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Finding suggests that retina acts as type of window to the brain

Finding suggests that retina acts as type of window to the brain

Researchers at the Gladstone Institutes and University of California, San Francisco have shown that a loss of cells in the retina is one of the earliest signs of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) in people with a genetic risk for the disorder-even before any changes appear in their behavior. [More]
UAB scientist receives R01 grant to study transmission of deadly bacteria from mothers to infants

UAB scientist receives R01 grant to study transmission of deadly bacteria from mothers to infants

New research from the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Optometry will study the transmission of a bacteria that up to 40 percent of healthy women carry, which becomes deadly when passed on to infants during birth. [More]
ESMO announces names of outstanding individuals receiving annual awards

ESMO announces names of outstanding individuals receiving annual awards

The European Society for Medical Oncology, the leading pan-European organisation representing medical oncologists, announced the names of outstanding individuals receiving the Society's esteemed annual awards, to be presented during the ESMO 2014 Congress, on 26 September, in Madrid. [More]
Many rural health care providers do not routinely screen women for IPV, say Penn State researchers

Many rural health care providers do not routinely screen women for IPV, say Penn State researchers

Many primary care physicians in rural communities do not routinely screen women for intimate partner violence (IPV), according to Penn State medical and public health researchers. Rural women who are exposed to such violence have limited resources if they seek help. [More]
Blockbuster Fifty Shades linked with greater risk of harmful health behaviors in women

Blockbuster Fifty Shades linked with greater risk of harmful health behaviors in women

Popular fiction that normalizes and glamorizes violence against women, such as the blockbuster Fifty Shades series, may be associated with a greater risk of potentially harmful health behaviors and risks. [More]
Penn Medicine launches CAROT to build novel therapies for retinal and ocular disorders

Penn Medicine launches CAROT to build novel therapies for retinal and ocular disorders

The Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania has launched the Penn Center for Advanced Retinal and Ocular Therapeutics (CAROT) to build on its previous success developing novel therapies for the personalized diagnosis and treatment of retinal and ocular disorders. [More]
Ohio State, Nationwide Children's Hospital partner with ENTvantage for diagnosing bacterial sinusitis

Ohio State, Nationwide Children's Hospital partner with ENTvantage for diagnosing bacterial sinusitis

The Ohio State University, through the Ohio State Innovation Foundation, and Nationwide Children's Hospital announced the signing of an exclusive, world-wide agreement with ENTvantage Diagnostics Inc. licensing a technology for rapid diagnosing of bacterial sinusitis. [More]
DNA testing for congenital cataracts can accurately diagnose diseases linked to childhood blindness

DNA testing for congenital cataracts can accurately diagnose diseases linked to childhood blindness

Researchers in the United Kingdom have demonstrated that advanced DNA testing for congenital cataracts can quickly and accurately diagnose a number of rare diseases marked by childhood blindness, according to a study published online today in Ophthalmology, the journal of the American Academy of Ophthalmology. [More]
Researchers restore missing repair protein in skeletal muscle of patients with muscular dystrophy

Researchers restore missing repair protein in skeletal muscle of patients with muscular dystrophy

Advances in the treatment of muscular dystrophy: For the first time, a research team has succeeded in restoring a missing repair protein in skeletal muscle of patients with muscular dystrophy. [More]
Blocking nerve signals could be effective treatment for stomach cancer

Blocking nerve signals could be effective treatment for stomach cancer

Research from Columbia University Medical Center shows that nerves may play a critical role in stomach cancer growth and that blocking nerve signals using surgery or Botox® (onabotulinumtoxinA) could be an effective treatment for the disease. [More]
Dual tasking abilities show regression in athletes returning to action in less than a month

Dual tasking abilities show regression in athletes returning to action in less than a month

When are athletes who have suffered concussions ready to return to action? A new University of Oregon study has found that high school athletes who head back on the field with medical clearance within 60 days experience a significant regression in their abilities to simultaneously walk and do simple mental tasks. [More]
Newborn screening for SCID holds promise that affected children can lead healthy lives

Newborn screening for SCID holds promise that affected children can lead healthy lives

Using population-based screening outcomes of approximately 3 million infants, a team of scientists across 14 states, including four researchers at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, have shown that newborn screening for severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) can be successfully implemented across public health newborn screening programs. [More]
Study identifies protein that appears to play key role in protecting people infected with tuberculosis

Study identifies protein that appears to play key role in protecting people infected with tuberculosis

UCLA-led study has identified a protein that appears to play a key role in protecting people infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis — the bacterium that causes tuberculosis — from developing the active form of the disease. [More]
Researchers focus on how exposure to opioids may alter expression of OPRM1 gene

Researchers focus on how exposure to opioids may alter expression of OPRM1 gene

Some infants born with neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) secondary to in-utero opioid exposure have a more difficult time going through withdrawal than others, but the underlying reasons are not well understood. [More]
Study examines national impact of newborn screening test for SCID

Study examines national impact of newborn screening test for SCID

Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), a potentially life-threatening, but treatable, disorder affecting infants, is twice as common as previously believed, according to a new study that is the first to examine the national impact of this newborn screening test. [More]
Handwashing with antibacterial soap exposes hospital workers to potentially unsafe levels of triclosan

Handwashing with antibacterial soap exposes hospital workers to potentially unsafe levels of triclosan

Handwashing with antibacterial soap exposes hospital workers to significant and potentially unsafe levels of triclosan, a widely-used chemical currently under review by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, according to a study led by researchers from UC San Francisco. [More]
New web-based program helps to determine deadly form of brain cancer

New web-based program helps to determine deadly form of brain cancer

A new web-based program developed by University of Kentucky Markey Cancer Center researchers will provide a simple, free way for healthcare providers to determine which brain tumor cases require testing for a genetic mutation. [More]
Rettsyndrome.Org awards $1.5M to advance translational research, support Neuro-Habilitation Program

Rettsyndrome.Org awards $1.5M to advance translational research, support Neuro-Habilitation Program

The International Rett Syndrome Foundation now doing business as Rettsyndrome.org announces today that the Board of Trustees has awarded $1.5M to support 10 new grants to further translational research and launch of the neuro-habilitation therapeutic program, and fund clinical research. [More]
Experts provide useful recommendations for research on suicide prevention

Experts provide useful recommendations for research on suicide prevention

In a new supplement to the September issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, experts address the state of the science on suicide prevention and provide useful recommendations for research to inform effective suicide prevention. [More]
Communications about the benefits of vaccination influence parents' intentions to immunize children

Communications about the benefits of vaccination influence parents' intentions to immunize children

How do parents decide whether to vaccinate their child? In a study designed to formally look at the content of parent-targeted communications about the benefits of vaccination for measles, mumps and rubella, Indiana University School of Medicine investigators report that the framing of these messages influences parents' intentions to immunize their children. [More]