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Proximity Ligation Assay helps detect effectiveness of cancer vaccines

Proximity Ligation Assay helps detect effectiveness of cancer vaccines

Cancer vaccines are designed to turn the body's own immune system specifically against tumor cells. Particularly promising are vaccines that are directed against so-called neoantigens: These are proteins that have undergone a genetic mutation in tumor cells and, therefore, differ from their counterparts in healthy cells. [More]
New partnership aims to create stem cell resource to study psychiatric disorders

New partnership aims to create stem cell resource to study psychiatric disorders

The New York Stem Cell Foundation and the Stanley Center at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard are partnering to create a foundational stem cell resource to study psychiatric disorders through the production of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell lines from individuals with schizophrenia and other psychiatric disorders. [More]
Einstein researchers find possible clue to why older mothers have babies born with Down syndrome

Einstein researchers find possible clue to why older mothers have babies born with Down syndrome

Researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University have found a possible clue to why older mothers face a higher risk for having babies born with conditions such as Down syndrome that are characterized by abnormal chromosome numbers. [More]
Targeted nanomedicines could help prevent heart attacks caused by atherosclerosis

Targeted nanomedicines could help prevent heart attacks caused by atherosclerosis

Nanometer-sized "drones" that deliver a special type of healing molecule to fat deposits in arteries could become a new way to prevent heart attacks caused by atherosclerosis, according to a study in pre-clinical models by scientists at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Columbia University Medical Center. [More]
Study results pave way for new clinical trial for glioblastoma patients

Study results pave way for new clinical trial for glioblastoma patients

Immune cells engineered to seek out and attack a type of deadly brain cancer were found to be both safe and effective at controlling tumor growth in mice that were treated with these modified cells, according to a study published in Science Translational Medicine by a team from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and the Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research. [More]
Researchers report development of first 3D tissue-engineered system

Researchers report development of first 3D tissue-engineered system

A team led by researchers at Tufts University School of Engineering and the University of Pavia has reported development of the first three-dimensional tissue system that reproduces the complex structure and physiology of human bone marrow and successfully generates functional human platelets. [More]
Study provides new insights into early events that shape cancer

Study provides new insights into early events that shape cancer

A study led by researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital suggests a new way to trace cancer back to its cell type of origin. By leveraging the epigenome maps produced by the Roadmap Epigenomics Program - a resource of data collected from over 100 cell types - the research team found that the unique genetic landscape of a particular tumor could be used to predict that tumor's cell type of origin. [More]
NIH-sponsored clinical trials examine safety, acceptability of HIV antiretroviral medicines

NIH-sponsored clinical trials examine safety, acceptability of HIV antiretroviral medicines

Two new clinical trials are examining the safety and acceptability of antiretroviral medicines administered via injection as a means of protecting against HIV infection. The studies are being funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health, and conducted by the NIAID-funded HIV Prevention Trials Network (HPTN). [More]
Possible cause of liver disease identified in adolescents with cystic fibrosis

Possible cause of liver disease identified in adolescents with cystic fibrosis

A professor at the University of Colorado School of Medicine at the Anschutz Medical Campus and his colleagues have found a possible cause of liver disease in adolescents with cystic fibrosis. [More]
NIAID expands Tuberculosis Research Units program to drive innovation in TB research

NIAID expands Tuberculosis Research Units program to drive innovation in TB research

The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health, is expanding its Tuberculosis Research Units program in an effort to drive innovation in tuberculosis (TB) research. NIAID is awarding up to $15.2 million in fiscal year 2015 and as much as $105.3 million over seven years to fund four institutions that will act as a collaborative TBRU network. [More]
Duke researchers demonstrate genetic therapeutic technique to treat DMD patients

Duke researchers demonstrate genetic therapeutic technique to treat DMD patients

Duke researchers have demonstrated a genetic therapeutic technique that has the potential to treat more than half of the patients suffering from Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD). [More]
Weill Cornell receives NIH grant to study TB-causing bacteria

Weill Cornell receives NIH grant to study TB-causing bacteria

In an effort to stop tuberculosis (TB) from becoming progressively less treatable worldwide, the National Institutes of Health has awarded Weill Cornell Medical College more than $6.2 million in first-year funding to support a research collaboration among six institutions in close alliance with voluntary pharmaceutical partners. [More]
New molecule shows promise in controlling HIV without using daily antiretroviral drugs

New molecule shows promise in controlling HIV without using daily antiretroviral drugs

Scientists have created a new molecule that shows promise for controlling HIV without daily antiretroviral drugs. The molecule foils a wider range of HIV strains in the laboratory than any known broadly neutralizing HIV antibody and is more powerful than some of the most potent of these antibodies. [More]
New clinical trial launched in South Africa to study investigational HIV vaccine regimen

New clinical trial launched in South Africa to study investigational HIV vaccine regimen

A clinical trial called HVTN 100 has been launched in South Africa to study an investigational HIV vaccine regimen for safety and the immune responses it generates in study participants. This experimental vaccine regimen is based on the one tested in the U.S. Military HIV Research Program-led RV144 clinical trial in Thailand--the first study to demonstrate that a vaccine can protect people from HIV infection. [More]
NYU Langone, Technion collaborate to advance cancer research

NYU Langone, Technion collaborate to advance cancer research

In a groundbreaking step forward to advance global collaboration in the fight against cancer, two of the world's preeminent academic and research institutions -- NYU Langone Medical Center and the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology -- formally announced a $9 million gift from philanthropists Laura and Isaac Perlmutter that will fund two major, joint research endeavors with potentially far-reaching impact in advancing cancer research. [More]
First comprehensive maps and analyses of human epigenomes revealed

First comprehensive maps and analyses of human epigenomes revealed

Two dozen scientific papers published online simultaneously on Feb. 18, 2015 present the first comprehensive maps and analyses of the epigenomes of a wide array of human cell and tissue types. Epigenomes are patterns of chemical annotations to the genome that determine whether, how, and when genes are activated. [More]
President of MD Anderson selected as new fellow of AACR Academy

President of MD Anderson selected as new fellow of AACR Academy

Ron DePinho, M.D., president of The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, will be inducted as a new fellow of the American Association for Cancer Research Academy. He joins 10 other cancer leaders in the prestigious academy that recognizes people who have made significant contributions to cancer research. [More]
Scientists identify role of tau-associated MAPT gene in development of Alzheimer's disease

Scientists identify role of tau-associated MAPT gene in development of Alzheimer's disease

An international team of scientists, led by researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, has identified the microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT) gene as increasing the risk for developing Alzheimer's disease (AD). [More]
CAMH scientists discover potential new approach to treat multiple sclerosis

CAMH scientists discover potential new approach to treat multiple sclerosis

Scientists at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health have discovered a promising new approach to treat multiple sclerosis (MS). In a new study, they've identified a previously unknown change in the spinal cord related to MS, and a way to alter this change to reduce the nerve cell damage that occurs with the disease. [More]
Fusobacterium necrophorum often causes severe sore throats in young adults

Fusobacterium necrophorum often causes severe sore throats in young adults

New research from the University of Alabama at Birmingham suggests that Fusobacterium necrophorum more often causes severe sore throats in young adults than streptococcus — the cause of the much better known strep throat. [More]