Tetanus News and Research RSS Feed - Tetanus News and Research

Tetanus is a severe, frequently fatal disease caused by an exotoxin produced by Clostridium tetani, a bacterium that is found in the environment. Tetanus is not transmitted from person to person. Rather, Clostridium tetani enters the body through an open wound, including lacerations, abrasions and puncture wounds. The toxin causes neuromuscular dysfunction, with rigidity and spasms of skeletal muscles. The muscle spasms usually start in the jaw (which is why the disease is sometimes called "lockjaw") and neck and may spread to many other muscles, leading to generalized paralysis.
MinuteClinic enters into clinical collaboration agreement with Lifespan

MinuteClinic enters into clinical collaboration agreement with Lifespan

MinuteClinic, the retail medical clinic of CVS Health, and Lifespan, Rhode Island's largest health system, which includes five partner hospitals and multiple physician groups, announced today that they have entered into a clinical collaboration agreement. [More]
ADI develops ELISA test kits for detection of Ebola viral protein antibodies

ADI develops ELISA test kits for detection of Ebola viral protein antibodies

San Antonio, Texas-based Biotech Company Alpha Diagnostic Int'l has developed and released several convenient, rapid, and sensitive ELISA test kits for the detection of major Ebola viral protein antibodies (Glycoprotein, GP; Nucleoprotein, NP, and Viral Protein 40 or VP40). [More]
Foreign-born residents with low vaccination rates face greater risk of exposure to diseases

Foreign-born residents with low vaccination rates face greater risk of exposure to diseases

Foreign-born residents with low vaccination rates and their relatives in the U.S. are at greater risk of exposure to several vaccine-preventable diseases, e.g. influenza; pneumococcal diseases; tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis; hepatitis A; hepatitis B; shingles; and HPV, the human papilloma virus, which can lead to some types of cancer. [More]
Columbia University professor recommends vaccination for people travelling abroad

Columbia University professor recommends vaccination for people travelling abroad

Planning to travel outside the U.S. this holiday season? Check with your primary care provider or travel clinic when you book your flight. [More]
Sustained international efforts can help reduce premature deaths by 40% over next 20 years

Sustained international efforts can help reduce premature deaths by 40% over next 20 years

New research published today [Friday 19 September] in The Lancet suggests that, with sustained international efforts, the number of premature deaths could be reduced by 40% over the next two decades (2010-2030), halving under–50 mortality and preventing a third of the deaths at ages 50–69 years. [More]
Moms should be vaccinated for whooping cough during third trimester

Moms should be vaccinated for whooping cough during third trimester

Expectant moms should be vaccinated for pertussis, or whooping cough, during their third trimester, according to obstetricians at Loyola University Health System. Those in close contact with the infant also should be up to date with their whooping cough vaccine. [More]
High uptake of US infant vaccination in 2013

High uptake of US infant vaccination in 2013

The recently published National Immunization Survey (NIS) conducted by the CDC, shows that the majority of infants in the US were vaccinated against potentially serious diseases in 2013. Fewer than 1% of children were unvaccinated in 2013. [More]
First MinuteClinic walk-in medical clinics in Nebraska

First MinuteClinic walk-in medical clinics in Nebraska

The first MinuteClinic walk-in medical clinics in Nebraska are opening this week inside select CVS/pharmacy stores. Two clinics opened yesterday in Lincoln and one is opening today in Omaha. A third clinic in Lincoln and three more clinics in the Omaha area will open later this month. [More]
Little-known supportive cells in brain may play major role in cognitive function

Little-known supportive cells in brain may play major role in cognitive function

When you're expecting something-like the meal you've ordered at a restaurant-or when something captures your interest, unique electrical rhythms sweep through your brain. [More]
Doctors remind parents about importance of immunizing children

Doctors remind parents about importance of immunizing children

Doctors at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center want to remind parents about the importance of immunizing their children when preparing to send the children back to school. [More]
Trials show immunizations are effective in adults

Trials show immunizations are effective in adults

As kids prepare to head back to school, required immunizations are typically on the to-do list, but getting potentially lifesaving vaccines should not end when adulthood begins, says one University of Alabama at Birmingham infectious diseases expert. [More]
Uptake of HPV vaccine in US is unacceptably low

Uptake of HPV vaccine in US is unacceptably low

Data from the CDC's 2013 National Immunization Survey-Teen (NIS-Teen) published today show that the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine continues to be underutilized. [More]
Ralphs Pharmacies continue to offer Tdap vaccinations for whooping cough in Southern California

Ralphs Pharmacies continue to offer Tdap vaccinations for whooping cough in Southern California

As the number of pertussis cases, also known as whooping cough, reaches epidemic proportions in California, Ralphs Pharmacies continue to offer Tdap (tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis) vaccinations at its 85 in-store pharmacies throughout Southern California. [More]
Studies confirm importance of men seeing physician on regular basis

Studies confirm importance of men seeing physician on regular basis

For many men being a father is about staying strong as they protect and care for their family. Some men see going to the doctor as a weakness or nuisance, but protecting your health is one of the best things a father can do for his family. [More]
Sanofi presents Phase II trial results for investigational vaccine for prevention of CDI

Sanofi presents Phase II trial results for investigational vaccine for prevention of CDI

Sanofi Pasteur, the vaccines division of Sanofi, presented Phase II (H-030-012) trial results for an investigational vaccine for the prevention of Clostridium difficile infection at the 114th General Meeting of the American Society for Microbiology. [More]
Pfizer reports positive results from rLP2086 Phase 2 study for invasive meningococcal disease

Pfizer reports positive results from rLP2086 Phase 2 study for invasive meningococcal disease

Pfizer Inc. announced today the results from two Phase 2 studies of bivalent rLP2086, Pfizer's recombinant vaccine candidate, currently under development for the prevention of invasive meningococcal disease caused by Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B in 10 to 25 year olds. [More]
MinuteClinic walk-in medical clinics open in central Georgia

MinuteClinic walk-in medical clinics open in central Georgia

The first MinuteClinic walk-in medical clinics in central Georgia have opened inside two CVS/pharmacy stores in Macon and one in Warner Robbins. [More]
Rates of infant immunization with pertussis-containing vaccine do not increase with epidemic

Rates of infant immunization with pertussis-containing vaccine do not increase with epidemic

Conventional wisdom holds that when the risk of catching a disease is high, people are more likely to get vaccinated to protect themselves. [More]
Research provides definitive evidence of safety of Tdap immunization during pregnancy

Research provides definitive evidence of safety of Tdap immunization during pregnancy

A preliminary study finds that receipt of the tetanus toxoid, reduced diphtheria toxoid, and acellular pertussis (Tdap) vaccine in the third trimester of pregnancy did not increase the risk of adverse events for the mother or infant, according to a study in the May 7 issue of JAMA, a theme issue on child health. [More]
Promising new approach targets cancer protein to slow tumor growth

Promising new approach targets cancer protein to slow tumor growth

Sometimes a full-on assault isn't the best approach when dealing with a powerful enemy. A more effective approach, in the long run, may be to target the support system replenishing the supplies that keep your foe strong and ready for battle. [More]