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Stem cells have the remarkable potential to develop into many different cell types in the body during early life and growth. In addition, in many tissues they serve as a sort of internal repair system, dividing essentially without limit to replenish other cells as long as the person or animal is still alive. When a stem cell divides, each new cell has the potential either to remain a stem cell or become another type of cell with a more specialized function, such as a muscle cell, a red blood cell, or a brain cell.

Stem cells are distinguished from other cell types by two important characteristics. First, they are unspecialized cells capable of renewing themselves through cell division, sometimes after long periods of inactivity. Second, under certain physiologic or experimental conditions, they can be induced to become tissue- or organ-specific cells with special functions. In some organs, such as the gut and bone marrow, stem cells regularly divide to repair and replace worn out or damaged tissues. In other organs, however, such as the pancreas and the heart, stem cells only divide under special conditions.
Ontario announces $25 million investment to support new treatments for people with chronic diseases

Ontario announces $25 million investment to support new treatments for people with chronic diseases

Ontario is investing $25 million over five years to support new treatments and therapies for people living with chronic diseases, such as cancer, multiple sclerosis and diabetes. [More]
UT Southwestern scientists devise new technique to identify cell that replenishes adult heart muscle

UT Southwestern scientists devise new technique to identify cell that replenishes adult heart muscle

Regenerative medicine researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have identified a cell that replenishes adult heart muscle by using a new cell lineage-tracing technique they devised. [More]
Benitec, ReNeuron collaborate to launch new exploratory cellular therapy program

Benitec, ReNeuron collaborate to launch new exploratory cellular therapy program

Benitec Biopharma is pleased to announce the launch of a new exploratory cellular therapy program including exosome-based delivery utilising the Company's proprietary ddRNAi technology. Entry into these areas have been facilitated by the commencement of a collaboration with UK-based stem cell therapeutics company, ReNeuron. [More]
UCSF scientists identify characteristics of progenitor cells

UCSF scientists identify characteristics of progenitor cells

University of California San Francisco scientists have identified characteristics of a family of daughter cells, called MPPs, which are the first to arise from stem cells within bone marrow that generate the entire blood system. The researchers said the discovery raises the possibility that, by manipulating the fates of MPPs or parent stem cells, medical researchers could one day help overcome imbalances and deficiencies that can arise in the blood system due to aging or in patients with specific types of leukemia. [More]
International researchers identify previously unknown genetic immunodeficiency

International researchers identify previously unknown genetic immunodeficiency

An analysis of five families has revealed a previously unknown genetic immunodeficiency, says an international team led by researchers from Boston Children's Hospital. The condition, linked to mutations in a gene called DOCK2, deactivates many features of the immune system and leaves affected children open to a unique pattern of aggressive, potentially fatal infections early in life. [More]
Researchers explore the science of exosomes in heart repair

Researchers explore the science of exosomes in heart repair

A little more than a decade ago, researchers discovered that all cells secrete tiny communications modules jammed with an entire work crew of messages for other cells. Today, a team of researchers, led by stem cell researcher Raj Kishore, PhD, Director of the Stem Cell Therapy Program at the Center for Translational Medicine at Temple University School of Medicine, is harnessing the communications vesicles excreted by stem cells and using them to induce the damaged heart to repair itself. [More]
CellResearch receives new patent approval from USPTO for stem cell technology

CellResearch receives new patent approval from USPTO for stem cell technology

CellResearch Corporation Pte Ltd, a Singaporean company that specializes in stem cell technology, has received approval for its latest patent on 6 May 2015 from the US Patent and Trademark Office. [More]
ExCellThera's stem cell expansion approach may benefit AML patients undergoing transplants

ExCellThera's stem cell expansion approach may benefit AML patients undergoing transplants

Patients suffering from acute myeloid leukemia, who require stem cell transplantation as part of their treatment,may now benefit from a new best-in-class process that improves the viability and success of cord blood stem cell transplantation. [More]
GMP grade cell cryopreservation media

GMP grade cell cryopreservation media

AMSBIO has announced the launch of GMP grade STEM-CELLBANKER® manufactured in strict compliance with Japanese, EU, US, and PICS good manufacturing practice guidelines. [More]
New study reports more practical approach to heal the heart after a heart attack

New study reports more practical approach to heal the heart after a heart attack

Stem cell have been the main focus of healing therapy research because they can morph into new cells, and using a patient's own stem cells will not induce an autoimmune response. For healing after a heart attack, the ideal time to administer these therapies is when reopening the clogged blood vessel because the heart is easily accessible. While stem cells show promise for heart attack treatment, the process of harvesting and reintroducing the cells—which can take days or weeks—is too slow for this window. [More]
Researchers focus on novel techniques to combat global blood shortage

Researchers focus on novel techniques to combat global blood shortage

Red blood cells are the cells responsible for transporting oxygen to all the organs of the body. Red blood cells are the body's most common cell type: no less than 20 billion red blood cells die and are regenerated every day. [More]
Researchers create cell lines to study gene expression in precursor brown fat and white fat cells

Researchers create cell lines to study gene expression in precursor brown fat and white fat cells

Since the 2009 discovery that energy-burning brown fat can be active in adults, research has raced ahead to understand this tissue and exploit it to treat the epidemic of obesity. Active brown fat also may assist in directly easing the burden of diabetes and related metabolic diseases by lowering the levels of glucose and fatty acids in the bloodstream. But progress in studying human brown fat often has been slowed by difficulties in obtaining and studying samples of the human cells that develop into brown fat. [More]
Lawson researchers find radiation-resistant stem cell population in the colon linked to cancer growth

Lawson researchers find radiation-resistant stem cell population in the colon linked to cancer growth

Researchers at Lawson Health Research Institute have identified a new stem cell population in the colon linked to cancer growth. The findings, which were recently published in the prominent journal Cell Stem Cell, will significantly change the way we study and treat colon cancer. [More]
Researchers develop hPSC-based system for producing connections between neurons in the brain

Researchers develop hPSC-based system for producing connections between neurons in the brain

Human stem cells can be differentiated to produce other cell types, such as organ cells, skin cells, or brain cells. While organ cells, for example, can function in isolation, brain cells require synapses, or connectors, between cells and between regions of the brain. In a new study published in Restorative Neurology and Neuroscience, researchers report successfully growing multiple brain structures and forming connections between them in vitro, in a single culture vessel, for the first time. [More]
Molecules derived from avocados could help combat acute myeloid leukemia

Molecules derived from avocados could help combat acute myeloid leukemia

Rich, creamy, nutritious and now cancer fighting. New research reveals that molecules derived from avocados could be effective in treating a form of cancer. [More]
Combination of tosedostat and LDAC results in overall response rate of 54% in elderly patients with AML

Combination of tosedostat and LDAC results in overall response rate of 54% in elderly patients with AML

CTI BioPharma Corp. today announced findings from an investigator-sponsored Phase 2 trial in patients with either primary (de novo) acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or AML that has evolved from myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Results showed the combination of tosedostat with low dose cytarabine/Ara-C (LDAC) resulted in an overall response rate (ORR) of 54 percent in elderly patients with AML – with 45 percent of patients achieving durable complete responses (CR). [More]
New therapy for osteoporosis may be in the pipeline

New therapy for osteoporosis may be in the pipeline

Researchers from The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI), Florida, have reported a novel therapeutic approach that could promote the formation of new bone cells in people suffering from bone loss. [More]
USC Stem Cell scientist named 2015 Pew-Stewart scholar for cancer research

USC Stem Cell scientist named 2015 Pew-Stewart scholar for cancer research

USC Stem Cell researcher Min Yu, MD, PhD, is one of five early-career scientists to be named a 2015 Pew-Stewart scholar for cancer research. As part of this honor, she will receive $240,000 over four years to advance the understanding of metastatic breast cancer. [More]
Creighton researcher receives NIH grant to study gene, stem cell therapy in coronary artery bypass grafts

Creighton researcher receives NIH grant to study gene, stem cell therapy in coronary artery bypass grafts

A Creighton University researcher has received a National Institutes of Health grant to study the effects of gene and stem cell therapy in coronary artery bypass grafts, a first-of-its-kind undertaking that could transform the procedure, increase survival rates and dramatically reduce the possibility of re-occlusion of the grafted arteries and veins in the procedure. [More]
Stem cell transplant restores sensory functions in injured spinal cord

Stem cell transplant restores sensory functions in injured spinal cord

New research from Uppsala University shows promising progress in the use of stem cells for treatment of spinal cord injury. The results, which are published in the scientific journal Scientific Reports, show that human stem cells that are transplanted to the injured spinal cord contribute to restoration of some sensory functions. [More]
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