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The term sudden cardiac death refers to natural death from cardiac causes, heralded by abrupt loss of consciousness within one hour of the onset of acute symptoms.
Scientists develop new predictive model to help identify sudden cardiac death

Scientists develop new predictive model to help identify sudden cardiac death

Researchers from Emory's Rollins School of Public Health developed a sudden cardiac death (SCD) predictive model that can help identify and prevent the disease in individuals at high risk. [More]
Penn researchers develop model to predict sudden cardiac death risk

Penn researchers develop model to predict sudden cardiac death risk

Each year more than 300,000 Americans will succumb to out-of-hospital sudden cardiac death (SCD) -- the immediate and unexpected cessation of the heart's ability to function properly -- one of the leading causes of death in the United States. [More]
Scientists link malfunctioning molecular pathways to specific heart abnormalities in SCA

Scientists link malfunctioning molecular pathways to specific heart abnormalities in SCA

Patients with sickle cell anemia (SCA) develop heart complications and nearly a quarter die a sudden death. Now, researchers have linked malfunctioning molecular pathways to specific heart anomalies in SCA that result from progressive fibrosis and result in sudden death. [More]
Research shows clear link between heart and the brain of LQTS patients

Research shows clear link between heart and the brain of LQTS patients

Researchers at the University of Rochester Medical Center recently discovered a genetic link between Long QT Syndrome (LQTS), a rare cardiac rhythm disease, and an increased risk for seizures. [More]
Clinical study examines new treatment option for aortic stenosis patients with larger valve structure

Clinical study examines new treatment option for aortic stenosis patients with larger valve structure

A clinical trial exploring a new minimally invasive treatment option for some patients with severe aortic stenosis recently launched at Baylor Jack and Jane Hamilton Heart and Vascular Hospital. [More]
Genetic testing worthwhile in sudden cardiac death

Genetic testing worthwhile in sudden cardiac death

Genetic testing and family screening help to provide explanations for sudden cardiac death in children and young adults, shows a population-based study. [More]
Consensus paper on atrial cardiomyopathies could be important step forward for research, treatment

Consensus paper on atrial cardiomyopathies could be important step forward for research, treatment

The first consensus paper on atrial cardiomyopathies is set to be published simultaneously in EP-Europace, HeartRhythm, and the Journal of Arrhythmia. The key contents are launched today at CARDIOSTIM - EHRA EUROPACE 2016. [More]
Heart rhythm disorder may increase death risk in motor vehicle accident victims

Heart rhythm disorder may increase death risk in motor vehicle accident victims

A study in nearly three million motor vehicle accident victims has found that atrial fibrillation is associated with a higher risk of death. [More]
Women more likely to be hospitalised for acute ischaemic stroke than men, say researchers

Women more likely to be hospitalised for acute ischaemic stroke than men, say researchers

A 15 year study in 1.1 million patients with atrial fibrillation has found that women are 23% more likely to be hospitalised for acute ischaemic stroke than men. The research was presented today at CARDIOSTIM - EHRA EUROPACE 2016 by Dr Ghanshyam Shantha, a cardiovascular disease fellow at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa, US. [More]
Prolonged exposure to EAS systems can affect health of cardiac device patients

Prolonged exposure to EAS systems can affect health of cardiac device patients

Electronic anti-theft systems still post a threat to cardiac device patients, according to research presented today at CARDIOSTIM - EHRA EUROPACE 2016 by Professor Robert Stevenson, senior scientist at Greatbatch Medical in Santa Clarita, California, US. [More]
New research refutes hypothesis that elite endurance training causes right ventricle damage

New research refutes hypothesis that elite endurance training causes right ventricle damage

In 2012, Belgium scientists published a study that concluded that repeated bouts of intensive endurance exercise at the elite level may result in the pathological enlargement of the right ventricle, which, according to the article, is associated with potential health hazards including sudden cardia death. [More]
Non-invasive 3-D virtual heart assessment tool can help predict arrhythmia risk in patients

Non-invasive 3-D virtual heart assessment tool can help predict arrhythmia risk in patients

When electrical waves in the heart run amok in a condition called arrhythmia, sudden death can occur. To save the life of a patient at risk, doctors currently implant a small defibrillator to sense the onset of arrhythmia and jolt the heart back to a normal rhythm. [More]
New consensus statement guides student-athletes to respond to sudden cardiac arrest

New consensus statement guides student-athletes to respond to sudden cardiac arrest

The Journal of the American College of Cardiology today published a consensus statement that establishes guidance for conducting pre-participation screenings of college athletes and encourages emergency action plans for quickly responding to sudden cardiac arrest. [More]
UAB researchers focus on five key areas to improve care of CVD patients

UAB researchers focus on five key areas to improve care of CVD patients

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, approximately 610,000 people die of heart disease in the United States every year — that's one in every four deaths. The impact of cardiovascular diseases is quite large. [More]
New analysis of heart structure, function for prevention of cardiac emergencies in basketball players

New analysis of heart structure, function for prevention of cardiac emergencies in basketball players

An analysis of the cardiac structure and function of more than 500 National Basketball Association (NBA) players provides information that can be incorporated into clinical assessments for the prevention of cardiac emergencies in basketball players and the athletic community at large, according to a study published online by JAMA Cardiology. [More]
Family members affected by sudden cardiac death need better psychological support

Family members affected by sudden cardiac death need better psychological support

In a world-first survey study, researchers from the Centenary Institute and the University of Sydney have highlighted the need for better psychological support for families affected by sudden cardiac death due to a genetic heart disease. [More]
CAP2 gene responsible for cardiac conduction disease in mice

CAP2 gene responsible for cardiac conduction disease in mice

The presence or absence of the CAP2 gene causes sudden cardiac death in mice, according to new research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. In particular, the absence of the gene interrupts the animal's ability to send electrical signals to the heart to tell it to contract, a condition called cardiac conduction disease. [More]
Study explores prevalence of myocardial scars in middle-aged and older population

Study explores prevalence of myocardial scars in middle-aged and older population

In a multiethnic, middle-aged and older study population, the prevalence of myocardial scars (evidence of a heart attack) was nearly 8 percent, of which nearly 80 percent were unrecognized by electrocardiography or clinical evaluation, according to a study in the November 10 issue of JAMA. [More]
Study: Blackouts, near drownings linked to sudden death risk

Study: Blackouts, near drownings linked to sudden death risk

The annual congress of the South African Heart Association is being held in Rustenburg from Oct. 25-28, 2015. Experts from the European Society of Cardiology will present a special programme. [More]
Infections experienced in childhood may lead to premature ACS or heart attacks

Infections experienced in childhood may lead to premature ACS or heart attacks

"Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the number one killer worldwide, including in Indonesia where it accounts for 31.9% of all deaths," said Dr Qanitha. "CVD risk factors are rising rapidly in South-East Asia, particularly in young people. Most Indonesian CVD patients are under 56 years old and still economically productive. This very young CVD onset raises the question of whether local circumstances may play a role." [More]
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