Substance Abuse News and Research RSS Feed - Substance Abuse News and Research

Statistical analysis finds correlation between high BMI, cigarette smoking in teens

Statistical analysis finds correlation between high BMI, cigarette smoking in teens

A study examining whether overweight or obese teens are at higher risk for substance abuse finds both good and bad news: weight status has no correlation with alcohol or marijuana use but is linked to regular cigarette smoking. [More]
New Coalition helps prevent abuse, misuse, diversion of ADHD drug

New Coalition helps prevent abuse, misuse, diversion of ADHD drug

Today is the official launch of a newly formed Coalition of medical, mental health, higher education, student and pharmaceutical organizations that will work together to help prevent misuse, abuse and diversion of ADHD prescription stimulant medication. The Coalition will initially focus its efforts on college students. [More]
Gang involvement poses serious health-related risks for African American girls

Gang involvement poses serious health-related risks for African American girls

Being involved in a gang poses considerable health-related risks for adolescent African American girls, including more casual sex partners and substance abuse combined with less testing for HIV and less knowledge about preventing sexually transmitted diseases, according to a new study. [More]
Research delves into social norms and beliefs of teenage male electronic cigarette users

Research delves into social norms and beliefs of teenage male electronic cigarette users

"The Social Norms and Beliefs of Teenage Male Electronic Cigarette Use," a research study published in Journal of Ethnicity in Substance Abuse (Routledge), delves into the social norms and beliefs of teenage male electronic cigarette users. [More]
Survey of veterans receiving mental health services finds general satisfaction

Survey of veterans receiving mental health services finds general satisfaction

A survey of U.S. veterans receiving mental health services from the Veterans Health Administration finds general satisfaction, but also significant room for improvement among all areas studied. [More]
Social integration, strong family ties can help those who struggle with substance abuse

Social integration, strong family ties can help those who struggle with substance abuse

Social integration, including strong family ties, can protect one's well-being and even reduce the impact high-risk genes have on health. [More]
Mount Sinai researchers receive federal funding to treat HCV in primary care settings

Mount Sinai researchers receive federal funding to treat HCV in primary care settings

With the number of people with chronic hepatitis C reaching record levels in New York City and the recent availability of more effective treatments, researchers from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai recently announced the receipt of $1.9 million in federal funding to increase its capacity to treat HCV in primary care settings. [More]
Findings may help identify teens who are at risk for dangerous behaviors in the future

Findings may help identify teens who are at risk for dangerous behaviors in the future

According to the CDC, unintentional injuries are the leading cause of death for adolescents. Compared to the two leading causes of death for all Americans, heart disease and cancer, a pattern of questionable decision-making in dire situations comes to light in teen mortality. [More]
State highlights: Fed. judge in Ore. rules health plan wrongly denied autism coverage; new rules could disrupt care for disabled Kansans

State highlights: Fed. judge in Ore. rules health plan wrongly denied autism coverage; new rules could disrupt care for disabled Kansans

In a potentially far-reaching opinion, a federal judge in Portland has ruled that Providence Health Plan wrongfully denied insurance coverage for groundbreaking autism therapy for two Portland boys. [More]
Study suggests ways to treat cognitive deficits before psychiatric symptoms develop

Study suggests ways to treat cognitive deficits before psychiatric symptoms develop

Researchers at the University of Montreal and CHU Sainte-Justine Research Centre have traced the origins of ADHD, substance abuse and conduct disorder, and found that they develop from the same neurocognitive deficits, which in turn explains why they often occur together. [More]
State highlights: Mo. drops many from Medicaid; Mich. Medicaid shift savings

State highlights: Mo. drops many from Medicaid; Mich. Medicaid shift savings

A selection of health policy stories from Texas, Missouri, Illinois, Michigan, Florida, Pennsylvania, North Carolina and Minnesota. [More]
State highlights: Abortion restrictions prompt Senate fights; Vt.'s single payer March; Kan. uninsured numbers up

State highlights: Abortion restrictions prompt Senate fights; Vt.'s single payer March; Kan. uninsured numbers up

The 2014 campaign hasn't had the equivalent of Todd Akin's infamous rape comments driving the abortion debate. Instead, Democrats and Republicans are using a slew of new state abortion restrictions as weapons in the tight battle for control of the Senate. [More]
Helping women overcome the mental anguish of unwanted sexual advances

Helping women overcome the mental anguish of unwanted sexual advances

Some young women simply have more resilience and better coping skills and can shrug off the effect of unwanted cat calls, demeaning looks and sexual advances. Women with low resilience struggle and could develop psychological problems when they internalize such behavior, because they think they are to blame. [More]
New study casts doubt on the effectiveness of brief counseling for illicit drug use

New study casts doubt on the effectiveness of brief counseling for illicit drug use

In an effort to stem substance use, the U.S. has invested heavily in the past decade in a brief screening-and-intervention protocol for alcohol and other drugs. [More]
Sinai Hospital’s groundbreaking program helps ER patients to manage own care

Sinai Hospital’s groundbreaking program helps ER patients to manage own care

Sinai Hospital of Baltimore and HealthCare Access Maryland are piloting a groundbreaking program developed to proactively help patients, who frequently use the hospital's Emergency Department for non-urgent and chronic health conditions, better manage their own care, lead healthier lives, and in turn, save precious health-related resources. [More]
Researcher examines effectiveness of brief interventions for reducing problem drug use

Researcher examines effectiveness of brief interventions for reducing problem drug use

Peter Roy-Byrne, M.D., formerly of the University of Washington, Seattle, and colleagues write that few data exist on the effectiveness of brief (1-2 sessions) interventions for reducing problem drug use, a common issue in disadvantaged populations seeking care in safety-net medical settings (hospitals and community health clinics serving low-income patients with limited or no insurance). [More]
Roundtable discussion on heroin and prescription drug abuse

Roundtable discussion on heroin and prescription drug abuse

Jersey Shore University Medical Center hosted a roundtable discussion on August 4, led by Assemblywoman Mary Pat Angelini, to discuss the continued growth in heroin and prescription drug abuse in the shore community. [More]
Drug, alcohol addiction rehab in the US is big business

Drug, alcohol addiction rehab in the US is big business

Drug, alcohol and other addiction rehab in the United States is big business - $35 billion this year. There are now 14,000+ treatment facilities and growing. [More]
State highlights: Time of turmoil for Georgia hospitals; Oregon Medicaid takes aim at expensive heptatitis C drug

State highlights: Time of turmoil for Georgia hospitals; Oregon Medicaid takes aim at expensive heptatitis C drug

A selection of health policy stories from Gerogia, Wisconsin, Texas, Oregon, Florida, Michigan, Massachusetts, Connecticut and North Carolina. [More]

People with family incarcerations in their youth are more likely as adults to engage in smoking

New research shows that people who grew up in a household where a member was incarcerated have a 16-percent greater risk of experiencing poor health quality than adults who did not have a family member sent to prison. [More]