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Chaetocin synergistic with TKIs against CML cells

Chaetocin synergistic with TKIs against CML cells

Chaetocin, a mycotoxin that increases oxidative stress, can complement the activity of tyrosine kinase inhibitors in chronic myeloid leukaemia by overcoming innate resistance mediated by secreted bone marrow stromal cytokines and growth factors, researchers report. [More]
University at Buffalo researchers receive $500,000 grant to study IED-induced vision loss

University at Buffalo researchers receive $500,000 grant to study IED-induced vision loss

It's well known that battlefield explosions can cause hearing loss, but veterans may be surprised to learn that their vision may also suffer — sometimes weeks or months after combat exposure. [More]
New study shows that brain’s ability to manage stress depends on brain protein

New study shows that brain’s ability to manage stress depends on brain protein

The brain's ability to effectively deal with stress or to lack that ability and be more susceptible to depression, depends on a single protein type in each person's brain, according to a study conducted at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published November 12 in the journal Nature. [More]
AADE offers self-care tips for people with diabetes

AADE offers self-care tips for people with diabetes

From Thanksgiving through New Year's Day, the holidays can be fun and heartwarming. They can also be exhausting and stressful. [More]
New wearable technology could send personalized health alerts to troops, civilians

New wearable technology could send personalized health alerts to troops, civilians

Wearable devices can count the steps you take and the calories you burn. But can they help soldiers in the field? Or prevent someone from having a heart attack? [More]
New scientific paper reveals gaps in knowledge about preterm birth

New scientific paper reveals gaps in knowledge about preterm birth

Preterm birth is now the leading cause of death for children under 5 worldwide, and a new scientific paper reveals a startling lack of knowledge about what causes it and how to prevent it. [More]
Scientists receive NARSAD Distinguished Investigator Grants for mental health research

Scientists receive NARSAD Distinguished Investigator Grants for mental health research

The Brain & Behavior Research Foundation today announced the award of NARSAD Distinguished Investigator Grants valued at $1.5 million to 15 scientists, who are full professors or the equivalent, conducting innovative projects in diverse areas of neurobiological and behavioral research. [More]
Guidelines to limit tours of overseas duty reduce mental health problems in UK’s armed forces

Guidelines to limit tours of overseas duty reduce mental health problems in UK’s armed forces

Prolonged periods of deployment among the UK’s armed forces have fallen since the introduction of the “Harmony Guidelines” to limit tours of overseas duty—which might have led to a reduction in mental health problems, new research published in The Lancet Psychiatry journal suggests. [More]
Skin-to-skin contact supports breastfeeding, bonding and better health outcomes

Skin-to-skin contact supports breastfeeding, bonding and better health outcomes

Research during the past 30 years has found many benefits of skin-to-skin contact between mothers and newborns immediately after birth, particularly with aiding breastfeeding. However, in some hospitals, skin-to-skin contact following cesarean birth is not implemented, due to practices around the surgery. A recent Quality Improvement (QI) project demonstrated that women's birth experiences were improved by implementing skin-to-skin contact after cesarean surgery. [More]
Effecting changes to FosB gene could help control addiction, depression

Effecting changes to FosB gene could help control addiction, depression

Regulation of a single, specific gene in a brain region related to drug addiction and depression is sufficient to reduce drug and stress responses, according to a study conducted at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published October 27 online in the journal Nature Neuroscience. [More]
Research opens new potential target against enterics

Research opens new potential target against enterics

In research published in Nature Chemical Biology, scientists from RIKEN in Japan have discovered a surprisingly simple mechanism through which enterics can adjust to the very different oxygen environments inside the human gut and outside. [More]
Experts review advances in understanding, treatment of bipolar disorder

Experts review advances in understanding, treatment of bipolar disorder

Several lines of research have opened exciting new frontiers in scientific understanding and clinical management of bipolar disorder. Recent advances in bipolar disease research are described in this month's special issue of Harvard Review of Psychiatry. [More]
Stockholm researchers discover new mechanism that stimulates glucose uptake in brown fat

Stockholm researchers discover new mechanism that stimulates glucose uptake in brown fat

Research findings that can likely be used to develop a new type of medicine for type 2 diabetes are published today in the Journal of Cell Biology. Researchers at Stockholm University have discovered a new mechanism that stimulates glucose uptake in brown fat - a tissue whose primary function is to generate heat by burning fat and sugar. [More]
Sulindac drug can protect against oxidative damage due to AMD

Sulindac drug can protect against oxidative damage due to AMD

While oxygen is essential to our planet's life force and the way we function and stay healthy, high concentrations referred to as oxidative stress may very well be the cause of more than 70 widely-spread diseases such as cancer, heart disease, neurodegenerative diseases, and eye diseases including macular degeneration. [More]
Anxiety can accelerate conversion to Alzheimer's disease for people with mild cognitive impairment

Anxiety can accelerate conversion to Alzheimer's disease for people with mild cognitive impairment

People with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) are at increased risk of converting to Alzheimer's disease within a few years, but a new study warns the risk increases significantly if they suffer from anxiety. [More]
UW SMPH awarded $70 million grant to continue work on Inner-City Asthma Consortium

UW SMPH awarded $70 million grant to continue work on Inner-City Asthma Consortium

The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health, has awarded the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health a seven-year, $70 million grant for its continuing work on the Inner-City Asthma Consortium (ICAC) -- a nationwide clinical research network to evaluate and develop promising new immune-based treatments. [More]
New study finds that it is possible to distinguish between different hemorrhagic fevers

New study finds that it is possible to distinguish between different hemorrhagic fevers

A new study has found it is possible to distinguish between different hemorrhagic fevers, including Marburg (Ebola cousin) and Lassa before the person becomes symptomatic. [More]
Endothelin gene expression linked to vision loss in premature babies

Endothelin gene expression linked to vision loss in premature babies

A gene known to play a major role in constricting blood vessels also appears to be a major player in the aberrant blood vessel growth that can destroy the vision of premature babies. [More]
New model explains how immune cells recognize, destroy bacteria

New model explains how immune cells recognize, destroy bacteria

The innate immune system serves as the body's specialized armed forces division, comprised of a host of defense mechanisms used to battle bacterial infections. Among the system's warriors are white blood cells including the specialized macrophages, which maintain constant surveillance for foreign intruders or pathogens, functioning as the body's first line of defense, poised to attack at barrier sites including the skin, lungs and intestines. [More]
National Psoriasis Foundation to hold free psoriatic arthritis program in Dallas-Fort Worth area

National Psoriasis Foundation to hold free psoriatic arthritis program in Dallas-Fort Worth area

If you're one of the roughly 48,000 Dallas-Fort Worth area residents struggling with pain from psoriatic arthritis (PsA)—an inflammatory autoimmune disease that causes pain, swelling and stiffness of the joints and tendons—learn to control your condition with Be Joint Smart, a free psoriatic arthritis program presented by the National Psoriasis Foundation, at the Dallas Marriott Las Colinas on December 6. [More]