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A stenosis is an abnormal narrowing in a blood vessel or other tubular organ or structure.
Non-invasive FFRCT test can reduce need for invasive tests in patients having chest pain

Non-invasive FFRCT test can reduce need for invasive tests in patients having chest pain

According to results of the PLATFORM (Prospective LongitudinAl Trial of FFRCT: Outcome and Resource Impacts) trial, a test known as FFRCT can obviate the need for invasive tests in up to 61% of patients who have chest pain and suspected coronary artery disease. [More]
Training session can improve cardiologists’ ability to detect basic and advanced murmurs

Training session can improve cardiologists’ ability to detect basic and advanced murmurs

Cardiologists failed to identify more than half of basic and about 35 percent of advanced pre-recorded murmurs, but skills improved after a 90 minute training session, according to research presented today at the European Society of Cardiology Congress 2015. [More]
Pie Medical Imaging receives 2015 European Frost & Sullivan Award for Technology Leadership

Pie Medical Imaging receives 2015 European Frost & Sullivan Award for Technology Leadership

Based on its recent analysis of the cardiovascular image management market, Frost & Sullivan recognizes Pie Medical Imaging (PMI) with the 2015 European Frost & Sullivan Award for Technology Leadership. [More]
Elderly patients can benefit from new, minimally invasive surgery for aortic valve replacement

Elderly patients can benefit from new, minimally invasive surgery for aortic valve replacement

Select patients age 90 years and older with aortic stenosis (AS) can benefit from a relatively new, minimally invasive surgery for aortic valve replacement, according to an article in the September 2015 issue of The Annals of Thoracic Surgery. [More]
PCR London Valves 2015 to focus on innovative transcatheter therapies for valvular heart disease

PCR London Valves 2015 to focus on innovative transcatheter therapies for valvular heart disease

For the first time in its 6-year history, PCR London Valves, the world's largest Course solely devoted to addressing the rapidly expanding and innovative field of transcatheter therapies for valvular heart disease, will be taking place in Berlin, Germany, from the 20 to 22 of September 2015. [More]
Children's Hospital Los Angeles successfully implants Melody Transcatheter Pulmonary Valve in child actor

Children's Hospital Los Angeles successfully implants Melody Transcatheter Pulmonary Valve in child actor

Cardiologists from Children's Hospital Los Angeles successfully implanted a Melody Transcatheter Pulmonary Valve in child actor Max Page, the boy who made headlines playing mini Darth Vader in a 2011 Super Bowl ad for Volkswagen. [More]
Symic receives $1.5M NIH Phase II SBIR grant to develop AVF therapeutic candidate

Symic receives $1.5M NIH Phase II SBIR grant to develop AVF therapeutic candidate

Platform therapeutic company Symic Biomedical, Inc. announced today that it has received a $1.5M Phase II SBIR grant from the National Institutes of Health to further develop its therapeutic agent to reduce arteriovenous fistula (AVF) failures, a significant unmet clinical need in end stage renal disease (ESRD) patients undergoing hemodialysis. [More]
Loyola implants new percutaneous aortic heart valve that does not require open surgery

Loyola implants new percutaneous aortic heart valve that does not require open surgery

Loyola University Medical Center is the first center in Illinois to implant a new percutaneous aortic heart valve that does not require open heart surgery. [More]
Arterial shunt in hybrid palliation better for hypoplastic left heart syndrome treatment

Arterial shunt in hybrid palliation better for hypoplastic left heart syndrome treatment

Children born with the major congenital heart defect hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) often must undergo a series of corrective surgeries beginning at birth. While most have the standard three-stage Norwood procedure, a hybrid strategy has been introduced to offset some disadvantages associated with the Norwood surgeries. In a report in The Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, investigators compare whether outcomes can be improved if an arterial shunt is used as a source of pulmonary blood flow rather than the more conventional venous shunt as part of the hybrid strategy of HLHS surgical reconstruction. [More]
Orlando Health Heart Institute first in Central Florida to use CoreValve Evolut R System to replace heart valves

Orlando Health Heart Institute first in Central Florida to use CoreValve Evolut R System to replace heart valves

Leading edge heart valve technology is helping improve patient outcomes and giving doctors greater accuracy when implanting replacement valves. Interventional cardiologists and cardiovascular surgeons at the Orlando Health Heart Institute are the first in Central Florida to use the newly approved recapturable, self-expanding CoreValve Evolut R System. [More]
Stopping cocaine use may lower levels of ET-1 protein that plays key role in coronary artery disease

Stopping cocaine use may lower levels of ET-1 protein that plays key role in coronary artery disease

For people who use cocaine, stopping or reducing cocaine use is associated with decreased levels of endothelin-1 (ET-1)--a protein that plays a key role in the development of coronary artery disease, reports a study in the Journal of Addiction Medicine, the official journal of the American Society of Addiction Medicine. [More]
Patients who receive intracranial stents at increased risk of experiencing another stroke

Patients who receive intracranial stents at increased risk of experiencing another stroke

The risk of experiencing another stroke is higher if patients, after dilation of their blood vessels in the brain, receive not only clot-inhibiting drugs, but also have stents inserted. The recently published results of the VISSIT study confirm this conclusion of a rapid report by the German Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG) of October 2014. [More]

Edwards Lifesciences announces FDA approval of SAPIEN 3 transcatheter aortic heart valve

Edwards Lifesciences Corporation, the global leader in the science of heart valves and hemodynamic monitoring, today announced U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval of its most advanced transcatheter aortic heart valve – the Edwards SAPIEN 3 valve with the Commander Delivery System – for the treatment of high-risk patients suffering from severe, symptomatic aortic stenosis. [More]
Re-Inflating balloon after carotid stenting appears to double risk of stroke and death

Re-Inflating balloon after carotid stenting appears to double risk of stroke and death

Patients with severe blockages typically undergo surgery to scrape off the fatty deposits from the walls of the vessel, the preferred approach that carries notably lower stroke risk but is not recommended for people too sick to withstand traditional surgery... [More]
New Johns Hopkins study shows re-inflating balloon after carotid stenting fuels stroke risk

New Johns Hopkins study shows re-inflating balloon after carotid stenting fuels stroke risk

After reviewing outcomes from thousands of cases, researchers at Johns Hopkins report that patients with blocked neck arteries who undergo carotid stenting to prop open the narrowed blood vessels fare decidedly worse if their surgeons re-inflate a tiny balloon in the vessel after the mesh stent is in place. [More]
Use of balloon-expandable stent compared with medical therapy increases stroke risk

Use of balloon-expandable stent compared with medical therapy increases stroke risk

Among patients with symptomatic intracranial arterial stenosis (narrowing of an artery inside the brain), the use of a balloon-expandable stent compared with medical therapy (clopidogrel and aspirin) resulted in an increased of stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA), according to a study in the March 24/31 issue of JAMA. [More]
New research shows spinal surgery improves sexual function, reduces low back pain

New research shows spinal surgery improves sexual function, reduces low back pain

Chronic low back pain can limit everyday activities, including sex. New research presented today at the 2015 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS), found that 70 percent of patients consider sexual activity "relevant" to their life quality, and patients who receive surgical treatment for spinal spondylolisthesis (DS) and spinal stenosis (SS)--common degenerative conditions most often occurring in older adults--were twice as likely to report no pain during sex. [More]
Two-year data show continued survival advantage for self-expanding TAVR

Two-year data show continued survival advantage for self-expanding TAVR

Two-year data show a continued survival advantage for self-expanding transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) over standard surgery in high-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 64th Annual Scientific Session. [More]
MIS TLIF surgery results in less pain, shorter hospital stay and faster recovery

MIS TLIF surgery results in less pain, shorter hospital stay and faster recovery

A minimally invasive spinal fusion back surgery results in less blood loss, less postoperative pain, smaller incisions, a shorter hospital stay and faster recovery and return to work. [More]
NYU Langone Medical Center researchers find that air pollution may pose significant stroke risk

NYU Langone Medical Center researchers find that air pollution may pose significant stroke risk

Air pollution has been linked to a dangerous narrowing of neck arteries that occurs prior to strokes, according to researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center. [More]
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