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Healthy Aging Brain Center care model improves health outcomes and quality of care in older adults

Healthy Aging Brain Center care model improves health outcomes and quality of care in older adults

Studies have shown that a new patient and caregiver centered model of innovative, coordinated brain care for older adults improves health outcomes and quality of care for those with cognitive impairment. [More]
DNA modifications in blood are directly related to changes in brain tissues, say researchers

DNA modifications in blood are directly related to changes in brain tissues, say researchers

Johns Hopkins researchers say they have confirmed suspicions that DNA modifications found in the blood of mice exposed to high levels of stress hormone — and showing signs of anxiety — are directly related to changes found in their brain tissues. [More]

Research to understand exactly how bleach kills bacteria

Spring cleaning often involves chlorine bleach, which has been used as a disinfectant for hundreds of years. But our bodies have been using bleach's active component, hypochlorous acid, to help clean house for millennia. As part of our natural response to infection, certain types of immune cells produce hypochlorous acid to help kill invading microbes, including bacteria. [More]

Professor receives $1.7M NIH grant to explore novel treatments for chronic methamphetamine users

A Wayne State University professor recently received a nearly $1.7 million grant from the National Institutes of Drug Abuse of the National Institutes of Health to explore whether proteasome and parkin — two components of the ubiquitin-proteasome system — are potential pharmaceutical drug targets that can be manipulated to promote survival and recovery of dopaminergic terminals after binge and chronic administration of toxic doses of methamphetamine. [More]

Viewpoints: Debate rolls on about enrollment numbers; Ryan's plan 'squeezes seniors'

You can forgive a little football-spiking, even if Obamacare is far from the end zone. The White House this week announced that the number of people who enrolled in new individual health-care insurance plans under the Affordable Care Act topped 7 million and could still rise. [More]
Study describes two new genes that influence risk of women developing breast, ovarian cancer

Study describes two new genes that influence risk of women developing breast, ovarian cancer

​Today we know that women carrying BCRA1 and BCRA2 gene mutations have a 43% to 88% risk of developing from breast cancer before the age of 70. [More]
1/3 of ICU patients develop depression that typically manifests as physical symptoms

1/3 of ICU patients develop depression that typically manifests as physical symptoms

A third of intensive care patients develop depression that typically manifests as physical, or somatic, symptoms such as weakness, appetite change, and fatigue, rather than psychological symptoms, according to one of the largest studies to investigate the mental health and functional outcomes of survivors of critical care, published in The Lancet Respiratory Medicine. [More]
Research: Chronic sleep deprivation linked to heart failure

Research: Chronic sleep deprivation linked to heart failure

Poor sleep doubles hospitalisations in heart failure, according to new research in nearly 500 patients presented today at EuroHeartCare 2014. [More]
Study: Moderate to severe depression increases risk of heart failure by 40%

Study: Moderate to severe depression increases risk of heart failure by 40%

Moderate to severe depression increases the risk of heart failure by 40%, a study of nearly 63 000 Norwegians has shown. The findings were presented for the first time today at EuroHeartCare 2014. [More]

Electrode placement affects subthalamic nucleus stimulation outcomes

Researchers have identified factors associated with motor, cognitive and mood outcomes after deep-brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus in a large cohort of patients with Parkinson’s disease. [More]

Special Tree NeuroCare Center in Romulus offers greenhouse therapy

Recovering from a brain injury involves a great deal of hard work, and some of that work includes finding ways to enjoy life again. [More]

Inhibiting cancer-promoting prolactin causes unconventional cell death in preclinical research

Under stress from chemotherapy or radiation, some cancer cells dodge death by consuming a bit of themselves, allowing them to essentially sleep through treatment and later awaken as tougher, resistant disease. [More]
Eating watermelon reduces blood pressure in overweight individuals

Eating watermelon reduces blood pressure in overweight individuals

Be sure to pick up a watermelon - or two - at your neighborhood farmers' market. It could save your life. [More]
Sanford-Burnham to present new cancer research data at AACR 2014

Sanford-Burnham to present new cancer research data at AACR 2014

Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute will present a wide range of new research data at the annual American Association for Cancer Research Meeting in San Diego starting Saturday, April 5, at the San Diego Convention Center. The presentations will cover a variety of topics including breast, melanoma, and prostate cancer, as well as novel methods of delivering drugs to tumors. [More]
Young adults participated in cardio fitness activities may preserve memory, thinking skills in middle age

Young adults participated in cardio fitness activities may preserve memory, thinking skills in middle age

Young adults who run or participate in other cardio fitness activities may preserve their memory and thinking skills in middle age, according to a new study published in the April 2, 2014, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. Middle age was defined as ages 43 to 55. [More]
Research shows that use of fertility drugs does not increase breast cancer risk

Research shows that use of fertility drugs does not increase breast cancer risk

Women who took clomiphene citrate (brand name Clomid) or gonadotropins as a part of fertility treatment did not experience an increased risk for breast cancer over 30 years of follow-up, compared with women who were not treated with these medications, according to a study published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research. [More]
Researcher finds simple blood test that predicts person's risk for sudden cardiac death

Researcher finds simple blood test that predicts person's risk for sudden cardiac death

A researcher at the Cardiovascular Institute (CVI) at Rhode Island, The Miriam and Newport hospitals has found that a simple blood test can predict a person's risk for sudden cardiac death, enabling physicians to more quickly and accurately assess a patient's need for an implantable cardiac defibrillator (ICD). [More]

RFS introduces RF Assure Delivery System for improving birth safety at 2014 AORN national meeting

RF Surgical Systems Inc., the market leader in retained surgical item detection, debuted the RF Assure Delivery System for improving birth safety this week at the 2014 AORN national meeting of perioperative nurses in Chicago. The new system is specifically designed to prevent retained surgical sponges that are used during labor and delivery. [More]

Thorne Research launches NiaCel that supports endurance, energy and healthy aging

Thorne Research today announced the launch of NiaCel™, an innovative nutritional supplement that supports endurance, energy, and healthy aging. [More]
Study finds that stress can make allergies worse

Study finds that stress can make allergies worse

Stress doesn't cause allergies, but easing your mind might mean less allergy flare-ups this spring. According to a study published in the April issue of Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology, the scientific journal of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, allergy sufferers with persistent stress experience more allergy flares. [More]