Thalamus News and Research RSS Feed - Thalamus News and Research

The Thalamus is an area of the brain that helps process information from the senses and transmit it to other parts of the brain.
Neuroinflammation levels higher in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome

Neuroinflammation levels higher in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome

Researchers at the RIKEN Center for Life Science Technologies, in collaboration with Osaka City University and Kansai University of Welfare Sciences, have used functional PET imaging to show that levels of neuroinflammation, or inflammation of the nervous system, are higher in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome than in healthy people. [More]
NeuroSigma gets approval to market Monarch eTNS System in Australia

NeuroSigma gets approval to market Monarch eTNS System in Australia

NeuroSigma, Inc., a California-based life-sciences company focused on commercialization of its non-invasive Monarch eTNS System for the treatment of neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders, today announced that it has received approval from the Therapeutic Goods Administration to market its Monarch eTNS System in Australia. [More]
Neurosurgeons use MRI-guided laser technology to treat deep brain tumor

Neurosurgeons use MRI-guided laser technology to treat deep brain tumor

Using a novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided laser technology, neurosurgeons at UC San Diego Health System have successfully treated a malignant tumor deep inside a patient's brain. This is the first time that this FDA-approved laser-based treatment has been performed in California. [More]
Drug abuse appears to foster brain changes that resemble schizophrenia

Drug abuse appears to foster brain changes that resemble schizophrenia

Teens who were heavy marijuana users -- smoking it daily for about three years -- had abnormal changes in their brain structures related to working memory and performed poorly on memory tasks, reports a new Northwestern Medicine- study. [More]

Underlying loss of awareness during partial seizures is same as deep sleep

Epilepsy patients with complex partial seizures have impaired consciousness during seizure episodes and typically have no memory of the event. However, the mechanisms of seizure unconsciousness are unclear. [More]

UCL scientists show widespread differences in how genes get expressed in men and women's brains

UCL scientists have shown that there are widespread differences in how genes, the basic building blocks of the human body, are expressed in men and women's brains. [More]

Gray matter changes reflect psychosis burden

Changes in gray matter volume may be associated with psychosis burden rather than clinical diagnosis, research suggests. [More]
Natural painkiller system in the brain responds to social rejection

Natural painkiller system in the brain responds to social rejection

"Sticks and stones may break my bones, but words will never hurt me," goes the playground rhyme that's supposed to help children endure taunts from classmates. But a new study suggests that there's more going on inside our brains when someone snubs us - and that the brain may have its own way of easing social pain. [More]
Odour of newborns activates neural reward circuit in mothers, elicits maternal care functions

Odour of newborns activates neural reward circuit in mothers, elicits maternal care functions

What woman has not wanted to gobble up a baby placed in her arms, even if the baby is not hers? This reaction, which everyone has noticed or felt, could have biological underpinnings related to maternal functions. [More]

‘Risk circuits’ for schizophrenia refined

A study sheds further light on the brain circuits that may underlie risk for schizophrenia. [More]

Discovery sheds light on boundaries between brain regions

If the violins were taken away from the musicians performing Beethoven's 9th symphony, the resulting composition would sound very different. If the violins were left on stage but the violinists were removed, the same mutant version of the symphony would be heard. [More]
InSightec: First patient treated in ExAblate Neuro Phase III pivotal trial for tremor

InSightec: First patient treated in ExAblate Neuro Phase III pivotal trial for tremor

InSightec Ltd, the global leader in MR guided focused ultrasound, announced that the first patient has been treated as part of an ExAblate Neuro Phase III pivotal trial. The trial is a multicenter, double-blinded, randomized study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of treatment using the ExAblate Neuro in medication-refractory essential tremor patients. [More]

Neural clue to poor daytime concentration in insomnia

Researchers have found abnormal neural function in patients with primary insomnia, which may help explain why these patients find it hard to concentrate on daytime tasks despite the absence of objectively measured cognitive deficits. [More]

UCLA study suggests third possible cause for AD: Iron accumulation

​Alzheimer's disease has proven to be a difficult enemy to defeat. After all, aging is the No. 1 risk factor for the disorder, and there's no stopping that. [More]
Researchers create mouse models to advance the study of unusual deadly diseases

Researchers create mouse models to advance the study of unusual deadly diseases

By directly manipulating a portion of the prion protein-coding gene, Whitehead Institute researchers have created mouse models of two neurodegenerative diseases that are fatal in humans. The highly accurate reproduction of disease pathology seen with these models should advance the study of these unusual but deadly diseases. [More]

NeuroSigma receives FDA approval to begin Phase III trial of Monarch eTNS System for epilepsy

NeuroSigma, Inc., today announced conditional approval by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration of its Investigational Device Exemption application to commence a Phase III pivotal trial of the Monarch eTNS System for treatment of drug resistant epilepsy. [More]
Research findings on brain development may shed light on neurological disorders

Research findings on brain development may shed light on neurological disorders

Dennis O'Leary of the Salk Institute was the first scientist to show that the basic functional architecture of the cortex, the largest part of the human brain, was genetically determined during development. [More]

Study: COPD linked with increased risk of developing cerebral microbleeds

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is associated with an increased risk of developing cerebral microbleeds, according to a new study from researchers in the Netherlands. Cerebral microbleeds are a marker of cerebral small vessel disease, an important cause of age-related disability and cognitive decline. [More]
Study examines role of six-layered cerebral cortex in processing sensory information

Study examines role of six-layered cerebral cortex in processing sensory information

A series of studies conducted by Randy Bruno, PhD, and Christine Constantinople, PhD, of Columbia University's Department of Neuroscience, topples convention by showing that sensory information travels to two places at once: not only to the brain's mid-layer (where most axons lead), but also directly to its deeper layers. The study appears in the June 28, 2013, edition of the journal Science. [More]

NeuroSigma's Monarch eTNS System to make Canadian debut at 30th International Epilepsy Congress

NeuroSigma, Inc., a Los Angeles based medical device company, today announced that its Monarch eTNS System for the adjunctive treatment of epilepsy and depression will make its Canadian debut at the 30th International Epilepsy Congress, taking place in Montreal, Canada from June 23 to June 27, 2013. [More]