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Stem cells have the remarkable potential to develop into many different cell types in the body during early life and growth. In addition, in many tissues they serve as a sort of internal repair system, dividing essentially without limit to replenish other cells as long as the person or animal is still alive. When a stem cell divides, each new cell has the potential either to remain a stem cell or become another type of cell with a more specialized function, such as a muscle cell, a red blood cell, or a brain cell.

Stem cells are distinguished from other cell types by two important characteristics. First, they are unspecialized cells capable of renewing themselves through cell division, sometimes after long periods of inactivity. Second, under certain physiologic or experimental conditions, they can be induced to become tissue- or organ-specific cells with special functions. In some organs, such as the gut and bone marrow, stem cells regularly divide to repair and replace worn out or damaged tissues. In other organs, however, such as the pancreas and the heart, stem cells only divide under special conditions.
Comprehensive stroke centers reduce mortality risk in patients treated for hemorrhagic stroke

Comprehensive stroke centers reduce mortality risk in patients treated for hemorrhagic stroke

New research published today in the Journal of the American Heart Association indicates that patients who are treated for hemorrhagic stroke at a comprehensive stroke center are more likely to receive specialized treatment, reducing the risk of mortality. [More]
Cardiff scientists develop novel anti-cancer stem cell compound

Cardiff scientists develop novel anti-cancer stem cell compound

Cardiff University scientists have developed a novel anti-cancer stem cell agent capable of targeting aggressive tumour forming cells common to breast, pancreas, colon and prostate cancers. [More]
Salk discovery may offer new avenues for generating novel therapies

Salk discovery may offer new avenues for generating novel therapies

Scientists at the Salk Institute have discovered a novel type of pluripotent stem cell--cells capable of developing into any type of tissue--whose identity is tied to their location in a developing embryo. This contrasts with stem cells traditionally used in scientific study, which are characterized by their time-related stage of development. [More]
New study shows ulcer-causing bacteria can directly interact with stomach stem cells

New study shows ulcer-causing bacteria can directly interact with stomach stem cells

The ulcer-causing bacterium Helicobacter pylori can directly interact with stomach stem cells, causing the cells to divide more rapidly, according to a new study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. [More]
Scientists identify mechanism that explains how some stem cells get new identity

Scientists identify mechanism that explains how some stem cells get new identity

Scientists at the University of Copenhagen have identified one mechanism that explains how some stem cells choose to become a given cell type: the cells combine specific sets of proteins at precise positions along the DNA. When these particular groups of proteins are combined, the gates are opened so that certain groups of genes can now be used, giving the cells a new identity. [More]
Bone-marrow-derived MSCs can promote fracture healing

Bone-marrow-derived MSCs can promote fracture healing

Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been transplanted to successfully treat a variety of diseases and conditions. The benefit of using MSCs is their ability to self-renew and differentiate into a variety of specialized cell types, such as osteoblasts (cells contributing to bone formation), chondrocytes (cartilage cells), adipocytes (fat cells), myocardiocytes (the muscle cells that make up the cardiac muscle), and neurons (nervous system cells). [More]
AMSBIO launches new and exclusive biotinylated protein collection

AMSBIO launches new and exclusive biotinylated protein collection

AMSBIO has launched a new and exclusive biotinylated protein collection specially designed to simplify your research. [More]
Sangamo BioSciences to present data on ZFP Therapeutic platform at ASGCT meeting

Sangamo BioSciences to present data on ZFP Therapeutic platform at ASGCT meeting

Sangamo BioSciences, Inc. announced that data from clinical, preclinical and research-stage programs focused on the development of ZFP Therapeutics will be presented at the 18th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Gene and Cell Therapy [More]
Stempeutics Research granted process patent in China for novel stem-cell based drug Stempeucel

Stempeutics Research granted process patent in China for novel stem-cell based drug Stempeucel

Stempeutics Research, a group company of Manipal Education and Medical Group and a Joint Venture with Cipla Group, announced today that the State Intellectual Property Office of China granted a process patent for its novel stem-cell based drug Stempeucel. [More]
ISSCR calls for moratorium on human germline genome editing attempts in clinical practice

ISSCR calls for moratorium on human germline genome editing attempts in clinical practice

In response to an article published by Chinese scientists describing research that used gene editing technologies in human embryos, the International Society for Stem Cell Research has again called for a moratorium on attempts at human clinical germline genome editing while extensive scientific analysis of the potential risks is conducted, along with broad public discussion of the societal and ethical implications. [More]
Researchers show potential of stem cell-based therapy in treating brain-metastatic breast cancer

Researchers show potential of stem cell-based therapy in treating brain-metastatic breast cancer

Investigators from Massachusetts General Hospital and the Harvard Stem Cell Institute have developed an imageable mouse model of brain-metastatic breast cancer and shown the potential of a stem-cell-based therapy to eliminate metastatic cells from the brain and prolong survival. [More]
Discovery offers simpler, more cost-effective way to grow stem cells

Discovery offers simpler, more cost-effective way to grow stem cells

Stem cells naturally cling to feeder cells as they grow in petri dishes. Scientists have thought for years that this attachment occurs because feeder cells serve as a support system, providing stems cells with essential nutrients. [More]
Study points to TMPRSS2 gene as culprit for aggressive forms of androgen-fuelled cancers

Study points to TMPRSS2 gene as culprit for aggressive forms of androgen-fuelled cancers

A new study led by University of Toronto researcher Dr. David Lam has discovered the trigger behind the most severe forms of cancer pain. Released in top journal Pain this month, the study points to TMPRSS2 as the culprit: a gene that is also responsible for some of the most aggressive forms of androgen-fuelled cancers. [More]
Penn researchers find molecular bond between DNA damage, cellular senescence and premature aging

Penn researchers find molecular bond between DNA damage, cellular senescence and premature aging

Like a beloved pair of jeans, human DNA accumulates damage over time, and older people's bodies can't repair it as well. Many scientists believe a build up of damage can cause cells to enter an irreversible dormant state known as senescence. Cellular senescence is believed to be responsible for some of the telltale signs of aging, such as weakened bones, less resilient skin and slow-downs in organ function. [More]
Several drugs could lead to new MS treatment options

Several drugs could lead to new MS treatment options

New research published this week in Nature has found several drugs could lead to new treatment options for multiple sclerosis (MS), including two drugs that effectively treat MS at the source, in vivo. When administered at the peak of disease, these two drugs showed a striking reversal of disease severity. [More]
Stem cell treatment repairs birth defect, provides facial regeneration for people suffering traumatic injury

Stem cell treatment repairs birth defect, provides facial regeneration for people suffering traumatic injury

Researchers have pinpointed a primary cause of a rare skull disorder in infants, and the discovery could help wounded soldiers, car-wreck victims and other patients recover from disfiguring facial injuries. [More]
Adseverin protein plays key role in bone loss associated with osteoinflammatory disease

Adseverin protein plays key role in bone loss associated with osteoinflammatory disease

Adseverin, a protein found in the body, has been identified as the key driver behind the bone loss associated with the world's most common inflammatory disease: gum disease, or periodontitis. [More]
Researchers describe natural mechanism that helps repair lesions in teeth

Researchers describe natural mechanism that helps repair lesions in teeth

Researchers at Inserm and Paris Descartes University have just taken an important step in research on stem cells and dental repair. They have managed to isolate dental stem cell lines and to describe the natural mechanism by which they repair lesions in the teeth. This fundamental discovery will make it possible to initiate unprecedented therapeutic strategies to mobilise the resident dental stem cells and magnify their natural capacity for repair. [More]
Honokiol extract holds promise as adjunct treatment for bladder and kidney cancers

Honokiol extract holds promise as adjunct treatment for bladder and kidney cancers

The botanical extract honokiol, a biologically active molecule isolated from the bark of Magnolia spp., holds promise as an adjunct treatment for aggressive bladder and kidney cancers, as reported in two new studies. New research on honokiol in bladder cancer was presented at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2015. [More]
Gene therapy reduces infectious complications in children, teens with Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome

Gene therapy reduces infectious complications in children, teens with Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome

In a small study that included seven children and teens with Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, a rare immunodeficiency disorder, use of gene therapy resulted in clinical improvement in infectious complications, severe eczema, and symptoms of autoimmunity, according to a study in the April 21 issue of JAMA, a theme issue on child health. [More]
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