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Researchers identify mutations that may stimulate early cancer growth in precancerous colorectal tissue

Researchers identify mutations that may stimulate early cancer growth in precancerous colorectal tissue

Researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have discovered mutations that may fuel early cancer growth in precancerous colorectal tissue from high-risk patients. [More]
Epigenetic modification of Igfbp2 gene may increase risk of obesity and fatty liver

Epigenetic modification of Igfbp2 gene may increase risk of obesity and fatty liver

Scientists of the German Center for Diabetes Research led by the German Institute of Human Nutrition have shown in a mouse model that the epigenetic modification of the Igfbp2 gene observed in the young animal precedes a fatty liver in the adult animal later in life. [More]
Investigational drug abemaciclib shows durable clinical activity for variety of cancer types

Investigational drug abemaciclib shows durable clinical activity for variety of cancer types

The investigational anticancer therapeutic abemaciclib, which targets CDK4 and CDK6, showed durable clinical activity when given as continuous single-agent therapy to patients with a variety of cancer types, including breast cancer, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), glioblastoma, and melanoma, according to results from a phase I clinical trial. [More]
New data-intensive supercomputer may help combat spread of Zika virus

New data-intensive supercomputer may help combat spread of Zika virus

More than 50 data scientists, engineers, and UT Austin students gathered on Sunday, May 15, 2016 to use Big Data to fight the spread of Zika for the "Austin Zika Hackathon" at the Cloudera offices downtown. [More]
NIH-funded study finds visual impairment, blindness may double by 2050

NIH-funded study finds visual impairment, blindness may double by 2050

With the youngest of the baby boomers hitting 65 by 2029, the number of people with visual impairment or blindness in the United States is expected to double to more than 8 million by 2050, according to projections based on the most recent census data and from studies funded by the National Eye Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health. [More]
Small lipid nanocarrier may deliver chemotherapeutic drug more efficiently to brain tumor cells

Small lipid nanocarrier may deliver chemotherapeutic drug more efficiently to brain tumor cells

Great discoveries do come in small packages. Few know that better than Ann-Marie Broome, Ph.D., who feels nanotechnology holds the future of medicine with its ability to deliver powerful drugs in tiny, designer packages. [More]
Aggressive blood pressure intervention can benefit frail adults aged 75 and older

Aggressive blood pressure intervention can benefit frail adults aged 75 and older

NIH-supported researchers are reporting additional details about a widely-publicized study that linked a systolic blood pressure target under 120 mm Hg (millimeters of mercury) with reduced cardiovascular disease and a lower risk of death. [More]
New spectral triangulation system may help pinpoint targeted cancer tumors

New spectral triangulation system may help pinpoint targeted cancer tumors

Bathing a patient in LED light may someday offer a new way to locate tumors, according to Rice University researchers. [More]
New method helps scavenge inflammatory molecules that mediate sepsis in mice

New method helps scavenge inflammatory molecules that mediate sepsis in mice

Sepsis is a life-threatening complication of infection in which the molecules that the body releases to fight an infection trigger widespread inflammatory responses, resulting in damage to multiple organ systems. [More]
Two-way communication between cancer cells may be key to tumor metastasis

Two-way communication between cancer cells may be key to tumor metastasis

Two-way communication between cancer cells appears to be key to their becoming motile, clustering and spreading through metastasis, according to Rice University scientists. [More]
GMU’s early-detection urine test works for Lyme disease, study shows

GMU’s early-detection urine test works for Lyme disease, study shows

After three years and 300 patients, George Mason University researchers have proof that their early-detection urine test for Lyme disease works. [More]
Four major phenotypes may help improve prediction, prevention of cardiometabolic risk in prediabetes

Four major phenotypes may help improve prediction, prevention of cardiometabolic risk in prediabetes

Prediabetes is associated with increased risk of diabetes, cardiovascular disease, dementia and cancer. However, the disease risk considerably varies among subjects. [More]
NS5 viral protein could be promising vaccine target against Zika virus

NS5 viral protein could be promising vaccine target against Zika virus

A viral protein known as NS5 is a promising target for vaccines against Zika and related viruses, according to National Institutes of Health scientists and colleagues at Mount Sinai's Icahn School of Medicine. [More]
Researchers identify hCRTh2 protein as possible therapeutic target for asthma

Researchers identify hCRTh2 protein as possible therapeutic target for asthma

Patients with asthma have chronic lung inflammation that results in sporadic narrowing of the airways and difficulty breathing. Symptoms and severity are variable among individuals; however, the cells and inflammatory factors that trigger asthmatic events have been fairly well characterized and are similar regardless of the asthma-inducing stimuli. [More]
Older, frail hypertensive adults could benefit from intensive lowering of blood pressure

Older, frail hypertensive adults could benefit from intensive lowering of blood pressure

Adults with hypertension who are age 75 years and older, including those who are frail and with poor overall health, could benefit from lowering their blood pressure below current medical guidelines. [More]
Researchers identify low MCJ expression as marker of poor response to chemotherapy

Researchers identify low MCJ expression as marker of poor response to chemotherapy

Chemotherapy is a key part of the standard treatment regimen for triple-negative breast cancer patients whose cancer lacks expression of estrogen and progesterone receptors and the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2). [More]
TAK1 deficit protects mice from obesity

TAK1 deficit protects mice from obesity

Obesity and subsequent complications are increasing in frequency worldwide. The accumulation of adipose tissue is associated with increased inflammation, and it has been proposed that modification of proinflammatory responses could alter adipose tissue composition. [More]
Higher adolescent intake of saturated fat linked to higher dense breast volume in early adulthood

Higher adolescent intake of saturated fat linked to higher dense breast volume in early adulthood

Consuming high amounts of saturated fat or low amounts of mono- and polyunsaturated fats as an adolescent was associated with higher breast density in young adulthood. Breast density is a risk factor for breast cancer. [More]
Overreaction to Zika virus threat could affect psychological well-being of U.S. citizens

Overreaction to Zika virus threat could affect psychological well-being of U.S. citizens

Vector biologist Laura Harrington and chair of the Department of Entomology at Cornell University says overreaction to the threat of Zika virus in the continental U.S. could be harmful to citizens' psychological well-being, as well as the environment as it may lead to mass spraying of insecticides that may not be effective in controlling the mosquitos. [More]
High levels of secretin hormone may play vital role in management of chronic liver diseases

High levels of secretin hormone may play vital role in management of chronic liver diseases

High levels of a digestive hormone called secretin may play an important role in the management of certain chronic liver diseases, according to new research published in the journal Hepatology. These findings could result in new ways to treat cholestatic liver diseases, a condition that impairs the movement of bile, the fluid produced by the liver to digest fats. [More]
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