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Stem cells have the remarkable potential to develop into many different cell types in the body during early life and growth. In addition, in many tissues they serve as a sort of internal repair system, dividing essentially without limit to replenish other cells as long as the person or animal is still alive. When a stem cell divides, each new cell has the potential either to remain a stem cell or become another type of cell with a more specialized function, such as a muscle cell, a red blood cell, or a brain cell.

Stem cells are distinguished from other cell types by two important characteristics. First, they are unspecialized cells capable of renewing themselves through cell division, sometimes after long periods of inactivity. Second, under certain physiologic or experimental conditions, they can be induced to become tissue- or organ-specific cells with special functions. In some organs, such as the gut and bone marrow, stem cells regularly divide to repair and replace worn out or damaged tissues. In other organs, however, such as the pancreas and the heart, stem cells only divide under special conditions.
CNIO researchers identify new mechanism that influences differentiation of keratinocytes

CNIO researchers identify new mechanism that influences differentiation of keratinocytes

The formation of human skin involves a cascade of biochemical signals, which are not well understood. However, they are very important since their failure may cause diseases, such as Atopic Dermatitis and skin cancers, which affect more than 25% of the human population. [More]
HLI gains access to PGDx's cancer genomics solutions to expand cancer genome analysis

HLI gains access to PGDx's cancer genomics solutions to expand cancer genome analysis

Personal Genome Diagnostics, Inc., a provider of advanced cancer genome analysis and testing services, and Human Longevity, Inc., the human health information technology and health care company, today announced that HLI will have access to PGDx's cancer genomics solutions to expand its analysis of cancer genomes, including CancerSelect, PlasmaSelect, CancerXome, METDetect and CancerComplete. [More]
ULB researchers uncover new mechanism involved in tumour initiation, growth in SCC

ULB researchers uncover new mechanism involved in tumour initiation, growth in SCC

Researchers at the Université libre de Bruxelles (Belgium) report the mechanisms regulating the different functions of Twist1 controlling skin tumour initiation, cancer stem cell function and tumor progression. [More]
CHLA scientists grow tissue-engineered small intestine from human cells

CHLA scientists grow tissue-engineered small intestine from human cells

A new study by researchers at Children's Hospital Los Angeles has shown that tissue-engineered small intestine grown from human cells replicates key aspects of a functioning human intestine. The tissue-engineered small intestine they developed contains important elements of the mucosal lining and support structures, including the ability to absorb sugars, and even tiny or ultra-structural components like cellular connections. [More]
Canadian Blood Services, OPSEU reach tentative agreement to support employees in Ontario

Canadian Blood Services, OPSEU reach tentative agreement to support employees in Ontario

Today, Canadian Blood Services announced that it has reached a tentative agreement with the Ontario Public Service Employees Union, representing its support employees in Ontario. [More]
UCLA researchers develop method that defines unique stages of reprogramming skin cells

UCLA researchers develop method that defines unique stages of reprogramming skin cells

In a groundbreaking study that provides scientists with a critical new understanding of stem cell development and its role in disease, UCLA researchers at the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research led by Dr. Kathrin Plath, professor of biological chemistry, have established a first-of-its-kind methodology that defines the unique stages by which specialized cells are reprogrammed into stem cells that resemble those found in the embryo. [More]
Gamida Cell granted FDA and EMA orphan drug designation for NiCord

Gamida Cell granted FDA and EMA orphan drug designation for NiCord

Gamida Cell, a leader in cell therapy technologies and products for transplantation and adaptive immune therapy, announced today that orphan drug designation has been granted by The US Department of Health and Human Services, The FDA Office of Orphan Products Development (OOPD) for the investigational medicinal product NiCord for the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), acute myeloid leukemia (AML), Hodgkin lymphoma and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). [More]
Johns Hopkins scientists use genome editing technology to alter human stem cells

Johns Hopkins scientists use genome editing technology to alter human stem cells

A powerful “genome editing” technology known as CRISPR has been used by researchers since 2012 to trim, disrupt, replace or add to sequences of an organism’s DNA. [More]
BrainStorm's phase 2a ALS study meets primary endpoint

BrainStorm's phase 2a ALS study meets primary endpoint

BrainStorm Cell Therapeutics Inc., a leading developer of adult stem cell technologies for neurodegenerative diseases, today announced positive final results from its phase 2a clinical trial of NurOwn™ in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients, which enrolled 14 subjects at Hadassah Medical Center in Jerusalem. [More]
Luck is a key factor in cancer development

Luck is a key factor in cancer development

A statistical model that measures the proportion of cancers that develop as a result of random mutations occurring during cell division was published in Science today. [More]
Johns Hopkins scientists create statistical model to measure proportion of cancer incidence

Johns Hopkins scientists create statistical model to measure proportion of cancer incidence

Scientists from the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center have created a statistical model that measures the proportion of cancer incidence, across many tissue types, caused mainly by random mutations that occur when stem cells divide. [More]
Study shows that reprogramming stem cells can prevent cancer following full body radiation

Study shows that reprogramming stem cells can prevent cancer following full body radiation

The body has evolved ways to get rid of faulty stem cells. A University of Colorado Cancer Center study published today in the journal Stem Cells shows that one of these ways is a "program" that makes stem cells damaged by radiation differentiate into other cells that can no longer survive forever. [More]
LIBD announces significant advances in identifying causes of schizophrenia, brain disorders

LIBD announces significant advances in identifying causes of schizophrenia, brain disorders

The Lieber Institute for Brain Development (LIBD) announces significant advances in identifying the causes of schizophrenia and related developmental brain disorders and translating these findings into new treatment strategies. [More]
Novastem uses Stemedica's stem cell products to treat patient in ischemic stroke study

Novastem uses Stemedica's stem cell products to treat patient in ischemic stroke study

Novastem, a leader in regenerative medicine, announces the treatment of its first patient in its study for ischemic stroke at Clinica Santa Clarita. [More]
Study reveals why older people are at higher risk for developing cancer

Study reveals why older people are at higher risk for developing cancer

Why are older people at higher risk for developing cancer? Prevailing opinion holds that, over time, your body's cells accumulate DNA damage and that eventually this damage catches up with the body in a way that causes cancer. [More]
C3BS enrols 240th patient in CHART-1 European trial of C-Cure for treatment of congestive heart failure

C3BS enrols 240th patient in CHART-1 European trial of C-Cure for treatment of congestive heart failure

Cardio3 BioSciences, a leader in the discovery and development of regenerative, protective and reconstructive therapies, announces today the enrolment of the 240th patient in its CHART-1 European trial for C-Cure, the first and only stem cell therapeutic using guided stem cells for the treatment of congestive heart failure. [More]
Study reveals why older people are at increased risk for developing cancer

Study reveals why older people are at increased risk for developing cancer

Why are older people at higher risk for developing cancer? Prevailing opinion holds that, over time, your body's cells accumulate DNA damage and that eventually this damage catches up with the body in a way that causes cancer. [More]
Penn study has implications for developing new cell-based treatments for skin disease

Penn study has implications for developing new cell-based treatments for skin disease

As the main component of connective tissue in the body, fibroblasts are the most common type of cell. Taking advantage of that ready availability, scientists from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, the Wistar Institute, Boston University School of Medicine, and New Jersey Institute of Technology have discovered a way to repurpose fibroblasts into functional melanocytes, the body's pigment-producing cells. [More]
Novel marker may help doctors choose most effective treatment for older patients with AML

Novel marker may help doctors choose most effective treatment for older patients with AML

A new study led by researchers at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute describes a novel marker that might help doctors choose the least toxic, most effective treatment for many older patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). [More]
Apheresis: A potent therapeutic in extracorporeal photopherisis

Apheresis: A potent therapeutic in extracorporeal photopherisis

Apheresis, the simple process of drawing blood, becomes a powerful therapeutic in extracorporeal photopherisis (ECP) according to clinicians and scientists who met at the NIH State of the Science Symposium in Therapeutic Apheresis. Nora Ratcliffe, MD, of Dartmouth Hitchcock, looked at current methodology and opportunities for research in a paper recently published in Transfusion Medicine Review, titled "National Institutes of Health State of the Science Symposium in Therapeutic Apheresis: Scientific Opportunities in Extracorporeal Photopheresis." [More]