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New, simpler way for encapsulation-free controlled protein release

New, simpler way for encapsulation-free controlled protein release

A U of T Engineering team has designed a simpler way to keep therapeutic proteins where they are needed for long periods of time. The discovery is a potential game-changer for the treatment of chronic illnesses or injuries that often require multiple injections or daily pills. [More]
Study identifies potential new treatment for subset of gastric cancer patients

Study identifies potential new treatment for subset of gastric cancer patients

Testing cancers for 'addiction' to a gene that boosts cell growth can pick out patients who may respond to a targeted drug under development, a major new study reports. [More]
New understanding of neurotransmitter transporter mechanism gives hope for treating depression, addicition

New understanding of neurotransmitter transporter mechanism gives hope for treating depression, addicition

When nerve cells have to communicate with each other in our brains, it involves release of small signal molecules, the so-called neurotransmitters, which act as chemical messengers in specific points of contact between nerve cells, called synapses. [More]
Meta-genomics analysis tool Taxonomer can rapidly and accurately detect pathogens

Meta-genomics analysis tool Taxonomer can rapidly and accurately detect pathogens

Scientists at the University of Utah, ARUP Laboratories, and IDbyDNA, Inc., have developed ultra-fast, meta-genomics analysis software called Taxonomer that dramatically improves the accuracy and speed of pathogen detection. [More]
Scientists debate role of AAV in causing hepatocellular carcinoma

Scientists debate role of AAV in causing hepatocellular carcinoma

Liver cancer can be triggered by mutations in cancer driver genes resulting from the insertion of adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors used to deliver therapeutic genes, although this tumor-inducing role of AAV remains highly controversial. [More]
Gene expression patterns of normal tissue may predict survival rates of estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer patients

Gene expression patterns of normal tissue may predict survival rates of estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer patients

Breast tissue surrounding tumors could be used to gauge future survival outcomes for women with estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer, a study led by University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers has found. [More]
CKD status does not affect health status outcomes after AMI

CKD status does not affect health status outcomes after AMI

Chronic kidney disease does not accentuate the decline in health status often experienced by patients after acute myocardial infarction, US study data show. [More]
Spexin harmone may play role in weight gain among teenagers

Spexin harmone may play role in weight gain among teenagers

A Mayo Clinic-led study found that obese teenagers have lower levels of a hormone potentially tied to weight management than teens of normal weights. The study is published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. [More]
Study explores history of penumbra in untreated acute stroke patients

Study explores history of penumbra in untreated acute stroke patients

Radiological imaging is being used more often to evaluate stroke diagnosis and outcomes, with penumbra, or tissue that is at risk of progressing to dead tissue but is still salvageable if blood flow is returned, as a potential target for therapy. [More]
Researchers spot molecular key that breast cancer cells use to invade bone marrow

Researchers spot molecular key that breast cancer cells use to invade bone marrow

Scientists at the Duke Cancer Institute have identified a molecular key that breast cancer cells use to invade bone marrow in mice, where they may be protected from chemotherapy or hormonal therapies that could otherwise eradicate them. [More]
Alzheimer’s research raises questions on the role of infection

Alzheimer’s research raises questions on the role of infection

A new study has shown that A-beta (Aβ), the protein that forms β-amyloid plaques in Alzheimer’s disease, is a normal part of the immune system - raising questions about the role infection plays in Alzheimer’s disease and whether current treatment strategies should be changed. [More]
Majority of young adults with abdominal obesity unaware of CKD risk

Majority of young adults with abdominal obesity unaware of CKD risk

Many young adults with abdominal obesity exhibit a readily detectable risk factor for chronic kidney disease (CKD), yet the vast majority don't know they're at risk, according to a study of nationwide health data led by Albert Einstein College of Medicine researchers that was published online today in the journal PLOS ONE. [More]
The National MDS Study aims to identify causes, genetic makeup of fatal blood diseases

The National MDS Study aims to identify causes, genetic makeup of fatal blood diseases

The National Myelodysplastic Syndromes Natural History Study is underway, the ECOG-ACRIN Cancer Research Group and its collaborators announced today. [More]
Zika virus infection may cause ocular problems in Brazilian infants with microcephaly

Zika virus infection may cause ocular problems in Brazilian infants with microcephaly

Researchers studying babies with a Zika virus-related birth defect say they have found previously unreported eye problems possibly linked to the virus that could result in severe visual impairment. [More]
Early diagnosis of lung cancer can increase survival rate by 73%

Early diagnosis of lung cancer can increase survival rate by 73%

The UK Lung cancer screening trial (UKLS) has been successfully completed and demonstrated that patients with a high risk of developing lung cancer can be identified with early stage disease and have up to a 73% chance of surviving for five years or more. The UKLS trial was conducted by experts in the University of Liverpool. [More]
Study provides better understanding of sequence of genetic events in colorectal cancer premalignancy

Study provides better understanding of sequence of genetic events in colorectal cancer premalignancy

Whole-exome sequencing of both colorectal adenomas (precancers often called polyps) and intestinal mucosa at risk for developing into adenomas from patients with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) has generated a comprehensive picture of the genomic alterations that characterize the evolution of normal mucosa to precancer. [More]
New Rutgers research aims at exploring gender differences in lung cancer

New Rutgers research aims at exploring gender differences in lung cancer

Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in both men and women. Lung cancer diagnoses have more than doubled among females in the past 38 years, while having fallen 29 percent among males, according to the American Lung Association. [More]
Obese teenagers may have lower levels of spexin harmone

Obese teenagers may have lower levels of spexin harmone

Obese teenagers already show signs of hormonal differences from normal-weight peers that may make them prone to weight gain, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. [More]
National Cancer Moonshot initiative needs to target proteins that drive cancer

National Cancer Moonshot initiative needs to target proteins that drive cancer

The National Cancer Moonshot initiative needs to move beyond genomics to target the proteins that are driving cancer, according to an Inova Health System and George Mason University collaborative paper published Thursday in the American Association for Cancer Research. [More]
Study highlights disparities in care for disadvantaged children with traumatic brain injuries

Study highlights disparities in care for disadvantaged children with traumatic brain injuries

Children who suffer traumatic brain injuries can face a difficult road to recovery, requiring services such as physical therapy and mental health treatment for months or years to get their young lives back on track. [More]
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