Stem Cell News and Research RSS Feed - Stem Cell News and Research

Stem cells have the remarkable potential to develop into many different cell types in the body during early life and growth. In addition, in many tissues they serve as a sort of internal repair system, dividing essentially without limit to replenish other cells as long as the person or animal is still alive. When a stem cell divides, each new cell has the potential either to remain a stem cell or become another type of cell with a more specialized function, such as a muscle cell, a red blood cell, or a brain cell.

Stem cells are distinguished from other cell types by two important characteristics. First, they are unspecialized cells capable of renewing themselves through cell division, sometimes after long periods of inactivity. Second, under certain physiologic or experimental conditions, they can be induced to become tissue- or organ-specific cells with special functions. In some organs, such as the gut and bone marrow, stem cells regularly divide to repair and replace worn out or damaged tissues. In other organs, however, such as the pancreas and the heart, stem cells only divide under special conditions.
Researchers reposition existing prazosin drug to combat glioblastoma

Researchers reposition existing prazosin drug to combat glioblastoma

Treatments available for glioblastoma—malignant brain tumors—have little effect. An international collaboration led by the Laboratoire Neurosciences Paris-Seine tested active ingredients from existing medications and eventually identified one compound of interest, prazosin, on these tumors. Not only did it seem to be effective in this type of cancer, but it also acted on a signaling pathway that is common with other cancers. [More]
Gladstone scientists bioengineer micro-scale heart tissues from stem cells

Gladstone scientists bioengineer micro-scale heart tissues from stem cells

Scientists at the Gladstone Institutes have invented a new way to create three-dimensional human heart tissue from stem cells. The tissue can be used to model disease and test drugs, and it opens the door for a precision medicine approach to treating heart disease. Although there are existing techniques to make three-dimensional tissues from heart cells, the new method dramatically reduces the number of cells needed, making it an easier, cheaper, and more efficient system. [More]
Novel gene therapy can improve symptoms of Bubble Boy disease in young adults

Novel gene therapy can improve symptoms of Bubble Boy disease in young adults

Adolescents and young adults with a severe inherited immunodeficiency disorder improved following treatment with novel gene therapy developed at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital and at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health. The results of this study appear today in the journal Science Translational Medicine. [More]
Study shows beneficial effect of hNSC transplantation for TBI

Study shows beneficial effect of hNSC transplantation for TBI

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of mortality and morbidity, often causing lifelong disability for those who survive. Treatment is limited to supportive care, but stem cell therapy has received recent attention as a way to promote recovery for injuries to the central nervous system (CNS). In this study, researchers transplanted human neural stem cells (hNSCs) into the brains of mice modeled with TBI to investigate whether the hosts' immune systems and the stem cells acting in concert would enhance repair. [More]
Irvine neurobiologists find new way to change damaging course of Huntington disease

Irvine neurobiologists find new way to change damaging course of Huntington disease

A study appearing April 14 in the journal Neuron suggests there may be a new way to change the damaging course of Huntington disease. [More]
Medi-551 antibody treatment decreases number of cancer stem cells by half in multiple myeloma patients

Medi-551 antibody treatment decreases number of cancer stem cells by half in multiple myeloma patients

An experimental antibody treatment decreased by half the number of cancer stem cells that drive the growth of tumors in nearly all patients with multiple myeloma, a cancer of the bone marrow and bone tissue, according to results of a preliminary clinical trial led by Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center scientists. [More]
Inflammation after stroke may help the brain to self-repair

Inflammation after stroke may help the brain to self-repair

After a stroke, there is inflammation in the damaged part of the brain. Until now, the inflammation has been seen as a negative consequence that needs to be abolished as soon as possible. But, as it turns out, there are also some positive sides to the inflammation, and it can actually help the brain to self-repair. [More]
Pluristem granted two key cell therapy patents in Japan

Pluristem granted two key cell therapy patents in Japan

Pluristem Therapeutics Inc. (PSTI), a leading developer of placenta-based cell therapy products, has announced that the Japan Patent Office has granted the Company two key patents addressing... [More]
Autologous haematopoietic stem cell transplantation promise for myasthenia gravis

Autologous haematopoietic stem cell transplantation promise for myasthenia gravis

Study findings in seven patients with severe myasthenia gravis support the use of autologous haematopoietic stem cell transplantation for achieving long-term remission. [More]
New stem cell therapy significantly improves outcomes in patients with severe heart failure

New stem cell therapy significantly improves outcomes in patients with severe heart failure

A new stem cell therapy significantly improved long-term health outcomes in patients with severe and end-stage heart failure in a study presented at the American College of Cardiology's 65th Annual Scientific Session. [More]
Investigational stem cell therapy improves outcomes in patients with severe heart failure

Investigational stem cell therapy improves outcomes in patients with severe heart failure

An investigational stem cell therapy derived from patients' own blood marrow significantly improved outcomes in patients with severe heart failure, according to a study from the Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute. [More]
End-stage heart failure patients treated with cell therapy experience fewer cardiac events

End-stage heart failure patients treated with cell therapy experience fewer cardiac events

End-stage heart failure patients treated with stem cells harvested from their own bone marrow experienced 37 percent fewer cardiac events - including deaths and heart failure hospital admissions - than a placebo-controlled group, according to a new study. [More]
Researchers find pathway to prevent emergence of zoonosis into human population

Researchers find pathway to prevent emergence of zoonosis into human population

The parasite responsible for a form of malaria now spreading from macaques to humans in South Asia could evolve to infect humans more efficiently, a step towards enhanced transmission between humans, according to a new study from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. The researchers say that defining the means by which the Plasmodium knowlesi parasite invades red blood cells could lead to interventions to prevent the emergence of the zoonosis into the human population. [More]
New technologies go far beyond traditional use of contact lenses for vision correction

New technologies go far beyond traditional use of contact lenses for vision correction

Imagine contact lenses that can deliver medicines directly to the eye, slow progression of nearsightedness in children, or monitor glucose levels in patients with diabetes. [More]
FDA approves Defitelio to treat hepatic veno-occlusive disease in adults, children

FDA approves Defitelio to treat hepatic veno-occlusive disease in adults, children

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Defitelio (defibrotide sodium) to treat adults and children who develop hepatic veno-occlusive disease (VOD) with additional kidney or lung abnormalities after they receive a stem cell transplant from blood or bone marrow called hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). [More]
Key opinions leaders to discuss role of cyclophosphamide in the field of HSCT

Key opinions leaders to discuss role of cyclophosphamide in the field of HSCT

Key opinions leaders in the field of haematopoetic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) will address the role of Cyclophosphamide, an anti-cancer chemotherapy drug, during the 42nd Annual Meeting of the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (EBMT) that will welcome more than 4,500 delegates in the host city of Valencia, Spain from the 3rd to the 6th of April 2016. [More]
Researchers to discuss on innovative cellular therapies during EBMT meeting

Researchers to discuss on innovative cellular therapies during EBMT meeting

Cellular Therapy is an emerging medical science that is today facing a unique developmental phase, well documented by the outstanding and growing numbers of clinical trials. [More]
CCCBD offers promising new investigational therapy to treat childhood ALL

CCCBD offers promising new investigational therapy to treat childhood ALL

The Children's Center for Cancer and Blood Diseases at Children's Hospital Los Angeles is one of the first sites in the world to offer a promising new investigational therapy to treat pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). [More]
New stem cell-based therapies for Parkinson's Disease may be on the horizon

New stem cell-based therapies for Parkinson's Disease may be on the horizon

As stem cell-based therapies are moving rapidly towards clinical trials, treatments for Parkinson's Disease (PD), an incurable condition, may be on the horizon. A recent announcement of a Phase I/IIa clinical trial involving transplantation of stem cells into the first human subjects has raised hope among patients and sparked discussions in the research community. [More]
New approach allows noninvasive identification of tumor mutations in lung cancer patients

New approach allows noninvasive identification of tumor mutations in lung cancer patients

Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have devised a way to significantly increase the sensitivity of a technique to identify and sequence DNA from cancer cells circulating in a person's blood. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement