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New AAV 3.0 program to create next-generation viral vectors for better treatment of inherited diseases

New AAV 3.0 program to create next-generation viral vectors for better treatment of inherited diseases

The Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania has launched a new program, called AAV 3.0, to create new viral vectors to find quicker and better treatments for an array of diseases. James M. Wilson, MD, PhD, a professor of Medicine and director of the Orphan Disease Center, will lead an interdisciplinary team of over 30 scientists to create this new technology platform with support provided by the University of Pennsylvania Health System. [More]
Study links alpha-defensin genes to IgA nephropathy risk

Study links alpha-defensin genes to IgA nephropathy risk

A gene which forms part of our body's first line of defence against infection may be associated with an increased risk with a type of kidney disease, research involving academics at The University of Nottingham has discovered. [More]
Ways to prevent, treat skin irritations after contact with poisonous plants

Ways to prevent, treat skin irritations after contact with poisonous plants

Poisonous plants cause the most common allergic reactions to the skin, affecting as many as 50 million Americans each year, according to the American Skin Association. University of Alabama at Birmingham associate professor of Emergency Medicine, Walter Schrading, M.D., says it is important people are able to identify poisonous plants, prevent an allergic reaction and treat skin irritations after contact. [More]
Educating parents on healthy infant sleep-related behaviors may help prevent childhood obesity

Educating parents on healthy infant sleep-related behaviors may help prevent childhood obesity

Teaching parents bedtime techniques to encourage healthy sleep habits in their infants may help prevent obesity, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers. Strong links exist between inadequate sleep and childhood obesity. [More]
High levels of calpain protein linked to improved survival of breast cancer patients

High levels of calpain protein linked to improved survival of breast cancer patients

A family of proteins that help cancer cells survive and spread around the body may be associated with improved prognosis for some women receiving treatment for breast cancer, research has shown. [More]
Study shows women with CIN3 more likely to develop anogenital cancers

Study shows women with CIN3 more likely to develop anogenital cancers

Women with a history of severe cervical intraepithelial neoplasia, a precancerous condition of the cervix that arises from infection with the human papillomavirus (HPV), had a long-term increased risk of developing anal, vulvar, and vaginal cancer. [More]
New electric mesh device wraps around the heart to deliver electrical impulses

New electric mesh device wraps around the heart to deliver electrical impulses

A research team led by investigators at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Seoul National University has developed a new electric mesh device that can be wrapped around the heart to deliver electrical impulses and thereby improve cardiac function in experimental models of heart failure, a major public health concern and leading cause of mortality and disability. [More]
Mice studies reveal new insights into neurons that cause symptoms of Rett syndrome

Mice studies reveal new insights into neurons that cause symptoms of Rett syndrome

Two studies in mice from Baylor College of Medicine, Texas, reveal new insights into neurons that mediate symptoms typical of the postnatal neurological disorder Rett syndrome. [More]
Laundry pods more likely to cause poisoning injuries in small children than nonpod detergents

Laundry pods more likely to cause poisoning injuries in small children than nonpod detergents

Laundry pod detergents are far more likely to cause poisoning injuries in young children than are nonpod laundry detergents, and are four times more likely to lead to hospitalization, according to findings published today from researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. [More]
Scientists explain how engineered anthrax toxin proteins could help eliminate cancerous tumors

Scientists explain how engineered anthrax toxin proteins could help eliminate cancerous tumors

Scientists from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, and the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute all parts of the National Institutes of Health, describe how combining engineered anthrax toxin proteins and existing chemotherapy drugs could potentially yield a therapy to reduce or eliminate cancerous tumors. [More]
First real-time study to test effectiveness of fertility app

First real-time study to test effectiveness of fertility app

In what is believed to be the first study of its kind, researchers at Georgetown University Medical Center's Institute for Reproductive Health are recruiting as many as 1,200 women to study, in real time, a smartphone app that calculates a woman's chance for pregnancy on a daily basis. [More]
Study highlights need to improve end-of-life care for all patients with serious illnesses

Study highlights need to improve end-of-life care for all patients with serious illnesses

Historically, efforts to improve end-of-life care have focused primarily on patients with cancer. But few studies have looked at the quality of end-of-life care for patients with other serious illnesses, such as lung, kidney or heart failure or dementia. [More]
Cardiologist Emelia Benjamin receives AHA 2016 Gold Heart Award

Cardiologist Emelia Benjamin receives AHA 2016 Gold Heart Award

Emelia J. Benjamin, MD, ScM, FACC, FAHA, professor of medicine in the section of cardiovascular medicine at Boston University School of Medicine, is the recipient of the American Heart Association's 2016 Gold Heart Award. [More]
Study to assess effects of early dementia screening on families of older adults

Study to assess effects of early dementia screening on families of older adults

A new grant to the Indiana University Center for Aging Research from the National Institute on Aging funds the first study to assess the potential benefits and harms to family members of early dementia screening of older adults. [More]
Mice study shows influence of dad's obesity on daughter’s body weight and breast cancer risk

Mice study shows influence of dad's obesity on daughter’s body weight and breast cancer risk

Obese male mice and normal weight female mice produce female pups that are overweight at birth through childhood, and have delayed development of their breast tissue as well as increased rates of breast cancer. [More]
Scientists discover how faulty genetic instructions contribute to development of AML

Scientists discover how faulty genetic instructions contribute to development of AML

Scientists have previously identified a series of genetic errors that commonly occur inside cancerous blood cells, but it hasn't been clear exactly how those genetic malfunctions create immature blood cells that overpopulate, crowd out healthy cells and spread in patients with acute myeloid leukemia or AML. [More]
JBMR article highlights controversies in treating high-risk osteoporosis patients

JBMR article highlights controversies in treating high-risk osteoporosis patients

The remarkable progress made over the past 30 years to reduce fractures and dramatically improve the quality of life for millions of osteoporosis patients is rapidly being reversed, say two bone health experts in a Journal of Bone and Mineral Research article published online today. [More]
Bone Balance Index may help predict bone loss in women during menopause transition

Bone Balance Index may help predict bone loss in women during menopause transition

Researchers have developed an index to better predict which women may experience faster bone loss across the menopause transition, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. [More]
Study finds dramatic increase in nonmedical use of prescription opioids in the U.S.

Study finds dramatic increase in nonmedical use of prescription opioids in the U.S.

Nonmedical use of prescription opioids more than doubled among adults in the United States from 2001-2002 to 2012-2013, based on a study from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, part of the National Institutes of Health. Nearly 10 million Americans, or 4.1 percent of the adult population, used opioid medications in 2012-2013 a class of drugs that includes OxyContin and Vicodin, without a prescription or not as prescribed (in greater amounts, more often, or longer than prescribed) in the past year. [More]
Adherence to cancer prevention guidelines on diet and physical activity may reduce disease incidence

Adherence to cancer prevention guidelines on diet and physical activity may reduce disease incidence

"Behaviors such as poor diet choices, physical inactivity, excess alcohol consumption and unhealthy body weight could account for more than 20 percent of cancer cases, and could, therefore, be prevented with lifestyle modifications," Kohler said, adding that when tobacco exposure is considered, these modifiable issues are believed to be factors in two-thirds of U.S. cancer deaths. [More]
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