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New NEI study shows that microglia can accelerate damage wrought by blinding eye disorders

New NEI study shows that microglia can accelerate damage wrought by blinding eye disorders

Spider-like cells inside the brain, spinal cord and eye hunt for invaders, capturing and then devouring them. These cells, called microglia, often play a beneficial role by helping to clear trash and protect the central nervous system against infection. But a new study by researchers at the National Eye Institute (NEI) shows that they also accelerate damage wrought by blinding eye disorders, such as retinitis pigmentosa. [More]
Using multiple pharmacies to fill prescriptions associated with opioid overdoses

Using multiple pharmacies to fill prescriptions associated with opioid overdoses

A study conducted in the state of Washington and reported in The Journal of Pain showed that almost half of deaths attributed to prescription opioids were Medicaid recipients, and using multiple pharmacies to fill prescriptions is linked with opioid overdoses. [More]
Special issue provides comprehensive overview of latest findings in the area of skeletal research

Special issue provides comprehensive overview of latest findings in the area of skeletal research

While there is good understanding of how bone mass, and more recently bone architecture, affects fracture risk, far less is known about the material properties of bone, or how these can impart resilience or fragility to the skeleton. [More]
Mandatory targets to reduce salt in processed foods could substantially cut cardiac deaths

Mandatory targets to reduce salt in processed foods could substantially cut cardiac deaths

Mandatory targets to reduce salt in processed food would help tackle inequalities in coronary heart disease that lead to excess deaths in deprived areas of England, according to research by the University of Liverpool. [More]
Premature babies who avoid eye contact in early infancy less likely to show symptoms of autism

Premature babies who avoid eye contact in early infancy less likely to show symptoms of autism

Premature babies are at an increased risk for developing autism spectrum disorder. But a small study indicates that preemies who avoid eye contact in early infancy are less likely to demonstrate symptoms of autism at age 2 than preemies who maintain eye contact during early interactions, according to new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. [More]
Study of genetic mutations could lead to optimized treatment plans for aplastic anemia patients

Study of genetic mutations could lead to optimized treatment plans for aplastic anemia patients

Scientists have identified a group of genetic mutations in patients with aplastic anemia, which likely will help doctors optimize treatment for this rare and deadly blood condition. The study, appearing in the New England Journal of Medicine, could lead to tailor-made treatment plans for aplastic anemia patients as part of the emerging precision medicine movement. [More]
Use of antipsychotic drugs more common in boys than girls, research shows

Use of antipsychotic drugs more common in boys than girls, research shows

Boys are more likely than girls to receive a prescription for antipsychotic medication regardless of age, researchers have found. [More]
Researchers complete phase 1 clinical trial of new drug for children suffering from neuroblastoma

Researchers complete phase 1 clinical trial of new drug for children suffering from neuroblastoma

Researchers at Spectrum Health Helen DeVos Children's Hospital have completed the first clinical trial of a new treatment for children suffering from neuroblastoma. In a clinical trial led by Giselle Sholler, MD, pediatric oncologist at Helen DeVos Children's Hospital and the Neuroblastoma and Medulloblastoma Translational Research Consortium (NMTRC), DFMO, an investigational agent, showed minimal side effects with long-term survival of three patients. [More]
Nanoparticles packed with chemotherapy drug and coated with chitosan target cancer stem-like cells

Nanoparticles packed with chemotherapy drug and coated with chitosan target cancer stem-like cells

Nanoparticles packed with a clinically used chemotherapy drug and coated with an oligosaccharide derived from the carapace of crustaceans might effectively target and kill cancer stem-like cells, according to a recent study led by researchers at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute. [More]
Damon Runyon creates new award to increase number of physician-scientists

Damon Runyon creates new award to increase number of physician-scientists

Physician-scientists are crucial to moving scientific discoveries from the lab to patients, but their numbers have been dwindling just when they are needed most, particularly in cancer research, as the number of cancer cases is projected to increase by 45 percent in the next fifteen years and elevate cancer to the leading cause of death in America. [More]
University of Georgia's Lynn Bailey leads international paper on folate biomarkers

University of Georgia's Lynn Bailey leads international paper on folate biomarkers

A University of Georgia researcher is lead author on an international paper on folate biomarkers as part of an initiative to provide evidence-based guidance for the global nutrition and public health community. [More]
Nuclea and Aelan partner to develop, commercialize novel biomarker tests using STEM cells as models

Nuclea and Aelan partner to develop, commercialize novel biomarker tests using STEM cells as models

Nuclea Biotechnologies Inc. announced today that it is partnering with Aelan Cell Technologies Inc. (San Francisco, California) for the development, validation and commercialization of novel biomarker tests and companion diagnostics using human STEM cells as models. [More]
Multiple courses of antibiotics may have significant impact on child development

Multiple courses of antibiotics may have significant impact on child development

A new animal study by NYU Langone Medical Center researchers adds to growing evidence that multiple courses of commonly used antibiotics may have a significant impact on children's development. [More]
Roswell Park, Lakeshore Cancer Center partner to improve access to cancer care for Nigerians

Roswell Park, Lakeshore Cancer Center partner to improve access to cancer care for Nigerians

America's oldest cancer center and one of the world's newest oncology centers are partnering to improve access to cancer prevention, screening and care for the people of Nigeria. Roswell Park Cancer Institute and Lakeshore Cancer Center have announced an affiliation that will see Roswell Park faculty providing clinical consultations to assist LCC oncologists, who will also have access to both training at RPCI and continuing professional education seminars they can participate in remotely. [More]
Hospital-wide clinical improvement initiative for patients at risk for DASH reduces readmission rates

Hospital-wide clinical improvement initiative for patients at risk for DASH reduces readmission rates

Brigham and Women's Hospital finds that developing and implementing an interdisciplinary care improvement initiative improves outcomes. [More]
Breast tumors have something in common with embryos, say MD Anderson researchers

Breast tumors have something in common with embryos, say MD Anderson researchers

It may seem incredulous, but breast tumors may have something in common with embryos ... at least in mice, say researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. [More]
Ranit Mishori awarded Macy Foundation grant to educate medical trainees about health needs of refugees

Ranit Mishori awarded Macy Foundation grant to educate medical trainees about health needs of refugees

The Josiah Macy Jr. Foundation has awarded a President's Grant to Georgetown family medicine physician Ranit Mishori, MD, MHS, FAAFP, to create a comprehensive curriculum to educate health professions students, residents and clinicians about the health needs of immigrants, migrants, torture survivors, asylum seekers and refugees. [More]
Dengue and chikungunya-carrying mosquitoes spreading to new areas, warn scientists

Dengue and chikungunya-carrying mosquitoes spreading to new areas, warn scientists

Scientists behind the first global distribution maps of two species of dengue and chikungunya-carrying mosquitoes warn they are spreading to new areas where they could cause disease. [More]
Poor sleep linked to negative mood in women with bipolar disorder

Poor sleep linked to negative mood in women with bipolar disorder

Poor sleep is associated with negative mood in women with bipolar disorder, according to researchers at Penn State College of Medicine and University of Michigan Medical School. [More]
Study supports need for diagnostic analysis of germline and tumor biomarker information

Study supports need for diagnostic analysis of germline and tumor biomarker information

A core tenet of precision medicine is that predictive biomarkers can enhance therapeutic decision-making. In a new pilot study, scientists at Molecular Health analyzed a randomly selected set of 250 patients with solid tumors and detected predictive biomarkers in more than 85% of tumors. [More]
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