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Stem cells have the remarkable potential to develop into many different cell types in the body during early life and growth. In addition, in many tissues they serve as a sort of internal repair system, dividing essentially without limit to replenish other cells as long as the person or animal is still alive. When a stem cell divides, each new cell has the potential either to remain a stem cell or become another type of cell with a more specialized function, such as a muscle cell, a red blood cell, or a brain cell.

Stem cells are distinguished from other cell types by two important characteristics. First, they are unspecialized cells capable of renewing themselves through cell division, sometimes after long periods of inactivity. Second, under certain physiologic or experimental conditions, they can be induced to become tissue- or organ-specific cells with special functions. In some organs, such as the gut and bone marrow, stem cells regularly divide to repair and replace worn out or damaged tissues. In other organs, however, such as the pancreas and the heart, stem cells only divide under special conditions.
A*STAR's GIS scientists develop new system that can predict treatment targets for cancer

A*STAR's GIS scientists develop new system that can predict treatment targets for cancer

In recent months, several national initiatives for personalized medicine have been announced, including the recently launched precision medicine initiative in the US, driven by rapid advances in genomic technologies and with the promise of cheaper and better healthcare. Significant challenges remain, however, in the management and analysis of genetic information and their integration with patient data. [More]
Biotech experts to establish ethical guidelines in cellular biotechnology at BEINGS 2015

Biotech experts to establish ethical guidelines in cellular biotechnology at BEINGS 2015

In May 2015 Atlanta will host Biotechnology and the Ethical Imagination: A Global Summit (BEINGS), an international summit drawing together the world's thought leaders on the highly debated issues of cellular biotechnology. [More]
Stem cell transplants more effective than mitoxantrone drug for people with severe multiple sclerosis

Stem cell transplants more effective than mitoxantrone drug for people with severe multiple sclerosis

Stem cell transplants may be more effective than the drug mitoxantrone for people with severe cases of multiple sclerosis (MS), according to a new study published in the February 11, 2015, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Longer donor leukocyte telomere length linked to improved survival following HCT

Longer donor leukocyte telomere length linked to improved survival following HCT

Among patients with severe aplastic anemia who received stem cell transplant from an unrelated donor, longer leukocyte (white blood cells) telomere length (a structure at the end of a chromosome) was associated with increased overall survival at 5 years, according to a study in the February 10 issue of JAMA. [More]
Researchers generate new reporter system to study bone regeneration potential of embryonic stem cells

Researchers generate new reporter system to study bone regeneration potential of embryonic stem cells

A new reporter system used to study the bone regeneration potential of human embryonic stem cells has been generated in research led by the University of Minnesota. The new reporter system is the first of its kind for human pluripotent stem cells and is important for identifying certain agents and pathways that mediate early stages of human bone development. [More]
Magnetizing biomolecules: an interview with Dr. Fred Whipple, AMSBIO

Magnetizing biomolecules: an interview with Dr. Fred Whipple, AMSBIO

Nanoparticle technology was originally developed in the 1980s and 1990s. As the technology evolved, it soon became possible to produce uniform nanoscopic beads that are magnetic, and that also have a variety of specific surface chemistries. It was immediately evident that such beads could be used to great advantage for biochemical separations. [More]
Japanese researchers explore use of bone marrow transplants to treat hypophosphatasia

Japanese researchers explore use of bone marrow transplants to treat hypophosphatasia

Recent research carried out by a team of researchers in Japan has investigated the use of bone marrow transplants (BMTs) to treat hypophosphatasia (HPP). In this study, the researchers carried out BMT for two infants with HPP in combination with allogenic (other-donated) mesenchymal stem cell transplants (MSCTs). The allogenic MSC donors were a parent of the infant. [More]
Duke University researchers devise new method to activate genes with light

Duke University researchers devise new method to activate genes with light

Duke University researchers have devised a method to activate genes in any specific location or pattern in a lab dish with the flip of a light switch by crossing a bacterium's viral defense system with a flower's response to sunlight. [More]
NYEE ophthalmologists offer prevention tips to observe AMD Awareness Month

NYEE ophthalmologists offer prevention tips to observe AMD Awareness Month

Macular degeneration is a major cause of irreversible vision loss in the United States and around the world. As many as 11 million Americans have some form of macular degeneration. [More]
UM SOM launches ‘Program in Lung Healing’ to develop treatments for acute respiratory failure

UM SOM launches ‘Program in Lung Healing’ to develop treatments for acute respiratory failure

University of Maryland School of Medicine (UM SOM) Dean E. Albert Reece, MD, PhD, MBA, and Jeffrey A. Rivest, MS, President and Chief Executive Officer of University of Maryland Medical Center (UMMC), today announced the official launch of a new "Program in Lung Healing," that will further the School's position as a national leader in research, education and clinical innovation for acute ailments of the lung and respiratory system. [More]
New study provides better understanding of how stem cells give rise to tumors

New study provides better understanding of how stem cells give rise to tumors

Researchers at Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute (Sanford-Burnham) have discovered a precise stem cell signaling process that can lead to intestinal tumors if disrupted. The findings add to our understanding of how stem cells give rise to tumors and identify specific stem cell molecules that may be targeted to prevent the onset, progression, and recurrence of intestinal cancers. [More]
MIT engineers discover way to grow liver-like cells to test potential malaria drugs

MIT engineers discover way to grow liver-like cells to test potential malaria drugs

In 2008, the World Health Organization announced a global effort to eradicate malaria, which kills about 800,000 people every year. As part of that goal, scientists are trying to develop new drugs that target the malaria parasite during the stage when it infects the human liver, which is crucial because some strains of malaria can lie dormant in the liver for several years before flaring up. [More]
New studies show that treating infertility with stem cells may not be realised

New studies show that treating infertility with stem cells may not be realised

Whether or not infertility can be treated with stem cells has been a matter of debate for many years. [More]
Three Keck Medicine scientists of USC receive $4.3 million from CIRM for stem cell research

Three Keck Medicine scientists of USC receive $4.3 million from CIRM for stem cell research

Three scientists from Keck Medicine of the University of Southern California have won grants exceeding $4.3 million from the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine for research that includes creating a temporary liver for transplant patients, finding novel ways to treat immune disorders and blood diseases and developing a new animal model for exploring diseases like heart failure, diabetes and neurodegenerative diseases. [More]
FDA accepts Sangamo BioSciences' IND for SB-BCLmR-HSPC genome editing approach

FDA accepts Sangamo BioSciences' IND for SB-BCLmR-HSPC genome editing approach

Sangamo BioSciences, Inc. announced today that an Investigational New Drug (IND) application for the company's SB-BCLmR-HSPC genome editing approach, which is designed to provide a one-time lasting therapy for beta-thalassemia, has been accepted by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and is now active. [More]
Anti-viral immune cells could inhibit bone marrow transplant infections caused by CMV

Anti-viral immune cells could inhibit bone marrow transplant infections caused by CMV

Bone marrow transplantation is a life-saving therapy for patients with blood cancers like leukemia or lymphoma. However, the depletion of the patient's immune system prior to transplantation can put patients at risk of for an infection by a virus called cytomegalovirus (CMV) that can be life threatening in these immune-compromised individuals. [More]
New study identifies three genes that enable glioblastoma to recur, progress after radiation therapy

New study identifies three genes that enable glioblastoma to recur, progress after radiation therapy

A new study identifies three genes that together enable a lethal form of brain cancer to recur and progress after radiation therapy. [More]
Researchers reveal new pathway for inhibiting growth of tumor cells tied to BRCA mutations

Researchers reveal new pathway for inhibiting growth of tumor cells tied to BRCA mutations

Inhibiting the action of a particular enzyme dramatically slows the growth of tumor cells tied to BRCA1 and BRCA2 genetic mutations which, in turn, are closely tied to breast and ovarian cancers, according to researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center. [More]
NQMBC recognizes Cancer Treatment Centers of America for providing quality breast cancer care

NQMBC recognizes Cancer Treatment Centers of America for providing quality breast cancer care

Cancer Treatment Centers of America at Midwestern Regional Medical Center has been recognized by the National Quality Measures for Breast Centers Program as being among the top centers in the country for providing quality breast cancer care. [More]
Bionomics initiates BNC210 Phase 1b clinical trial in healthy volunteers

Bionomics initiates BNC210 Phase 1b clinical trial in healthy volunteers

Bionomics Limited has initiated a Phase 1b clinical trial in healthy volunteers of BNC210, the Company's drug candidate in development for the treatment of anxiety and depression. [More]