Stomach Cancer News and Research RSS Feed - Stomach Cancer News and Research

Stomach cancer or gastric cancer affects around 7,000 people each year in the UK. Stomach cancer is difficult to detect in the early stages because the initial symptoms are also seen in less serious conditions such as persistent indigestion, heart burn, trapped wind, burping and stomach ache.
ImmunoGen reports net loss of $21.9 million in Q4 2013

ImmunoGen reports net loss of $21.9 million in Q4 2013

ImmunoGen, Inc., a biotechnology company that develops anticancer therapeutics using its Targeted Antibody Payload antibody-drug conjugate technology, today reported financial results for the three-month period and fiscal year ended June 30, 2013. ImmunoGen also provided guidance for its 2014 fiscal year and an update on the Company. [More]
White blood cells and the spread of cancer: an interview with Drs. Lorenzo Ferri and Jonathan Cools-Lartigue, McGill University

White blood cells and the spread of cancer: an interview with Drs. Lorenzo Ferri and Jonathan Cools-Lartigue, McGill University

As surgeons who take care of cancer patients, we have observed a troubling association between patients who suffer from infections after surgery and the rapid spread of their cancer. We have reported this in lung cancer patients, and others have made these observations in a variety of different cancers. However, the mechanisms responsible for this association are still poorly understood. [More]

Exalenz Bioscience launches BreathID Hp to test and treat H. pylori

Exalenz Bioscience, developer of advanced diagnostic systems that use a patient's breath to detect and help manage gastrointestinal and liver conditions, announced today the global launch of the BreathID Hp, a next generation device in the company's BreathID product line. [More]
It is possible to reduce salt content without reducing the taste

It is possible to reduce salt content without reducing the taste

It is entirely possible to reduce the salt content in a range of foods by up to 30% without reducing the taste. [More]
Genetic loci associated with H pylori bacteria are linked to stomach cancer

Genetic loci associated with H pylori bacteria are linked to stomach cancer

Two genome-wide association studies and a subsequent meta-analysis have found that certain genetic variations are associated with susceptibility to Helicobacter pylori, a bacteria that is a major cause of gastritis and stomach ulcers and is linked to stomach cancer, findings that may help explain some of the observed variation in individual risk for H pylori infection, according to a study in the May 8 issue of JAMA. [More]

Research findings have potential implications for treating human infections

Half of the world's human population is infected with the stomach bacteria called Helicobacter pylori, yet it causes disease in only about 10 percent of those infected. Other bacteria living in the stomach may be a key factor in whether or not H. pylori causes disease, according to a new study led by scientists at the University of California, Santa Cruz. [More]
Technique breathes new life into gastric cancer diagnosis

Technique breathes new life into gastric cancer diagnosis

A nanomaterial breath test can accurately distinguish gastric cancer from benign stomach disorders, preliminary results show. [More]

Weekend reading: Navigating treatment; Can a robot replace your doctor?

Your pathology report indicates that you have stomach cancer. Hearing those words conveying yet another cancer-related diagnosis-;my fourth since the age of 20-;I felt, at the age of 57, as though I had been airdropped into a foreign country. [More]

Scientists discover new subgroups of GC patients with different disease's characteristics

A collaboration between Portuguese and Italian scientists has discovered new subgroups of stomach cancer patients with different disease's characteristics, an information that is hoped will help improving the clinical management of a disease that still kills a dismaying 3 out of 4 patients. [More]
Case Western Reserve receives $220,000 grant to study gastric cancers

Case Western Reserve receives $220,000 grant to study gastric cancers

The Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine has received a $220,000 grant from the DeGregorio Family Foundation to study gastric cancers, which remain among the most deadly forms of disease. [More]
UCSD molecular biologist to receive Charles Rodolphe Brupbacher Prize for Cancer Research

UCSD molecular biologist to receive Charles Rodolphe Brupbacher Prize for Cancer Research

Molecular biologist Michael Karin is to receive this year's Charles Rodolphe Brupbacher Prize for Cancer Research in recognition of his studies on the role of chronic inflammation in the development of tumors. The award, which carries CHF 100,000 in prize money, is considered one of the highest accolades for cancer researchers worldwide. The awards ceremony takes place in Zurich this Thursday in the framework of an international symposium on "Breakthroughs in Cancer Research and Therapy". [More]
Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium to be held from Jan. 24-26 in San Francisco, CA

Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium to be held from Jan. 24-26 in San Francisco, CA

New research into the treatment and prognosis of gastrointestinal cancers was released today in advance of the tenth annual Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium being held January 24-26, 2013, at The Moscone West Building in San Francisco, CA. [More]

mTorc1 promotes growth of inflammation-associated colon and gastric cancers

Researchers have identified a complex of proteins that promotes the growth of some types of colon and gastric cancers, and shown that medications that block the function of this complex have the potential to be developed into a new treatment for these diseases. [More]
H. pylori may protect against stroke and some cancers

H. pylori may protect against stroke and some cancers

A new study by NYU School of Medicine researchers reveals that an especially virulent strain of the gut bacterium Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) isn't implicated in the overall death rate of the U.S. population, and may even protect against stroke and some cancers. [More]
Potential way to attack common stomach bacteria that cause ulcers

Potential way to attack common stomach bacteria that cause ulcers

Experiments at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory have revealed a potential new way to attack common stomach bacteria that cause ulcers and significantly increase the odds of developing stomach cancer. [More]
UC Irvine, Cal State Fullerton partner to help reduce cancer disparities in Orange County

UC Irvine, Cal State Fullerton partner to help reduce cancer disparities in Orange County

Researchers from UC Irvine's Chao Family Comprehensive Cancer Center and California State University, Fullerton's Health Promotion Research Institute have formed a partnership to help reduce cancer disparities in Orange County. [More]
Incidence of esophageal, stomach cancers increased in AIDS

Incidence of esophageal, stomach cancers increased in AIDS

The risk for esophageal and stomach carcinomas, as well as non-Hodgkin lymphomas, is significantly increased in people with AIDS, although the incidence of lymphomas has decreased, the results of a US and UK study reveal. [More]

People with AIDS more likely to develop esophageal and stomach carcinoma, NHLs

People with AIDS are at increased risk for developing esophageal and stomach carcinoma as well as non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHLs), according to a new study in Gastroenterology, the official journal of the American Gastroenterological Association. [More]
First Edition: July 23, 2012

First Edition: July 23, 2012

In this Kaiser Health News video, Greg Millett, a senior policy advisor in the Office of National AIDS Policy, tells Joanne Silberner that the president's National HIV/AIDS Strategy has improved coordination among federal agencies and that the 2010 health law will improve access to care for those living with HIV/AIDS. [More]

Study determines optimal screening strategy for gastric or stomach cancer

A new study has determined how often people should get screened for gastric or stomach cancer in high-risk regions of the world. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the findings could help reduce deaths from gastric cancer, which is the second most common cause of cancer-related mortality. [More]