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Study: More interventions needed for people with severe mental illnesses in criminal justice system

Study: More interventions needed for people with severe mental illnesses in criminal justice system

Responding to the large number of people with serious mental illnesses in the criminal justice system will require more than mental health services, according to a new report. [More]
Researchers define the process of Parkinson's disease using genetic mouse model

Researchers define the process of Parkinson's disease using genetic mouse model

Parkinson's Disease is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder. In Germany alone, almost half a million people are affected. The focus of the disease is the progressive degeneration of dopamine-producing nerve cells in a certain region of the midbrain, the substantia nigra. Misfolded proteins are the cause. Until recently, it was unclear why damage is confined to specific nerve cells. [More]
UIC receives $4.3 million grant to study needs of families caring for people with disabilities

UIC receives $4.3 million grant to study needs of families caring for people with disabilities

The University of Illinois at Chicago has received a five-year, $4.3 million grant from the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research and the Administration for Community Living to establish a new, multi-institutional center to study the needs of families caring for people with disabilities. [More]
NeuroSigma, VA partner to evaluate eTNS system for TBI patients in Phase I clinical trial

NeuroSigma, VA partner to evaluate eTNS system for TBI patients in Phase I clinical trial

NeuroSigma, Inc., a California-based life sciences company focused on commercialization of its non-invasive Monarch eTNS System for the treatment of neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders, today announced that it has entered into a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with the U.S. Veterans Affairs for a clinical trial to evaluate the benefits of non-invasive, external Trigeminal Nerve Stimulation (eTNS) for patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) in a Phase I clinical trial. [More]
Middle-aged women with neurotic personality may develop Alzheimer disease later in life

Middle-aged women with neurotic personality may develop Alzheimer disease later in life

Women who worry, cope poorly with stress and/or experience mood swings in middle age run a higher risk of developing Alzheimer disease later in life. This is the conclusion of a study carried out at the Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, that followed 800 women for nearly 40 years. [More]
High doses of fish oil supplements do not reduce atrial fibrillation

High doses of fish oil supplements do not reduce atrial fibrillation

High doses of fish oil supplements, rich in omega-3 fatty acids, do not reduce atrial fibrillation, a common type of irregular heartbeat in which the heart can beat as fast as 150 beats a minute. The results of the AFFORD trial led by the Montreal Heart Institute were published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology on October 7th. [More]
Lund University researchers explore personalised treatment for type 2 diabetes

Lund University researchers explore personalised treatment for type 2 diabetes

Researchers at Lund University in Sweden are testing a treatment for type 2 diabetes which targets the disease mechanism itself - and not just the symptoms. For the first time, knowledge about the individual patient's genetic risk profile is being used. The treatment completely restores the capacity to secrete insulin, which is impaired by the risk gene. [More]
Imperial researchers plan to test DTP3 drug in multiple myeloma patients

Imperial researchers plan to test DTP3 drug in multiple myeloma patients

Scientists at Imperial College London have developed a new cancer drug which they plan to trial in multiple myeloma patients by the end of next year. [More]
Henrik Kehlet recognized with ASA's 2014 Excellence in Research Award

Henrik Kehlet recognized with ASA's 2014 Excellence in Research Award

The American Society of Anesthesiologists today presented Henrik Kehlet, M.D., Ph.D., with its 2014 Excellence in Research Award in recognition of his outstanding contributions to research which have had an important impact on anesthesiology as a medical specialty. [More]
Mental stress affects women's hearts more than men's

Mental stress affects women's hearts more than men's

Researchers have known for decades that stress contributes to heart disease. But a new analysis by researchers at Duke Medicine shows mental stress may tax women's hearts more than men's. [More]
VisionCare's Implantable Miniature Telescope gets FDA approval for treating end-stage AMD

VisionCare's Implantable Miniature Telescope gets FDA approval for treating end-stage AMD

VisionCare Ophthalmic Technologies, Inc., a developer of advanced visual prosthetic devices for the treatment of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), today announced the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the Implantable Miniature Telescope (by Dr. Isaac Lipshitz) for use in patients living with bilateral end-stage age-related macular degeneration who are age 65 or older. [More]
National Psoriasis Foundation to hold free psoriatic arthritis program in Seattle

National Psoriasis Foundation to hold free psoriatic arthritis program in Seattle

If you're one of the roughly 28,000 Seattle metro residents struggling with pain from psoriatic arthritis (PsA)—an inflammatory autoimmune disease that causes pain, swelling and stiffness of the joints and tendons—learn to control your condition with Be Joint Smart, a free psoriatic arthritis program presented by the National Psoriasis Foundation, at the Double Tree Suites Southcenter on November 8. [More]
Men and women have different cardiovascular, psychological reactions to mental stress

Men and women have different cardiovascular, psychological reactions to mental stress

Men and women have different cardiovascular and psychological reactions to mental stress, according to a study of men and women who were already being treated for heart disease. [More]
Ebola epidemic and its impact on healthcare workers

Ebola epidemic and its impact on healthcare workers

Since its first outbreak in Guinea in December, 2013, Ebola has hit West African healthcare providers disproportionately hard. [More]
Preoperative IV ibuprofen improves quality of recovery after laparoscopic cholecystectomy surgery

Preoperative IV ibuprofen improves quality of recovery after laparoscopic cholecystectomy surgery

Cumberland Pharmaceuticals Inc. today announced that preoperative intravenous ibuprofen improved overall quality of recovery in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy surgery. These results will be presented at the American Anesthesiology 2014 Annual Meeting in New Orleans, Louisiana. [More]
Neurobiologist Michael Meaney wins 2014 Klaus J. Jacobs Research Prize

Neurobiologist Michael Meaney wins 2014 Klaus J. Jacobs Research Prize

Neurobiologist Michael Meaney (McGill University and Douglas Mental Health University Institute), a senior fellow of the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research, has won a major award worth $1.16 million Canadian for his research on how early childhood experiences shape biological development. [More]
Grand Challenges Canada announces 11 seed grants to improve mental health in developing countries

Grand Challenges Canada announces 11 seed grants to improve mental health in developing countries

On the day the world is collectively raising awareness on mental health issues, Grand Challenges Canada, funded by the Government of Canada, announced new funding for 11 novel ideas to improve mental health in developing countries, one of the biggest unmet needs of our time. Seed grants of up to $270,000 are awarded to 11 innovators from Canada and low- and middle-income countries, totalling $2.9 million CAD. [More]
Discovery may provide new therapeutic avenue to target autophagy in tumors

Discovery may provide new therapeutic avenue to target autophagy in tumors

No matter what type of chemotherapy you attack a tumor with, many cancer cells resort to the same survival tactic: They start eating themselves. [More]
CUMC researchers use innovative algorithm to find driving force behind aggressive form of glioblastoma

CUMC researchers use innovative algorithm to find driving force behind aggressive form of glioblastoma

Using an innovative algorithm that analyzes gene regulatory and signaling networks, Columbia University Medical Center researchers have found that loss of a gene called KLHL9 is the driving force behind the most aggressive form of glioblastoma, the most common form of brain cancer. [More]
Exposure to workplace violence can lead to serious consequences for health sector employees

Exposure to workplace violence can lead to serious consequences for health sector employees

Exposure to violence in the workplace can lead to serious consequences for health sector employees say Stéphane Guay and Nathalie Lanctôt of the Institut universitaire de santé mentale and the University of Montreal, who studied this issue in a systematic review of the literature. [More]