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Researchers suggest need for human studies to examine effects of cannabinoid use during pregnancy

Researchers suggest need for human studies to examine effects of cannabinoid use during pregnancy

In this new era of legalized marijuana, far too little research has been conducted on the effect of cannabis on the development of human embryos, say researchers at Georgetown University Medical Center who scoured medical literature on the topic and found what they say is worrisome animal research. [More]
New portable adhesive patch drives small electrical current to promote wound healing

New portable adhesive patch drives small electrical current to promote wound healing

Good news for the millions of people who suffer from skin wounds that won't heal. A team of researchers at The Ohio State University has brought a potentially transformative solution to the problem by creating a portable adhesive patch that drives a continuous, small electrical current to stimulate healing and reduce the risk of infection. [More]
GUMC receives FDA clearance to begin clinical study of cancer drug in patients with Alzheimer's disease

GUMC receives FDA clearance to begin clinical study of cancer drug in patients with Alzheimer's disease

Georgetown University Medical Center today announces the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has completed its review of an investigational new drug application (IND) for the use of nilotinib in a phase II clinical trial for patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease. [More]
Study underscores importance of preventing risk factors across entire lifespan

Study underscores importance of preventing risk factors across entire lifespan

Prevention of cardiovascular disease in mid- to later life in black and white Americans is an increasingly important health concern, according to a study from the Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke project recently published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. [More]
New approach bolsters protein in blood vessels to protect against cerebral malaria

New approach bolsters protein in blood vessels to protect against cerebral malaria

Boosting a protective protein to stabilize blood vessels weakened by malaria showed improved survival beyond that of antimalarial drugs alone in pre-clinical research. [More]
New 3-D printed biomaterial could be effective in treating children with bone defects

New 3-D printed biomaterial could be effective in treating children with bone defects

A Northwestern University research team has developed a 3-D printable ink that produces a synthetic bone implant that rapidly induces bone regeneration and growth. This hyperelastic "bone" material, whose shape can be easily customized, one day could be especially useful for the treatment of bone defects in children. [More]
Researchers uncover key factor for promoting wound healing after corneal injuries

Researchers uncover key factor for promoting wound healing after corneal injuries

In cases of severe ocular trauma involving the cornea, wound healing occurs following intervention, but at the cost of opaque scar tissue formation and damaged vision. Recent research has shown that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) — which can differentiate into a variety of cells, including bone, cartilage, muscle and fat cells — are capable of returning clarity to scarred corneas; however, the mechanisms by which this happens remained a mystery — until now. [More]
Studies find environment plays major role in shaping immune system

Studies find environment plays major role in shaping immune system

Like fingerprints, immune systems vary from person to person. And although we all inherit a unique set of genes that help us respond to infections, recent studies have found that our history and environment—like where and with whom we live—are responsible for 60% to 80% of the differences between individual immune systems, while genetics account for the rest. [More]
HPV vaccine can decrease incidence of cervical pre-cancers among young women, research shows

HPV vaccine can decrease incidence of cervical pre-cancers among young women, research shows

Every 20 minutes, someone in the United States receives a cancer diagnosis related to human papillomavirus. HPV causes cancer of the cervix, anus and throat. [More]
ADDF awards $2.1 million grant for clinical study of cancer drug in Alzheimer's patients

ADDF awards $2.1 million grant for clinical study of cancer drug in Alzheimer's patients

The Alzheimer's Drug Discovery Foundation announces a $2.1 million grant awarded to R. Scott Turner, MD, PhD, of Georgetown University Medical Center to conduct a phase II clinical trial of low-dose nilotinib (marketed as Tasigna for use as a cancer therapy) in patients with Alzheimer's disease. [More]
Additional antibiotic reduces infection rates by 50% for women who have cesarean delivery

Additional antibiotic reduces infection rates by 50% for women who have cesarean delivery

Physicians at the University of Alabama at Birmingham and colleagues have discovered that administering the antibiotic azithromycin alongside the standard recommended antibiotic regimen, cefazolin, reduces infection rates by 50 percent for women who have a non-elective cesarean delivery. [More]
Department of Defense funds cardiac cell therapy trial for heart failure patients

Department of Defense funds cardiac cell therapy trial for heart failure patients

Building on the results of a recent Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute study published just six months ago, the Department of Defense has awarded a $10 million grant to fund a cardiac cell therapy trial for patients diagnosed with a common but difficult-to-treat form of heart failure. [More]
Researchers aim to discover new treatments for triple-negative breast cancer

Researchers aim to discover new treatments for triple-negative breast cancer

The precision medicine approach involving DNA sequencing to pinpoint specific alterations that can be targeted with anti-cancer therapies is becoming an alternate treatment avenue for those with poor-responding cancers. [More]
Biomedical engineers develop artificial blood vessels capable of growth within recipient

Biomedical engineers develop artificial blood vessels capable of growth within recipient

In a groundbreaking new study led by University of Minnesota biomedical engineers, artificial blood vessels bioengineered in the lab and implanted in young lambs are capable of growth within the recipient. [More]
Experimental PET tracer can diagnose concussion-related brain degeneration in living person

Experimental PET tracer can diagnose concussion-related brain degeneration in living person

An experimental positron emission tomography (PET) tracer can effectively diagnose concussion-related brain degeneration while a person is still alive, according to a proof-of-concept study conducted at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published September 27 in the journal Translational Psychiatry. [More]
Association for Molecular Pathology announces winners of 2016 awards

Association for Molecular Pathology announces winners of 2016 awards

The Association for Molecular Pathology, the premier global, non-profit organization serving molecular diagnostics professionals, today announced the recipients of the Jeffrey A. Kant Leadership Award and the AMP Meritorious Service Award. Together with the AMP Award for Excellence in Molecular Diagnostics, these awards will be presented at the AMP 2016 Annual Meeting. [More]
University of Bonn researchers develop new method to combat complex brain tumors

University of Bonn researchers develop new method to combat complex brain tumors

Glioblastomas are incurable malignant brain tumors. Usually the patients affected survive for only a few months. [More]
JAK inhibitors may be first effective treatment for people with alopecia areata

JAK inhibitors may be first effective treatment for people with alopecia areata

Seventy-five percent of patients with moderate to severe alopecia areata—an autoimmune disease that causes patchy, and less frequently, total hair loss—had significant hair regrowth after treatment with ruxolitinib, reported researchers from Columbia University Medical Center. By the end of their treatment, average hair regrowth was 92 percent. [More]
Study data does not support benefits of testosterone supplementation in men with ‘low T’

Study data does not support benefits of testosterone supplementation in men with ‘low T’

The prescription of testosterone supplementation for cardiovascular health, sexual function, physical function, mood, or cognitive function in men with "low T" is not supported by clinical trials data, conclude researchers who describe a review of more than 200 clinical trials published Sept. 21 in PLOS One. [More]
Duke, Wisconsin and UAB researchers create bioengineered patches to treat heart failure

Duke, Wisconsin and UAB researchers create bioengineered patches to treat heart failure

The heart cannot regenerate muscle tissue after a heart attack has killed part of the muscle wall, and that dead tissue can strain surrounding muscle, leading to a lethal heart enlargement. [More]
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