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Stem cells have the remarkable potential to develop into many different cell types in the body during early life and growth. In addition, in many tissues they serve as a sort of internal repair system, dividing essentially without limit to replenish other cells as long as the person or animal is still alive. When a stem cell divides, each new cell has the potential either to remain a stem cell or become another type of cell with a more specialized function, such as a muscle cell, a red blood cell, or a brain cell.

Stem cells are distinguished from other cell types by two important characteristics. First, they are unspecialized cells capable of renewing themselves through cell division, sometimes after long periods of inactivity. Second, under certain physiologic or experimental conditions, they can be induced to become tissue- or organ-specific cells with special functions. In some organs, such as the gut and bone marrow, stem cells regularly divide to repair and replace worn out or damaged tissues. In other organs, however, such as the pancreas and the heart, stem cells only divide under special conditions.
Using iPS technology researchers develop new therapies for Parkinson's disease and ALS

Using iPS technology researchers develop new therapies for Parkinson's disease and ALS

Dresden. Dr. Jared Sterneckert is entering the research area "Neurodegenerative Diseases" of the DFG Research Center and Cluster of Excellence at the TU Dresden as a new junior group leader. Since 2006, he has led a team working at the "Max Planck Institute for Molecular Biomedicine" in Münster to develop models of Parkinson's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. [More]
Researchers reveal how alteration of single nucleotide could initiate fragile X syndrome

Researchers reveal how alteration of single nucleotide could initiate fragile X syndrome

Researchers reveal how the alteration of a single nucleotide—the basic building block of DNA—could initiate fragile X syndrome, the most common inherited form of intellectual disability. The study appears in The Journal of Cell Biology. [More]
Researchers find method to expand blood stem cells used to treat cancer patients

Researchers find method to expand blood stem cells used to treat cancer patients

A team of scientists from the University of Colorado School of Medicine has reported the breakthrough discovery of a process to expand production of stem cells used to treat cancer patients. [More]
Alternatives to cigarette smoking may still pose a risk to human health due to over-use

Alternatives to cigarette smoking may still pose a risk to human health due to over-use

Cigarette smoking kills approximately 440,000 Americans each year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Protection. It's the leading cause of preventable death worldwide. In order to overcome this addiction, many people resort to nicotine replacement therapies. [More]
New online analytic tool enhances process of re-engineering cells for biomedical research

New online analytic tool enhances process of re-engineering cells for biomedical research

A Mayo Clinic researcher and his collaborators have developed an online analytic tool that will speed up and enhance the process of re-engineering cells for biomedical investigation. CellNet is a free-use Internet platform that uses network biology methods to aid stem cell engineering. [More]
BloodCenter's Erythroid Chimerism test available to monitor transplanted SCD patients

BloodCenter's Erythroid Chimerism test available to monitor transplanted SCD patients

BloodCenter of Wisconsin's Diagnostic Laboratories today announced the availability of an innovative Erythroid Chimerism test to monitor erythroid lineage chimerism in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) following allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. [More]

TxCell announces five new patents for core technology and ASTrIA platform

TxCell SA, a biotech developing innovative, personalized cell-based immunotherapies using antigen-specific regulatory T-cells (Ag-Tregs) for chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, today announces that five new patents for their technologies have been issued in the Unites States, Asia and Australia since the beginning of 2014. [More]
Scientists find that DNA repair drug could help treat leukaemia, other cancers

Scientists find that DNA repair drug could help treat leukaemia, other cancers

A team of scientists led by Research Associate Professor Motomi Osato and Professor Yoshiaki Ito from the Cancer Science Institute of Singapore at the National University of Singapore found that a drug originally designed for killing a limited type of cancer cells with DNA repair defects could potentially be used to treat leukaemia and other cancers. [More]
Drug to kill limited type of cancer cells with DNA repair defects could treat leukaemia

Drug to kill limited type of cancer cells with DNA repair defects could treat leukaemia

A team of scientists led by Research Associate Professor Motomi Osato and Professor Yoshiaki Ito from the Cancer Science Institute of Singapore (CSI Singapore) at the National University of Singapore (NUS) found that a drug originally designed for killing a limited type of cancer cells with DNA repair defects could potentially be used to treat leukaemia and other cancers. [More]
Endothelial cells can function as cardiac stem cells to produce new heart muscle tissue

Endothelial cells can function as cardiac stem cells to produce new heart muscle tissue

Endothelial cells residing in the coronary arteries can function as cardiac stem cells to produce new heart muscle tissue, Vanderbilt University investigators have discovered. [More]

New BioInformant report finds 21-fold increase in companies involved in cord blood banking industry

As a leading provider of market research, MarketResearch.com is pleased to announce the distribution of a new BioInformant Worldwide, L.L.C. report that found a 21-fold increase (2,100%) in the companies involved in the cord blood banking industry in the past 10 years. [More]
Newborn screening for SCID holds promise that affected children can lead healthy lives

Newborn screening for SCID holds promise that affected children can lead healthy lives

Using population-based screening outcomes of approximately 3 million infants, a team of scientists across 14 states, including four researchers at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, have shown that newborn screening for severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) can be successfully implemented across public health newborn screening programs. [More]
Longitude and NovaQuest acquire California Cryobank

Longitude and NovaQuest acquire California Cryobank

California Cryobank, a global leader in reproductive tissue donor services and storage and stem cell banking, announced today that it has been acquired by equity investors Longitude Venture Partners II, L.P. and NovaQuest Pharma Opportunities Fund III, L.P.. [More]
Study confirms close link between immune system and adult neurogenesis

Study confirms close link between immune system and adult neurogenesis

A new study by Barbara Beltz, the Allene Lummis Russell Professor of Neuroscience at Wellesley College, and Irene Soderhall of Uppsala University, Sweden, published in the August 11 issue of the journal Developmental Cell, demonstrates that the immune system can produce cells with stem cell properties, using crayfish as a model system. These cells can, in turn, create neurons in the adult animal. [More]
Novartis and Gamida Cell sign Option and Investment Agreements

Novartis and Gamida Cell sign Option and Investment Agreements

​Elbit Imaging Ltd. announced today that Elbit Medical Technologies Ltd., a subsidiary of the Company in which it holds approximately 86% of the voting power, announced that on August 18, 2014, Gamida Cell Ltd., in which Elbit Medical holds approximately 30.8% of the voting power and a vast majority of Gamida Cell's shareholders (including Elbit Medical), signed Option and Investment Agreements with Novartis Pharma AG (Novartis). [More]
Researchers use new gene editing method to correct mutation that leads to DMD

Researchers use new gene editing method to correct mutation that leads to DMD

UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers successfully used a new gene editing method to correct the mutation that leads to Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) in a mouse model of the condition. [More]
Scientists create computer algorithm for cell and tissue engineering

Scientists create computer algorithm for cell and tissue engineering

In a boon to stem cell research and regenerative medicine, scientists at Boston Children's Hospital, the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University and Boston University have created a computer algorithm called CellNet as a "roadmap" for cell and tissue engineering, to ensure that cells engineered in the lab have the same favorable properties as cells in our own bodies. [More]
Illness-linked genetic variation affects connections among neurons in the developing brain

Illness-linked genetic variation affects connections among neurons in the developing brain

A genetic variation linked to schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and severe depression wreaks havoc on connections among neurons in the developing brain, a team of researchers reports. [More]
Researchers review potential of adipose-derived stem cells to improve nerve regeneration

Researchers review potential of adipose-derived stem cells to improve nerve regeneration

Stem cell researchers at the Blond McIndoe Laboratory, University of Manchester, UK, led by Dr Adam Reid, present a review of the current literature on the suitability of adipose-derived stem cells in peripheral nerve repair. [More]
Researchers find crucial signaling pathway that helps HSCs to generate

Researchers find crucial signaling pathway that helps HSCs to generate

Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) give rise to all other blood cell types, but their development and how their fate is determined has long remained a mystery. [More]