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Streptococcus pneumoniae, or Pneumococcus, is a very common bacterial infection in both industrialized and developing countries. In particular, young children and the elderly represent high-risk populations of developing pneumococcal infections. According to the WHO, the bacterium kills up to one million children under the age of five years each year worldwide. It accounts for many Bacterial Meningitis cases in adults and it is the most common cause of Bacteraemia, Pneumonia, Meningitis and Otitis media in young children.
‘Concerning’ rise in pneumococcus risk factors

‘Concerning’ rise in pneumococcus risk factors

Researchers report that the incidence of Streptococcus pneumoniae infection has fallen significantly in the USA in the past decade but describe a “concerning trend” whereby the baseline health status of those with serious pneumococcal disease has worsened. [More]
Aging Japanese population driving high CAP burden

Aging Japanese population driving high CAP burden

There is a high incidence of community-acquired pneumonia in Kochi City in western Japan, which is primarily explained by the large proportion of elderly inhabitants, researchers report. [More]
Prevalence of bacterial meningitis drops in the United States

Prevalence of bacterial meningitis drops in the United States

Advances in the prevention and treatment of an often fatal condition called bacterial meningitis appear to be paying dividends in the United States, report infectious disease experts at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) in the journal The Lancet Infectious Diseases. [More]
Mucosal lymphoid cells key to S. pneumoniae defence

Mucosal lymphoid cells key to S. pneumoniae defence

Type 3 innate lymphoid cells in the lung mucosa are activated early in the course of infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae and are a major source of interleukin-22 production, research reveals. [More]
Pneumococcal pneumonia mortality falling

Pneumococcal pneumonia mortality falling

Between 2000 and 2013 there has been an increase in the early prescription of antibiotics and use of combination therapy in patients with pneumococcal pneumonia, researchers report. [More]
Researchers release evidence substantiating unexpected dual role of immune system

Researchers release evidence substantiating unexpected dual role of immune system

University of Leicester researchers have released evidence substantiating an unexpected dual role of an important component of the immune system. [More]
Bacterial respiratory tract colonization before catching influenza may protect against severe disease

Bacterial respiratory tract colonization before catching influenza may protect against severe disease

Many studies have shown that more severe illness and even death are likely to result if you develop a secondary respiratory infection after developing influenza. Now, however, a team of researchers based at The Wistar Institute has determined that if you reverse the order of infection, the bacteria Streptococcus pneumoniae (often called pneumococcus) may actually protect against a bad case of the flu. [More]

Scientists uncover mechanisms that can protect against lethal bacteria

An important development in understanding how the bacterium that causes pneumonia, meningitis and septicaemia remains harmlessly in the nose and throat has been discovered at the University of Liverpool's Institute of Infection and Global Health. [More]
Mechanisms of recurrent bacteria AOM in children under scrutiny

Mechanisms of recurrent bacteria AOM in children under scrutiny

The immune response in young children with bacterial acute otitis media differs between individuals who are prone to such infection and those who are not, US researchers have shown. [More]
S. pneumoniae is major cause of severe pneumonia in Gambian children

S. pneumoniae is major cause of severe pneumonia in Gambian children

Researchers have published a detailed survey of children with pneumonia in the Gambia, which reveals that Streptococcus pneumoniae is the predominant aetiological agent and that multiple pathogens are present in at least half of cases. [More]
S. pneumoniae interacts with other nasopharyngeal bacteria

S. pneumoniae interacts with other nasopharyngeal bacteria

Streptococcus pneumoniae bacteria are able to detect and respond to other bacterial species in the same host niche, researchers report in Open Biology. [More]
Inflammatory pneumococcal response differs by age

Inflammatory pneumococcal response differs by age

The composition of inflammatory lung infiltrate in people with pneumonia caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae differs by age, an in-situ study reveals. [More]
Pediatric viral respiratory tract infection often complicated by bacterial sinusitis

Pediatric viral respiratory tract infection often complicated by bacterial sinusitis

Nearly 1 in 10 cases of viral upper respiratory tract infections in infants and young children is complicated by acute bacterial sinusitis, often in conjunction with acute otitis media, a longitudinal cohort study has found. [More]
S. pneumoniae serotypes differ between primary and post-viral disease

S. pneumoniae serotypes differ between primary and post-viral disease

Certain capsular serotypes of Streptococcus pneumoniae are particularly likely to cause disease in people who have recently experienced a respiratory viral infection, study findings indicate. [More]
S. pneumoniae is commonest cause of paediatric CAP

S. pneumoniae is commonest cause of paediatric CAP

Streptococcus pneumoniae is the predominant cause of community-acquired pneumonia among children in Belgium, with non-vaccine serotypes accounting for the majority of cases, a Belgian study shows. [More]
ADMA Biologics reports consolidated net loss of $15.5M in 2013

ADMA Biologics reports consolidated net loss of $15.5M in 2013

ADMA Biologics, Inc., a late-stage biopharmaceutical company that develops, manufactures, and intends to market specialty plasma-based biologics for the treatment and prevention of certain infectious diseases, today announced its financial results for the year ended December 31, 2013 and provided recent company developments as well as anticipated milestones for 2014. [More]
Low dose injections of artificial properdin provides protection against septic diseases in mice

Low dose injections of artificial properdin provides protection against septic diseases in mice

Breakthrough MRC-funded study from University of Leicester shows low dose injections of artificial properdin provides substantial protection against septic diseases in mice [More]
ASU scientist selected as 2014 recipient of Lifetime Achievement Award

ASU scientist selected as 2014 recipient of Lifetime Achievement Award

Roy Curtiss III, a scientist at the Biodesign Institute at Arizona State University, has been selected as the 2014 recipient of the Lifetime Achievement Award from the American Society for Microbiology. [More]

Low dose injections of artificial properdin provide protection against septic diseases

Researchers at the University of Leicester have produced an artificial version of a naturally occurring protein, properdin, which has been found to successfully combat bacterial pneumonia and meningitis when tested in mice. [More]
CSP analogues may attenuate S. pneumoniae virulence, resistance

CSP analogues may attenuate S. pneumoniae virulence, resistance

The spread of virulent, antibiotic-resistant strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae may be controllable through the use of competence-stimulating peptide analogues, US researchers believe. [More]