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Researchers identify brain circuit that helps take major developmental step despite nutritional stress

Researchers identify brain circuit that helps take major developmental step despite nutritional stress

When we go hungry, we have the ability to ignore the urge to eat such that we can carry out the task at hand. It has long been known that the brain is involved in such decisions. [More]
AgriLife scientists examine role of ghrelin receptor in age-related adipose tissue inflammation in mice

AgriLife scientists examine role of ghrelin receptor in age-related adipose tissue inflammation in mice

Scientists have proposed that inflammation is the harbinger of aging and central to the aging process, a phenomenon described as 'inflamm-aging,' said Dr. Yuxiang Sun. [More]
NIH researchers discover rare, lethal inflammatory disease that affects young children

NIH researchers discover rare, lethal inflammatory disease that affects young children

National Institutes of Health researchers have discovered a rare and sometimes lethal inflammatory disease - otulipenia - that primarily affects young children. They have also identified anti-inflammatory treatments that ease some of the patients' symptoms: fever, skin rashes, diarrhea, joint pain and overall failure to grow or thrive. [More]
Seeds of tropical shrub guarana contain ten times more amount of catechins than green tea

Seeds of tropical shrub guarana contain ten times more amount of catechins than green tea

The millions of people who consume green tea all over the world benefit from the catechins it contains. [More]
Low selenium levels linked to liver cancer risk? An interview with Dr David Hughes

Low selenium levels linked to liver cancer risk? An interview with Dr David Hughes

Food provides us with a variety of substances we need to maintain life. These substances are essential nutrients and are classified as macronutrients (water, protein, fats, and carbohydrates) and micronutrients (vitamins and minerals). [More]
Regular family meals create positive outcomes in children

Regular family meals create positive outcomes in children

Juggling jobs, kids and the demands of a busy, modern life often comes at the expense of family mealtime at home. [More]
Cells may need some reactive forms of oxygen to maintain health

Cells may need some reactive forms of oxygen to maintain health

Within our bodies, high levels of reactive forms of oxygen can damage proteins and contribute to diabetic complications and many other diseases. [More]
Females working in forensic science labs report high stress levels than male counterparts

Females working in forensic science labs report high stress levels than male counterparts

Women may be at the forefront of the fast-growing forensic science field, but they're also more stressed than their male counterparts, indicates new research led by a Michigan State University criminologist. [More]
Diabetes medication offers protection against arterial stiffness in overweight female mice

Diabetes medication offers protection against arterial stiffness in overweight female mice

Obesity and Type 2 diabetes are associated with vascular stiffening and the development of cardiovascular disease. [More]
Next generation wearables for health monitoring: an interview with Dr Steven LeBoeuf

Next generation wearables for health monitoring: an interview with Dr Steven LeBoeuf

Wearables have proliferated in the marketplace, but there's still a lot of opportunity for growth. One of the ways in which wearables are limited is that people expect their wearables to really measure what they feel is important to be measured [More]
Study evaluates psychosocial outcomes of presenting true self on Facebook

Study evaluates psychosocial outcomes of presenting true self on Facebook

People may express their true self more easily on Facebook than in person, and the more one's "Facebook self" differs from their true self, the greater their stress level and the less socially connected they tend to be, according to a new study published in Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. [More]
Novel material heals diabetic wounds faster than standard bandage

Novel material heals diabetic wounds faster than standard bandage

At some point in their lives, 15 percent of people with diabetes will develop a painful and hard-to-treat foot ulcer. [More]
New study shows female urologists perform more surgeries on women than male counterparts

New study shows female urologists perform more surgeries on women than male counterparts

Although female certified urologists are still a minority within the specialty, they perform many more procedures on women than their male colleagues, who perform more procedures on men than their female colleagues. [More]
Migraine patients differ from healthy people by increased vascular reactivity

Migraine patients differ from healthy people by increased vascular reactivity

A group of scientists from several Russian universities and medical centers made progress in explaining the nature of one of the most ancient neurologic diseases – migraine. The study was conducted within a larger project to develop a device capable of remotely and effectively diagnosing this disease. [More]
Rice scientists unveil behavior of graphene nanoribbons in solutions

Rice scientists unveil behavior of graphene nanoribbons in solutions

Graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) bend and twist easily in solution, making them adaptable for biological uses like DNA analysis, drug delivery and biomimetic applications, according to scientists at Rice University. [More]
Wearable device for sleep quality enhancement could reduce risk of PTSD in military personnel

Wearable device for sleep quality enhancement could reduce risk of PTSD in military personnel

Brain State Technologies announces the presentation of a study that describes how use of a wearable neurotechnology device by military personnel could improve sleep and thereby lower the risk of developing post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). [More]
Obstructive sleep apnea and hypoxia linked to progression of NAFLD in obese adolescents

Obstructive sleep apnea and hypoxia linked to progression of NAFLD in obese adolescents

Researchers from the University of Colorado School of Medicine have published a new study showing that sleep apnea worsens non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in obese adolescents. [More]
Researchers find new way to kill Staphylococcus aureus bacteria

Researchers find new way to kill Staphylococcus aureus bacteria

Scientists have discovered a new way to attack Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. The team, from Imperial College London, have revealed how the bacteria regulates its salt levels. [More]
MGH investigators discover key molecules essential for sensing proteasome dysfunction

MGH investigators discover key molecules essential for sensing proteasome dysfunction

Maintaining appropriate levels of proteins within cells largely relies on a cellular component called the proteasome, which degrades unneeded or defective proteins to recycle the components for the eventual assembly of new proteins. [More]
Healthy BMI, exercise and diet can lower abnormal protein build-ups linked to Alzheimer’s

Healthy BMI, exercise and diet can lower abnormal protein build-ups linked to Alzheimer’s

A study by researchers at UCLA's Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior has found that a healthy diet, regular physical activity and a normal body mass index can reduce the incidence of protein build-ups that are associated with the onset of Alzheimer's disease. [More]
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