and Cellular Dynamics International, Inc. (CEO: Robert J. Palay), a leading developer and manufacturer of fully functioning human cells in industrial quantities to precise specifications, today announced that the two companies have entered into a definitive agreement whereby Fujifilm will acquire CDI via an all-cash tender offer to be followed by a second step merger. [More]
MRI technique may help detect cancerous cells

MRI technique may help detect cancerous cells

Imaging tests like mammograms or CT scans can detect tumors, but figuring out whether a growth is or isn't cancer usually requires a biopsy to study cells directly. Now results of a Johns Hopkins study suggest that MRI could one day make biopsies more effective or even replace them altogether by noninvasively detecting telltale sugar molecules shed by the outer membranes of cancerous cells. [More]
Mitochondrial DNA movement: an interview with Professor Jiri Neuzil, Griffith University

Mitochondrial DNA movement: an interview with Professor Jiri Neuzil, Griffith University

According to our understanding, mitochondria undergo cycles of fusion-fission, i.e. they divide within the constraints of a cell and, upon cell division, each of the two daughter cells gets its ‘share’ of mitochondria. [More]
Australian researchers find gene that drives aggressive form of triple-negative breast cancer

Australian researchers find gene that drives aggressive form of triple-negative breast cancer

Australian researchers have found that so-called 'triple-negative breast cancers' are two distinct diseases that likely originate from different cell types. This helps explain why survival prospects for women with the diagnosis tend to be either very good or very bad. [More]
Radiation resistance in leukemia can be overcome by using new precision medicine, say researchers

Radiation resistance in leukemia can be overcome by using new precision medicine, say researchers

A team of researchers led by Fatih M. Uckun, MD, PhD, of The Saban Research Institute of Children's Hospital Los Angeles and Professor at the University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine has determined that radiation resistance in leukemia can be overcome by using an engineered protein they recently designed and developed as a new precision medicine against leukemia. [More]
apceth begins Agenmestencel-T Phase II clinical trial in gastrointestinal cancer patients

apceth begins Agenmestencel-T Phase II clinical trial in gastrointestinal cancer patients

apceth, a global leader in engineered cell therapies, today announced the successful completion of the Phase I and initiation of the Phase II part of its ongoing monocentric Phase I/II clinical trial TREAT-ME 1 with the engineered cell therapeutic product Agenmestencel-T, at the Klinikum Grosshadern in Munich. [More]
Brainstorm Cell Therapeutics provides business update, announces financial results for 2014

Brainstorm Cell Therapeutics provides business update, announces financial results for 2014

BrainStorm Cell Therapeutics Inc., a leading developer of adult stem cell technologies for neurodegenerative diseases, today announced financial results for the three months and year ended December 31, 2014. [More]
Mount Sinai researchers reprogram blood cells into iPSCs to study genetic origins of MDS

Mount Sinai researchers reprogram blood cells into iPSCs to study genetic origins of MDS

Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) -- adult cells reprogrammed back to an embryonic stem cell-like state--may better model the genetic contributions to each patient's particular disease. In a process called cellular reprogramming, researchers at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have taken mature blood cells from patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and reprogrammed them back into iPSCs to study the genetic origins of this rare blood cancer. [More]
AstraZeneca, HSCI collaborate to find new treatments for diabetes

AstraZeneca, HSCI collaborate to find new treatments for diabetes

AstraZeneca today announced that it has entered into a five-year research collaboration with the Harvard Stem Cell Institute to adapt a technique that creates human beta cells from stem cells for use in screens of AstraZeneca’s compound library in the search for new treatments for diabetes. [More]
Arno Therapeutics' AR-42 with cisplatin demonstrates anti-tumor effect in bladder cancer models

Arno Therapeutics' AR-42 with cisplatin demonstrates anti-tumor effect in bladder cancer models

Arno Therapeutics, Inc., a clinical stage biopharmaceutical company primarily focused on the development of oncology therapeutics, today announced that data from a preclinical study demonstrate its histone-deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor AR-42 in combination with cisplatin has a synergistic anti-tumor effect in bladder cancer models. [More]
TSRI scientists identify enzyme that maintains healthy periods of inactivity in HSCs to prevent anemia

TSRI scientists identify enzyme that maintains healthy periods of inactivity in HSCs to prevent anemia

Stem cells can generate any type of cell in the body, but they are inactive most of the time—and for good reason. When stem cells become too active and divide too often, they risk acquiring cell damage and mutations. In the case of blood stem cells (also called hematopoietic stem cells or HSCs), this can lead to blood cancers, a loss of blood cells and an impaired ability to fight disease. [More]
Mesenchymal stem cell transplantation reduces opioid tolerance, opioid-induced pain

Mesenchymal stem cell transplantation reduces opioid tolerance, opioid-induced pain

Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) transplantation reduced opioid tolerance and opioid-induced hyperalgesia caused by daily morphine injections in rats, according to new research. [More]
BIO KOREA celebrates 10th anniversary to share new information and technology in health industry

BIO KOREA celebrates 10th anniversary to share new information and technology in health industry

BIO KOREA is celebrating its 10th anniversary as a convention to share the latest information and technology in the health industry and to establish corporate partnerships among global experts. [More]
Duke researchers develop new model to study why some HPV infections go away and others progress

Duke researchers develop new model to study why some HPV infections go away and others progress

For people infected with the human papilloma virus (HPV), the likelihood of clearing the infection and avoiding HPV-related cancer may depend less on the body's disease-fighting arsenal than has been generally assumed. [More]

University of Michigan scientists grow first 3D mini lungs from human stem cells

Scientists from the University of Michigan have grown the first 3D mini lungs from stem cells. The study, published in eLife, compliments other developments in the field such as growing mainly 2D structures and building lung tissue from the scaffold of donated organs. [More]
HSCT use varies with region

HSCT use varies with region

A review of almost one million haematopoietic stem cell transplantation procedures has highlighted differences in the availability of the procedure and the use of autologous and allogeneic transplants across the world. [More]
ItpkB enzyme regulates stem cells function to prevent cancer, anemia

ItpkB enzyme regulates stem cells function to prevent cancer, anemia

Stem cells can generate any type of cell in the body, but they are inactive most of the time--and for good reason. When stem cells become too active and divide too often, they risk acquiring cell damage and mutations. [More]
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