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Allegheny Health Network, Highmark Health commemorate opening of Health + Wellness Pavilion in Wexford

Allegheny Health Network, Highmark Health commemorate opening of Health + Wellness Pavilion in Wexford

Officials and employees of Highmark Health and Allegheny Health Network today joined community leaders and public officials to celebrate the planned October 1 grand opening of the Network's new Health + Wellness Pavilion in Wexford. [More]
GSA and NAM select reporters for Journalists in Aging Fellows Program

GSA and NAM select reporters for Journalists in Aging Fellows Program

The Gerontological Society of America (GSA) and New America Media (NAM) have selected 19 reporters for the Journalists in Aging Fellows Program, now in its fifth year. [More]
Thirteen research projects to explore nondrug approaches to manage pain, other health conditions

Thirteen research projects to explore nondrug approaches to manage pain, other health conditions

Thirteen research projects totaling approximately $21.7 million over 5 years will explore nondrug approaches to managing pain and related health conditions such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), drug abuse, and sleep issues. The effort seeks to enhance options for the management of pain and associated problems in U.S. military personnel, veterans, and their families. [More]
Researchers examine how telephone-based coaching could help COPD patients

Researchers examine how telephone-based coaching could help COPD patients

Coaching patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease to manage stress, practice relaxation and participate in light exercise can boost a patient's quality of life and can even improve physical symptoms, researchers at Duke Medicine report. [More]
Working long hours in jobs of low socioeconomic status can increase the risk of diabetes

Working long hours in jobs of low socioeconomic status can increase the risk of diabetes

It is widely accepted that working long hours can be detrimental to one's health; not least because it leaves less time free to exercise and can cause stress and sleep disturbances. [More]
Weight loss possible for mentally ill patients

Weight loss possible for mentally ill patients

The STRIDE lifestyle intervention helps individuals taking antipsychotics to lose weight and improve their fasting glucose levels, study findings indicate. [More]
New pediatric heart-defect patches enhance electrical connections between cells

New pediatric heart-defect patches enhance electrical connections between cells

Carbon nanotubes serve as bridges that allow electrical signals to pass unhindered through new pediatric heart-defect patches invented at Rice University and Texas Children's Hospital. [More]
Consistent walking in nature lowers depression, enhances mental health

Consistent walking in nature lowers depression, enhances mental health

They are common suggestions to remedy stress: You just need a breath of fresh air. Walk it off. Get out and see people. [More]
Study raises questions about educational efforts to increase knowledge of HPV vaccination

Study raises questions about educational efforts to increase knowledge of HPV vaccination

"Knowledge is power" is an old saying. Another cliché warns, "a little knowledge is a dangerous thing." When it comes to getting inoculated against the Human Papilloavirus (HPV), it seems that neither saying is true. In fact, according to a study by a multidisciplinary University of Pennsylvania research team, knowledge may in fact be a meaningless thing. [More]
Tissue-level model of human airway musculature could pave way for patient-specific asthma treatments

Tissue-level model of human airway musculature could pave way for patient-specific asthma treatments

The majority of drugs used to treat asthma today are the same ones that were used 50 years ago. New drugs are urgently needed to treat this chronic respiratory disease, which causes nearly 25 million people in the United States alone to wheeze, cough, and find it difficult at best to take a deep breath. [More]
Kaiser Permanente supports AHA to improve blood pressure control for African-Americans

Kaiser Permanente supports AHA to improve blood pressure control for African-Americans

Kaiser Permanente, the nation's largest integrated health care system, will support the American Heart Association in a broad effort to improve blood pressure control for African-Americans in two U.S. cities over three years. [More]
New approach to diagnose tuberculosis

New approach to diagnose tuberculosis

Researchers working in the UK and The Gambia, have developed a new approach to the diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB) that relies on direct sequencing of DNA extracted from sputum (a technique called metagenomics) to detect and characterize the bacteria that cause TB without the need for time-consuming culture of bacteria in the laboratory. [More]
Promising new approach for combating colorectal cancer

Promising new approach for combating colorectal cancer

Scientists at the University of York are working on a promising new approach for tackling colorectal cancer, the second most common cause of cancer-related death. [More]
Pilot study shows benefits of psychoeducational wellness program in MS people

Pilot study shows benefits of psychoeducational wellness program in MS people

Kessler researchers have published a pilot study showing the benefits of a 10-week psychoeducational wellness program in people with multiple sclerosis (MS). Improvements were seen in mood, overall mental health, perceived stress, and pain. [More]
Caltech researcher explores link between variable heart rate, health and fitness

Caltech researcher explores link between variable heart rate, health and fitness

Although the heart beats out a very familiar "lub-dub" pattern that speeds up or slows down as our activity increases or decreases, the pattern itself isn't as regular as you might think. In fact, the amount of time between heartbeats can vary even at a "constant" heart rate-and that variability, doctors have found, is a good thing. [More]
Single-family room environment can optimize care for preterm infants

Single-family room environment can optimize care for preterm infants

The prevalence of preterm birth - the birth of an infant prior to 37 weeks of pregnancy - is a significant health problem that has increased over the past two decades. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, preterm birth affects nearly 500,000 babies each year, or one of every eight born in the U.S. While medical care has improved survival rates for preterm infants, questions remain about ways to positively impact the neurodevelopmental outcomes of preterm infants. [More]
Researchers take major step forward in accurate diagnosis of people experiencing psychosis

Researchers take major step forward in accurate diagnosis of people experiencing psychosis

A study led by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill researchers represents an important step forward in the accurate diagnosis of people who are experiencing the earliest stages of psychosis. [More]
Brandeis researchers explore relationship between weight and stress-induced inflammation

Brandeis researchers explore relationship between weight and stress-induced inflammation

If you're overweight, you may be at greater risk for stress-related diseases like type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and cancer, according to a new study by Brandeis University. [More]
Extra stress in same-sex couples may raise risk of domestic abuse

Extra stress in same-sex couples may raise risk of domestic abuse

Domestic violence occurs at least as frequently, and likely even more so, between same-sex couples compared to opposite-sex couples, according to a review of literature by Northwestern Medicine scientists. [More]
Private efforts to address mental health needs of veterans could aid VA health system reform

Private efforts to address mental health needs of veterans could aid VA health system reform

A unique partnership to support private efforts to provide mental health services to veterans and their families could provide a model for similar efforts should federal officials decide to expand privately provided health care as part of reform of the VA health system, according to a new RAND Corporation report. [More]