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The Thalamus is an area of the brain that helps process information from the senses and transmit it to other parts of the brain.
Scientists identify microrna that provides clues for quieting auditory hallucinations of schizophrenia

Scientists identify microrna that provides clues for quieting auditory hallucinations of schizophrenia

St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists have identified a small RNA (microRNA) that may be essential to restoring normal function in a brain circuit associated with the "voices" and other hallucinations of schizophrenia. [More]
Study using Cubresa SPECT scanner finds potential non-invasive diagnosis for Alzheimer’s

Study using Cubresa SPECT scanner finds potential non-invasive diagnosis for Alzheimer’s

Cubresa’s SPECT scanner was used to determine if a novel molecular label, TRV6001, in development for in vivo imaging of the BChE enzyme present in the brains of Alzheimer’s Disease patients follows the known distribution of the enzyme in animal models of the disease. [More]
UAB case study details patient experiencing hemorrhagic stroke after consumption of energy drink

UAB case study details patient experiencing hemorrhagic stroke after consumption of energy drink

Investigators at the University of Alabama at Birmingham have presented the first case study of a patient experiencing a hemorrhagic stroke — a brain bleed — following consumption of an energy drink. [More]
Researchers find differences in the brain regions of children with Tourette's syndrome

Researchers find differences in the brain regions of children with Tourette's syndrome

Using MRIs, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have identified areas in the brains of children with Tourette's syndrome that appear markedly different from the same areas in the brains of children who don't have the neuropsychiatric disorder. [More]
Fetal brains use unique amplifier to transmit signals, research shows

Fetal brains use unique amplifier to transmit signals, research shows

Fetal brains use a special amplifier in order to transmit signals, according to research published in the journal eLife by George Washington University's (GW) Matthew Colonnese, Ph.D. and Yasunobu Murata, Ph.D. Early neural connections are sparse, weak, and unreliable. [More]
Brain atrophy patterns linked to loss of specific cognitive abilities in patients with Alzheimer's disease

Brain atrophy patterns linked to loss of specific cognitive abilities in patients with Alzheimer's disease

Mathematical modeling of the brain scans of patients with Alzheimer's disease and others at risk for the devastating neurodegenerative disorder has identified specific patterns of brain atrophy that appear to be related to the loss of particular cognitive abilities. [More]
Research provides scientific evidence for adverse effects of cannabis intake on brain development

Research provides scientific evidence for adverse effects of cannabis intake on brain development

Researchers have clarified important mechanisms involved in the formation of neural circuits in the brain. [More]
MRI-guided focused ultrasound treatment improves quality of life in patients with essential tremor

MRI-guided focused ultrasound treatment improves quality of life in patients with essential tremor

Treatment with MRI-guided focused ultrasound significantly improves tremors and quality of life in patients with essential tremor (ET), the most common movement disorder, according to a study published in the August 25 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. [More]
New report documents fetal brain abnormalities linked to congenital Zika infection

New report documents fetal brain abnormalities linked to congenital Zika infection

In a special report released August 23 in the journal Radiology, a team of researchers including Deborah Levine, MD, Director of Obstetric & Gynecologic ultrasound at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School, documented the brain abnormalities associated with congenital Zika in 45 confirmed and presumed cases from northeastern Brazil. [More]
UCLA researchers use noninvasive ultrasound technique to jump-start the brain of coma patient

UCLA researchers use noninvasive ultrasound technique to jump-start the brain of coma patient

A 25-year-old man recovering from a coma has made remarkable progress following a treatment at UCLA to jump-start his brain using ultrasound. [More]
New noninvasive treatment option improves quality of life in patients with essential tremor

New noninvasive treatment option improves quality of life in patients with essential tremor

Treatment with MRI-guided focused ultrasound significantly improves tremors and quality of life in patients with essential tremor (ET), the most common movement disorder, according to a study published in the August 25 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. [More]
FDA approves new ExAblate Neuro to treat patients with essential tremor

FDA approves new ExAblate Neuro to treat patients with essential tremor

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved the first focused ultrasound device to treat essential tremor in patients who have not responded to medication. ExAblate Neuro uses magnetic resonance (MR) images taken during the procedure to deliver focused ultrasound to destroy brain tissue in a tiny area thought to be responsible for causing tremors. [More]
Neuroscientists map neural connections over long distances in the brain

Neuroscientists map neural connections over long distances in the brain

A team of neuroscientists at the Champalimaud Centre for the Unknown, in Lisbon, has been able to map single neural connections over long distances in the brain. [More]
Music instruction improves cognitive, socio-emotional development in young children

Music instruction improves cognitive, socio-emotional development in young children

Music instruction appears to accelerate brain development in young children, particularly in the areas of the brain that are responsible for processing sound, language development, speech perception and reading skills, according to initial results of a five-year study by USC neuroscientists. [More]
Research highlights significance of ultra-rapid brain responses to threat-related visual stimuli

Research highlights significance of ultra-rapid brain responses to threat-related visual stimuli

An international team lead by researchers from CTB-UPM shows that the amygdala in the human brain is able to detect possible threats in the visual environment at ultra-fast time scales. [More]

Mediodorsal thalamus plays key role in new learning and decision making

Scientists have confirmed one of the brain areas responsible for rapid updating of information during learning - the sort of information we use to negotiate many changing situations in everyday life. [More]
Exposing headache sufferers to pure-wavelength green light can lessen severity of migraines

Exposing headache sufferers to pure-wavelength green light can lessen severity of migraines

Most migraine and post-traumatic headache sufferers find their headaches get worse in light, leading them to quit their most fundamental daily tasks and seek the comfort of darkness. [More]
Researchers identify role of darks in visual brain maps

Researchers identify role of darks in visual brain maps

Scientists have been studying how visual space is mapped in the cerebral cortex for many decades under the assumption that the map is equal for lights and darks. Surprisingly, recent work demonstrates that visual brain maps are dark-centric and that, just as stars rotate around black holes in the Universe, lights rotate around darks in the brain representation of visual space. [More]
Heavy marijuana use may lead to lower dopamine release in the brain

Heavy marijuana use may lead to lower dopamine release in the brain

In a recent study, researchers found evidence of a compromised dopamine system in heavy users of marijuana. Lower dopamine release was found in the striatum - a region of the brain that is involved in working memory, impulsive behavior, and attention. Previous studies have shown that addiction to other drugs of abuse, such as cocaine and heroin, have similar effects on dopamine release, but such evidence for cannabis was missing until now. [More]
Understanding neuronal feedback could provide new insight into visual perception

Understanding neuronal feedback could provide new insight into visual perception

Ever see something that isn't really there? Could your mind be playing tricks on you? The "tricks" might be your brain reacting to feedback between neurons in different parts of the visual system, according to a study published in the Journal of Neuroscience by Carnegie Mellon University Assistant Professor of Biological Sciences Sandra J. Kuhlman and colleagues. [More]
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