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Stem cells have the remarkable potential to develop into many different cell types in the body during early life and growth. In addition, in many tissues they serve as a sort of internal repair system, dividing essentially without limit to replenish other cells as long as the person or animal is still alive. When a stem cell divides, each new cell has the potential either to remain a stem cell or become another type of cell with a more specialized function, such as a muscle cell, a red blood cell, or a brain cell.

Stem cells are distinguished from other cell types by two important characteristics. First, they are unspecialized cells capable of renewing themselves through cell division, sometimes after long periods of inactivity. Second, under certain physiologic or experimental conditions, they can be induced to become tissue- or organ-specific cells with special functions. In some organs, such as the gut and bone marrow, stem cells regularly divide to repair and replace worn out or damaged tissues. In other organs, however, such as the pancreas and the heart, stem cells only divide under special conditions.
Researchers are now step closer to find treatment for dengue fever

Researchers are now step closer to find treatment for dengue fever

There have been several news reports that the world's first dengue vaccine will be available next year. However, the latest clinical trials show that the vaccine only provides a protection of around 50 per cent for DENV-2 and DENV-1, which are commonly found in Singapore. [More]
Scientists study how artificial light influences biological clock

Scientists study how artificial light influences biological clock

Researchers at Inserm, led by Claude Gronfier (Inserm Unit 846: Stem Cell and Brain Institute), have, for the first time, conducted a study under real conditions on the body clocks of members of the international polar research station Concordia. [More]
Blood-forming stem cell transplantation benefits infants with severe combined immunodeficiency

Blood-forming stem cell transplantation benefits infants with severe combined immunodeficiency

Babies who are born with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) can be successfully treated with a transplant of blood-forming stem cells, according to experts led by Memorial Sloan Kettering's Richard J. O'Reilly, MD, a world-renowned pioneer in the development of transplant protocols. [More]
Post-doctoral fellows working on stem cell treatment for stroke

Post-doctoral fellows working on stem cell treatment for stroke

The San Antonio Life Sciences Institute, a joint venture between The University of Texas at San Antonio and The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, has selected the winners of the Postdoc Initiative Pilot Program. [More]
New stem-cell discovery may lead to more streamlined process for tissue regeneration

New stem-cell discovery may lead to more streamlined process for tissue regeneration

A new stem-cell discovery might one day lead to a more streamlined process for obtaining stem cells, which in turn could be used in the development of replacement tissue for failing body parts, according to UC San Francisco scientists who reported the findings in the current edition of Cell. [More]
CanTx, Novogen name two key CMOs to manufacture clinical batches of anti-cancer drug Cantrixil

CanTx, Novogen name two key CMOs to manufacture clinical batches of anti-cancer drug Cantrixil

Oncology drug developer, CanTx Inc., and its parent company, Novogen Ltd., today announced that they have named two key contract manufacturing organizations (CMOs) to produce clinical batches of the experimental anti-cancer drug, Cantrixil. [More]
Scientists discover new pathway to manipulate, maintain human ESCs in a "na-ve"

Scientists discover new pathway to manipulate, maintain human ESCs in a "na-ve"

For years, researchers and patients have hoped that embryonic stem cells (ESCs)-capable of forming nearly any cell type in the body-could provide insight into numerous diseases perhaps even be used to treat them. Yet progress has been hampered by the inability to transfer research and tools from mouse ESC studies to their human counterparts, in part because human ESCs are "primed" and slightly less plastic than the mouse cells. [More]
Scientists one step closer to creating viable cell replacement therapy for multiple sclerosis patients

Scientists one step closer to creating viable cell replacement therapy for multiple sclerosis patients

Scientists at The New York Stem Cell Foundation Research Institute are one step closer to creating a viable cell replacement therapy for multiple sclerosis from a patient's own cells. [More]
AMSBIO-Trevigen prize winner announced

AMSBIO-Trevigen prize winner announced

AMSBIO, regular sponsor of the annual Beatson International Cancer Conference announces that the winner of the AMSBIO-Trevigen prize for the best poster was Katarzyna Grzes - a PhD researcher specialising in Cell Signaling and Immunology at the University of Dundee (Scotland, UK).
Miss Grzes was named as winner of the Poster Prize for the best presented and most interesting poster for her work entitled 'Metabolic regulation in PTEN null T lymphoma / leukemia'. [More]
NYSCF and Beyond Batten Disease Foundation partner to find cure for juvenile Batten disease

NYSCF and Beyond Batten Disease Foundation partner to find cure for juvenile Batten disease

The New York Stem Cell Foundation (NYSCF) and Beyond Batten Disease Foundation (BBDF) have partnered to develop stem cell resources to investigate and explore new treatments and ultimately find a cure for juvenile Batten disease, a fatal illness affecting children. [More]
Marker identified for population of renal cancer cells with stem-cell-like features

Marker identified for population of renal cancer cells with stem-cell-like features

Researchers have identified a population of clear cell renal cell carcinoma cells positive for the CTR2 marker that possess some stem-cell-like features and are able to induce an angiogenic response in vivo. [More]
Marker identified for population of renal cancer cells with stem-cell-like features

Marker identified for population of renal cancer cells with stem-cell-like features

Researchers have identified a population of clear cell renal cell carcinoma cells positive for the CTR2 marker that possess some stem-cell-like features and are able to induce an angiogenic response in vivo. Targeting CTR2 was shown to decrease drug resistance to cisplatin. [More]
Researchers collaborate to tackle rare diseases

Researchers collaborate to tackle rare diseases

Support from a network of leading researchers across Europe specialised in a rare auto-immune disease with unmet medical needs could help test several novel treatments [More]
Viewpoints: Problems in training docs; impact of HHS' territory decision; what Halbig decision might mean

Viewpoints: Problems in training docs; impact of HHS' territory decision; what Halbig decision might mean

ast week's burst of world disorder was ideal for a news dump, and the White House didn't disappoint: On no legal basis, all 4.5 million residents of the five U.S. territories were quietly released from ObamaCare. [More]
Researchers identify group of cells in brain that plays important role in Down syndrome

Researchers identify group of cells in brain that plays important role in Down syndrome

Researchers from UC Davis School of Medicine and Shriners Hospitals for Children - Northern California have identified a group of cells in the brain that they say plays an important role in the abnormal neuron development in Down syndrome. [More]
Three leading universities join forces to find better solutions for patients with craniofacial defects

Three leading universities join forces to find better solutions for patients with craniofacial defects

One in every 2,000 babies is born with a skull that can't grow normally. Various sections of these babies' skulls are fused together at joints called sutures, constricting the developing brain and disrupting vision, sleep, eating and IQ. For these young patients, risky skull-expanding surgeries become an almost annual event. [More]
Researchers develop new single-cell technique to study environmental effects on DNA

Researchers develop new single-cell technique to study environmental effects on DNA

Researchers at the BBSRC-funded Babraham Institute, in collaboration with the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute Single Cell Genomics Centre, have developed a powerful new single-cell technique to help investigate how the environment affects our development and the traits we inherit from our parents. [More]
RPCI redesignated as Blue Distinction Center for delivering quality transplant care

RPCI redesignated as Blue Distinction Center for delivering quality transplant care

BlueCross BlueShield of Western New York today has redesignated Roswell Park Cancer Institute (RPCI) as a Blue Distinction CenterĀ® for delivering quality transplant care as part of the Blue Distinction Centers for Specialty CareĀ® program. [More]
Study illustrates how domino effect of one genetic error can contribute to hydrocephalus

Study illustrates how domino effect of one genetic error can contribute to hydrocephalus

The mysterious condition once known as "water on the brain" became just a bit less murky this week thanks to a global research group led in part by a Case Western Reserve researcher. [More]
Zhichan decoction promotes dopaminergic neurons following NSC transplantation in PD rats

Zhichan decoction promotes dopaminergic neurons following NSC transplantation in PD rats

There is an increasing interest in Parkinson's disease (PD) treatment by increasing dopamine content and reducing dopaminergic metabolites in the brain. [More]