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South African study shows that person-to person transmission drives drug-resistant TB epidemics

South African study shows that person-to person transmission drives drug-resistant TB epidemics

A study published today in The New England Journal of Medicine provides compelling evidence that extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR TB) is spread from person-to-person in the KwaZulu-Natal province, South Africa from 2011-2014. [More]
Longer distance to clinics prompted by restrictive Texas law linked to drop in abortions

Longer distance to clinics prompted by restrictive Texas law linked to drop in abortions

New research from the Texas Policy Evaluation Project (TxPEP) exploring the impact of House Bill 2 (HB 2) - the restrictive Texas abortion law that was struck down by the Supreme Court - found that increases in travel distance to the nearest abortion clinic caused by clinic closures were closely associated with decreases in the official number of abortions. [More]
EMQ to showcase healthcare and life sciences project at Arab Health

EMQ to showcase healthcare and life sciences project at Arab Health

Edgbaston Medical Quarter (EMQ) will be at Arab Health 2017 for the first time to showcase the healthcare and life sciences revolution taking place in the West Midlands, in the heart of the UK. [More]
Study shows evidence that person-to-person transmission drives spread of drug-resistant TB

Study shows evidence that person-to-person transmission drives spread of drug-resistant TB

A study published today in The New England Journal of Medicine provides compelling evidence that extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR TB) is spread from person-to-person in the KwaZulu-Natal province, South Africa from 2011-2014. [More]
U of I scientists discuss piglet model used for pediatric nutrition and neurodevelopment research

U of I scientists discuss piglet model used for pediatric nutrition and neurodevelopment research

Pediatric nutrition research has sh own the important effects of early-life nutrition on a baby's development--especially the gastrointestinal tract--and more recent research indicates that nutrition may also have an influence on an infant's brain as it develops. [More]
UCSF collaborates with Intel to deploy and validate deep learning analytics to improve healthcare

UCSF collaborates with Intel to deploy and validate deep learning analytics to improve healthcare

UC San Francisco's Center for Digital Health Innovation today announced a collaboration with Intel Corporation to deploy and validate a deep learning analytics platform designed to improve care by helping clinicians make better treatment decisions, predict patient outcomes, and respond more nimbly in acute situations. [More]
Influenza experts examine evolution of avian disease

Influenza experts examine evolution of avian disease

Few influenza viruses are as widespread and adaptable as avian influenza viruses, and scientists are not entirely sure why. [More]
RIT research explores impact of shear stress on cells moving through blood vessels

RIT research explores impact of shear stress on cells moving through blood vessels

How do cells and protein molecules respond to stress as they travel through blood vessels? Could resulting changes to these biological components impact how diseases are spread? [More]
‘Collateral lethality’ may create new therapeutic options for several cancers

‘Collateral lethality’ may create new therapeutic options for several cancers

Cancer cells often delete genes that normally suppress tumor formation. These deletions also may extend to neighboring genes, an event known as "collateral lethality," which may create new options for development of therapies for several cancers. [More]
Soft robotic sleeve that mimics healthy cardiac muscles could aid failing hearts

Soft robotic sleeve that mimics healthy cardiac muscles could aid failing hearts

Every year about 2,100 people receive heart transplants in the United States, while 5.7 million suffer from heart failure. Given the scarcity of available donor hearts, clinicians and biomedical engineers from Boston Children's Hospital and Harvard University have spent several years developing a mechanical alternative. [More]
Researcher awarded $1.8 million grant to explore how chronic stress impacts cancer development

Researcher awarded $1.8 million grant to explore how chronic stress impacts cancer development

A five-year, $1.8 million grant (R01CA203965) from the National Cancer Institute awarded to Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey resident research member Wenwei Hu, PhD, will support research to further elucidate the mechanisms behind the most frequently mutated gene in human tumors - p53. [More]
Stem cell research offers alternative view of cancer metastasis

Stem cell research offers alternative view of cancer metastasis

Stem cells are among the most energetically activated, migratory and proliferative sub-populations of tumour cells, according to observations by scholars at the Biomedical Research Centre at the University of Salford. [More]
TGen scientists identify potent inhibitory compound for treatment against glioblastoma

TGen scientists identify potent inhibitory compound for treatment against glioblastoma

A study led by scientists at the Translational Genomics Research Institute has identified "a potent inhibitory compound" in the elusive hunt for an improved treatment against glioblastoma, the most common and deadly type of adult brain cancer. [More]
Study shows clinical and psychosocial consequences following survival of Ebola infection

Study shows clinical and psychosocial consequences following survival of Ebola infection

The long-term clinical and social sequelae following survival of Ebola infection are unknown. [More]
New report highlights trends in heart disease care in the U.S.

New report highlights trends in heart disease care in the U.S.

Over 93 percent of heart attack patients are receiving stents within the guideline-recommended threshold of 90 minutes after arriving at the hospital, with the median time to stenting only 59 minutes, according to a broad report on trends in heart disease care from the American College of Cardiology's National Cardiovascular Data Registry published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. [More]
Calorie restriction helps rhesus monkeys lead longer and healthier lives, report shows

Calorie restriction helps rhesus monkeys lead longer and healthier lives, report shows

Settling a persistent scientific controversy, a long-awaited report shows that restricting calories does indeed help rhesus monkeys live longer, healthier lives. [More]
Research findings could offer ways of fighting treatment resistance in oesophageal cancer

Research findings could offer ways of fighting treatment resistance in oesophageal cancer

Researchers at Trinity College Dublin have made exciting new findings that could offer a means of fighting resistance to treatment for people with oesophageal cancer. [More]
Study provides insights into CPEB4 gene and fatty liver disease

Study provides insights into CPEB4 gene and fatty liver disease

This condition generally leads to chronic inflammation (non-alcoholic steatohepatitis), which can trigger fibrosis, cirrhosis and ultimately liver cancer. This study on the basic biology of the liver paves the way to examine therapeutic strategies to fight and prevent fatty liver disease. [More]
Scientists identify how early responses of immune system can affect development of EBOV disease

Scientists identify how early responses of immune system can affect development of EBOV disease

A new mouse model of early Ebola virus infection has shown National Institutes of Health (NIH) scientists and colleagues how early responses of the immune system can affect development of EBOV disease. [More]
Talking therapy strengthens connections in the brains of people with psychosis, study shows

Talking therapy strengthens connections in the brains of people with psychosis, study shows

A new study from King's College London and South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust has shown for the first time that cognitive behaviour therapy strengthens specific connections in the brains of people with psychosis, and that these stronger connections are associated with long-term reduction in symptoms and recovery eight years later. [More]
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