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Workplace mindfulness-based intervention reduces stress levels and risk of burnout

Workplace mindfulness-based intervention reduces stress levels and risk of burnout

A study by researchers at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center found that a workplace mindfulness-based intervention reduced stress levels of employees exposed to a highly stressful occupational environment. [More]
Non-suicidal self-injury common among Iraq and Afghanistan veterans

Non-suicidal self-injury common among Iraq and Afghanistan veterans

Non-suicidal self-injury--that is, purposefully hurting oneself without conscious suicidal intent--is relatively common among Iraq and Afghanistan veterans, according to a study published online April 1, 2015, in Psychiatry Research. [More]
Therese S. Richmond recognized with Claire M. Fagin Distinguished Researcher Award

Therese S. Richmond recognized with Claire M. Fagin Distinguished Researcher Award

Therese S. Richmond, PhD, CRNP, FAAN, the Andrea B. Laporte Professor of Nursing at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, received the Claire M. Fagin Distinguished Researcher Award on April 28 at the University. [More]
Study finds link between PTSD and accelerated aging

Study finds link between PTSD and accelerated aging

In recent years, public health concerns about post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have risen significantly, driven in part by affected military veterans returning from conflicts in the Middle East and elsewhere. PTSD is associated with number of psychological maladies, among them chronic depression, anger, insomnia, eating disorders and substance abuse. [More]
Researchers identify promising combination strategy for treating glioblastomas

Researchers identify promising combination strategy for treating glioblastomas

Therapies that specifically target mutations in a person's cancer have been much-heralded in recent years, yet cancer cells often find a way around them. To address this, researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and Moores Cancer Center identified a promising combinatorial approach to treating glioblastomas, the most common form of primary brain cancer. [More]
Gynecologic oncologist awarded grant to improve quality of life for women with endometrial cancer

Gynecologic oncologist awarded grant to improve quality of life for women with endometrial cancer

The Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute Board of Governors recently awarded more than $2.7 million in contracted funding to Katina Robison, MD, a gynecologic oncologist with the Program in Women's Oncology at Women & Infants Hospital of Rhode Island, a Care New England hospital, for the study "Cancer of the Uterus and Treatment of Stress Incontinence." [More]
Discovery may have opened up new frontier in fight against breast cancer

Discovery may have opened up new frontier in fight against breast cancer

For years, scientists have been puzzled by the presence of short stretches of genetic material floating inside a variety of cells, ranging from bacteria to mammals, including humans. These fragments are pieces of the genetic instructions cells use to make proteins, but are too short a length to serve their usual purpose. [More]
New research could help predict outbreaks of West Nile virus disease in the U.S.

New research could help predict outbreaks of West Nile virus disease in the U.S.

New research has identified correlations between weather conditions and the occurrence of West Nile virus disease in the United States, raising the possibility of being able to better predict outbreaks. [More]
Enhanced recovery program for patients undergoing colorectal operations speeds patients' recovery

Enhanced recovery program for patients undergoing colorectal operations speeds patients' recovery

Patients undergoing colorectal operations who participated in an enhanced recovery program left the hospital sooner and had significantly lower hospital costs than patients who had the traditional approach to their care, according to a new study, which also found further postoperative improvements after adding an infection prevention protocol. [More]
Obesity and depression play role in excessive daytime sleepiness

Obesity and depression play role in excessive daytime sleepiness

Obesity and depression -- not only lack of sleep -- are underlying causes for regular drowsiness, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers. They say these findings could lead to more personalized sleep medicine for those with excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS). [More]
Identifying signs of depression, anxiety in children

Identifying signs of depression, anxiety in children

Parents, teachers and others can find it hard to spot signs of depression and anxiety in children - and struggle with how they can help. [More]
Mayo Clinic provides expert guidance on fertility, conception

Mayo Clinic provides expert guidance on fertility, conception

With Mother's Day being May 10 and May being Women's Health Month, Mayo Clinic offers expert guidance on fertility and conception. [More]
Specific brain chemical may play role in promoting chronic pain

Specific brain chemical may play role in promoting chronic pain

A chemical in the brain typically associated with cognition, movement and reward-motivation behavior -- among others -- may also play a role in promoting chronic pain, according to new research at The University of Texas at Dallas. [More]
Researchers report new primary care model to address trauma

Researchers report new primary care model to address trauma

Recognizing that patients' experiences of childhood and adult trauma are common and have a direct impact on their health, UCSF clinical researchers and Positive Women's Network-USA have developed and are reporting a new primary care model. [More]
Tomosynthesis detects more breast cancers compared to traditional mammography

Tomosynthesis detects more breast cancers compared to traditional mammography

Tomosynthesis detects 40% more breast cancers than traditional mammography does, according to a major screening study from Lund University, Sweden. This is the first large-scale study to compare the screening method with regular mammograms. The 3D X-ray technique is also more comfortable for women, as breast compression is halved. [More]
Scientists uncover new pharmaceutical strategy for treating melanoma

Scientists uncover new pharmaceutical strategy for treating melanoma

Scientists looking to better understand the mechanisms behind the origin and spread of melanoma tumors have uncovered a possible role for a decades-old antibacterial agent in treating these aggressive and increasingly common cancers. [More]
Relaxation response has significant impact on patients with gastrointestinal disorders

Relaxation response has significant impact on patients with gastrointestinal disorders

A pilot study has found that participating in a nine-week training program including elicitation of the relaxation response had a significant impact on clinical symptoms of the gastrointestinal disorders irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease and on the expression of genes related to inflammation and the body's response to stress. [More]
Researchers study early response of cells to ischemia

Researchers study early response of cells to ischemia

A group of researchers from the Lomonosov Moscow State University in collaboration with their Irish colleagues from the University College Cork has studied the early response of cells to ischemia, which is a restriction in blood supply to tissues causing the death of the cell. [More]
New research can help explain prevalence of carpal tunnel syndrome and sciatica

New research can help explain prevalence of carpal tunnel syndrome and sciatica

New research from the University of Eastern Finland and Kuopio University Hospital can help explain the prevalence of widespread syndromes such as carpal tunnel syndrome and sciatica. According to the results, neural movements can be measured by using non-invasive techniques, which are also applicable in diagnostics and rehabilitation planning. [More]
WHO and UNHCR jointly issue new guide to better identify, manage mental health needs

WHO and UNHCR jointly issue new guide to better identify, manage mental health needs

Worldwide close to 80 million people are currently impacted by humanitarian emergencies arising from natural disasters and armed conflicts, such as those in the Central African Republic, South Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Yemen, and more recently, Nepal. WHO estimates 5% to 10% of these people suffer from a mental health condition such as depression as a result of the emergency. [More]
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