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New Research Advisory Committee formed to support people with type 1 diabetes

New Research Advisory Committee formed to support people with type 1 diabetes

JDRF, the leading global organization funding type 1 diabetes (T1D) research, announced today the formation of a new external Research Advisory Committee (RAC) comprised of individuals internationally renowned for their expertise in research as well as the care and treatment of those with T1D. [More]
Drugs designed to curb Rac1 signaling pathway may help relieve inflammatory pain in sufferers

Drugs designed to curb Rac1 signaling pathway may help relieve inflammatory pain in sufferers

New research uncovers a cascade of reactions within nerve cells that relay sensations of pain associated with inflammation. The findings, which are published in the British Journal of Pharmacology, indicate that drugs designed to curb this pathway may help relieve inflammatory pain in sufferers. [More]
Dementia incidence highest in African Americans, lowest in Asian Americans

Dementia incidence highest in African Americans, lowest in Asian Americans

The first study to look at dementia risk in a population representing the diversity of the United States finds dementia incidence to be highest in African Americans and lowest in Asian Americans. The rate of occurrence of dementia in African Americans was found to be 65 percent higher than Asian Americans. [More]
Fasudil improves memory in rats, promotes degradation of toxic tau in the eyes of fruit flies

Fasudil improves memory in rats, promotes degradation of toxic tau in the eyes of fruit flies

Could a kinase inhibitor some doctors prescribe to keep blood flowing after brain surgery be used to treat neurodegeneration? New research suggests it might be worth exploring the question. [More]

BMJ, UCSF team up to provide self-study online modules for healthcare researchers

BMJ, a global healthcare knowledge provider, has joined forces with the University of California, San Francisco, a world leader in biomedical research, to provide self-study online modules for doctors and healthcare researchers to develop their research skills and become published authors. [More]
Cancer patients who miss scheduled radiation therapy appointments have worse outcomes

Cancer patients who miss scheduled radiation therapy appointments have worse outcomes

Cancer patients who miss two or more radiation therapy sessions have a worse outcome than fully compliant patients, investigators at Montefiore Einstein Center for Cancer Care and Albert Einstein College of Medicine's NCI-designated Albert Einstein Cancer Center have found. [More]
Yale study examines sex-related social differences in infants at risk for autism

Yale study examines sex-related social differences in infants at risk for autism

Infant girls at risk for autism pay more attention to social cues in faces than infant boys, according to a Yale School of Medicine study -- the first one known to prospectively examine sex-related social differences in at-risk infants. [More]
Researchers seek to better understand sequence of events that leads people to develop MS

Researchers seek to better understand sequence of events that leads people to develop MS

A team of investigators at Brigham and Women's Hospital and the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke has launched a study of individuals at risk for multiple sclerosis (MS). [More]
Implantable device could help deliver toxic cocktail of drugs directly to pancreatic tumors

Implantable device could help deliver toxic cocktail of drugs directly to pancreatic tumors

A highly lethal cancer sometimes requires large doses of highly toxic drugs. However, a blitzkrieg approach can be unfeasible for some patients due to severe side effects. Now a powerhouse team of researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has revealed that an implantable device can deliver a particularly toxic cocktail of drugs directly to pancreatic tumors to stunt their growth or in some cases, shrink them - all while showing signs that the rest of the body would be spared toxic side effects. [More]
University of Oxford, SomaLogic partner to discover protein biomarkers for clinical diseases and conditions

University of Oxford, SomaLogic partner to discover protein biomarkers for clinical diseases and conditions

The University of Oxford and SomaLogic announced today that they have agreed to undertake a number of collaborative projects that will employ SomaLogic's proprietary SOMAmer reagents and SOMAscan assay technologies to discover and characterize protein biomarkers for a range of clinical diseases and conditions. [More]

Hallucinogens may have therapeutic potential against intimate partner violence

Evidence in a study led by researchers at the University of British Columbia along with University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Public Health Associate Professor Peter S. Hendricks, Ph.D., suggests hallucinogens such as psilocybin or LSD may have therapeutic potential for reducing intimate partner violence, or IPV. [More]
New method could help physicians detect infection in wounds in less than a minute

New method could help physicians detect infection in wounds in less than a minute

A new method for detection of infection in wounds could take physicians less than a minute to complete, rather than the current 24 hours it takes to plate bacteria and leave it to incubate overnight, according to research by the George Washington University's Victoria Shanmugam, M.D. [More]
Ambrisentan avoids sildenafil drug interaction in PAH patients

Ambrisentan avoids sildenafil drug interaction in PAH patients

Sildenafil may be better given to pulmonary arterial hypertension patients in combination with ambrisentan than with bosentan, study findings suggest. [More]
Study estimates prevalence of periodontitis at state and local levels across U.S. using SAE method

Study estimates prevalence of periodontitis at state and local levels across U.S. using SAE method

The International and American Associations for Dental Research have published an article titled "Predicting Periodontitis at State and Local Levels in the United States" in the OnlineFirst portion of the Journal of Dental Research. In it, authors P.I. Eke, X. Zhang, H. Lu, L. Wei, G. Thornton-Evans, K.J. Greenlund, J.B. Holt and J.B. Croft estimate the prevalence of periodontitis at state and local levels across the United States by using a novel, small area estimation (SAE) method. [More]
Bone loss linked with ALL therapy occurs during first month of treatment

Bone loss linked with ALL therapy occurs during first month of treatment

Investigators at Children's Hospital Los Angeles have found that significant bone loss - a side effect of chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) - occurs during the first month of treatment, far earlier than previously assumed. Results of the study will be available online February 4, in advance of publication in the journal Bone. [More]
New method could help scientists conduct in-depth research on malignant tumors in cancer patients

New method could help scientists conduct in-depth research on malignant tumors in cancer patients

Scientists at the Children's Medical Center Research Institute at UT Southwestern have pioneered a new method for conducting in-depth research on malignant tumors in patients, in the process discovering new complexities underlying cancer biology and overturning a nearly century-old perception about cancer metabolism. [More]
African-American patients with connective tissue diseases at risk for cardiovascular disease

African-American patients with connective tissue diseases at risk for cardiovascular disease

A study based on medical records from more than a quarter million adult patients found that African-American patients with connective tissue diseases such as lupus or rheumatoid arthritis were twice as likely as white patients to suffer from narrowed or atherosclerotic blood vessels, which increase the risk of a heart attack, stroke or death. [More]
Using corticosteroids before late preterm delivery reduces respiratory complications in babies

Using corticosteroids before late preterm delivery reduces respiratory complications in babies

A multicenter clinical trial led by researchers at Columbia University Medical Center and NewYork-Presbyterian has found that the use of corticosteroids in mothers at risk for late preterm delivery significantly reduced the incidence of severe respiratory complications in their babies. [More]
NIH researchers identify genetic mutation responsible for vibratory urticaria

NIH researchers identify genetic mutation responsible for vibratory urticaria

Scientists at the National Institutes of Health have identified a genetic mutation responsible for a rare form of inherited hives induced by vibration, also known as vibratory urticaria. Running, hand clapping, towel drying or even taking a bumpy bus ride can cause temporary skin rashes in people with this rare disorder. [More]
Study reveals fetal origin for social and repetitive behavior deficits

Study reveals fetal origin for social and repetitive behavior deficits

Fetal development has been known to play an important role in social interaction, a fundamental behavior found in nearly all organisms, and later adult social behaviors. Autism, a highly heritable neurodevelopment disorder that causes difficulties with social interactions, has been postulated to be caused by neuron overgrowth in the prenatal period, although the precise timing and cause of this overgrowth has been unknown. [More]
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