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Stem cells have the remarkable potential to develop into many different cell types in the body during early life and growth. In addition, in many tissues they serve as a sort of internal repair system, dividing essentially without limit to replenish other cells as long as the person or animal is still alive. When a stem cell divides, each new cell has the potential either to remain a stem cell or become another type of cell with a more specialized function, such as a muscle cell, a red blood cell, or a brain cell.

Stem cells are distinguished from other cell types by two important characteristics. First, they are unspecialized cells capable of renewing themselves through cell division, sometimes after long periods of inactivity. Second, under certain physiologic or experimental conditions, they can be induced to become tissue- or organ-specific cells with special functions. In some organs, such as the gut and bone marrow, stem cells regularly divide to repair and replace worn out or damaged tissues. In other organs, however, such as the pancreas and the heart, stem cells only divide under special conditions.
VIB research reveals new insights into ALS

VIB research reveals new insights into ALS

Research into amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) conducted by VIB-KU Leuven has led to interesting and unexpected conclusions. [More]
Scientists discover improved method for large scale production of human stem cells

Scientists discover improved method for large scale production of human stem cells

Scientists have discovered a new method of creating human stem cells which could solve the big problem of the large-scale production needed to fully realise the potential of these remarkable cells for understanding and treating disease. [More]
Researchers study how skin stem cells respond to forces

Researchers study how skin stem cells respond to forces

All cells share the same genetic code, no matter if they are skin or brain cells. However, these cells are exposed to very different types of mechanical environments and mechanical stresses. [More]
International project to develop globally accessible bank of new cancer cell models for research

International project to develop globally accessible bank of new cancer cell models for research

An international project to develop a large, globally accessible bank of new cancer cell culture models for the research community launched today. [More]
New study identifies four subtypes of human insulin producing beta cells involved in diabetes

New study identifies four subtypes of human insulin producing beta cells involved in diabetes

A new study led by nationally prominent stem cell scientist Markus Grompe, M.D., has determined the existence of at least four separate subtypes of human insulin producing beta cells that may be important in the understanding and treatment of diabetes. The findings were published online today in the journal Nature Communications. [More]
JAX researchers find precise, reliable way to identify leukemia cells of origin

JAX researchers find precise, reliable way to identify leukemia cells of origin

Every cancer starts with a single cell, and Jackson Laboratory researchers have found a precise and reliable way -- whole-genome profiling of open chromatin -- to identify the kind of cell that leads to a given case of leukemia, a valuable key to cancer prognosis and outcome. [More]
Scientists detect first cell from which tumour grows in skin cancers

Scientists detect first cell from which tumour grows in skin cancers

Scientists have identified for the first time the 'cell of origin' - in other words, the first cell from which the cancer grows - in basal cell carcinoma, the most common form of skin cancer, and followed the chain of events that lead to the growth of these invasive tumours. [More]
Deadly bacteria can travel to the brain and spinal cord in 24 hours, new study finds

Deadly bacteria can travel to the brain and spinal cord in 24 hours, new study finds

A deadly bacteria that can be picked up by a simple sniff can travel to the brain and spinal cord in just 24 hours, a new Griffith University and Bond University study has found. [More]
Study finds microRNA let-7 plays key role in restricting neuroblastoma

Study finds microRNA let-7 plays key role in restricting neuroblastoma

Great strides have been made in treating neuroblastoma, the most common cancer in infants and toddlers. However, advanced cases are often fatal, and children who survive often face life-long physical and intellectual challenges related to their treatment. [More]
Scientists use stem cell techniques to unravel biology of autism

Scientists use stem cell techniques to unravel biology of autism

The brains of some people with autism spectrum disorder grow faster than usual early on in life, often before diagnosis. [More]
Buck researchers find new way for possible treatment of AMD

Buck researchers find new way for possible treatment of AMD

Buck researchers boosted the potency of a broccoli-related compound by ten times and identified it as a possible treatment for age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the leading cause of vision loss affecting more than 10 million older Americans. [More]
Minoryx Therapeutics initiates phase 1 clinical trial of MIN-102

Minoryx Therapeutics initiates phase 1 clinical trial of MIN-102

Minoryx Therapeutics, a drug development company specialized in the discovery and development of new drugs for orphan diseases, today announces the initiation of its first-in-man Phase 1 clinical trial for its lead compound MIN-102. [More]
Diabetes drug metformin could help reduce toxic acid levels linked to MSUD

Diabetes drug metformin could help reduce toxic acid levels linked to MSUD

Maple Syrup Urine Disease (MSUD) is a rare inherited metabolic disorder involving the dysfunction of an enzyme which breaks down three essential amino acids: leucine, isoleucine and valine. [More]
New research reveals b1-integrin protein as promising therapeutic target for muscle aging

New research reveals b1-integrin protein as promising therapeutic target for muscle aging

As we age, the function and regenerative abilities of skeletal muscles deteriorate, which means it is difficult for the elderly to recover from injury or surgery. New work from Carnegie's Michelle Rozo, Liangji Li, and Chen-Ming Fan demonstrates that a protein called b1-integrin is crucial for muscle regeneration. [More]
AOSSM presents research awards, grants at annual meeting

AOSSM presents research awards, grants at annual meeting

In order to recognize and encourage cutting-edge research in key areas of orthopaedic sports medicine, the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine will present research awards and grants during its Annual Meeting, July 7-10 in Colorado Springs, CO. [More]
Emergency physicians encourage safe fireworks practices

Emergency physicians encourage safe fireworks practices

Fireworks sales will be blazing across the country from now through the Fourth of July. As retailers begin their promotions, the Pennsylvania Academy of Ophthalmology, the Pennsylvania College of Emergency Physicians, and the Pennsylvania Medical Society join the American Academy of Ophthalmology in shining light on the explosive fact: fireworks injuries cause approximately 10,000 visits to the emergency room each year, according to the data from the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission. [More]
Researchers use gelation chips to develop strong muscle fibers

Researchers use gelation chips to develop strong muscle fibers

USC researcher Megan L. McCain and colleagues have devised a way to develop bigger, stronger muscle fibers. But instead of popping up on the bicep of a bodybuilder, these muscles grow on a tiny scaffold or "chip" molded from a type of water-logged gel made from gelatin. [More]
Novel high-resolution method helps study which genes are active in tissues

Novel high-resolution method helps study which genes are active in tissues

Scientists at Karolinska Institutet and the Royal Institute of Technology have devised a new high-resolution method for studying which genes are active in a tissue. [More]
Researchers develop in vitro model system for investigating etiology of NAFLD

Researchers develop in vitro model system for investigating etiology of NAFLD

Researchers from the Institute for Stem Cell Research and Regenerative Medicine at the University Clinic of Düsseldorf have established an in vitro model system for investigating nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). [More]
New IDSA guidelines focus on diagnosis, treatment of deadly aspergillosis

New IDSA guidelines focus on diagnosis, treatment of deadly aspergillosis

New therapies are improving care, but early diagnosis remains critical in the effective treatment of invasive, a potentially deadly fungal infection, according to new guidelines released by the Infectious Diseases Society of America and published in the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases. [More]
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