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Strong ‘therapeutic alliance’ can be key to successful treatment of alcohol use disorder

A positive, trusting relationship between counselor and patient, known as a "therapeutic alliance," can be key to successful treatment of alcohol use disorder, a new study finds. [More]
SCS therapy can be key to reducing use of opioids in patients battling chronic pain, study finds

SCS therapy can be key to reducing use of opioids in patients battling chronic pain, study finds

New research has found spinal cord stimulation (SCS) therapy can be key to reducing or stabilizing the use of opioids in patients battling chronic pain. [More]
Study challenges concept of gender differences in the human brain

Study challenges concept of gender differences in the human brain

How different are men and women's brains? The latest evidence to address this controversy comes from a study at Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science, where a meta-analysis of human amygdala volumes found no significant difference between the sexes. [More]
Heavy adolescent drinking alters cortical excitability and functional connectivity in the brain

Heavy adolescent drinking alters cortical excitability and functional connectivity in the brain

Long-term heavy use of alcohol in adolescence alters cortical excitability and functional connectivity in the brain, according to a new study from the University of Eastern Finland and Kuopio University Hospital. [More]
New pocket guide offers detailed guidance on treating older adults with mental health issues

New pocket guide offers detailed guidance on treating older adults with mental health issues

Nearly 20 percent of older Americans experience depression and the highest rate of suicide is among older adult Caucasian males. [More]
Frequent online social interactions may mitigate symptoms of game addiction in teenagers

Frequent online social interactions may mitigate symptoms of game addiction in teenagers

Teenagers who play video games for more than four hours a day suffer from symptoms of depression, but frequent use of social media and instant messaging may mitigate symptoms of game addiction in these teens, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health-led research suggests. [More]
Researchers explore cause for increasing use of cannabis among older Americans

Researchers explore cause for increasing use of cannabis among older Americans

The U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration has reported that cannabis use by persons over age 50 has outpaced recent growth observed across all other age groups. [More]
Hormonal fluctuations make women more sensitive to addictive properties of cocaine, study reveals

Hormonal fluctuations make women more sensitive to addictive properties of cocaine, study reveals

Hormonal fluctuations women undergo make them particularly sensitive, compared to men, to the addictive properties of cocaine, according to a study conducted at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published January 10 in the journal Nature Communications. [More]
Study identifies factors linked to disengagement from treatment for opioid use disorder

Study identifies factors linked to disengagement from treatment for opioid use disorder

Individuals with opioid use disorder who are treated with buprenorphine, a commonly prescribed drug to treat addiction, are more likely to disengage from treatment programs if they are black or Hispanic, unemployed, or have hepatitis C according to a study published online in the Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment. [More]
Researchers warn about taking psilocybin-containing ‘magic mushrooms’

Researchers warn about taking psilocybin-containing ‘magic mushrooms’

In a survey of almost 2,000 people who said they had had a past negative experience when taking psilocybin-containing "magic mushrooms," Johns Hopkins researchers say that more than 10 percent believed their worst "bad trip" had put themselves or others in harm's way, and a substantial majority called their most distressing episode one of the top 10 biggest challenges of their lives. [More]
Legalization of recreational marijuana changes teens' use and perceptions of marijuana

Legalization of recreational marijuana changes teens' use and perceptions of marijuana

Marijuana use significantly increased and its perceived harm decreased among eighth- and 10th-graders in Washington state following enactment of recreational marijuana laws, according to a UC Davis and Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health to be published online in JAMA Pediatrics. [More]
Psychiatric and behavioral conditions are important risk factors for long-term opioid use

Psychiatric and behavioral conditions are important risk factors for long-term opioid use

A wide range of pre-existing psychiatric and behavioral conditions and the use of psychoactive drugs could be important risk factors leading to long-term use of opioid pain medications, reports a study in PAIN, the official publication of the International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP). [More]
'Friendship Bench' approach holds potential to improve lives of people with mental health problems

'Friendship Bench' approach holds potential to improve lives of people with mental health problems

Their offices are simple wooden seats, called Friendship Benches, located in the grounds of health clinics around Harare and other major cities in Zimbabwe. [More]
New UCLA research recommends community clinics to routinely screen for misuse of drugs

New UCLA research recommends community clinics to routinely screen for misuse of drugs

The misuse of both prescription and illicit drugs is so prevalent in Tijuana and East Los Angeles that community clinics in those areas should routinely, though discreetly, screen for it, according to new UCLA research. [More]
Later high school start times linked to positive outcomes among teens

Later high school start times linked to positive outcomes among teens

A review of the scientific literature by a workgroup composed of representatives from the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Sleep Research Society, and American Academy of Dental Sleep Medicine found that later high school start times are associated with positive outcomes among teens, including longer weekday sleep durations and reduced vehicular accident rates. [More]
Over-the-counter antioxidant may promote reductions in alcohol use in marijuana-dependent teens

Over-the-counter antioxidant may promote reductions in alcohol use in marijuana-dependent teens

An over-the-counter antioxidant known as N-acetylcysteine (NAC) is showing early promise at promoting abstinence from or reduced use of alcohol in marijuana-dependent adolescents, report researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) in the December 2016 Addictive Behaviors. [More]
Body image behavioral misperception linked to alcohol use among high school girls

Body image behavioral misperception linked to alcohol use among high school girls

Among high school girls ages 14-18, those who report and act on body image misperceptions are more likely to have had at least one drink in their life, and more likely to have engaged in episodes of heavy drinking than girls of the same age without body image misperceptions, a new study has found. [More]
Study reveals self-harm is leading cause of pregnancy-related deaths in Colorado

Study reveals self-harm is leading cause of pregnancy-related deaths in Colorado

Self-harm was the leading cause of pregnancy-associated deaths in Colorado from 2004 to 2014, ahead of car crashes, medical conditions and homicide, according to researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. [More]
New research categorizes patients with depression into four unique subtypes

New research categorizes patients with depression into four unique subtypes

Patients with depression can be categorized into four unique subtypes defined by distinct patterns of abnormal connectivity in the brain, according to new research from Weill Cornell Medicine. [More]
UAB physician calls for better education, legislation to help patients with opioid abuse

UAB physician calls for better education, legislation to help patients with opioid abuse

The U.S. opioid epidemic has evolved so much in the last four years that current federal policy responses risk diminishing returns in saving human lives, according to a new peer-reviewed perspective by University of Alabama at Birmingham Associate Professor of Preventive medicine Stefan Kertesz, M.D. His perspective was published online in the addiction journal Substance Abuse. [More]
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