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Stem cells have the remarkable potential to develop into many different cell types in the body during early life and growth. In addition, in many tissues they serve as a sort of internal repair system, dividing essentially without limit to replenish other cells as long as the person or animal is still alive. When a stem cell divides, each new cell has the potential either to remain a stem cell or become another type of cell with a more specialized function, such as a muscle cell, a red blood cell, or a brain cell.
New strategy may bring us one step closer to "fountain of youth”

New strategy may bring us one step closer to "fountain of youth”

It's an exciting time to be an elderly mouse. Researchers believe that by removing senescent cells (cells with a persistent damage response), which naturally accumulate with age, senior rodents can regrow hair, run faster, and improve organ function. [More]
Fred Hutch’s new Evergreen Fund to promote commercialization of research into lifesaving therapies

Fred Hutch’s new Evergreen Fund to promote commercialization of research into lifesaving therapies

Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center announced its first-ever grants from its newly established Evergreen Fund to spur researchers' efforts to advance bold ideas toward creating or partnering with a commercial entity. [More]
Myc genes play key role in self-renewal of spermatogonial stem cells

Myc genes play key role in self-renewal of spermatogonial stem cells

Sperm are constantly replenished in the adult male body. Understanding the workings of stem cells responsible for this replenishment is expected to shed light on why male fertility diminishes with age, and possibly lead to new treatments for infertility. [More]
Whitehead Institute researchers identify mechanism underlying cancer drug-resistance

Whitehead Institute researchers identify mechanism underlying cancer drug-resistance

The use of proteasome inhibitors to treat cancer has been greatly limited by the ability of cancer cells to develop resistance to these drugs. [More]
Researchers develop synthetic cardiac stem cells that offer therapeutic benefits

Researchers develop synthetic cardiac stem cells that offer therapeutic benefits

Researchers from North Carolina State University, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University have developed a synthetic version of a cardiac stem cell. [More]
UC researchers uncover obesity-related protein's role in leukemia development

UC researchers uncover obesity-related protein's role in leukemia development

Cancer researchers at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine have found an obesity-associated protein's role in leukemia development and drug response which could lead to more effective therapies for the illness. [More]
AXT makes magnetic particle imaging technology available to researchers in Australia

AXT makes magnetic particle imaging technology available to researchers in Australia

AXT is proud to be able to bring another cutting-edge technology to Australia that will help our medical researchers accelerate the rate at which they bring new cures, remedies and therapies to clinical realities. [More]
Clinical study tests adult stem cell therapy for infants with congenital HLHS

Clinical study tests adult stem cell therapy for infants with congenital HLHS

In a first-in-children randomized clinical study, medical researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and the Interdisciplinary Stem Cell Institute at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine have begun testing to see whether adult stem cells derived from bone marrow benefit children with the congenital heart defect hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS). [More]
Replacing missing gut bacteria could help treat children with rare autoimmune disease

Replacing missing gut bacteria could help treat children with rare autoimmune disease

Defects in the body's regulatory T cells (T reg cells) cause inflammation and autoimmune disease by altering the type of bacteria living in the gut, researchers from The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston have discovered. [More]
First-in-human study of cell bandage for common sporting knee injury shows promising results

First-in-human study of cell bandage for common sporting knee injury shows promising results

A 'living bandage' made from stem cells, which could revolutionise the treatment and prognosis of a common sporting knee injury, has been trialled in humans for the first time by scientists at the Universities of Liverpool and Bristol. [More]
Researchers find new insights into silencing of X-chromosomes in human embryos

Researchers find new insights into silencing of X-chromosomes in human embryos

Researchers have discovered new insights into how one of the two X-chromosomes is silenced during the development of female human embryos and also in lab-grown stem cells. [More]
Researchers identify attractive drug candidate to target glioma tumors

Researchers identify attractive drug candidate to target glioma tumors

In a paper published today in Cancer Research, researchers: 1) identify a biomarker enzyme associated with aggressive glioma brain tumors, 2) reveal the regulatory mechanism for that enzyme, and 3) demonstrate potent efficacy, using a mouse model of glioma, for a small molecule inhibitor they have developed. [More]
URMC researchers identify potential new means of treating severe genetic diseases in children

URMC researchers identify potential new means of treating severe genetic diseases in children

University of Rochester Medical Center researchers believe they have identified a potential new means of treating some of the most severe genetic diseases of childhood, according to a study in PLOS Biology. [More]
Multifunctional RNA nanoparticles could overcome treatment resistance in breast cancer, study shows

Multifunctional RNA nanoparticles could overcome treatment resistance in breast cancer, study shows

Researchers at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine have been able to generate multifunctional RNA nanoparticles that could overcome treatment resistance in breast cancer, potentially making existing treatments more effective in these patients. [More]
New stem cell research project to replicate brain's neural networks using 3D nanoprinting

New stem cell research project to replicate brain's neural networks using 3D nanoprinting

Aston University has launched MESO-BRAIN, a major stem cell research project which it hopes will develop three-dimensional (3D) nanoprinting techniques that can be used to replicate the brain's neural networks.​ [More]
Stem cell-based risk scoring tool could predict AML patient’s response to standard treatment

Stem cell-based risk scoring tool could predict AML patient’s response to standard treatment

Leukemia researchers at Princess Margaret Cancer Centre have developed a 17-gene signature derived from leukemia stem cells that can predict at diagnosis if patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) will respond to standard treatment. [More]
Study shows involvement of lipid metabolism in tumour metastasis

Study shows involvement of lipid metabolism in tumour metastasis

A study headed by Salvador Aznar Benitah, ICREA researcher at the Institute for Research in Biomedicine, and published today in Nature identifies metastasis-initiating cells through a specific marker, namely the protein CD36. [More]
TSRI scientists reveal how vision-loss treatment may leave the eyes, kidneys vulnerable to cellular damage

TSRI scientists reveal how vision-loss treatment may leave the eyes, kidneys vulnerable to cellular damage

A common class of drugs for vision loss may actually add to the problem in some patients, according to new research co-led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI). [More]
Study examines link between employment status and nonmedical use of prescription opioids

Study examines link between employment status and nonmedical use of prescription opioids

Researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health found that employment status is a factor in nonmedical use of prescription opioids and prescription stimulants. [More]
UCLA researchers discover how chronic inflammation increases prostate cancer risk

UCLA researchers discover how chronic inflammation increases prostate cancer risk

UCLA researchers have discovered a previously unrecognized type of progenitor cell that, though rare in most regions of the human prostate, is found in uncommonly high numbers in inflamed areas of the gland. [More]
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