Tinnitus News and Research RSS Feed - Tinnitus News and Research

Tinnitus is a disorder in which a person hears noises such as buzzing, ringing, clicking, or the sound of a pulse, when no outside sound is causing them. Tinnitus may have many different causes, and may be a symptom of another disease or condition. It may be caused by certain tumors and anticancer drugs.
UK charity Action on Hearing Loss funds new project to develop medicines for hearing loss

UK charity Action on Hearing Loss funds new project to develop medicines for hearing loss

Today, UK charity Action on Hearing Loss announces a major investment to fund a new project to develop medicines to treat age-related hearing loss and noise-induced hearing loss at BioTrinity 2016 – Europe’s Leading Investment and Biopartnering Conference. [More]
Researchers design more effective version of FDA-approved epilepsy drug with fewer side effects

Researchers design more effective version of FDA-approved epilepsy drug with fewer side effects

Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and Arts & Sciences have designed a more effective version of an FDA-approved epilepsy drug with the potential for fewer side effects, according to a study published on March 22 in Molecular Pharmacology. The experimental agent also could prove to be a treatment for tinnitus and other disorders caused by volatile neural signaling. [More]
Concussion-related symptoms improve following initial session of OMT

Concussion-related symptoms improve following initial session of OMT

Two case reports published in The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association document improvements in concussion-related symptoms following an initial session of osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT). [More]
Brain's natural plasticity could compensate for inner ear damage

Brain's natural plasticity could compensate for inner ear damage

Researchers from Massachusetts Eye and Ear/Harvard Medical School have described, for the first time, the adult brain's ability to compensate for a near-complete loss of auditory nerve fibers that link the ear to the brain. The findings, published in the current issue of Neuron, suggest that the brain's natural plasticity can compensate for inner ear damage to bring sound detection abilities back within normal limits; however, it does not recover speech intelligibility. [More]
FDA-approved, once-daily 24-hour aspirin now available for prevention of stroke and acute cardiac events

FDA-approved, once-daily 24-hour aspirin now available for prevention of stroke and acute cardiac events

New Haven Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced the availability by prescription of DURLAZA, the first and only 24-hour, extended-release aspirin capsules (162.5mg) approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the secondary prevention of stroke and acute cardiac events, including myocardial infarction (heart attack) in high-risk cardiovascular patients. [More]
FDA permits Sound Pharmaceuticals to start SPI-1005 clinical trial for treatment of Meniere's Disease

FDA permits Sound Pharmaceuticals to start SPI-1005 clinical trial for treatment of Meniere's Disease

Sound Pharmaceuticals is pleased to announce that it began enrolling a clinical trial to test SPI-1005 in the treatment of Meniere's Disease (MD). MD or idiopathic endolymphatic hydrops is an inner ear disease that involves episodic vertigo, sensorineural hearing loss, and tinnitus. [More]
New study reveals why some vestibular schwannomas cause hearing loss

New study reveals why some vestibular schwannomas cause hearing loss

A new study at Massachusetts Eye and Ear showed that in some cases of vestibular schwannoma, a sometimes-lethal tumor often associated with neurofibromatosis 2 (NF2), secretions from the tumor contain toxic molecules that damage the inner ear. [More]
New study reveals link between tinnitus severity and emotion processing in the brain

New study reveals link between tinnitus severity and emotion processing in the brain

Tinnitus, otherwise known as ringing in the ears, affects nearly one-third of adults over age 65. The condition can develop as part of age-related hearing loss or from a traumatic injury. In either case, the resulting persistent noise causes varying amounts of disruption to everyday life. [More]
New Haven Pharmaceuticals' DURLAZA drug delivers sustained antiplatelet control for full 24 hours

New Haven Pharmaceuticals' DURLAZA drug delivers sustained antiplatelet control for full 24 hours

New Haven Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced new study data that shows the company's FDA-approved drug DURLAZA delivers sustained antiplatelet control for a full 24-hour period in high-risk patients. [More]
Breakthrough research to be presented at AAO-HNSF 2015 Annual Meeting & OTO EXPO

Breakthrough research to be presented at AAO-HNSF 2015 Annual Meeting & OTO EXPO

Research to be presented tomorrow at the 2015 Annual Meeting & OTO EXPOSM of the American Academy of Otolaryngology--Head and Neck Surgery Foundation (AAO-HNSF) spans across the otolaryngology specialty. [More]
Neuroscientists reveal the brain malady responsible for tinnitus, chronic pain

Neuroscientists reveal the brain malady responsible for tinnitus, chronic pain

Neuroscientists at Georgetown University Medical Center and Germany's Technische Universität München say they've uncovered the brain malady responsible for tinnitus and for chronic pain — the uncomfortable, sometimes agonizing sensations that persist long after an initial injury. [More]
NEI experts explore long-term effects of Ebola on the eye

NEI experts explore long-term effects of Ebola on the eye

Following the 2014 Ebola outbreak in West Africa that took the lives of more than 11,200 people in the region, the National Eye Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health, has deployed a team of clinicians and technical experts to Monrovia, Liberia to investigate the long-term effects of Ebola on the eye. [More]
Pitt researchers identify molecular mechanisms behind resilience to tinnitus, possible drug therapy

Pitt researchers identify molecular mechanisms behind resilience to tinnitus, possible drug therapy

Researchers have identified in an animal model the molecular mechanisms behind resilience to noise-induced tinnitus and a possible drug therapy that could reduce susceptibility to this chronic and sometimes debilitating condition. The findings by a team from the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine were published online in the journal eLife. [More]
Unituxin (dinutuximab) granted EC Marketing Authorisation for treatment of childhood neuroblastoma

Unituxin (dinutuximab) granted EC Marketing Authorisation for treatment of childhood neuroblastoma

United Therapeutics Corporation announced today that the European Commission (EC) has granted Marketing Authorisation for Unituxin (dinutuximab) for the treatment of high-risk neuroblastoma in patients aged 12 months to 17 years, who have previously received induction chemotherapy and achieved at least a partial response, followed by myeloablative therapy and autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT). [More]
Transcranial magnetic stimulation holds promise for tinnitus patients

Transcranial magnetic stimulation holds promise for tinnitus patients

In the largest U.S. clinical trial of its kind funded by the Veterans Affairs Rehabilitation Research and Development Service, researchers at the VA Portland Medical Center and Oregon Health & Science University found that transcranial magnetic stimulation significantly improved tinnitus symptoms for more than half of study participants. [More]
New research project aims to improve music listening experiences in people with hearing impairments

New research project aims to improve music listening experiences in people with hearing impairments

Beethoven composed some of his most famous works after he became profoundly deaf. More recently, musicians such as Ozzy Osbourne, Brian Wilson and Phil Collins have encountered problems with their hearing. Tinnitus affects many more, from Eric Clapton and Neil Young to will.i.am. [More]
Major breakthrough provides new insights into how tinnitus develops

Major breakthrough provides new insights into how tinnitus develops

Tinnitus is the most common service-related disability for veterans returning from Iraq and Afghanistan. Often described as a ringing in the ears, more than 1.5 million former service members, one out of every two combat veterans, report having this sometimes debilitating condition, resulting in more than $2 billion dollars in annual disability payments by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. [More]
World Veterans Federation supports approved technology for tinnitus relief among veterans

World Veterans Federation supports approved technology for tinnitus relief among veterans

TINNITUS, a debilitating "ringing in the ears", has become the No. 1 service- connected disability among veterans, surpassing post-traumatic stress disorder. [More]
IV cosyntropin therapy matches EBP in relieving pain from post-dural puncture headache

IV cosyntropin therapy matches EBP in relieving pain from post-dural puncture headache

Intravenous (IV) cosyntropin therapy was equivalent to epidural blood patch (EBP) in relieving pain from post-dural puncture headache (PDPH) with potential for fewer complications and lower costs, data from a randomized, controlled trial showed. [More]

New semi-transparent patch delivers effective treatment for tinnitus

Sufferers of tinnitus - an uncontrollable ringing in the ears - are getting some golden silence as Swedish scientists reveal a new treatment for the condition. [More]
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