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Aging astrocytes lose ability to protect motor neurons, reveal Cedars-Sinai ALS researchers

Aging astrocytes lose ability to protect motor neurons, reveal Cedars-Sinai ALS researchers

Lou Gehrig's disease, also known as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS, attacks muscle-controlling nerve cells – motor neurons – in the brain, brainstem and spinal cord, leading to progressive weakness and eventual paralysis of muscles throughout the body. Patients typically survive only three to five years after diagnosis. [More]
Ghrelin has potential to stimulate alcohol craving, study reveals

Ghrelin has potential to stimulate alcohol craving, study reveals

Ghrelin is a hormone released by the stomach and it stimulates appetite and food intake. Alcohol is commonly viewed as a psychoactive substance that primarily affects brain function, but it is also a highly caloric food. [More]
Study: Certain prostate cancer medications linked to cardiac death risk

Study: Certain prostate cancer medications linked to cardiac death risk

A new study has found that certain prostate cancer medications are linked with an increased risk of dying from heart-related causes in men with congestive heart failure or prior heart attacks. Published in BJU International, the findings will help doctors and patients weigh the benefits and risks of the drugs. [More]
UCLA research could lead to simple saliva test for early diagnosis of deadly diseases

UCLA research could lead to simple saliva test for early diagnosis of deadly diseases

UCLA research could lead to a simple saliva test capable of diagnosing — at an early stage — diabetes and cancer, and perhaps neurological disorders and autoimmune diseases. [More]
New standard of care for pediatric AML patients who receive umbilical cord transplants

New standard of care for pediatric AML patients who receive umbilical cord transplants

A new standard of care for children facing acute myeloid leukemia (AML) may be clear, following a multi-year study published in the latest edition of the New England Journal of Medicine. [More]
Genetic differences contribute to risk for autism

Genetic differences contribute to risk for autism

Small differences in as many as a thousand genes contribute to risk for autism, according to a study led by Mount Sinai researchers and the Autism Sequencing Consortium, and published today in the journal Nature. [More]
Researchers use DNA sequencing to uncover genes that heighten autism risk

Researchers use DNA sequencing to uncover genes that heighten autism risk

In the largest study of its kind to date, researchers have used DNA sequencing to uncover dozens of genes that heighten the risk for autism. Joseph Buxbaum, Ph.D., Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York City, Mark Daly, Ph.D., Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, and their colleagues examined more than 14,000 DNA samples from affected children, parents and unrelated people. [More]
Sleep apnea may affect peoples' ability to form new spatial memories

Sleep apnea may affect peoples' ability to form new spatial memories

Sleep apnea may affect your ability to form new spatial memories, such as remembering where you parked your car, new research led by NYU Langone Medical Center sleep specialists suggests. [More]
Pre-treatment pain intensity predicts survival of patients with head and neck cancer

Pre-treatment pain intensity predicts survival of patients with head and neck cancer

Pre-treatment pain intensity is an independent survival predictor for patients with head and neck cancer, according to new research published in The Journal of Pain, the peer-reviewed publication of the American Pain Society. [More]
Study: Obese youths with ALL have worse outcomes than lean counterparts

Study: Obese youths with ALL have worse outcomes than lean counterparts

Obese youths with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are known to have worse outcomes than their lean counterparts. To find out why, investigators at Children's Hospital Los Angeles studied patients who were obese at the time of their diagnosis with ALL to determine if body mass index (BMI) impacted response to initial chemotherapy. This response to initial chemotherapy (or induction therapy) is measured by the absence of leukemia cells in the bone marrow. [More]
MPI Research announces acquisition of Jasper Clinical Research & Development

MPI Research announces acquisition of Jasper Clinical Research & Development

MPI Research today announced it has acquired the assets of Kalamazoo, Mich.-based Jasper Clinical Research & Development, Inc. Jasper is a respected clinical research organization that provides early-stage human clinical testing of promising new drugs, and is well known to pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies worldwide. [More]
UAB offers MRI-US image fusion technique for prostate cancer detection

UAB offers MRI-US image fusion technique for prostate cancer detection

The latest advancement in prostate cancer detection is magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound fusion-guided biopsy, which offers benefits for both patient and physician. [More]
Study reveals subtypes, potential diagnostic and treatment clues for papillary thyroid carcinomas

Study reveals subtypes, potential diagnostic and treatment clues for papillary thyroid carcinomas

A comprehensive analysis of the genomes of nearly 500 papillary thyroid carcinomas (PTC) – the most common form of thyroid cancer – has provided new insights into the roles of frequently mutated cancer genes and other genomic alterations that drive disease development. [More]
Infant’s cry can indicate prenatal cocaine exposure

Infant’s cry can indicate prenatal cocaine exposure

A new study conducted by University of North Carolina School of Medicine researchers provides the first known evidence of how a similar acoustic characteristic in the cry sounds of human infants and rat pups may be used to detect the harmful effects of prenatal cocaine exposure on nervous system development. [More]
Human trial of second investigational Ebola vaccine candidate under way

Human trial of second investigational Ebola vaccine candidate under way

Human testing of a second investigational Ebola vaccine candidate is under way at the National Institutes of Health's Clinical Center in Bethesda, Maryland. [More]
Rutgers scientists are developing new medical imaging method for early detection of cancer

Rutgers scientists are developing new medical imaging method for early detection of cancer

A new medical imaging method being developed at Rutgers University could help physicians detect cancer and other diseases earlier than before, speeding treatment and reducing the need for invasive, time-consuming biopsies. [More]
Einstein, Montefiore receive grant to establish home health services for people with IDD

Einstein, Montefiore receive grant to establish home health services for people with IDD

Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University and Montefiore Medical Center in collaboration with Developmental Disabilities Health Alliance of New York and Community Resource Center for the Developmentally Disabled, Inc., have received a $2.4 million grant to integrate medical and mental healthcare for children and adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD). [More]
Marital hostility, history of depression can increase obesity risk in adults

Marital hostility, history of depression can increase obesity risk in adults

The double-whammy of marital hostility and a history of depression can increase the risk for obesity in adults by altering how the body processes high-fat foods, according to new research. [More]
Study reveals that people with stress-related inflammation may suffer from depression

Study reveals that people with stress-related inflammation may suffer from depression

Preexisting differences in the sensitivity of a key part of each individual's immune system to stress confer a greater risk of developing stress-related depression or anxiety, according to a study conducted at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published October 20 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. [More]
UNMC researcher receives $3.3 million grant to study rare diseases that affect children

UNMC researcher receives $3.3 million grant to study rare diseases that affect children

University of Nebraska Medical Center researcher, William Rizzo, M.D., has received a five-year, $3.3 million grant to study 10 rare diseases that affect children beginning in infancy or early childhood and throughout their life. [More]