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Streptococcus pneumoniae, or Pneumococcus, is a very common bacterial infection in both industrialized and developing countries. In particular, young children and the elderly represent high-risk populations of developing pneumococcal infections. According to the WHO, the bacterium kills up to one million children under the age of five years each year worldwide. It accounts for many Bacterial Meningitis cases in adults and it is the most common cause of Bacteraemia, Pneumonia, Meningitis and Otitis media in young children.
MSU experts pioneer pathways to new treatment options for pneumonia

MSU experts pioneer pathways to new treatment options for pneumonia

Streptococcus pneumoniae likely is not a term immediately recognizable by most individuals, even if they have had unpleasant run-ins with the common bacterium. However, experts at Mississippi State University are pioneering pathways to new treatment options. [More]
Caltech scientists uncover three-dimensional structure of disease-fighting protein

Caltech scientists uncover three-dimensional structure of disease-fighting protein

The polymeric immunoglobulin receptor, or pIgR, is a multitasking protein produced in the lining of mucosal surfaces, such as the intestines. It plays a pivotal role in the body's immune functions by sequestering bacteria and by assisting antibodies—large proteins that can identify and neutralize specific bacteria and viruses. [More]
School holidays may be linked to increased rates of adult pneumococcal CAP

School holidays may be linked to increased rates of adult pneumococcal CAP

A study presented today (6 September 2016) at this year's European Respiratory Society International Congress in London, UK shows that adults admitted to hospital during school holidays are 38% more likely to have pneumococcal community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) than those admitted during term time. [More]
Research provides insight into how harmless nasal bacteria help protect from diseases

Research provides insight into how harmless nasal bacteria help protect from diseases

Staphylococcus aureus is a common colonizer of the human body. Although, one quarter of the U.S. population live with the bacteria and never get sick, having S. aureus present in the nostrils is a risk for infections that range in severity from mild skin to life- threatening MRSA infections. [More]
Exposure to atmospheric dust, high temperatures can increase risk of bacterial meningitis

Exposure to atmospheric dust, high temperatures can increase risk of bacterial meningitis

Exposure to airborne dust and high temperatures are significant risk factors for bacterial meningitis, a new study by the University of Liverpool's Institute of Infection and Global Health has found. [More]
Study develops new methodology to analyse genetic bases of pathogenic bacteria

Study develops new methodology to analyse genetic bases of pathogenic bacteria

The study has developed a pioneering methodology to analyse the genetic bases of pathogenic bacteria and can be used to identify therapeutic targets in order to develop new antimicrobial agents. [More]
New immunization approach may one day wipe out pneumonia, meningitis

New immunization approach may one day wipe out pneumonia, meningitis

A new vaccine allows pneumonia-causing bacteria to colonize inside the body, springing into action only if the bacteria pose a threat. [More]
Oxford researchers discover genes that make children more susceptible to bacteraemia

Oxford researchers discover genes that make children more susceptible to bacteraemia

A team led by Oxford University has identified genes that make certain children more susceptible to invasive bacterial infections by performing a large genome-wide association study in African children. [More]
Allergan's sNDA for TEFLARO (ceftaroline fosamil) accepted by FDA

Allergan's sNDA for TEFLARO (ceftaroline fosamil) accepted by FDA

Allergan plc today announced the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has accepted for filing the company's supplemental New Drug Application (sNDA) for TEFLARO (ceftaroline fosamil). [More]
Vaccinations could have significant economic value

Vaccinations could have significant economic value

Vaccinations, long recognized as an excellent investment that saves lives and prevents illness, could have significant economic value that far exceeds their original cost, a new study from researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health has found. [More]
UM SOM to team up with industry to develop vaccine for preventing deadly bacterial infections

UM SOM to team up with industry to develop vaccine for preventing deadly bacterial infections

The Center for Vaccine Development at the University of Maryland School of Medicine will participate in a partnership with industry to develop a vaccine to prevent a group of deadly bacterial infections that occur commonly among hospital patients. [More]
Good bacteria can help inhibit growth of S. pneumoniae

Good bacteria can help inhibit growth of S. pneumoniae

A new study from the Forsyth Institute is helping to shed more light on the important connections among the diverse bacteria in our microbiome. According to research published in mBio, scientists at Forsyth, led by Dr. Katherine P. Lemon, along with their collaborator at Vanderbilt University, have demonstrated that a harmless bacterium found in the nose and on skin may negatively impact the growth of a pathogen that commonly causes middle ear infections in children and pneumonia in children and older adults. [More]
Bacteriophage therapy: an alternative to antibiotics? An interview Professor Clokie

Bacteriophage therapy: an alternative to antibiotics? An interview Professor Clokie

A phage is a virus that infects a bacterium. People often get very confused about what the difference is between a virus and a bacterium. A virus, like a bacterium, is also a microorganism, but unlike bacteria, it needs to have a host to be able to replicate and propagate. [More]
Scientists create detailed image of deadly toxin linked to bacterial pneumonia, meningitis, septicaemia

Scientists create detailed image of deadly toxin linked to bacterial pneumonia, meningitis, septicaemia

Scientists from the University of Leicester have for the first time created a detailed image of a toxin - called pneumolysin - associated with deadly infections such as bacterial pneumonia, meningitis and septicaemia. [More]
Paratek initiates Omadacycline phase 3 clinical study in community acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP)

Paratek initiates Omadacycline phase 3 clinical study in community acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP)

Paratek Pharmaceuticals, Inc. has announced the dosing of the first patient in its Phase 3 clinical study of its lead drug candidate, omadacycline, for the treatment of Community Acquired Bacterial Pneumonia (CABP). This global Phase 3 study will assess the efficacy and safety of omadacycline compared with moxifloxacin in subjects with CABP. [More]
University of Leicester awarded BBSRC grant to explore three key areas that impact human health

University of Leicester awarded BBSRC grant to explore three key areas that impact human health

The University of Leicester has been awarded over £1.5 million in order to advance knowledge and understanding in three key areas that impact on health. [More]
FDA permits marketing of first CSF nucleic acid-based test for detection of multiple pathogens

FDA permits marketing of first CSF nucleic acid-based test for detection of multiple pathogens

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today allowed marketing of the first cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) nucleic acid-based test for simultaneous detection of multiple pathogens that can cause central nervous system infections. [More]
Allergan's anti-infective portfolio to be highlighted at IDWeek 2015

Allergan's anti-infective portfolio to be highlighted at IDWeek 2015

Allergan plc today announced that its infectious disease portfolio will be featured in 13 abstracts highlighting data at IDWeek 2015, which takes place from October 7-11, 2015, in San Diego. [More]
Pneumococcal and rotavirus vaccines lead to rapid reduction in pediatric hospital burden

Pneumococcal and rotavirus vaccines lead to rapid reduction in pediatric hospital burden

Researchers show that the introduction of both pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCVs) and rotavirus vaccines (RVs) led to the rapid and dramatic reduction in hospital burden of both winter diarrhea and respiratory infections within <5 years post introduction of the vaccines. [More]
FDA approves Allergan's sNDA to update label for TEFLARO (ceftaroline fosamil)

FDA approves Allergan's sNDA to update label for TEFLARO (ceftaroline fosamil)

Allergan plc today announced the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the company's supplemental new drug application (sNDA) to update the label for TEFLARO (ceftaroline fosamil) for the treatment of adult patients with acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI) and community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP). [More]
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