Stomach Cancer News and Research RSS Feed - Stomach Cancer News and Research

Stomach cancer or gastric cancer affects around 7,000 people each year in the UK. Stomach cancer is difficult to detect in the early stages because the initial symptoms are also seen in less serious conditions such as persistent indigestion, heart burn, trapped wind, burping and stomach ache.
Overall EU cancer, leukaemia mortality rates to fall in 2016

Overall EU cancer, leukaemia mortality rates to fall in 2016

Total cancer-related mortality rates for men and women in the European Union will decline in 2016, say researchers who predict falls in death rates from most neoplasms, including leukaemia. [More]
New study finds familial risk and heritability of cancer among twins

New study finds familial risk and heritability of cancer among twins

A large new study of twins has found that having a twin sibling diagnosed with cancer poses an excess risk for the other twin to develop any form of cancer. Among the 23 different types of cancer studied, an excess familial risk was seen for almost all of the cancers, including common cancers such as breast and prostate cancer, but also more rare cancers such as testicular cancer, head and neck cancer, melanoma, ovarian and stomach cancer. [More]
Researchers reveal inherited genetic errors across 12 cancer types

Researchers reveal inherited genetic errors across 12 cancer types

Researchers long have known that some portion of the risk of developing cancer is hereditary and that inherited genetic errors are very important in some tumors but much less so in others. [More]
Seaweed extract shows promise in treating H. pylori-related diseases, gastric cancer

Seaweed extract shows promise in treating H. pylori-related diseases, gastric cancer

A unique seaweed extract shows promise for the treatment of Helicobacter pylori-related diseases and gastric cancer, according to new research undertaken at the University of Western Australia. [More]
Certain drugs could be used to treat gastric cancers with particular pattern of mutations

Certain drugs could be used to treat gastric cancers with particular pattern of mutations

Gastric cancer, otherwise known as stomach cancer, does not respond well to existing treatments and it is currently the third leading cause of cancer death in the world (after lung and liver cancer). Researchers have discovered that certain drugs, currently used to treat breast, ovarian and pancreatic cancers, could also be used to treat certain gastric cancers with a particular pattern of mutations (genomic molecular fingerprint). [More]
Experts call for better risk profiling for GI cancers

Experts call for better risk profiling for GI cancers

Cancers of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract continue to exert their toll across Europe, with many diagnosed too late for effective treatment. Bowel cancer screening programmes are now underway in most European countries, but screening for other GI cancers is patchy and not necessarily well-targeted. [More]
New drug delivery method could be used to target cancer, tuberculosis

New drug delivery method could be used to target cancer, tuberculosis

Scientists have designed a novel method for improving the delivery of therapeutic molecules into diseased cells such as those found in cancer and tuberculosis. [More]
Major UK trial to examine role of aspirin in cancer recurrence

Major UK trial to examine role of aspirin in cancer recurrence

The world's largest ever clinical trial looking at whether taking aspirin every day stops some of the most common cancers coming back, launches across the UK today (Thursday). [More]
Poorly-designed animal study threatens validity of preclinical research

Poorly-designed animal study threatens validity of preclinical research

Badly designed studies may lead to the efficacy of drugs being overestimated and money being wasted on trials that prove fruitless, according to new a study from McGill University in Canada. [More]
New online Smart Map shows progress in UK lung cancer care

New online Smart Map shows progress in UK lung cancer care

Roy Castle Lung Cancer Foundation (RCLCF) today launches a new online Smart Map that shows how standards of lung cancer care vary throughout the UK.(1) The resource, available at http://www.roycastle.org/how-we-help/our-campaigns/improving-treatment-and-care/interactive-map, is based on the latest research by the National Lung Cancer Audit (NLCA), published in December 2014.2 This shows encouraging improvements have been made in standards of lung cancer care across multiple UK regions. [More]
EUROCARE 5 study shows large variations in blood cancer patients' survival in Europe

EUROCARE 5 study shows large variations in blood cancer patients' survival in Europe

Comparisons of cancer patients' survival and care in Europe up to 2007 show that although more patients are surviving for at least five years after diagnosis, there are large variations between countries, which are particularly significant in cancers of the blood. [More]
Tadpole Endoscope improves diagnostic procedures for various cancers

Tadpole Endoscope improves diagnostic procedures for various cancers

Engineers have developed a new medical device aimed at improving diagnostic procedures for various cancers: the Tadpole Endoscope (TE). [More]
MACC1 gene can help predict better treatment options for patients with Klatskin carcinoma

MACC1 gene can help predict better treatment options for patients with Klatskin carcinoma

Bile duct cancer is rare and is usually detected too late. Often only extensive liver surgery can help or, in rare cases, liver transplantation. But which patients will benefit from surgery and which will not, because their risk of cancer recurrence is too high? With the oncogene MACC1 as a biomarker, physicians for the first time have a tool to decide which treatment option is best for patients with Klatskin carcinoma, one type of bile duct cancer. [More]
Study reveals that miR-7 suppresses gastric cancer by inhibiting key signaling pathway

Study reveals that miR-7 suppresses gastric cancer by inhibiting key signaling pathway

A study in The Journal of Cell Biology reveals that the microRNA miR-7 suppresses gastric (stomach) cancer by inhibiting a key signaling pathway, and that this protective mechanism is compromised by the cancer-causing bacterium H. pylori. Finding drugs capable of inducing miR-7 could therefore prove to be an effective treatment against the progression of gastric cancer. [More]
Eradicating H. pylori bacterium with short course of therapy may help prevent gastric cancer

Eradicating H. pylori bacterium with short course of therapy may help prevent gastric cancer

A new review published in the Cochrane Library, indicates that eradicating Helicobacter pylori bacterium-- the main cause of stomach ulcers - with a short course of therapy comprising two commonly used medicines may help to reduce the risk of gastric cancer. Stomach, or gastric, cancer is the third most common cause of death from cancer worldwide, and people who are infected with the Helicobacter pylori bacterium are more likely to develop the disease. [More]
Larrea Biosciences merged into Gordian Holdings

Larrea Biosciences merged into Gordian Holdings

Larrea Biosciences has been merged into Gordian Holdings, Inc. "Marshalling the Body's best Offense and Defense against Disease, Its own Immune System, through Immunotherapy." Gordian Holdings obtained the rights from OnkologixRx, Inc., for the Markets in China and North America. [More]

New breath test could help diagnose oesophageal and gastric cancer in minutes

Researchers have devised a breath test that can help doctors diagnose the early signs of oesophageal and gastric cancer in minutes. [More]
Researchers reveal that Helicobacter pylori infection can lead to gastric cancer

Researchers reveal that Helicobacter pylori infection can lead to gastric cancer

Around half of the global population is chronically infected with the stomach bacterium Helicobacter pylori, almost 1 percent of whom go on to develop gastric adenocarcinoma, one of the deadliest forms of cancer. Usually it takes many decades for the cancer to develop, making it difficult to pinpoint exactly how it is linked to an infection. [More]
Game changing, breakthrough early cancer detection technology presented at ASCO 2015

Game changing, breakthrough early cancer detection technology presented at ASCO 2015

Anpac Bio-Medical Science Co., Ltd., Chief Executive Officer and Scientist Dr. Chris Yu and the Anpac research team are introducing what the 2015 Nobel Prize Laureate Summit on Biomedical Science (NPLS) organizers published as, "game changing" and "breakthrough" early cancer detection technology research results at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting in Chicago, Illinois, May 29 – June 2, 2015. [More]
Mistakes in mismatch repair genes may accurately predict response to certain immunotherapy drugs

Mistakes in mismatch repair genes may accurately predict response to certain immunotherapy drugs

In a report of a proof-of-principle study of patients with colon and other cancers for whom standard therapies failed, researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center say that mistakes in so-called mismatch repair genes, first identified by Johns Hopkins and other scientists two decades ago, may accurately predict who will respond to certain immunotherapy drugs known as PD-1 inhibitors. Such drugs aim to disarm systems developed by cancer cells to evade detection and destruction by immune system cells. [More]
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