Stem Cell News and Research RSS Feed - Stem Cell News and Research

Stem cells have the remarkable potential to develop into many different cell types in the body during early life and growth. In addition, in many tissues they serve as a sort of internal repair system, dividing essentially without limit to replenish other cells as long as the person or animal is still alive. When a stem cell divides, each new cell has the potential either to remain a stem cell or become another type of cell with a more specialized function, such as a muscle cell, a red blood cell, or a brain cell.

Stem cells are distinguished from other cell types by two important characteristics. First, they are unspecialized cells capable of renewing themselves through cell division, sometimes after long periods of inactivity. Second, under certain physiologic or experimental conditions, they can be induced to become tissue- or organ-specific cells with special functions. In some organs, such as the gut and bone marrow, stem cells regularly divide to repair and replace worn out or damaged tissues. In other organs, however, such as the pancreas and the heart, stem cells only divide under special conditions.
Study reveals how stem cells work to improve lung function in ARDS

Study reveals how stem cells work to improve lung function in ARDS

A new study has revealed how stem cells work to improve lung function in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). [More]
Belgian receives research grant from Jeffrey Modell to help cure IPEX syndrome

Belgian receives research grant from Jeffrey Modell to help cure IPEX syndrome

For the first time the Jeffrey Modell Foundation is giving a research grant to a Belgian laboratory. The team of Adrian Liston from VIB-KU Leuven will use the grant to develop a gene therapy to cure children that suffer from IPEX syndrome, a rare and fatal autoimmune disorder in which the immune system attacks the body's own tissues and organs. [More]
Canada funds 22 inventive ideas for improving health in low-resource countries

Canada funds 22 inventive ideas for improving health in low-resource countries

Grand Challenges Canada, funded by the Government of Canada, today announced $2.4 million in seed funds shared between 22 projects from Canada and nine developing nations, to pursue inventive new ideas for improving health in low-resource countries. [More]
Researchers examine why stem cells lose their capacity to repair damage as age increases

Researchers examine why stem cells lose their capacity to repair damage as age increases

As we age, stem cells throughout our bodies gradually lose their capacity to repair damage, even from normal wear and tear. [More]
New antifungal drug effective against invasive mold disease in cancer patients with less adverse effects

New antifungal drug effective against invasive mold disease in cancer patients with less adverse effects

A newly developed antifungal, isavuconazole, is as effective as an existing drug, voriconazole, against invasive mold disease in cancer patients with less adverse effects, according to phase 3 clinical data presented at the 54th Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, an infectious disease meeting of the American Society for Microbiology. [More]
PHI collaborates with Northeastern University for establishing novel cell analysis applications

PHI collaborates with Northeastern University for establishing novel cell analysis applications

Phase Holographic Imaging (PHI) today announces a collaboration agreement with Northeastern University of Boston. [More]
Scientists apply iPS cell technology to Huntington's disease transgenic monkey model

Scientists apply iPS cell technology to Huntington's disease transgenic monkey model

Creating induced pluripotent stem cells or iPS cells allows researchers to establish "disease in a dish" models of conditions ranging from Alzheimer's disease to diabetes. [More]
Project aims at establishing central biobank for development of new drugs

Project aims at establishing central biobank for development of new drugs

Human stem cells allow scientists to assess how patients are likely to respond to new drugs and to examine how illnesses come about. [More]
Transplantation of B10 cells helps inhibit development of bladder fibrosis post SCI

Transplantation of B10 cells helps inhibit development of bladder fibrosis post SCI

A team of researchers from Korea and Canada have found that transplantation of B10 cells (a stable immortalized human bone marrow derived -mesenchymal stem cell line; B10 hMSC) directly into the bladder wall of mice modeled with spinal cord injury (SCI) helped inhibit the development of bladder fibrosis and improved bladder function by promoting the growth of smooth muscle cells in the bladder. [More]
Clinical trial to assess safety and efficacy of novel monoclonal antibody for CLL patients

Clinical trial to assess safety and efficacy of novel monoclonal antibody for CLL patients

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, in partnership with the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM) and Celgene Corporation, a New Jersey-based biopharmaceutical company, have launched a phase 1 human clinical trial to assess the safety and efficacy of a novel monoclonal antibody for patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). [More]
Using iPS technology researchers develop new therapies for Parkinson's disease and ALS

Using iPS technology researchers develop new therapies for Parkinson's disease and ALS

Dresden. Dr. Jared Sterneckert is entering the research area "Neurodegenerative Diseases" of the DFG Research Center and Cluster of Excellence at the TU Dresden as a new junior group leader. Since 2006, he has led a team working at the "Max Planck Institute for Molecular Biomedicine" in Münster to develop models of Parkinson's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. [More]
Researchers reveal how alteration of single nucleotide could initiate fragile X syndrome

Researchers reveal how alteration of single nucleotide could initiate fragile X syndrome

Researchers reveal how the alteration of a single nucleotide—the basic building block of DNA—could initiate fragile X syndrome, the most common inherited form of intellectual disability. The study appears in The Journal of Cell Biology. [More]
Researchers find method to expand blood stem cells used to treat cancer patients

Researchers find method to expand blood stem cells used to treat cancer patients

A team of scientists from the University of Colorado School of Medicine has reported the breakthrough discovery of a process to expand production of stem cells used to treat cancer patients. [More]
Alternatives to cigarette smoking may still pose a risk to human health due to over-use

Alternatives to cigarette smoking may still pose a risk to human health due to over-use

Cigarette smoking kills approximately 440,000 Americans each year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Protection. It's the leading cause of preventable death worldwide. In order to overcome this addiction, many people resort to nicotine replacement therapies. [More]
New online analytic tool enhances process of re-engineering cells for biomedical research

New online analytic tool enhances process of re-engineering cells for biomedical research

A Mayo Clinic researcher and his collaborators have developed an online analytic tool that will speed up and enhance the process of re-engineering cells for biomedical investigation. CellNet is a free-use Internet platform that uses network biology methods to aid stem cell engineering. [More]
BloodCenter's Erythroid Chimerism test available to monitor transplanted SCD patients

BloodCenter's Erythroid Chimerism test available to monitor transplanted SCD patients

BloodCenter of Wisconsin's Diagnostic Laboratories today announced the availability of an innovative Erythroid Chimerism test to monitor erythroid lineage chimerism in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) following allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. [More]

TxCell announces five new patents for core technology and ASTrIA platform

TxCell SA, a biotech developing innovative, personalized cell-based immunotherapies using antigen-specific regulatory T-cells (Ag-Tregs) for chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, today announces that five new patents for their technologies have been issued in the Unites States, Asia and Australia since the beginning of 2014. [More]
Scientists find that DNA repair drug could help treat leukaemia, other cancers

Scientists find that DNA repair drug could help treat leukaemia, other cancers

A team of scientists led by Research Associate Professor Motomi Osato and Professor Yoshiaki Ito from the Cancer Science Institute of Singapore at the National University of Singapore found that a drug originally designed for killing a limited type of cancer cells with DNA repair defects could potentially be used to treat leukaemia and other cancers. [More]
Drug to kill limited type of cancer cells with DNA repair defects could treat leukaemia

Drug to kill limited type of cancer cells with DNA repair defects could treat leukaemia

A team of scientists led by Research Associate Professor Motomi Osato and Professor Yoshiaki Ito from the Cancer Science Institute of Singapore (CSI Singapore) at the National University of Singapore (NUS) found that a drug originally designed for killing a limited type of cancer cells with DNA repair defects could potentially be used to treat leukaemia and other cancers. [More]
Endothelial cells can function as cardiac stem cells to produce new heart muscle tissue

Endothelial cells can function as cardiac stem cells to produce new heart muscle tissue

Endothelial cells residing in the coronary arteries can function as cardiac stem cells to produce new heart muscle tissue, Vanderbilt University investigators have discovered. [More]