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Four Next-Generation Preclinical Imaging Systems introduced

Bruker today introduces four important new preclinical imaging systems at the World Molecular Imaging Congress 2015 [More]
Common drug used for treating fungal infections in lung transplant recipients increases risk for skin cancer, death

Common drug used for treating fungal infections in lung transplant recipients increases risk for skin cancer, death

Voriconazole, a prescription drug commonly used to treat fungal infections in lung transplant recipients, significantly increases the risk for skin cancer and even death, according to a new study by UC San Francisco researchers. [More]
UAB will compete to help lead NIH research program to study health benefits of exercise

UAB will compete to help lead NIH research program to study health benefits of exercise

This summer, the NIH Common Fund announced a five-year, $170 million effort to reveal — in molecular terms — how exercise delivers its many benefits throughout the body. [More]
Study reveals new epigenetic mechanism underlying progression of cancer tumors

Study reveals new epigenetic mechanism underlying progression of cancer tumors

Aggressive cancer growth and alterations in gene activity without changes in DNA sequence (epigenetics) are associated with mutant p53 proteins, according to new research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
Potential new treatment for sepsis and ARDS

Potential new treatment for sepsis and ARDS

Scientists at Queen's University Belfast are developing a potential revolutionary new treatment for Sepsis and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS), which are among the leading causes of death in hospitalised patients in the UK. [More]
Researchers develop new method that can target drug delivery to the lung

Researchers develop new method that can target drug delivery to the lung

Researchers from Columbia Engineering and Columbia University Medical Center have developed a new method that can target delivery of very small volumes of drugs into the lung. [More]
USF, FARA to jointly host scientific symposium on Friedreich's ataxia

USF, FARA to jointly host scientific symposium on Friedreich's ataxia

The University of South Florida will again bring together leading researchers and patients searching for a treatment for Friedreich's ataxia and related disorders at the seventh annual scientific symposium "Understanding Energy for A Cure." The symposium will be held 5 to 8:30 p.m., Thursday, Sept. 17, at the USF Marshall Student Center Ballroom, USF Cedar Circle, Tampa, FL 33620. [More]
University of Maryland Medicine offers MRI-guided focused ultrasound treatment to Parkinson's patients

University of Maryland Medicine offers MRI-guided focused ultrasound treatment to Parkinson's patients

University of Maryland Medicine (the University of Maryland Medical Center and the University of Maryland School of Medicine) and its Center for Metabolic Imaging and Image-Guided Therapeutics (CMIT) has begun to use MRI-guided focused ultrasound on a deep structure within the brain related to Parkinson's disease - the globus pallidus. [More]
TGen scientists identify potential gene associated with NAFLD-related liver damage

TGen scientists identify potential gene associated with NAFLD-related liver damage

In a first-of-its-kind exploratory study, the Translational Genomics Research Institute has identified a potential gene associated with the initiation of the most common cause of liver damage. [More]
UC San Diego-led research team awarded $1.89 million to carry out research on leptospirosis

UC San Diego-led research team awarded $1.89 million to carry out research on leptospirosis

An international research team, headed by Joseph Vinetz, MD, professor of medicine at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and director of the UC San Diego Center for Tropical Medicine and Travelers Health, has been awarded a 5-year, $1.89 million cooperative agreement to carry out translational research studies of leptospirosis, an infectious and sometimes fatal bacterial disease endemic in much of the world. [More]
Annual diabetic retinopathy screening for children with type 1 diabetes should begin at later age, study says

Annual diabetic retinopathy screening for children with type 1 diabetes should begin at later age, study says

A new study has found that the occurrence of advanced forms of a diabetic eye disease remains low among children living with diabetes, regardless of how long they have had the disease or their ability to keep blood sugar levels controlled. Researchers are therefore recommending that most children with type 1 diabetes delay annual diabetic retinopathy screenings until age 15, or 5 years after their diabetes diagnosis, whichever occurs later. [More]
New NIH grants support research that combines DNA sequence information and electronic medical records

New NIH grants support research that combines DNA sequence information and electronic medical records

A dozen awards from the National Institutes of Health will support research that incorporates DNA sequence information into electronic medical records. The goal of research conducted by the Electronic Medical Records and Genomics (eMERGE) network is to better understand the genomic basis of disease and to tailor medical care to individual patients based on their genomic differences. [More]
Researchers reveal how the brain manages multitasking

Researchers reveal how the brain manages multitasking

What makes someone better at switching between different tasks? Looking for the mechanisms behind cognitive flexibility, researchers at the University of Pennsylvania and Germany's Central Institute of Mental Health in Mannheim and Charité University Medicine Berlin have used brain scans to shed new light on this question. [More]
U-M study suggests potential treatment options for children with aggressive, advanced cancer

U-M study suggests potential treatment options for children with aggressive, advanced cancer

For children with rare, aggressive and advanced cancer, precision medicine may help doctors determine their best treatment options, a new study finds. [More]
SKA2 gene may play a role in development of PTSD

SKA2 gene may play a role in development of PTSD

A gene linked in previous research, appears to predict more severe post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms as well as a thinner cortex in regions of the brain critical for regulating strong emotions and coping with stressful experiences. This study is believed to be the first to show that the spindle and kinetochore-associated complex subunit 2 (SKA2) gene may play a role in the development of PTSD. [More]
Bacterial litmus test provides low-cost method to measure blood micronutrients

Bacterial litmus test provides low-cost method to measure blood micronutrients

A bacterium engineered to produce different pigments in response to varying levels of a micronutrient in blood samples could give health officials an inexpensive way to detect nutritional deficiencies in resource-limited areas of the world. [More]
Scientists closer to understanding how neurons are wired to form circuits in the eye

Scientists closer to understanding how neurons are wired to form circuits in the eye

When we move our head, the whole visual world moves across our eyes. Yet we can still make out a bee buzzing by or a hawk flying overhead, thanks to unique cells in the eye called object motion sensors. [More]
Sleep loss increases chance of catching a cold

Sleep loss increases chance of catching a cold

A new study led by a UC San Francisco sleep researcher supports what parents have been saying for centuries: to avoid getting sick, be sure to get enough sleep. [More]
Affinity tuning can make CAR T cells spare normal cells and attack cancer cells

Affinity tuning can make CAR T cells spare normal cells and attack cancer cells

A new development in engineering chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells, called affinity tuning, can make the CAR T cells spare normal cells and better recognize and attack cancer cells, which may help lower the toxicity associated with this type of immunotherapy when used against solid tumors, according to a preclinical study. [More]
New UC Davis Environmental Health Sciences Center launched to protect communities from unhealthy exposures

New UC Davis Environmental Health Sciences Center launched to protect communities from unhealthy exposures

A cross-disciplinary center focused on identifying connections between environmental toxins and disease has been established at UC Davis Health System with the ultimate goal of developing preventions and policies that protect communities from unhealthy exposures. [More]
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