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Stem cells have the remarkable potential to develop into many different cell types in the body during early life and growth. In addition, in many tissues they serve as a sort of internal repair system, dividing essentially without limit to replenish other cells as long as the person or animal is still alive. When a stem cell divides, each new cell has the potential either to remain a stem cell or become another type of cell with a more specialized function, such as a muscle cell, a red blood cell, or a brain cell.

Stem cells are distinguished from other cell types by two important characteristics. First, they are unspecialized cells capable of renewing themselves through cell division, sometimes after long periods of inactivity. Second, under certain physiologic or experimental conditions, they can be induced to become tissue- or organ-specific cells with special functions. In some organs, such as the gut and bone marrow, stem cells regularly divide to repair and replace worn out or damaged tissues. In other organs, however, such as the pancreas and the heart, stem cells only divide under special conditions.
Tumor-suppressing protein acts as dimmer switch to dial down gene expression

Tumor-suppressing protein acts as dimmer switch to dial down gene expression

A tumor-suppressing protein acts as a dimmer switch to dial down gene expression. It does this by reading a chemical message attached to another protein that's tightly intertwined with DNA, a team led by scientists at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center reported at the AACR Annual Meeting 2014. [More]
Researchers identify biological process that appears to trigger Parkinson's disease

Researchers identify biological process that appears to trigger Parkinson's disease

Working with human neurons and fruit flies, researchers at Johns Hopkins have identified and then shut down a biological process that appears to trigger a particular form of Parkinson's disease present in a large number of patients. A report on the study, in the April 10 issue of the journal Cell, could lead to new treatments for this disorder. [More]
BioLineRx to initiate Phase 1/2 clinical trial on new drug candidate for CML treatment

BioLineRx to initiate Phase 1/2 clinical trial on new drug candidate for CML treatment

BioLineRx, a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company dedicated to identifying, in-licensing and developing promising therapeutic candidates, announced today that Prof. Arnon Nagler, Director of the Hematology Division and Bone Marrow Transplantation Center at Sheba Medical Center, Israel, has received final regulatory approval to evaluate BioLineRx's BL-8040 as a treatment for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in a Phase 1/2 clinical study. [More]

Red LED irradiation promotes cell transplantation in treatment of hypoxic-ischemic brain damage

A series of previous studies suggested that the neuronal differentiation rate of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells during the in vitro culture reached 78-92%, but their in vivo transplantation efficiency, and survival and differentiation rates were very low. [More]

Stem cells culled from bone marrow may prove beneficial in stroke recovery

Stem cells culled from bone marrow may prove beneficial in stroke recovery, scientists at UC Irvine's Sue & Bill Gross Stem Cell Research Center have learned. [More]
Osiris Therapeutics receives $15 million cash payment from Mesoblast for Prochymal

Osiris Therapeutics receives $15 million cash payment from Mesoblast for Prochymal

Osiris Therapeutics, Inc., the leading stem cell company focused on developing and marketing products to treat conditions in wound care, orthopedic and sports medicine markets, announced that it has received the next $15 million cash payment from Mesoblast in accordance with the Purchase Agreement relating to the Prochymal business. [More]
Penn Medicine to host symposium on regenerative medicine

Penn Medicine to host symposium on regenerative medicine

The University of Pennsylvania's Institute for Regenerative Medicine will host a symposium on Friday, April 11, 2014 to detail the progress researchers are making toward reprogramming human cells to treat a variety of diseases. [More]
Researchers receive NIH grant for pediatric acute myelogenous leukemia treatment

Researchers receive NIH grant for pediatric acute myelogenous leukemia treatment

​A $1.92 million grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) was awarded to a research team that focuses on new approaches for treatment of relapsed pediatric acute myelogenous leukemia (rAML), led by Yang Liu, PhD, Bothworth Chair and Director of the Center for Cancer and Immunology Research (CCIR) at Children's Research Institute of Children's National Health System, and Reuven Schore, MD, member of CCIR and attending physician in the Leukemia & Lymphoma Program of the Division of Oncology of the Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders. [More]

Ambit initiates QUANTUM-R Phase 3 clinical trial of quizartinib in FLT3-ITD positive AML patients

Ambit Biosciences, a biopharmaceutical company focused on discovery and development of drugs targeting unmet needs in oncology, autoimmune and inflammatory disease, today announced the initiation of the QUANTUM-R Phase 3 clinical trial comparing quizartinib as monotherapy to chemotherapy regimens in relapsed/refractory acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients with the FMS-like tyrosine kinase-3 (FLT3)-ITD mutation. [More]

Ambit initiates Phase 2 study of quizartinib in acute myeloid leukemia patients

Ambit Biosciences, a biopharmaceutical company focused on discovery and development of drugs targeting unmet needs in oncology, autoimmune and inflammatory disease, today announced the initiation of the Phase 2 cohort of the MD Anderson Cancer Center-sponsored Phase 1/2 study of quizartinib in combination with either 5-azacitidine or low dose cytarabine for previously untreated FLT3-ITD positive acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients age 60 or older, or FLT3-ITD positive AML patients 18 years of age or older in first relapse. [More]
Compounds from plant confer protective effects against breast cancer, say researchers

Compounds from plant confer protective effects against breast cancer, say researchers

Compounds derived from plant-based sources - including garlic, broccoli and medicine plants - confer protective effects against breast cancer, explain researchers at the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI), partner with the UPMC CancerCenter. [More]

UCL scientists find new way to artificially control paralyzed muscles using light

​A new way to artificially control muscles using light, with the potential to restore function to muscles paralysed by conditions such as motor neuron disease and spinal cord injury, has been developed by scientists at UCL and King's College London. [More]
Blood sample could diagnose many types of solid cancers

Blood sample could diagnose many types of solid cancers

A blood sample could one day be enough to diagnose many types of solid cancers, or to monitor the amount of cancer in a patient's body and responses to treatment. Previous versions of the approach, which relies on monitoring levels of tumor DNA circulating in the blood, have required cumbersome and time-consuming steps to customize it to each patient or have not been sufficiently sensitive. [More]
Researcher pinpoints error in protein formation that could be root of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

Researcher pinpoints error in protein formation that could be root of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

By studying nerve cells that originated in patients with a severe neurological disease, a University of Wisconsin-Madison researcher has pinpointed an error in protein formation that could be the root of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. [More]
Harvard stem cell scientists discover potential treatment for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

Harvard stem cell scientists discover potential treatment for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

Harvard stem cell scientists have discovered that a recently approved medication for epilepsy may possibly be a meaningful treatment for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)-Lou Gehrig's disease, a uniformly fatal neurodegenerative disorder. The researchers are now collaborating with Massachusetts General Hospital to design an initial clinical trial testing the safety of the treatment in ALS patients. [More]
FDA clears Omeros' OMS721 IND for inhibition of complement‑mediated TMAs

FDA clears Omeros' OMS721 IND for inhibition of complement‑mediated TMAs

Omeros Corporation today announced that its Investigational New Drug Application (IND) to evaluate OMS721 for the inhibition of complement‑mediated thrombotic microangiopathies (TMAs) has been cleared by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. [More]
Researchers investigate how gene regulation affects evolution and development

Researchers investigate how gene regulation affects evolution and development

Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) has received EUR 900,000 for three years to investigate, jointly with the Institute of Molecular Biology (IMB), how gene regulation affects evolution and development. [More]

Vestiage completes R&D for two new products

Vestiage™, Inc., the emerging leader in healthy aging, announced today that it has completed R&D for two new products that it intends to launch in upcoming quarters. [More]
Research report on global UCB stem cell market

Research report on global UCB stem cell market

Research and Markets has announced the addition of the "Global Stem Cell Umbilical Cord Blood (UCB) Market - Size, Share, Global Trends, Analysis, Opportunities, Growth, Intelligence and Forecast to 2020" report to their offering. [More]
Cedars-Sinai earns grant to conduct clinical trial of gene therapy product for patients with Lou Gehrig's disease

Cedars-Sinai earns grant to conduct clinical trial of gene therapy product for patients with Lou Gehrig's disease

The Cedars-Sinai Regenerative Medicine Institute has received a $2.5 million grant from the Department of Defense to conduct animal studies that, if successful, could provide the basis for a clinical trial of a gene therapy product for patients with Lou Gehrig's disease, also called amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS. [More]