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New study shows nicotine exposure promotes alcohol dependence

New study shows nicotine exposure promotes alcohol dependence

Why do smokers have a five to ten times greater risk of developing alcohol dependence than nonsmokers? Do smokers have a greater tendency toward addiction in general or does nicotine somehow reinforce alcohol consumption? Now, a study led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute helps provide insight into these questions, showing that, in rat models, nicotine exposure actually promotes alcohol dependence. [More]
Autophagy: A new approach to fighting tuberculosis

Autophagy: A new approach to fighting tuberculosis

A new approach to combatting tuberculosis would take advantage of a complex, natural process called autophagy that the human body uses to recycle nutrients, remove damaged cell components, eliminate invading bacteria, and respond to inflammation. [More]
Novel findings may hold promise for children, adults with mitochondrial disorders

Novel findings may hold promise for children, adults with mitochondrial disorders

Rooted in malfunctions in the tiny power plants that energize our cells, mitochondrial disorders are notoriously complex and variable, with few effective treatments. Now, novel findings in microscopic worms may hold great promise for children and adults with mitochondrial disorders [More]
SGK1 enzyme protects brain cells in animal models of Parkinson's disease

SGK1 enzyme protects brain cells in animal models of Parkinson's disease

Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute have found how a widely known but little-studied enzyme protects brain cells in models of Parkinson's disease. [More]
Ancient natural compound can protect the heart from hypertrophy

Ancient natural compound can protect the heart from hypertrophy

A natural compound derived from the bark of the magnolia tree, can protect the heart from hypertrophy, a thickening of cardiac muscle often caused by chronic high blood pressure that can lead to heart failure, researchers report in the April 14 issue of the online journal Nature Communications. [More]
Studies reveal that dietary supplement can improve reproductive health

Studies reveal that dietary supplement can improve reproductive health

Current statistics on U.S. birth rates from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report a continued trend toward delayed motherhood. As fertility gradually declines in the 30s, particularly after age 35, the risk of experiencing difficulty conceiving may increase. In addition to age, there are other common reasons why women may experience difficulties conceiving, including: irregular ovulation cycles and poor egg quality, which may be associated with stress, lifestyle or poor diet. [More]
Mindfulness meditation can reduce pain, anxiety in healthy individuals

Mindfulness meditation can reduce pain, anxiety in healthy individuals

When Rebecca Erwin was a varsity rower at the University of North Carolina, the coach had the team's members take a yoga and meditation class. [More]
DFG selects 10 researchers to receive 2015 Heinz Maier-Leibnitz Prize

DFG selects 10 researchers to receive 2015 Heinz Maier-Leibnitz Prize

This year's recipients of the most important prize for early career researchers in Germany have been announced. The selection committee, appointed by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG, German Research Foundation) and the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF), has chosen ten researchers, five women and five men, to receive the 2015 Heinz Maier-Leibnitz Prizes. [More]
Administration of selenide protects heart tissue post cardiac arrest, shows study

Administration of selenide protects heart tissue post cardiac arrest, shows study

Damage to heart muscle from insufficient blood supply during cardiac arrest and reperfusion injury after blood flow is restored can be reduced by nearly 90 percent if selenide, a form of the essential nutrient selenium, is administered intravenously in the wake of the attack, according to a new preclinical study by researchers at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. [More]
Researchers identify phenomenon that explains effects of oxidative stress on immune cells

Researchers identify phenomenon that explains effects of oxidative stress on immune cells

You're up in the mountains, the snow is blindingly white, and the sun is blazing down from the sky: ideal skiing conditions - but any skiers carrying the herpes virus might also have to reckon with the onset of cold sores after their day out. [More]
Impact Beverage launches breakthrough athletic supplement in Southern California

Impact Beverage launches breakthrough athletic supplement in Southern California

Impact Beverage LLC today announced the introduction of its breakthrough athletic supplement HeadOn to Southern California. The ready-to-drink formula, which launched in Colorado earlier this year, changes the way athletes and active individuals approach strenuous activity. [More]
Plymouth researchers receive grant to develop effective therapy for Huntington's disease

Plymouth researchers receive grant to develop effective therapy for Huntington's disease

Huntington's disease is an hereditary disorder of the nervous system caused by a faulty gene on chromosome four. The faulty gene leads to nerve damage in the area of the brain resulting in gradual physical, mental and emotional changes. Those born to a parent with Huntington's disease have a 50:50 chance of developing it, and there is currently no cure. [More]
Study: 9% of U.S. adults have impulsive, angry behavior and have access to guns

Study: 9% of U.S. adults have impulsive, angry behavior and have access to guns

An estimated 9 percent of adults in the U.S. have a history of impulsive, angry behavior and have access to guns, according to a study published this month in Behavioral Sciences and the Law. The study also found that an estimated 1.5 percent of adults report impulsive anger and carry firearms outside their homes. [More]
Researchers explore influence of low-frequency magnetic fields on neurodegenerative disorders

Researchers explore influence of low-frequency magnetic fields on neurodegenerative disorders

Low-frequency alternating magnetic fields such as those generated by overhead power lines are considered a potential health risk because epidemiological studies indicate that they may aggravate, among other things, neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). [More]
AACN announces recipients of annual research grants

AACN announces recipients of annual research grants

The American Association of Critical-Care Nurses announces the recipients of its annual research grants, with total available funding of $160,000. [More]
Recognizing and preventing child abuse

Recognizing and preventing child abuse

Every 10 seconds a report is made concerning a child being abused. Child abuse can lead to life-long physical, emotional and psychological conditions. Each year in the U.S., more than 1,600 children die from abuse or neglect. April is National Child Abuse Awareness Month and Loyola University Health System is working with physicians, nurses, parents and communities to help bring awareness to this preventable childhood danger. [More]
Researchers assess how chronic stress and relationship quality influence individual's blood pressure

Researchers assess how chronic stress and relationship quality influence individual's blood pressure

While other studies have shown that stress and negative marital quality can influence mortality and blood pressure, there has not been research that discussed how it might affect married couples over time. Using systolic blood pressure as a gauge, researchers assessed whether an individual's blood pressure is influenced by their own as well as their partner's reports of chronic stress and whether there are gender differences in these patterns. [More]
RAND report examines sleep problems in U.S. military members

RAND report examines sleep problems in U.S. military members

Improving the quality and quantity of U.S. military members' sleep following deployment could help reduce other health problems, including depression and post-traumatic stress disorder, according to a new RAND Corporation study. [More]
Bilirubin levels raised in newly diagnosed Parkinson’s disease

Bilirubin levels raised in newly diagnosed Parkinson’s disease

Bilirubin levels are upregulated in patients with early Parkinson’s disease and are associated with disease progression at 2 years, a study shows. [More]
CXCR3 molecule is key mediator of melanoma metastasis, shows research

CXCR3 molecule is key mediator of melanoma metastasis, shows research

In a unique partnership demonstrating excellence in "team science," Dartmouth investigators from Norris Cotton Cancer Center identified a role for the molecule CXCR3 (widely known to regulate the migration of immune cells) as a key mediator of melanoma metastasis. [More]
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