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Toxoplasmosis is considered to be the third leading cause of death attributed to foodborne illness in the United States. More than 60 million men, women, and children in the U.S. carry the Toxoplasma parasite, but very few have symptoms because the immune system usually keeps the parasite from causing illness. However, women newly infected with Toxoplasma during pregnancy and anyone with a compromised immune system should be aware that toxoplasmosis can have severe consequences for them.
GMU’s early-detection urine test works for Lyme disease, study shows

GMU’s early-detection urine test works for Lyme disease, study shows

After three years and 300 patients, George Mason University researchers have proof that their early-detection urine test for Lyme disease works. [More]
Candida yeast infections more common in men with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder

Candida yeast infections more common in men with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder

In a study prompted in part by suggestions from people with mental illness, Johns Hopkins researchers found that a history of Candida yeast infections was more common in a group of men with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder than in those without these disorders, and that women with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder who tested positive for Candida performed worse on a standard memory test than women with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder who had no evidence of past infection. [More]
Common parasitic infection linked to intermittent explosive disorder

Common parasitic infection linked to intermittent explosive disorder

In recent years, a common parasitic infection - as many as a third of the world's population may have it - has been linked to a range of psychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, as well as behavioral dysregulation such as suicide attempts and car accidents. [More]
Toxoplasmosis infection may be linked to rage disorder

Toxoplasmosis infection may be linked to rage disorder

A new study has shown that people who have a psychiatric condition called intermittent explosive disorder (IED) are twice as likely to have been exposed to toxoplasma gondii, the parasite found in cat feces and undercooked meat. [More]
Turing Pharmaceuticals emphasizes continued availability of Daraprim

Turing Pharmaceuticals emphasizes continued availability of Daraprim

Turing Pharmaceuticals AG, a privately-held biopharmaceutical company focused on developing and commercializing innovative treatments for serious diseases and conditions, today emphasizes the continued availability of Daraprim and cautions healthcare providers of proposed alternatives to Daraprim. [More]
Study identifies potential new approaches to curing parasitic diseases

Study identifies potential new approaches to curing parasitic diseases

A study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences shows that some forms of the single celled parasites, Trypanosoma brucei and Toxoplasma gondii behave like cancer cells. [More]
New research may offer strategies for developing toxoplasma-inactivated vaccine

New research may offer strategies for developing toxoplasma-inactivated vaccine

Toxoplasma gondii is a common parasite which causes the development of fatal encephalosis or pneumonia in immunodeficient patients under treatment of AIDS or cancer. [More]
Basic research for developing toxoplasma vaccine underway

Basic research for developing toxoplasma vaccine underway

Toxoplasma gondii is a common parasite which causes the development of fatal encephalosis or pneumonia in immunodeficient patients under treatment of AIDS or cancer. Pregnant women who are infected may suffer a miscarriage or the newborn child may suffer from a congenital disease. Currently, a toxoplasma vaccine for humans is not available. Using experimental animals such as mice, basic research for developing an inactivated vaccine is underway. [More]
Impax sells U.S. rights to Daraprim brand for $55 million to Turing Pharmaceuticals

Impax sells U.S. rights to Daraprim brand for $55 million to Turing Pharmaceuticals

Impax Laboratories, Inc. today announced that it has sold its U.S. rights to the Daraprim brand to Turing Pharmaceuticals AG for approximately $55 million. [More]
Turing Pharmaceuticals acquires rights to market Daraprim (pyrimethamine) in the U.S.

Turing Pharmaceuticals acquires rights to market Daraprim (pyrimethamine) in the U.S.

Turing Pharmaceuticals AG today announced that it has acquired the exclusive rights to market Daraprim (pyrimethamine) in the U.S. from Impax Laboratories, Inc. The acquisition by Turing is part of a strategic effort focused on treatments for toxoplasmosis and other serious infectious diseases. The company also announced plans to invest in the development of new drug candidates for toxoplasmosis. [More]
Malaria parasite protein essential for parasite invasion into red blood cells

Malaria parasite protein essential for parasite invasion into red blood cells

A new study led by researchers at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health finds that a malaria parasite protein called calcineurin is essential for parasite invasion into red blood cells. Human calcineurin is already a proven target for drugs treating other illnesses including adult rheumatoid arthritis and lupus, and the new findings suggest that parasite calcineurin should be a focus for the development of new antimalarial drugs. [More]
Study reveals how immune cells are programmed to repair or protect the body

Study reveals how immune cells are programmed to repair or protect the body

An unexpected finding by an international team of scientists based at The University of Manchester and National Institutes of Health in America has shed new light on how immune cells are programmed to either repair or protect the body. [More]
Penn, UGA scientists awarded new contract to develop genome database for microbial pathogens

Penn, UGA scientists awarded new contract to develop genome database for microbial pathogens

At the turn of the millennium, the cost to sequence a single human genome exceeded $50 million, and the process took a decade to complete. Microbes have genomes, too, and the first reference genome for a malaria parasite was completed in 2002 at a cost of roughly $15 million. But today researchers can sequence a genome in a single afternoon for just a few thousand dollars. Related technologies make it possible to capture information about all genes in the genome, in all tissues, from multiple individuals. [More]
Fogarty receives three grants for research focused on biodiversity conservation

Fogarty receives three grants for research focused on biodiversity conservation

In addition to diseases for which there are ineffective or no cures, key pathogens are becoming increasingly drug-resistant. [More]
Discovery opens new pathways for treatment of toxoplasmosis and malaria

Discovery opens new pathways for treatment of toxoplasmosis and malaria

A newly identified protein and other proteins it interacts with could become effective targets for new drugs to control the parasite that cause toxoplasmosis, researchers led by investigators at Indiana University School of Medicine have reported. [More]
Atorvastatin drug plus zoledronic acid may help treat toxoplasmosis

Atorvastatin drug plus zoledronic acid may help treat toxoplasmosis

Researchers at the University of Georgia have discovered that a combination of two commonly prescribed drugs used to treat high cholesterol and osteoporosis may serve as the foundation of a new treatment for toxoplasmosis, a parasitic infection caused by the protozoan Toxoplasma gondii. They published their findings recently in PLOS Pathogens. [More]
Toxoplasma infection makes mice fearless

Toxoplasma infection makes mice fearless

The Toxoplasma parasite can be deadly, causing spontaneous abortion in pregnant women or killing immune-compromised patients, but it has even stranger effects in mice. [More]
Research sheds light on malaria-related parasite's transition from acute to chronic stage

Research sheds light on malaria-related parasite's transition from acute to chronic stage

A new discovery about the malaria-related parasite Toxoplasma gondii -- which can threaten babies, AIDS patients, the elderly and others with weakened immune function -- may help solve the mystery of how this single-celled parasite establishes life-long infections in people. [More]
Combination of two environmental factors contributes to schizophrenia

Combination of two environmental factors contributes to schizophrenia

The interplay between an infection during pregnancy and stress in puberty plays a key role in the development of schizophrenia, as behaviourists from ETH Zurich demonstrate in a mouse model. However, there is no need to panic. [More]
Stem cell line could also advance research into liver cancers, cystic fibrosis

Stem cell line could also advance research into liver cancers, cystic fibrosis

Chronic or acute, liver failure can be deadly. Toxins take over, the skin turns yellow and higher brain function slows. "There is no effective therapy at the moment to deal with the toxins that build up in your body," said Neil Talbot, a Research Animal Scientist for the USDA Agricultural Research Service. "Their only option now is to transplant a liver." [More]
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