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Electronic medical data could help verify link between maternal obesity and diabetes to autism

Electronic medical data could help verify link between maternal obesity and diabetes to autism

Scientists show they can use electronic medical records and birth information to verify and strengthen an already suspected link between autistic children and pregnant mothers with obesity and diabetes. [More]
Higher aerobic fitness levels may improve chances of survival after first heart attack

Higher aerobic fitness levels may improve chances of survival after first heart attack

People who are fit are more likely to survive their first heart attack, according to a study of nearly 70,000 patients of Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit. [More]
Frequent traumatic experiences throughout infancy increase risk of psychosis during adulthood

Frequent traumatic experiences throughout infancy increase risk of psychosis during adulthood

A research carried out with participation of the University of Granada proves that suffering repeated traumatic experiences throughout infancy and adolescence multiplies by 7 the risk of suffering psychosis during adulthood. [More]
Bile acid enables foetus to produce blood stem cells

Bile acid enables foetus to produce blood stem cells

A research group at Lund University in Sweden has been able to show that bile acid is transferred from the mother to the foetus via the placenta to enable the foetus to produce blood stem cells. [More]
New partnership aims to study underlying neurobiology and genetics of PTSD, TBI

New partnership aims to study underlying neurobiology and genetics of PTSD, TBI

Cohen Veterans Bioscience today announced two new collaborative partnership efforts that will provide critical research tools for understanding the underlying neurobiology and genetics of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and traumatic brain injury (TBI) with the goal of accelerating the development of first generation diagnostics and treatments. [More]
Children born to obese women with diabetes at higher risk of developing autism

Children born to obese women with diabetes at higher risk of developing autism

Children born to obese women with diabetes are more than four times as likely to be diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder than children of healthy weight mothers without diabetes, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health research suggests. [More]
Unobtrusive patch on the forehead provides relief from PTSD

Unobtrusive patch on the forehead provides relief from PTSD

An average of 30 years had passed since the traumatic events that had left them depressed, anxious, irritable, hypervigilant, unable to sleep well and prone to nightmares. [More]
Ocean acidification affecting population demography, adaptation potential of marine species

Ocean acidification affecting population demography, adaptation potential of marine species

Ocean acidification may be impacting upon the population dynamics of marine species and hindering their ability to genetically adapt to future climate change. [More]
Family members affected by sudden cardiac death need better psychological support

Family members affected by sudden cardiac death need better psychological support

In a world-first survey study, researchers from the Centenary Institute and the University of Sydney have highlighted the need for better psychological support for families affected by sudden cardiac death due to a genetic heart disease. [More]
Refugee women have higher risk of giving birth too early than non-refugee immigrants

Refugee women have higher risk of giving birth too early than non-refugee immigrants

Refugee women who come to Canada have greater risk of giving birth prematurely than non-refugee immigrants, a study by a St. Michael's Hospital researcher has found. Those risks are fueled by the fact that the preterm birth rate was 7.1 per cent among secondary refugees - those who spent more than six months in a transit country before arriving in Canada -compared to five per cent among secondary, non-refugee immigrants. [More]
Patients sent for unnecessary blood tests before low-risk surgical procedures

Patients sent for unnecessary blood tests before low-risk surgical procedures

Depending on which hospital you go to for your low-risk surgical procedure, you may be 2.4 times more or less likely to be sent for unnecessary blood tests. This is among the findings of a study conducted by researchers from the Institute of Clinical Evaluative Sciences and the Women's College Hospital Institute for Health Systems Solutions and Virtual Care. [More]
Scientists discover epigenetic switch linked to obesity

Scientists discover epigenetic switch linked to obesity

It is well known that a predisposition to adiposity lies in our genes. A new study by researchers at the Max Planck Institute of Immunobiology and Epigenetics in Freiburg now shows that it is also crucial how these genes are regulated. The scientists led by Andrew Pospisilik discovered a novel regulatory, epigenetic switch, which causes individuals with identical genetic material, such as monozygotic twins, to either be lean or obese. [More]
Depression care management prevents death among older adults with diabetes

Depression care management prevents death among older adults with diabetes

According to a new study published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, effective treatment for depression could go a long way toward improving health status and even preventing death among older adults who also have diabetes. [More]
EHCI: European healthcare steadily improving

EHCI: European healthcare steadily improving

European healthcare is steadily improving, in spite of alarm bells about financial crisis austerity measures, aging population and migration turmoil. [More]
Educational programs, new clinic policies could significantly reduce level of opioid medication

Educational programs, new clinic policies could significantly reduce level of opioid medication

A recent study showed that medical provider training, new clinic policies and efforts to "taper" opioid use for pain treatment could significantly reduce the level of opioid medication that patients used -- a limited but positive step for a nation enmeshed in opioid use, abuse and overdose deaths. [More]
New study aims to prevent chronic cardiac failure

New study aims to prevent chronic cardiac failure

Researchers at Osaka University clarified that the cell adhesion inhibition of periostin1 damages myocardinal cells, inducing compromised cardiac myocyte contractile force and myocytes death, leading to the onset of cardiac failure after AMI through the administration of periostin neutralizing antibodies they had developed on their own. [More]

Heat waves increase mortality risk in patients with lung disease

Heat waves are becoming more common in summer and have health-related consequences. In patients with chronic lung disease, the risk of dying increases by up to 43%, according to an original article by Christian Witt and colleagues in the current issue of Deutsches Ärzteblatt International (Dtsch Arztebl Int 2015; 112: 878-83). [More]
New study identifies DKK3 as a driver of kidney fibrosis

New study identifies DKK3 as a driver of kidney fibrosis

Chronic kidney disease can develop in response to a variety of insults and is characterized by progressive renal fibrosis and atrophy of kidney tubule. Therapeutic options are limited and the disease is often not detected until later stages. [More]
People suffering from chronic stress, anxiety may be at increased risk for depression and dementia

People suffering from chronic stress, anxiety may be at increased risk for depression and dementia

A scientific review paper warns that people need to find ways to reduce chronic stress and anxiety in their lives or they may be at increased risk for developing depression and even dementia. [More]
Parental debt may have adverse effects on socioemotional well-being of children

Parental debt may have adverse effects on socioemotional well-being of children

Certain types of debt that parents take on may have adverse effects on children's socioemotional well-being according to a new study by researchers at the University of Wisconsin at Madison and Dartmouth published by the journal Pediatrics. [More]
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