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Evena Medical introduces advanced wearable ultrasound for real-time bedside imaging at MEDICA 2016

Evena Medical introduces advanced wearable ultrasound for real-time bedside imaging at MEDICA 2016

Evena Medical, a leader in the development of high-quality, high-definition imaging for fast, accurate and precise bedside visualization, is introducing its enhanced DeepVu Ultrasound 4.0, offering clinicians the most advanced handheld ultrasound for use by clinicians of all skill levels. [More]
Experts to discuss use of holograms and 3D printing at EuroEcho-Imaging 2016

Experts to discuss use of holograms and 3D printing at EuroEcho-Imaging 2016

EuroEcho-Imaging 2016 brings advanced techniques to the bedside with international experts set to discuss the use of holograms and 3D printing to guide interventions. [More]
Heart Valve Voice report sets out recommendations to prioritise development of NICE heart valve disease guidelines

Heart Valve Voice report sets out recommendations to prioritise development of NICE heart valve disease guidelines

UK charity Heart Valve Voice today launches its report, ‘Towards a Heart Healthy Future: a 2020 Vision for Heart Valve Disease’ at a parliamentary event attended by MPs across the country. [More]
Telemedicine can be effective in treating kids with asthma who live long distances from hospital

Telemedicine can be effective in treating kids with asthma who live long distances from hospital

Allergists are the best-trained medical specialists to treat asthma, but not everyone lives close to an allergist. Children who live hundreds of miles from the nearest allergist may not be receiving the best and most cost-effective care. [More]
Economic crisis linked to cancer mortality increase? An interview with Dr Mahiben Maruthappu

Economic crisis linked to cancer mortality increase? An interview with Dr Mahiben Maruthappu

We found that the recent global economic crisis may have been associated with 260,000 additional cancer deaths in the OECD, between 2008 and 2010 alone. [More]
Oxford researchers developing new automated system for easier, cheaper diagnosis of pneumonia

Oxford researchers developing new automated system for easier, cheaper diagnosis of pneumonia

Oxford researchers are developing a tool to make it much easier and cheaper to diagnose pneumonia -- the number one killer of children under 5. Their latest research is published in Journal of the Royal Society Interface. [More]
Bringing healthcare home: an interview with Dr Andrew Lin

Bringing healthcare home: an interview with Dr Andrew Lin

The goal of CliniCloud is to bring healthcare home. For us, what that means is a patient-centered and patient-modeled healthcare system, where we focus on the fact that consumers want access to healthcare and to a doctor. We're building an ecosystem around the tools and the software to really enable that to happen as conveniently and as affordably as possible. [More]
Health of 1 million over 65s at risk from low awareness of heart valve disease

Health of 1 million over 65s at risk from low awareness of heart valve disease

New research has revealed that the UK’s over 60s could seriously be jeopardising their health due to a lack of awareness of heart valve disease. [More]
New smart phone app connects patient and doctor via Facebook

New smart phone app connects patient and doctor via Facebook

Telemedicine, which allows doctors to communicate, diagnose and even treat their patients remotely is on the rise thanks to advances in information technology. It allows healthcare workers to securely monitor patients in inaccessible parts of the world as well as providing more timely responses for patients in many situations. [More]
Novel iPad simulation app can instruct future nurses in monitoring babies and mothers during labor

Novel iPad simulation app can instruct future nurses in monitoring babies and mothers during labor

Sheila Taylor leaned in to see the baby's heartbeat rhythm. She watched as the baby's heartbeat line fell without a corresponding spike showing the mother's uterus contracting down on it. [More]
New computer program and electronic stethoscope developed to diagnose lung problems

New computer program and electronic stethoscope developed to diagnose lung problems

The classic stethoscope has entered the digital age. Medical researchers have created a computer program that connects to an electronic stethoscope to classify lung sounds into five common diagnostic categories. [More]
Ultrasound becoming the most widely used imaging tool in medicine today

Ultrasound becoming the most widely used imaging tool in medicine today

Mention "ultrasound" and most people likely will think of an image of a fetus in a mother's womb. But while providing peeks at the not-yet-born is one of ultrasound's most common applications, that's only a small part of the picture. [More]
Elegant Medical to receive patent for groundbreaking Stethos electronic stethoscope

Elegant Medical to receive patent for groundbreaking Stethos electronic stethoscope

Elegant Medical LLC today announced it will receive an issued patent from the US Patent and Trademark Office for its groundbreaking Stethos electronic stethoscope, the most significant advancement to the stethoscope in half a century. [More]
Training medical students on handheld ultrasound device can enhance their physical diagnosis

Training medical students on handheld ultrasound device can enhance their physical diagnosis

A new study by researchers from Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai found that training medical students to use a handheld ultrasound device can enhance the accuracy of their physical diagnosis. [More]
New screening tools detect heart and lung disease

New screening tools detect heart and lung disease

Two Michigan high school students, sisters Ilina and Medha Krishen, have developed screening tools using electronic stethoscopes to detect lung and heart disease. [More]
Viewpoints: Ezekiel Emanuel's choice of an age to die; new enrollment numbers still confusing

Viewpoints: Ezekiel Emanuel's choice of an age to die; new enrollment numbers still confusing

Seventy-five. That's how long I want to live: 75 years. This preference drives my daughters crazy. It drives my brothers crazy. My loving friends think I am crazy. They think that I can't mean what I say; that I haven't thought clearly about this, because there is so much in the world to see and do. To convince me of my errors, they enumerate the myriad people I know who are over 75 and doing quite well. They are certain that as I get closer to 75, I will push the desired age back to 80, then 85, maybe even 90. I am sure of my position. [More]
Viewpoints: Robin Williams' 'wakeup call'; surprise in Medicaid growth; tools to stop Ebola in U.S.

Viewpoints: Robin Williams' 'wakeup call'; surprise in Medicaid growth; tools to stop Ebola in U.S.

Earlier this year, [Robin] Williams checked himself into a rehabilitation facility. And whether he needed help with addiction or mental illness-;or, as is so often the case, with both-;it's safe to assume he got it. He had the money to afford the best and the sad truth is that, in some cases, even the best isn't enough to save people. [More]
New disposable device may help doctors to monitor post-operative ileus

New disposable device may help doctors to monitor post-operative ileus

A disposal, plastic listening device that attaches to the abdomen may help doctors definitively determine which post-operative patients should be fed and which should not, an invention that may improve outcomes, decrease healthcare costs and shorten hospital stays, according to a UCLA study. [More]
Manchester mentoring scheme helps student become doctor

Manchester mentoring scheme helps student become doctor

A trip to The University of Manchester at age 15 has led to a career in medicine for Salford school boy Emmanuel Oladipo who graduates today (8 July). [More]
Research explores the effects of food marketing and its impact on consumers

Research explores the effects of food marketing and its impact on consumers

Health-related buzzwords, such as "antioxidant," "gluten-free" and "whole grain," lull consumers into thinking packaged food products labeled with those words are healthier than they actually are, according to a new research study conducted by scholars at the University of Houston (UH). [More]
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