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Penn prediction tool increases sepsis identification and care, indicates fewer deaths

Penn prediction tool increases sepsis identification and care, indicates fewer deaths

An automated early warning and response system for sepsis developed by Penn Medicine experts has resulted in a marked increase in sepsis identification and care, transfer to the ICU, and an indication of fewer deaths due to sepsis. A study assessing the tool is published online in the Journal of Hospital Medicine. [More]

Economic cost of adolescent chronic pain is $19.5 billion a year

Research in The Journal of Pain estimated that the economic cost of moderate to severe chronic pain in adolescents is $19.5 billion a year. The Journal of Pain is the peer-reviewed publication of the American Pain Society. [More]
TSRI, STSI researchers receive NIH grants to set up platforms to mine biomedical data

TSRI, STSI researchers receive NIH grants to set up platforms to mine biomedical data

San Diego researchers at The Scripps Research Institute and Scripps Translational Science Institute will receive more than $4.4 million as part of a National Institutes of Health initiative called "Big Data to Knowledge" (BD2K). [More]
UChicago awarded $12 million grant to establish national center to study drug abuse-related behaviors

UChicago awarded $12 million grant to establish national center to study drug abuse-related behaviors

The National Institute on Drug Abuse has awarded the University of Chicago a $12 million, five year grant to establish a national Center of Excellence to study drug abuse-associated behaviors by conducting research with rats. [More]
CUMC researchers use innovative algorithm to find driving force behind aggressive form of glioblastoma

CUMC researchers use innovative algorithm to find driving force behind aggressive form of glioblastoma

Using an innovative algorithm that analyzes gene regulatory and signaling networks, Columbia University Medical Center researchers have found that loss of a gene called KLHL9 is the driving force behind the most aggressive form of glioblastoma, the most common form of brain cancer. [More]
Study addresses the challenge of genomic heterogeneity

Study addresses the challenge of genomic heterogeneity

Known cancer-driving genomic aberrations in localized lung cancer appear to be so consistently present across tumors that a single biopsy of one region of the tumor is likely to identify most of them, according to a paper published today in Science. [More]
InSightec to share new insights at FUS symposium

InSightec to share new insights at FUS symposium

InSightec, world leader in MR-guided Focused Ultrasound (MRgFUS) will be on site at the Focused Ultrasound International Symposium (FUS) to share key insights gained in the past two years of using its non-invasive MRgFUS solution for treating a variety of neurosurgical, oncological and gynecological indications. [More]
HemoShear completes first-phase development of novel cancer drug discovery platform

HemoShear completes first-phase development of novel cancer drug discovery platform

HemoShear today announced that it has completed the first phase of development of a novel cancer drug discovery platform that replicates human tumor biology and responds to clinically-relevant drug concentrations. [More]
CHOP joins CEGIR to advance treatment of eosinophilic disorders

CHOP joins CEGIR to advance treatment of eosinophilic disorders

The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia has joined a new consortium announced today by the National Institutes of Health to advance the treatment of chronic inflammatory diseases called eosinophilic disorders. [More]
Molecular biologists awarded NIH grant to identify new compounds to fight malaria parasite

Molecular biologists awarded NIH grant to identify new compounds to fight malaria parasite

A team of molecular biologists, jointly led by Clemson University professor Jim Morris, was awarded a $151,121 grant from the National Institutes of Health to identify new compounds with anti-malarial activity for a deadly parasite species that kills hundreds of thousands of people each year. [More]
Pediatric specialist in EGIDs helps lead $6.25 million NIH clinical research project

Pediatric specialist in EGIDs helps lead $6.25 million NIH clinical research project

A pediatric specialist in eosinophilic gastrointestinal diseases (EGIDs) at the University of Colorado School of Medicine and Children's Hospital Colorado will help lead a five-year, $6.25 million clinical research project recently funded by the National Institutes of Health. [More]
TGen, NAU awarded patent for genomics-based test to detect H1N1 pandemic flu strain

TGen, NAU awarded patent for genomics-based test to detect H1N1 pandemic flu strain

The federal government has awarded a patent to the Translational Genomics Research Institute and Northern Arizona University for a test that can detect — and assist in the treatment of — the H1N1 pandemic flu strain. [More]
Overuse of cardiac stress testing with imaging increases healthcare costs

Overuse of cardiac stress testing with imaging increases healthcare costs

In a new study recently published in the Annals of Internal Medicine, researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center concluded that overuse of cardiac stress testing with imaging has led to rising healthcare costs and unnecessary radiation exposure to patients. [More]
Low sexual desire among women can be treatable

Low sexual desire among women can be treatable

Low sexual desire is common among both pre- and post-menopausal women. It can cause personal distress, harm relationships, and have a negative impact on body image and self confidence. Yet few women seek medical care for this condition, and the reasons are explored in a timely article in Journal of Women's Health, a peer-reviewed publication from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. [More]
Montefiore Medical Center experts raise awareness about the importance of flu vaccines

Montefiore Medical Center experts raise awareness about the importance of flu vaccines

Each year, 30,000 people die from influenza infection and its complications. In an effort to get ahead of the upcoming flu season, experts at Montefiore Medical Center are raising awareness about the importance of the flu vaccine, which remains the best option to reduce a person's risk of contracting the virus. The flu season can start as early as late September and usually runs for about 12 to 15 weeks. [More]
Nurse-led intervention program fails to improve 30-day hospital readmission rates

Nurse-led intervention program fails to improve 30-day hospital readmission rates

Researchers at UC San Francisco have found that a nurse-led intervention program designed to reduce readmissions among ethnically and linguistically diverse older patients did not improve 30-day hospital readmission rates. Their findings suggest hospitals evaluate such programs before implementing or continuing. [More]
Researchers demonstrate involvement of ClpB protein in eating disorders

Researchers demonstrate involvement of ClpB protein in eating disorders

Eating disorders (ED) such as anorexia nervosa, bulimia, and binge eating disorder affect approximately 5-10% of the general population, but the biological mechanisms involved are unknown. Researchers at Inserm Unit 1073, "Nutrition, inflammation and dysfunction of the gut-brain axis" (Inserm/University of Rouen) have demonstrated the involvement of a protein produced by some intestinal bacteria that may be the source of these disorders. [More]
Dengue fever cases in India 282 times higher than officially reported, study says

Dengue fever cases in India 282 times higher than officially reported, study says

The annual number of dengue fever cases in India is 282 times higher than officially reported, and the disease inflicts an economic burden on the country of at least US$1.11 billion each year in medical and other expenses, according to a new study published online today in the American Journal of Tropical Medicine & Hygiene. [More]
Study identifies six new genetic variants associated with habitual coffee drinking

Study identifies six new genetic variants associated with habitual coffee drinking

A new, large-scale study has identified six new genetic variants associated with habitual coffee drinking. The genome-wide meta-analysis, led by Harvard School of Public Health and Brigham and Women's Hospital researchers, helps explain why a given amount of coffee or caffeine has different effects on different people and provides a genetic basis for future research exploring the links between coffee and health. [More]
NanoString, BWH partner to translate genomic biomarker discoveries into clinical cancer diagnostics

NanoString, BWH partner to translate genomic biomarker discoveries into clinical cancer diagnostics

NanoString Technologies, Inc., a provider of life science tools for translational research and molecular diagnostic products, today announced that it has signed a multi-year, multi-investigator research collaboration with Harvard-affiliated Brigham and Women's Hospital to accelerate the translation of genomic biomarker discoveries into clinical cancer diagnostics. [More]