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Heat-shock protein 90 enables ER+ breast cancers to develop resistance to hormonal therapy

Heat-shock protein 90 enables ER+ breast cancers to develop resistance to hormonal therapy

Long known for its ability to help organisms successfully adapt to environmentally stressful conditions, the highly conserved molecular chaperone heat-shock protein 90 (HSP90) also enables estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancers to develop resistance to hormonal therapy. [More]
Study calls for new protocols to treat women with high blood pressure

Study calls for new protocols to treat women with high blood pressure

That blood pressure plays a role in human health has been known for quite a while. Hypertension - the medical term for high blood pressure - was first described as a disease in the early 1800s, and the inflatable cuff that's used in measuring blood pressure was invented in 1896. [More]
Learning technique may help overcome cognitive issues in fragile X syndrome

Learning technique may help overcome cognitive issues in fragile X syndrome

A learning technique that maximizes the brain's ability to make and store memories may help overcome cognitive issues seen in fragile X syndrome, a leading form of intellectual disability, according to UC Irvine neurobiologists. [More]
Weight loss surgery and exercise lower risks of serious health problems

Weight loss surgery and exercise lower risks of serious health problems

Throughout the past year, studies on the positive effects of weight loss surgery have been published in a variety of medical journals in the US and abroad. We learned that weight loss surgery is relatively safe, and that it is effective in improving serious health conditions. More recently, we also learned that it is a factor in preventing Type 2 diabetes from developing in people considered to be pre-diabetic. [More]
Scientists identify brain mechanisms that turn unpleasant experiences into long-lasting memories

Scientists identify brain mechanisms that turn unpleasant experiences into long-lasting memories

We know that everyday events can be easy to forget, but dangerous experiences that trigger fear can remain engraved in the brain for years. Now, scientists from New York University and Japan's RIKEN Brain Science Institute have added to our understanding how this occurs. [More]
Adverse childhood experiences impact child health, school outcomes

Adverse childhood experiences impact child health, school outcomes

Nearly half of all children in the United States are exposed to at least one social or family experience that can lead to traumatic stress and impact their healthy development - be it having their parents divorce, a parent die or living with someone who abuses alcohol or drugs - increasing the risk of negative long-term health consequences or of falling behind in school, suggests new research led by the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. [More]
Better planning needed to improve mother-infant outcomes in hospitals, say CHOP researchers

Better planning needed to improve mother-infant outcomes in hospitals, say CHOP researchers

What does it mean for expectant mothers and hospitals when there are large-scale closures of maternity units? A new study led by researchers at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia provides an inside view from hospital staff members in Philadelphia, where 13 out of 19 obstetric units closed in a 15-year period. [More]
Experts launch new interdisciplinary scientific collaboration to improve health in urban areas

Experts launch new interdisciplinary scientific collaboration to improve health in urban areas

Aiming to empower planners and policy-makers to achieve better health for billions of people living in fast-growing urban areas, world health, environmental, behavioural and social science experts today launched a major new interdisciplinary scientific collaboration. [More]
Study highlights causes of postpartum disorders in new mothers

Study highlights causes of postpartum disorders in new mothers

In the days shortly after giving birth, most mothers experience a period of increased calmness and decreased stress responses, but around 20% of mothers experience anxiety. Some women may become depressed, and around one in a thousand can develop psychosis. The latest evidence indicates that these distressing responses to motherhood are still poorly understood, but that animal research could provide valuable clues to their causes. [More]
Low doses of fluoxetine could hold key to preventing PMS symptoms

Low doses of fluoxetine could hold key to preventing PMS symptoms

Low doses of fluoxetine - better known as the anti-depressant Prozac - could hold the key to preventing PMS symptoms, an international team of researchers has found. [More]
Cellular mechanisms of alcohol dependence: an interview with Dr Sanna, TSRI

Cellular mechanisms of alcohol dependence: an interview with Dr Sanna, TSRI

In the brain there are both excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters. These are molecules that are released from nerve endings in the brain and in the periphery and either excite or inhibit other nerve cells, also known as neurons. [More]
Vitamin C may reduce exercise-induced bronchoconstriction and respiratory symptoms

Vitamin C may reduce exercise-induced bronchoconstriction and respiratory symptoms

Physical activity increases oxidative stress, and therefore, as an antioxidant vitamin C might have particularly evident effects on people who are participating in vigorous exercise. In several studies, vitamin C administration attenuated the increases in oxidative stress markers caused by exercise. Furthermore, vitamin C is involved in the metabolism of histamine, prostaglandins, and cysteinyl leukotrienes, all of which appear to be mediators in the pathogenesis of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. [More]
New study finds that military culture enables use of tobacco for stress relief

New study finds that military culture enables use of tobacco for stress relief

Military culture perpetuates the notion that using tobacco provides stress relief, a new study in the American Journal of Health Promotion finds. But other stress relievers, such as exercise or taking meditation breaks, could be more valuable and effective than smoking breaks and avoid the health risks of tobacco. [More]
Over 325 new Xist Fitness centers to be introduced across the U.S.

Over 325 new Xist Fitness centers to be introduced across the U.S.

St. Louis' own BAM Brands, the parent company of Tanco, MassageLuXe and Xist Fitness will be introducing over 325 NEW Xist Fitness locations across the United States. Partnering with former Major League Baseball professional and 2015 Hall of Fame Nominee, Gary Sheffield, Xist Fitness will open approximately two hundred locations in Florida alone. [More]
Emerging strategies to boost healthy RBCs may reduce burden of anemia linked to blood disorders

Emerging strategies to boost healthy RBCs may reduce burden of anemia linked to blood disorders

Emerging treatment approaches may reduce the burden of anemia associated with blood disorders by enhancing production of healthy red blood cells, according to data presented today at the 56th American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting and Exposition. [More]
University of Utah professor develops MORE intervention program for chronic pain patients

University of Utah professor develops MORE intervention program for chronic pain patients

How can people who are dependent on prescription opioids reduce their cravings? Learn to enjoy other aspects of their lives. [More]

New Crime Victims' Institute series explores human sex trafficking

Human sex trafficking is a serious problem both domestically and internationally and enhanced education is necessary to address the risk factors for entry into the sex trade, the physical and mental health consequences of victimization, and institutional responses to victims, according to a new series published by the Crime Victims' Institute at Sam Houston State University. [More]
Primary care can help tackle mental health care disparities among ethnic minorities

Primary care can help tackle mental health care disparities among ethnic minorities

Primary care that includes mental health screenings and treatments that take into account a patient's language and cultural background can help address mental health care disparities among ethnic minorities, according to psychologists, physicians and other health care experts writing in a special issue of Psychological Services, published by the American Psychological Association. [More]
Going to bed late evenings linked to repetitive negative thoughts

Going to bed late evenings linked to repetitive negative thoughts

When you go to bed, and how long you sleep at a time, might actually make it difficult for you to stop worrying. So say Jacob Nota and Meredith Coles of Binghamton University in the US, who found that people who sleep for shorter periods of time and go to bed very late at night are often overwhelmed with more negative thoughts than those who keep more regular sleeping hours. [More]
Massage therapy: A natural way to strengthen the immune system this flu season

Massage therapy: A natural way to strengthen the immune system this flu season

As seasons change our bodies become more susceptible to cold and flu. Massage therapy is a natural way to strengthen the immune system at this vulnerable time, especially if it is already weakened by stress, fatigue or poor nutrition. [More]