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Viewpoints: Ezekiel Emanuel's choice of an age to die; new enrollment numbers still confusing

Viewpoints: Ezekiel Emanuel's choice of an age to die; new enrollment numbers still confusing

Seventy-five. That's how long I want to live: 75 years. This preference drives my daughters crazy. It drives my brothers crazy. My loving friends think I am crazy. They think that I can't mean what I say; that I haven't thought clearly about this, because there is so much in the world to see and do. To convince me of my errors, they enumerate the myriad people I know who are over 75 and doing quite well. They are certain that as I get closer to 75, I will push the desired age back to 80, then 85, maybe even 90. I am sure of my position. [More]
Viewpoints: Robin Williams' 'wakeup call'; surprise in Medicaid growth; tools to stop Ebola in U.S.

Viewpoints: Robin Williams' 'wakeup call'; surprise in Medicaid growth; tools to stop Ebola in U.S.

Earlier this year, [Robin] Williams checked himself into a rehabilitation facility. And whether he needed help with addiction or mental illness-;or, as is so often the case, with both-;it's safe to assume he got it. He had the money to afford the best and the sad truth is that, in some cases, even the best isn't enough to save people. [More]
New disposable device may help doctors to monitor post-operative ileus

New disposable device may help doctors to monitor post-operative ileus

A disposal, plastic listening device that attaches to the abdomen may help doctors definitively determine which post-operative patients should be fed and which should not, an invention that may improve outcomes, decrease healthcare costs and shorten hospital stays, according to a UCLA study. [More]

Manchester mentoring scheme helps student become doctor

A trip to The University of Manchester at age 15 has led to a career in medicine for Salford school boy Emmanuel Oladipo who graduates today (8 July). [More]
Research explores the effects of food marketing and its impact on consumers

Research explores the effects of food marketing and its impact on consumers

Health-related buzzwords, such as "antioxidant," "gluten-free" and "whole grain," lull consumers into thinking packaged food products labeled with those words are healthier than they actually are, according to a new research study conducted by scholars at the University of Houston (UH). [More]
Longer looks: Tech-savvy health care ads; being cautious of bad hospital data

Longer looks: Tech-savvy health care ads; being cautious of bad hospital data

"Mom, Dad, what's wrong with me?" Michael Moscariello was a smart, thoughtful 10-year-old when that question burst out one evening before dinner. ... May Moscariello, Michael's mom, had taken him to Franciscan Hospital for Children in Boston three years earlier, in 1988. [More]

New pro-health law bumper stickers take aim at tea party

Also, Americans For Prosperity is airing new anti-Obamacare ads. As the political back-and-forth action continues, The Washington Post checks some of the facts. [More]
First Edition: March 25, 2014

First Edition: March 25, 2014

Today's early morning highlights from the major news organizations, including stories previewing today's Supreme Court action regarding the health law's contraception coverage mandate. [More]

Study: Girls who play with Barbie dolls see fewer career options than boys

In one of the first experiments to explore the influence of fashion dolls, an Oregon State University researcher has found that girls who play with Barbie dolls see fewer career options for themselves than for boys. [More]

HD Medical to showcase groundbreaking visual stethoscope at Arab Health exposition

At the upcoming Arab Health exposition in the Australian Pavilion Stand 2H13, HD Medical, Inc. will demonstrate its groundbreaking visual stethoscope ViScope MD featuring the world's first murmur detection capability. This revolutionary stethoscope offers a unique integrated visual display that lets medical professionals perform dynamic auscultation and "see" the heart sounds they hear in real-time visual waveforms. The ViScope MD visual display is complemented by superior high fidelity sound quality for unmatched clarity. HD Medical has invested over a decade refining its proprietary noise reduction technology. [More]

2014's health law tactics: Republican midterm hopes, Democrats re-selling law

The health law will be a major factor in 2014's midterm elections, with Republicans -- some candidates even doctors -- hoping to use its rocky rollout to their advantage in holding the House and re-taking the Senate. In the meantime, the White House and President Barack Obama look to use feel-good health care stories, celebrities and even moms to sell the overhaul. [More]
Viewpoints: Gov. Jindal skeptical of navigators program; scare tactics against Obamacare growing

Viewpoints: Gov. Jindal skeptical of navigators program; scare tactics against Obamacare growing

By August 15, the Obama administration is expected to spend $54 million of our tax dollars to hire community organizers to push this law on the American people. ... [More]
State highlights: Ore. nonprofit hospitals see increased revenue, but lower charity care; Calif. shift means lost autism treatment

State highlights: Ore. nonprofit hospitals see increased revenue, but lower charity care; Calif. shift means lost autism treatment

A new state report shows the average Oregon hospital more than doubled its margin, or profit, between 2009 and 2011, even as its provision of charity care went down. The findings trace the hospital sector rebound from recessionary lows in 2008, and how expanded Medicaid enrollment in Oregon has helped boost hospitals' bottom line even as many continue to expand to some assessors' dismay (Budnick, 7/5). [More]
First Edition: July 8, 2013

First Edition: July 8, 2013

Today's early morning highlights from the major news organizations, including news about a new ad campaign against the health law, more reaction to the administration's delay of the employer mandate provision and states efforts to restrict abortions. [More]
In rural Alaska, new rules reshape care often hampered by isolation

In rural Alaska, new rules reshape care often hampered by isolation

Two news outlets examine some of the difficulties in providing care in Alaska. [More]
First Edition: May 29, 2013

First Edition: May 29, 2013

Today's early morning highlights from the major news organizations include a look at California's effort to expand health care and reports on the Supreme Court's announcement that stops Indiana from barring Planned Parenthood from Medicaid funding. [More]
Handheld ultrasound devices: an interview with Warren Ortmann, Signostics

Handheld ultrasound devices: an interview with Warren Ortmann, Signostics

Ultrasound devices use sound waves to image the organs of the body safely, without the use of radiation. The sound waves are produced by applying a current to a piezoelectric crystal housed in a transducer. The crystal alters shape and creates a sound wave. [More]
Weekend reading: What your doctor should tell you, new stages of grief

Weekend reading: What your doctor should tell you, new stages of grief

Dr. Jim Dougher climbs into his white SUV, plugs the address of his next patient into the GPS, and he's off. The SUV is well stocked: He has a large Tupperware bin in the back full of bandages and wound cleaning supplies; he has a variation on the old-time doctor's bag with a stethoscope and blood-pressure cuff; and he has a dedicated cellular wifi hotspot and a laptop that can communicate with HealthCare Partner's electronic medical record. [More]
AHA/ASA identify top cardiovascular and stroke research advances for 2012

AHA/ASA identify top cardiovascular and stroke research advances for 2012

Resuscitation, cell regeneration, a new high blood pressure treatment and developments in devices for treating stroke are among the key scientific findings that make up this year's top cardiovascular and stroke research identified by the American Heart Association and American Stroke Association. [More]

New listening device monitors effectiveness of kidney stone treatment

A new listening device, developed by scientists from the University of Southampton, is being used to monitor the effectiveness of the treatment of kidney stones - saving patients unnecessary repeat therapy and x-ray monitoring. [More]