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Babies treated for CMV infection for six months have better developmental outcomes

Babies treated for CMV infection for six months have better developmental outcomes

Babies treated for symptomatic cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection for six months, instead of the standard six weeks, have better hearing and developmental outcomes, according to a new study from the University of Alabama at Birmingham. [More]
New approach could dramatically increase survival rate of cancer patients

New approach could dramatically increase survival rate of cancer patients

Michail Sitkovsky, an immunophysiology expert at Northeastern University, and his research colleagues have made a breakthrough discovery in cancer treatment. The new approach, some 30 years in the making, could dramatically increase the survival rate of patients with cancer, which kills some 8 million people each year. [More]
Oxytocin may be a potential therapeutic target for improving social function in psychiatric disorders

Oxytocin may be a potential therapeutic target for improving social function in psychiatric disorders

Researchers at the Yerkes National Primate Research Center, Emory University, have shown inducing the release of brain oxytocin may be a viable therapeutic option for enhancing social function in psychiatric disorders, including autism spectrum disorders and schizophrenia. [More]
New study shows who benefits most from statin therapy

New study shows who benefits most from statin therapy

Research has demonstrated that the risk for developing coronary heart disease depends on a host of risk factors that are related both to lifestyle and genetics. In a new study from Brigham and Women's Hospital, Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, and Massachusetts General Hospital, researchers tested whether a composite of genetic variants could identify the risk of cardiovascular death and heart attacks as well as identify individuals who derived greater clinical benefit from statin therapy. [More]

Study: People use touch of a handshake to sample, sniff signaling molecules

Limp or firm, your handshake conveys subliminal social cues. Now, research reveals it also transmits chemical signals that could explain why the greeting evolved in the first place. [More]
Brain scientists map changes in communication between nerve cells in rats

Brain scientists map changes in communication between nerve cells in rats

Lights, sound, action: we are constantly learning how to incorporate outside sensations into our reactions in specific situations. In a new study, brain scientists have mapped changes in communication between nerve cells as rats learned to make specific decisions in response to particular sounds. The team then used this map to accurately predict the rats' reactions. These results add to our understanding of how the brain processes sensations and forms memories to inform behavior. [More]
Scientists produce cartilage from embryonic stem cells

Scientists produce cartilage from embryonic stem cells

Scientists have succeeded in producing cartilage formed from embryonic stem cells that could in future be used to treat the painful joint condition osteoarthritis. [More]
Study findings raise questions about additional value of cancer care in the U.S.

Study findings raise questions about additional value of cancer care in the U.S.

Despite sharp increases in spending on cancer treatment, cancer mortality rates in the United States have decreased only modestly since 1970, Samir Soneji, PhD of Dartmouth's Norris Cotton Cancer Center and The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy & Clinical Practice has found. [More]
UTHealth study focuses on new cognitive behavioral therapy to treat PTSD, substance use disorders

UTHealth study focuses on new cognitive behavioral therapy to treat PTSD, substance use disorders

A new cognitive behavioral therapy designed to treat both post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and substance use disorders is the focus of research at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston Medical School. [More]
Celimmune licenses anti-IL-15 monoclonal antibody from Amgen

Celimmune licenses anti-IL-15 monoclonal antibody from Amgen

Celimmune LLC, a clinical development-stage immunotherapy company focused on treating and preventing autoimmune diseases, announced today that it has licensed a Phase 2-stage, anti-IL-15 monoclonal antibody (AMG 714) from Amgen. [More]
Findings may explain why HIV cure strategies have failed

Findings may explain why HIV cure strategies have failed

A major hurdle to curing people of HIV infection is the way the virus hides in a reservoir composed primarily of dormant immune cells. [More]
CEGIR launches patient contact registry for people with eosinophilic gastrointestinal diseases

CEGIR launches patient contact registry for people with eosinophilic gastrointestinal diseases

To coincide with Rare Disease Day 2015, the Consortium of Eosinophilic Gastrointestinal Disease Researchers today launched a patient contact registry for individuals with eosinophilic gastrointestinal diseases (EGID), a group of rare diseases. [More]
Early intervention with GLP-1 analogues may delay onset of type 2 diabetes

Early intervention with GLP-1 analogues may delay onset of type 2 diabetes

GLP-1 is a hormone that regulates glucose levels in the body by stimulating the secretion of insulin, and GLP-1 also inhibits appetite. "We have found that GLP-1 is reduced by up to 25% among people with pre-diabetes and up to 20% among obese people compared to normal weight people. [More]
Novel financing technique may unlock funding for developing 'orphan' drugs to treat rare diseases

Novel financing technique may unlock funding for developing 'orphan' drugs to treat rare diseases

A paper published today, "Financing translation: Analysis of the NCATS rare-diseases portfolio" in Science Translational Medicine, demonstrates the potential of a new financing technique to reduce the risk associated with investing in the treatment of new diseases and potentially unlock new levels of funding for developing so-called "orphan" drugs. [More]
Two cancer centres partner to advance personalized therapies against cancer

Two cancer centres partner to advance personalized therapies against cancer

Two internationally acclaimed cancer centres today announced a partnership to accelerate academic and clinical research to advance personalized, targeted therapies against cancer. [More]
Researchers successfully convert adult human skin cells into neurons that control appetite

Researchers successfully convert adult human skin cells into neurons that control appetite

Researchers have for the first time successfully converted adult human skin cells into neurons of the type that regulate appetite, providing a patient-specific model for studying the neurophysiology of weight control and testing new therapies for obesity. [More]
NIAID partners with Liberian government to test ZMapp drug for Ebola virus disease

NIAID partners with Liberian government to test ZMapp drug for Ebola virus disease

In partnership with the Liberian government, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases today launched a clinical trial to obtain safety and efficacy data on the investigational drug ZMapp as a treatment for Ebola virus disease. The study, which will be conducted in Liberia and the United States, is a randomized controlled trial enrolling adults and children with known Ebola virus infection. [More]

Study explores thoughts among accredited physical therapy schools on pain education

A study published in The Journal of Pain showed that just 2 of 3 accredited physical therapy (PT) schools surveyed believe their students receive adequate education in pain management. [More]
Targeting stroma could potentially extend survival of pancreatic cancer patients

Targeting stroma could potentially extend survival of pancreatic cancer patients

Like a stealth jet cloaks itself from radar, cancer cells cloak themselves within tumors by hiding behind a dense layer of cellular material known as stroma. [More]

Unique research consortium focuses on musculoskeletal disorders and diseases

The Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences, the University of Missouri – Kansas City and the University of Kansas Medical Center proudly announce a research consortium among the three Kansas City-area institutions. The consortium brings together scientists and resources focused on the research of musculoskeletal disorders and diseases. [More]