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Study evaluates costs and benefits of medical board recertification for improving healthcare quality

Study evaluates costs and benefits of medical board recertification for improving healthcare quality

Many physicians are pushing back against or debating new requirements for maintaining medical board certifications, which affect more than 250,000 physicians nationwide. Now, a new study by UC San Francisco and Stanford University researchers concludes that the cost of implementing the most recent requirements will be an estimated $5.7 billion over the next 10 years. [More]
New non-invasive spinal cord stimulation helps paralyzed men voluntarily move their legs

New non-invasive spinal cord stimulation helps paralyzed men voluntarily move their legs

Five men with complete motor paralysis were able to voluntarily generate step-like movements thanks to a new strategy that non-invasively delivers electrical stimulation to their spinal cords, according to a new study funded in part by the National Institutes of Health. The strategy, called transcutaneous stimulation, delivers electrical current to the spinal cord by way of electrodes strategically placed on the skin of the lower back. [More]
Study shows why candidate vaccine used in HVTN 505 clinical trial not protective against HIV infection

Study shows why candidate vaccine used in HVTN 505 clinical trial not protective against HIV infection

A study by researchers at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and Duke University helps explain why the candidate vaccine used in the HVTN 505 clinical trial was not protective against HIV infection despite robustly inducing anti-HIV antibodies: the vaccine stimulated antibodies that recognized HIV as well as microbes commonly found in the intestinal tract, part of the body's microbiome. [More]
New Penn study questions relevance of fish oil-derived SPMs and their anti-inflammatory effects in humans

New Penn study questions relevance of fish oil-derived SPMs and their anti-inflammatory effects in humans

The importance of a diet rich in fish oils - now a billion dollar food-supplement industry -- has been debated for over half a century. A few large clinical trials have supported the idea that fish oils confer therapeutic benefits to patients with cardiovascular disease. Researchers think that hearts and blood vessels may benefit in part from their anti-inflammatory properties. [More]
Detailed molecular analyses reveal new treatment options for aggressive childhood leukemia

Detailed molecular analyses reveal new treatment options for aggressive childhood leukemia

Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) leukemia is the most common type of cancer in children. It can occur in various forms, differing not only by specific changes in the genetic material of the leukemia cells but also by their response to therapies. Now, an international team of scientists from Berlin, Düsseldorf, Hannover, Heidelberg, Kiel, and Zurich have succeeded in decoding the molecular characteristics of an as yet incurable subtype of leukemia, paving the way for new therapeutic approaches. [More]
Smaller doses of resveratrol more effective at preventing bowel cancer

Smaller doses of resveratrol more effective at preventing bowel cancer

Resveratrol, a chemical found in red grapes, is more effective in smaller doses at preventing bowel cancer in mice than high doses, according to new research published today (Wednesday) in the journal Science Translational Medicine. [More]
Finding by UCSF researchers could increase availability of kidneys for transplant

Finding by UCSF researchers could increase availability of kidneys for transplant

Mild hypothermia in deceased organ donors significantly reduces delayed graft function in kidney transplant recipients when compared to normal body temperature, according to UC San Francisco researchers and collaborators, a finding that could lead to an increase in the availability of kidneys for transplant. [More]
Blocking the expression of certain gene reduces excessive fat in patients

Blocking the expression of certain gene reduces excessive fat in patients

By blocking the expression of a certain gene in patients, University of Montreal researchers have contributed to the demonstration of great decreases in the concentration of triglycerides in their blood, even in various severe forms of hypertriglyceridemia and regardless of the base values or the treatment the patient usually receives. [More]
Innovative course helps make medical students more confident about dealing with health disparities

Innovative course helps make medical students more confident about dealing with health disparities

An innovative three-month elective course has helped make some first-year medical students at Albert Einstein College of Medicine more confident about dealing with health disparities they'll likely encounter as physicians, according to a follow-up study published online today in the journal Academic Medicine. [More]
New computer-based system provides real-time feedback before and during facial transplant surgery

New computer-based system provides real-time feedback before and during facial transplant surgery

Following several years of research and collaboration, physicians and engineers at Johns Hopkins and Walter Reed National Military Medical Center say they have developed a computer platform that provides rapid, real-time feedback before and during facial transplant surgery, which may someday improve face-jaw-teeth alignment between donor and recipient. [More]
Discovery paves way for new therapeutic approaches to treat fatal leukemia in children

Discovery paves way for new therapeutic approaches to treat fatal leukemia in children

Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common type of cancer in children. It can occur in various forms, differing not only by specific changes in the genetic material of the leukemia cells but also by their response to therapies. [More]
TGen scientist named a recipient of 2015 Bisgrove Scholars award

TGen scientist named a recipient of 2015 Bisgrove Scholars award

Dr. Candace Lewis, a research scientist at the Translational Genomics Research Institute, is one of five recipients of the 2015 Bisgrove Scholars award, Science Foundation Arizona announced today. [More]
Two-step regimen of experimental MERS vaccines show promise in mice

Two-step regimen of experimental MERS vaccines show promise in mice

A two-step regimen of experimental vaccines against Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) prompted immune responses in mice and rhesus macaques, report National Institutes of Health scientists who designed the vaccines. Vaccinated mice produced broadly neutralizing antibodies against multiple strains of the MERS coronavirus (MERS-CoV), while vaccinated macaques were protected from severe lung damage when later exposed to MERS-CoV. [More]
Study demonstrates that stress hormone cortisol can reduce heroin cravings

Study demonstrates that stress hormone cortisol can reduce heroin cravings

Every addiction is characterized by a strong desire for a certain addictive substance, be it nicotine, alcohol or other drug. Researchers at the University of Basel in Switzerland recently conducted a study on heroin addiction and demonstrated that the stress hormone cortisol can reduce addictive cravings. [More]
Champions Oncology's revenue increases 32% to $3.2 million in fourth quarter 2015

Champions Oncology's revenue increases 32% to $3.2 million in fourth quarter 2015

Champions Oncology, Inc., engaged in the development of advanced technology solutions and services to personalize the development and use of oncology drugs, today announced its financial results for the year ended April 30, 2015. [More]
RGS2 protein plays significant role in healthy egg-sperm union in mice

RGS2 protein plays significant role in healthy egg-sperm union in mice

Researchers at the National Institutes of Health have discovered a protein that plays a vital role in healthy egg-sperm union in mice. The protein RGS2 can delay an egg's development into an embryo in order to allow time for sperm to arrive and merge with the egg in a healthy fertilization process. The embryo cannot survive without the male chromosomes. [More]
Innovative approach to treating AAT deficiency

Innovative approach to treating AAT deficiency

Researchers have demonstrated the feasibility of delivering an RNA that encodes for the protein alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT)--which is missing or nonfunctional in the genetic disorder AAT deficiency--into cells in the laboratory, enabling the cells to produce highly functional AAT. [More]
UC San Diego Health signs affiliation agreement with La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology

UC San Diego Health signs affiliation agreement with La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology

UC San Diego Health, with the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, has entered into a multi-year affiliation agreement with La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology designed to deepen existing collaborative relationships, boost basic research of diseases of the immune system and more quickly introduce new clinical treatments and therapies. [More]
New technique improves survival time for glioblastoma patients by 50%

New technique improves survival time for glioblastoma patients by 50%

The rapid spread of a common and deadly brain tumor has been slowed down significantly in a mouse model by cutting off the way some cancer cells communicate, according to a team of researchers that includes UF Health faculty. [More]
Regeneron, Sanofi to jointly advance new immuno-oncology treatment options for cancer patients

Regeneron, Sanofi to jointly advance new immuno-oncology treatment options for cancer patients

Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc. and Sanofi have entered into a new global collaboration to discover, develop and commercialize new antibody cancer treatments in the emerging field of immuno-oncology. [More]
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