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Scientists examine effect of clothing on preterm babies' behavior

Scientists examine effect of clothing on preterm babies' behavior

Scientists at the Laboratoire éthologie Animale et Humaine (CNRS/Université de Rennes 1), working in collaboration with a neonatologist from Brest University Hospital, observed the effect of preterm babies' clothing on their behavior. Newborns placed in a sleep sack were less active and touched parts of their bodies less frequently than those dressed in a simple bodysuit. [More]
Study compares effectiveness of CT scan and traditional stress test in patients with chest pain

Study compares effectiveness of CT scan and traditional stress test in patients with chest pain

Patients with chest pain have similar rates of heart attacks and other major cardiac events within two years whether they were evaluated with a new type of CT scan or the traditional stress test, according to results presented today by Duke Medicine researchers at a meeting of the American College of Cardiology. [More]
New research initiative seeks to speed up implementation of health care policy for women veterans

New research initiative seeks to speed up implementation of health care policy for women veterans

As more women veterans seek health care in the Veterans Administration system, effective approaches are needed to ensure that their unique needs are recognized and met. A special April supplement to Medical Care collects new studies from an ongoing research initiative to inform health care policy for women veterans. [More]
CT coronary angiography can accurately diagnose coronary artery disease

CT coronary angiography can accurately diagnose coronary artery disease

Use of computed tomography coronary angiography, which provides 3-D images of the heart, coupled with standard care allows doctors to more accurately diagnose coronary artery disease in patients presenting with chest pain, therefore, leading to more appropriate follow-up testing and treatments, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 64th Annual Scientific Session. [More]
Exposure to diesel exhaust may exacerbate respiratory diseases

Exposure to diesel exhaust may exacerbate respiratory diseases

Researchers in the UK have, for the first time, shown how exhaust pollution from diesel engines is able to affect nerves within the lung. Air pollution is a significant threat to health, they say, and identifying potential mechanisms linking exposure to diesel exhaust and the exacerbation of respiratory diseases may lead to treatments for those affected. [More]
Study sheds light on cell migration mechanisms involved in wound-healing process

Study sheds light on cell migration mechanisms involved in wound-healing process

Researchers at the University of Arizona have discovered what causes and regulates collective cell migration, one of the most universal but least understood biological processes in all living organisms. [More]
Creatine monohydrate disappoints in Parkinson’s disease

Creatine monohydrate disappoints in Parkinson’s disease

Creatine monohydrate fails to live up to its early promise in patients with Parkinson’s disease, show the results of the Long-term Study 1. [More]
Combining CT measurements assists pulmonary hypertension prediction

Combining CT measurements assists pulmonary hypertension prediction

Research suggests that combining pulmonary artery and ventricular measurements improves the chances of identifying pulmonary hypertension in patients undergoing computed tomography pulmonary angiography. [More]
Blunted cortisol response common in non-classic CAH

Blunted cortisol response common in non-classic CAH

Nearly two-thirds of children with non-classic congenital adrenal hyperplasia have an inadequate cortisol response, report researchers. [More]
Parenchymal preservation surgery linked to lower mortality, complication rates in cancer patients

Parenchymal preservation surgery linked to lower mortality, complication rates in cancer patients

A surgical approach in which a surgeon removes less than a lobe of the liver in a patient undergoing an operation for liver cancer is associated with lower mortality and complication rates, according to new study results published online as an "article in press" in the Journal of the American College of Surgeons (JACS). [More]
Guanabenz drug prevents myelin loss, alleviates symptoms of MS in animal models

Guanabenz drug prevents myelin loss, alleviates symptoms of MS in animal models

An FDA-approved drug for high blood pressure, guanabenz, prevents myelin loss and alleviates clinical symptoms of multiple sclerosis (MS) in animal models, according to a new study. [More]
Stress about financial/economic issues is a leading factor that impacts people's sleep

Stress about financial/economic issues is a leading factor that impacts people's sleep

Royal Philips today released "Sleep: A Global Perspective," the first in a series of reports highlighting sleep trends and habits collected from a survey of nearly 8,000 people across 10 countries. [More]
Slow-growing tumors have treatment-resistant stem cells, shows study

Slow-growing tumors have treatment-resistant stem cells, shows study

Scientists are eager to make use of stem cells' extraordinary power to transform into nearly any kind of cell, but that ability also is cause for concern in cancer treatment. [More]
UC San Diego scientist selected to receive Linda E. Saltzman New Investigator Award

UC San Diego scientist selected to receive Linda E. Saltzman New Investigator Award

Jamila K. Stockman, PhD, MPH, assistant professor of medicine and global public health at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine has been selected to receive the Linda E. Saltzman New Investigator Award. [More]
Yoga could help reduce depression in pregnant women

Yoga could help reduce depression in pregnant women

In a small pilot study, researchers at Brown University, Butler Hospital, and Women & Infants' Hospital have found evidence suggesting that yoga could help pregnant women with significant depression reduce the severity of the mood disorder. [More]
Research findings offer new insights into pathophysiology of PTSD

Research findings offer new insights into pathophysiology of PTSD

Researchers at the Veterans Affairs San Diego Healthcare System and University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, with colleagues in New York and the United Kingdom, have identified genetic markers, derived from blood samples that are linked to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The markers are associated with gene networks that regulate innate immune function and interferon signaling. [More]
Sanford-Burnham researchers discover control mechanism for glutamine uptake in breast cancer cells

Sanford-Burnham researchers discover control mechanism for glutamine uptake in breast cancer cells

Researchers at Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute have discovered a mechanism that explains why some breast cancer tumors respond to specific chemotherapies and others do not. The findings highlight the level of glutamine, an essential nutrient for cancer development, as a determinant of breast cancer response to select anticancer therapies, and identify a marker associated with glutamine uptake, for potential prognosis and stratification of breast cancer therapy. [More]
2U, Yale University partner to launch online Master of Medical Science degree for PA

2U, Yale University partner to launch online Master of Medical Science degree for PA

2U, Inc., today announced that it is partnering with Yale University to launch an online Master of Medical Science (MMSc) degree for aspiring physician associates (PA), pending approval of the online program by the Accreditation Review Commission on Education for the Physician Assistant and various state licensing agencies. [More]
Researchers identify new class of drugs that slows aging process

Researchers identify new class of drugs that slows aging process

A research team from The Scripps Research Institute, Mayo Clinic and other institutions has identified a new class of drugs that in animal models dramatically slows the aging process—alleviating symptoms of frailty, improving cardiac function and extending a healthy lifespan. [More]
Narcolepsy bears trademarks of classic autoimmune disorder

Narcolepsy bears trademarks of classic autoimmune disorder

Narcoleptics suffer from bouts of sleepiness and sleep attacks, which impair their ability to function in daily life. But the precise cause of narcolepsy has long eluded scientists, and the cure for the devastating neurological disorder afflicting an estimated three million people worldwide -- and one in 3,000 Americans -- remains at bay. [More]
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