Translational News and Research RSS Feed - Translational News and Research

Dual tasking abilities show regression in athletes returning to action in less than a month

Dual tasking abilities show regression in athletes returning to action in less than a month

When are athletes who have suffered concussions ready to return to action? A new University of Oregon study has found that high school athletes who head back on the field with medical clearance within 60 days experience a significant regression in their abilities to simultaneously walk and do simple mental tasks. [More]
Newborn screening for SCID holds promise that affected children can lead healthy lives

Newborn screening for SCID holds promise that affected children can lead healthy lives

Using population-based screening outcomes of approximately 3 million infants, a team of scientists across 14 states, including four researchers at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, have shown that newborn screening for severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) can be successfully implemented across public health newborn screening programs. [More]
Study identifies protein that appears to play key role in protecting people infected with tuberculosis

Study identifies protein that appears to play key role in protecting people infected with tuberculosis

UCLA-led study has identified a protein that appears to play a key role in protecting people infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis — the bacterium that causes tuberculosis — from developing the active form of the disease. [More]
Researchers focus on how exposure to opioids may alter expression of OPRM1 gene

Researchers focus on how exposure to opioids may alter expression of OPRM1 gene

Some infants born with neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) secondary to in-utero opioid exposure have a more difficult time going through withdrawal than others, but the underlying reasons are not well understood. [More]
Study examines national impact of newborn screening test for SCID

Study examines national impact of newborn screening test for SCID

Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), a potentially life-threatening, but treatable, disorder affecting infants, is twice as common as previously believed, according to a new study that is the first to examine the national impact of this newborn screening test. [More]
Handwashing with antibacterial soap exposes hospital workers to potentially unsafe levels of triclosan

Handwashing with antibacterial soap exposes hospital workers to potentially unsafe levels of triclosan

Handwashing with antibacterial soap exposes hospital workers to significant and potentially unsafe levels of triclosan, a widely-used chemical currently under review by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, according to a study led by researchers from UC San Francisco. [More]
New web-based program helps to determine deadly form of brain cancer

New web-based program helps to determine deadly form of brain cancer

A new web-based program developed by University of Kentucky Markey Cancer Center researchers will provide a simple, free way for healthcare providers to determine which brain tumor cases require testing for a genetic mutation. [More]
Rettsyndrome.Org awards $1.5M to advance translational research, support Neuro-Habilitation Program

Rettsyndrome.Org awards $1.5M to advance translational research, support Neuro-Habilitation Program

The International Rett Syndrome Foundation now doing business as Rettsyndrome.org announces today that the Board of Trustees has awarded $1.5M to support 10 new grants to further translational research and launch of the neuro-habilitation therapeutic program, and fund clinical research. [More]
Experts provide useful recommendations for research on suicide prevention

Experts provide useful recommendations for research on suicide prevention

In a new supplement to the September issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, experts address the state of the science on suicide prevention and provide useful recommendations for research to inform effective suicide prevention. [More]
Communications about the benefits of vaccination influence parents' intentions to immunize children

Communications about the benefits of vaccination influence parents' intentions to immunize children

How do parents decide whether to vaccinate their child? In a study designed to formally look at the content of parent-targeted communications about the benefits of vaccination for measles, mumps and rubella, Indiana University School of Medicine investigators report that the framing of these messages influences parents' intentions to immunize their children. [More]
New cholesterol guidelines can significantly help reduce cardiovascular events

New cholesterol guidelines can significantly help reduce cardiovascular events

A study from UT-Southwestern researchers found that recently introduced cholesterol guidelines would significantly reduce new cardiovascular events, when compared to treatment based on previous cholesterol guidelines. [More]
Rare mutation in suspect gene disrupts brain circuitry in complex psychiatric disorders

Rare mutation in suspect gene disrupts brain circuitry in complex psychiatric disorders

Researchers have long suspected that major mental disorders are genetically-rooted diseases of synapses - the connections between neurons. [More]
Researchers compare benefits of bivalirudin and heparin for patients undergoing coronary stenting

Researchers compare benefits of bivalirudin and heparin for patients undergoing coronary stenting

Bivalirudin and heparin are two anticoagulant options for patients undergoing coronary stenting for ischemic heart disease. Bivalirudin, a newer anticoagulant, has been touted as being as effective as generic heparin, but with nearly half the rate of bleeding. [More]
Study to explain how brain reorganizes itself as children learn math facts

Study to explain how brain reorganizes itself as children learn math facts

As children learn basic arithmetic, they gradually switch from solving problems by counting on their fingers to pulling facts from memory. The shift comes more easily for some kids than for others, but no one knows why. [More]
FDA-approved drug eliminates immune cells that destroys hair follicles in people with alopecia areata

FDA-approved drug eliminates immune cells that destroys hair follicles in people with alopecia areata

Researchers at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) have identified the immune cells responsible for destroying hair follicles in people with alopecia areata, a common autoimmune disease that causes hair loss, and have tested an FDA-approved drug that eliminated these immune cells and restored hair growth in a small number of patients. [More]
Researchers reveal how early changes in DNA methylation involved in Alzheimer's disease

Researchers reveal how early changes in DNA methylation involved in Alzheimer's disease

A new study led by researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) and Rush University Medical Center, reveals how early changes in brain DNA methylation are involved in Alzheimer's disease. [More]
Microbes influence human eating behavior, dietary choices

Microbes influence human eating behavior, dietary choices

It sounds like science fiction, but it seems that bacteria within us — which outnumber our own cells about 100-fold — may very well be affecting both our cravings and moods to get us to eat what they want, and often are driving us toward obesity. [More]
NIH challenges innovators to compete for prizes by developing new ways to track a single cell

NIH challenges innovators to compete for prizes by developing new ways to track a single cell

The National Institutes of Health is challenging science innovators to compete for prizes totaling up to $500,000, by developing new ways to track the health status of a single cell in complex tissue over time. [More]
NIH-funded study explores how thalamic reticular nucleus influences consciousness

NIH-funded study explores how thalamic reticular nucleus influences consciousness

Ever wonder why it's hard to focus after a bad night's sleep? Using mice and flashes of light, scientists show that just a few nerve cells in the brain may control the switch between internal thoughts and external distractions. [More]
UCSF study shows price differences for ten common blood tests across California hospitals

UCSF study shows price differences for ten common blood tests across California hospitals

New UC San Francisco research shows significant price differences for ten common blood tests in California hospitals, with some patients charged as little as $10 for one test while others were charged $10,169 for the identical test. [More]