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Stem cells have the remarkable potential to develop into many different cell types in the body during early life and growth. In addition, in many tissues they serve as a sort of internal repair system, dividing essentially without limit to replenish other cells as long as the person or animal is still alive. When a stem cell divides, each new cell has the potential either to remain a stem cell or become another type of cell with a more specialized function, such as a muscle cell, a red blood cell, or a brain cell.

Stem cells are distinguished from other cell types by two important characteristics. First, they are unspecialized cells capable of renewing themselves through cell division, sometimes after long periods of inactivity. Second, under certain physiologic or experimental conditions, they can be induced to become tissue- or organ-specific cells with special functions. In some organs, such as the gut and bone marrow, stem cells regularly divide to repair and replace worn out or damaged tissues. In other organs, however, such as the pancreas and the heart, stem cells only divide under special conditions.
Bionomics begins BNC210 Phase II clinical trial for treatment of anxiety, depression

Bionomics begins BNC210 Phase II clinical trial for treatment of anxiety, depression

Bionomics Limited, a biopharmaceutical company focused on the discovery and development of innovative therapeutics for the treatment of cancer and diseases of the central nervous system, today announced the initiation of a Phase II clinical study of BNC210, the Company's drug candidate in development for the treatment of anxiety and depression. [More]
Zinc deficiency can activate Hedgehog signaling pathway

Zinc deficiency can activate Hedgehog signaling pathway

Zinc deficiency - long associated with numerous diseases, e.g. autism, lung cancer, prostate cancer, and ovarian cancers - can lead to activation of the Hedgehog signaling pathway, a biomolecular pathway that plays essential roles in developing organisms and in diseases, according to new research at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. [More]
Research: Stem cell injection may soon slow or reverse effects of age-related macular degeneration

Research: Stem cell injection may soon slow or reverse effects of age-related macular degeneration

An injection of stem cells into the eye may soon slow or reverse the effects of early-stage age-related macular degeneration, according to new research from scientists at Cedars-Sinai. Currently, there is no treatment that slows the progression of the disease, which is the leading cause of vision loss in people over 65. [More]
Johns Hopkins researchers create the largest library of brain cells from ALS patients

Johns Hopkins researchers create the largest library of brain cells from ALS patients

Researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine have transformed skin cells from patients with Lou Gehrig’s disease, or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), into brain cells affected by the progressive, fatal disease and deposited those human-made cells into the first public ALS cell library, enabling scientists to better study the disease. [More]
Springer releases new international journal in partnership with Regenerative Engineering Society

Springer releases new international journal in partnership with Regenerative Engineering Society

Springer has launched Regenerative Engineering and Translational Medicine in partnership with the newly formed Regenerative Engineering Society. The new international journal will cover the convergence of multiple fields, including tissue generation, advanced materials science, stem cell research, the physical sciences and developmental biology, and is actively seeking submissions. [More]
New study describes way to regenerate lung tissue after injury

New study describes way to regenerate lung tissue after injury

A new collaborative study describes a way that lung tissue can regenerate after injury. The team found that lung tissue has more dexterity in repairing tissue than once thought. [More]
Fraunhofer researchers develop cell-free substrate made of advanced fibers

Fraunhofer researchers develop cell-free substrate made of advanced fibers

Regenerative medicine uses cells harvested from the patient's own body to heal damaged tissue. Fraunhofer researchers have developed a cell-free substrate containing proteins to which autologous cells bind and grow only after implantation. [More]
Bionomics to present BNC105 trial results of metastatic renal cancer at Asian Oncology Summit

Bionomics to present BNC105 trial results of metastatic renal cancer at Asian Oncology Summit

Bionomics Limited (ASX: BNO, OTCQX: BNOEF) today announced that it will present a poster with new data on the DisrupTOR-1 trial of BNC105 in patients with metastatic renal cancer at the 7th Asian Oncology Summit being held from April 10-12, 2015 in Shanghai, China. [More]
Stem cell disease model reveals how tumor suppressor may drive bone cancer

Stem cell disease model reveals how tumor suppressor may drive bone cancer

Using induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), a team led by Mount Sinai researchers has gained new insight into genetic changes that may turn a well known anti-cancer signaling gene into a driver of risk for bone cancers, where the survival rate has not improved in 40 years despite treatment advances. [More]
Scientists identify chemical compounds that block cancer-causing oncoprotein

Scientists identify chemical compounds that block cancer-causing oncoprotein

A team of scientists at the University of Kansas has pinpointed six chemical compounds that thwart HuR, an "oncoprotein" that binds to RNA and promotes tumor growth. [More]

Frontier Lifeline Hospital gets approval for cardiac stem cell research by the national Apex committee for stem cell research and clinical trial (heart regeneration)

Frontier Lifeline Hospital (FLL) has been already involved in cardiac stem cell therapy post the approval by Clinical Trial registry of India, Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR) in 2010... [More]
Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute sets new national standard for most adult heart transplants

Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute sets new national standard for most adult heart transplants

The Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute completed 120 adult heart transplants and two adult heart-lung transplants in 2014, setting a new national standard for the most adult heart transplants performed in a single year. [More]
Frost & Sullivan forecasts growth of global healthcare market

Frost & Sullivan forecasts growth of global healthcare market

The healthcare industry is entangled in a transitory phase in which therapeutics, devices, products and services are sold into traditional care settings that are unable to keep up with the requirements placed upon it by changing demographics and consumer needs. At the same time, opportunities for new services and care, such as ambulatory, mobile, and home care, lack the appropriate level of maturity to provide robust revenue streams despite having the promise to increase healthcare delivery efficiency and reduce long term costs. [More]
Research finding may lead to new potential therapeutic targets for lung cancer

Research finding may lead to new potential therapeutic targets for lung cancer

Lung cancer is the second most common type of cancer and the number one cause of cancer-related mortality. It is estimated that more than 158,000 people will die from lung cancer in the United States this year. Many scientists believe that targeting a type of cell called a cancer stem cell may be necessary to completely cure lung cancer. [More]
Astellas Pharma, MD Anderson sign option agreement to research and develop new treatment for AML

Astellas Pharma, MD Anderson sign option agreement to research and develop new treatment for AML

Astellas Pharma Inc. and The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center today announced the signing of an option agreement to research and develop a new treatment for patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). [More]
Clinical trial uses personalized cellular therapy to treat GVHD complication of bone marrow transplant

Clinical trial uses personalized cellular therapy to treat GVHD complication of bone marrow transplant

An innovative clinical trial using the science of "personalized" cellular therapy has begun enrolling children and adults suffering from graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD), a life-threatening complication of bone marrow transplantation in which donor immune lymphocytes attack the organs of the bone marrow transplant recipient. [More]
Leukemia drug could prevent and control growth of colorectal tumours

Leukemia drug could prevent and control growth of colorectal tumours

Scientists from Nanyang Technological University (NTU Singapore) and Sweden's Karolinska Institutet, one of Europe's largest and most prestigious medical universities, have discovered that an existing chemotherapy drug used to treat leukaemia could prevent and control the growth of colorectal tumours. [More]
Study: 'Open' stem cell chromosomes hold great promise for treating liver, pancreas diseases

Study: 'Open' stem cell chromosomes hold great promise for treating liver, pancreas diseases

Stem cells hold great promise for treating a number of diseases, in part because they have the unique ability to differentiate, specializing into any one of the hundreds of cell types that comprise the human body. [More]
Researchers pinpoint molecular mechanisms that inhibit Hippo pathway in pediatric bone cancers

Researchers pinpoint molecular mechanisms that inhibit Hippo pathway in pediatric bone cancers

A particular molecular pathway permits stem cells in pediatric bone cancers to grow rapidly and aggressively, according to researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center and its Laura and Isaac Perlmutter Cancer Center. [More]
Scientists isolate energy-burning 'beige' fat from adult humans

Scientists isolate energy-burning 'beige' fat from adult humans

For the first time, a research team, led by a UC San Francisco biologist, has isolated energy-burning "beige" fat from adult humans, which is known to be able to convert unhealthy white fat into healthy brown fat. The scientists also found new genetic markers of this beige fat. [More]
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