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Stem cells have the remarkable potential to develop into many different cell types in the body during early life and growth. In addition, in many tissues they serve as a sort of internal repair system, dividing essentially without limit to replenish other cells as long as the person or animal is still alive. When a stem cell divides, each new cell has the potential either to remain a stem cell or become another type of cell with a more specialized function, such as a muscle cell, a red blood cell, or a brain cell.

Stem cells are distinguished from other cell types by two important characteristics. First, they are unspecialized cells capable of renewing themselves through cell division, sometimes after long periods of inactivity. Second, under certain physiologic or experimental conditions, they can be induced to become tissue- or organ-specific cells with special functions. In some organs, such as the gut and bone marrow, stem cells regularly divide to repair and replace worn out or damaged tissues. In other organs, however, such as the pancreas and the heart, stem cells only divide under special conditions.
Researchers use gene-editing technique involving low-dose irradiation to repair human stem cells

Researchers use gene-editing technique involving low-dose irradiation to repair human stem cells

For the first time, researchers have employed a gene-editing technique involving low-dose irradiation to repair patient cells, according to a study published in the journal Stem Cells Translational Medicine. This method, developed by researchers in the Cedars-Sinai Board of Governors Regenerative Medicine Institute, is 10 times more effective than techniques currently in use. [More]
New TCR therapy demonstrates encouraging clinical responses in patients with multiple myeloma

New TCR therapy demonstrates encouraging clinical responses in patients with multiple myeloma

Results from a clinical trial investigating a new T cell receptor (TCR) therapy that uses a person's own immune system to recognize and destroy cancer cells demonstrated a clinical response in 80 percent of multiple myeloma patients with advanced disease after undergoing autologous stem cell transplants (ASCT). [More]
Adaptimmune’s NY-ESO-1 TCR-engineered T-cell therapy mediates sustained antitumor effects in multiple myeloma patients

Adaptimmune’s NY-ESO-1 TCR-engineered T-cell therapy mediates sustained antitumor effects in multiple myeloma patients

Adaptimmune Therapeutics plc, a clinical stage biopharmaceutical company focused on the use of T-cell therapy to treat cancer, today announced that data from its Phase I/II study of its affinity enhanced T-cell receptor therapeutic targeting the NY-ESO-1 cancer antigen in patients with multiple myeloma has been published in Nature Medicine. [More]
Researchers use iPSCs to explore new treatments for kidney disease

Researchers use iPSCs to explore new treatments for kidney disease

One promising way to treat diseased or damaged kidneys is cell therapies that include the transplantation of renal progenitor cells, which can then develop into the cells needed for full recovery. Acquiring a sufficient number of progenitor cells has been difficult, however, which is why scientists have considered induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), since they can be expanded at significantly high levels and then differentiated into the progenitors. [More]
Patients' own genetically engineered immune cells show significant success against multiple myeloma

Patients' own genetically engineered immune cells show significant success against multiple myeloma

In recent years, immunotherapy has emerged as a promising treatment for certain cancers. Now this strategy, which uses patients' own immune cells, genetically engineered to target tumors, has shown significant success against multiple myeloma, a cancer of the plasma cells that is largely incurable. [More]
Researchers find evidence that directly links disrupted metabolism to fatal type of lymphoma

Researchers find evidence that directly links disrupted metabolism to fatal type of lymphoma

Researchers from the School of Medicine at The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio have found evidence that directly links disrupted metabolism (energy production in cells) to a common and often fatal type of lymphoma. [More]
UofL conducts Phase I research study for children with relapsed tumors

UofL conducts Phase I research study for children with relapsed tumors

Zach feels "pretty good." Sam wants to be "done with shots!" And Tyler finds it helps to "just keep thinking that at least I'm getting out of school." They are normal boys who had normal lives until cancer came into the picture. All have faced the disease for two years or more, with surgeries, chemotherapy and radiation treatments. All were diagnosed with various malignant solid tumors, went into remission and then relapsed. [More]
Novel cancer drug candidate developed in Singapore advances into clinical trials

Novel cancer drug candidate developed in Singapore advances into clinical trials

A made-in-Singapore cancer drug has advanced into clinical trials, charting a milestone in Singapore's biomedical sciences initiative that will go towards improving the lives of cancer patients in Singapore, and worldwide. [More]
Leading scientists to meet in Southampton to discuss new technologies to create living tissues

Leading scientists to meet in Southampton to discuss new technologies to create living tissues

Leading scientists from the UK and around the world will meet at the University of Southampton next week (20 and 21 July) to discuss new technologies to create new, living tissues in the lab and to help our bodies regenerate themselves. [More]
Research breakthrough opens door to a world of regenerative medicine for treating mitochondrial disease

Research breakthrough opens door to a world of regenerative medicine for treating mitochondrial disease

A study led by Shoukhrat Mitalipov, Ph.D., and Hong Ma, M.D., Ph.D., at the Center for Embryonic Cell and Gene Therapy at Oregon Health & Science University and the Oregon National Primate Research Center has revealed the first critical step in developing novel gene and stem cell therapy treatments for patients with mitochondrial disease. [More]
Salk researchers move one step closer to making cures for genetic diseases a reality

Salk researchers move one step closer to making cures for genetic diseases a reality

Healthy brain, muscle, eye and heart cells would improve the lives of tens of thousands of people around the world with debilitating mitochondrial diseases. Now, researchers at the Salk Institute have gotten one step closer to making such cures a reality: they've turned cells from patients into healthy, mutation-free stem cells that can then become any cell type. [More]
Americord Registry reports new policy for client reimbursement

Americord Registry reports new policy for client reimbursement

Americord Registry, a private cord blood, cord tissue, and placenta tissue banking company, announced today that it is introducing a new policy for client reimbursement. Starting immediately, Americord will offer full reimbursements for cancellation fees that are often incurred by parents who sign up with other cord blood banks. [More]
Gene therapy provides life-long protection to photoreceptor cells in animal model of retinitis pigmentosa

Gene therapy provides life-long protection to photoreceptor cells in animal model of retinitis pigmentosa

A collaboration between scientists in the UK and the USA has shown that gene therapy can give life-long protection to the light-sensitive photoreceptor cells responsible for colour vision in a mouse model of the most common inherited eye disorder. [More]
Agilent and BTI collaborate to address a critical need in biopharmaceutical industry

Agilent and BTI collaborate to address a critical need in biopharmaceutical industry

The collaboration will address a gap in analytical tests and standards applied for drugs based on glycoproteins, which now form the majority of approved biopharmaceutical drugs. Current analytical methods for characterizing glycans are time-consuming and difficult to deploy in commercial environments. They are also limited in their ability to detect and analyze minor glycan species. [More]
Transplanted MSCs slow progression of lupus nephritis by suppressing Tfh cells in SLE animal model

Transplanted MSCs slow progression of lupus nephritis by suppressing Tfh cells in SLE animal model

Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease that produces autoantibodies and subsequent immune reactions that can lead to a variety of symptoms, including inflammation of the kidneys, or nephritis. When researchers transplanted mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) derived from human bone marrow into mice modeled with SLE, they found that inflammation was reduced and nephritis "attenuated." [More]
Study shows possibility of using embryonic stem cells to repair damaged lung tissue

Study shows possibility of using embryonic stem cells to repair damaged lung tissue

Collectively, such diseases of the airways as emphysema, bronchitis, asthma and cystic fibrosis are the second leading cause of death worldwide. More than 35 million Americans alone suffer from chronic respiratory disease. Weizmann Institute scientists have now proposed a new direction that could, in the future, lead to the development of a method for alleviating some of their suffering. [More]
Scientists gain insights into dynamic remodeling of tissue during lung repair

Scientists gain insights into dynamic remodeling of tissue during lung repair

Our lungs are permanently exposed to harmful environmental factors that can damage or even destroy their cells. In a specific regenerative process these injured cells must be replaced as soon as possible. In collaboration with colleagues from the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, scientists at the Helmholtz Zentrum München have now, for the first time, gained detailed insights into the dynamic remodeling of the tissue during lung repair. [More]
Acceleration of cell cycle transition kinetic can make human blood stem cells more powerful

Acceleration of cell cycle transition kinetic can make human blood stem cells more powerful

For the first time, the research group of Prof. Claudia Waskow at the Carl Gustav Carus Faculty of Medicine at Dresden Technical University is now describing a new mechanism in which the length of the G1 phase of the cell cycle has a dramatic impact on the fitness of human blood stem cells. [More]
Scientists uncover new genes that affect development and maintenance of blood stem cell

Scientists uncover new genes that affect development and maintenance of blood stem cell

Even though the transplantation of blood stem cells, also known as bone marrow, has saved many lives over many decades, the genes that control the number or function of blood stem cells are not fully understood. In a study published in June in Stem Cell Reports, the USC Stem Cell labs of Hooman Allayee and Gregor Adams uncovered new genes that affect blood stem cell development and maintenance. [More]
Vanderbilt receives $12.8 million federal grant to develop better ways to predict effects of drugs in patients

Vanderbilt receives $12.8 million federal grant to develop better ways to predict effects of drugs in patients

Vanderbilt University Medical Center has received a five-year, $12.8 million grant from the federal government to develop better ways to predict how patients will respond to the drugs they're given. [More]
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