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CAP, ASCO University and AMP partner to create Molecular Oncology Tumor Board series

CAP, ASCO University and AMP partner to create Molecular Oncology Tumor Board series

The College of American Pathologists, the American Society of Clinical Oncology's ASCO University, and the Association for Molecular Pathology recently announced their partnership in the creation of the Molecular Oncology Tumor Board series, an online and user-driven resource designed to help cancer care providers with the interpretation and understanding of tumor molecular profiling tests and studies. [More]

Study: Classic psychedelics may hold great promise in preventing suicide

Classic psychedelics, such as LSD, psilocybin mushrooms and mescaline, previously have been shown to occasion lasting improvements in mental health. But researchers led by University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Public Health investigators wanted to advance the existing research and determine whether classic psychedelics might be protective with regard to suicidal thoughts. [More]
Scientists take a huge step forward in identifying root causes of psoriasis

Scientists take a huge step forward in identifying root causes of psoriasis

Case Western Reserve scientists have taken a huge leap toward identifying root causes of psoriasis, an inflammatory skin condition affecting 125 million people around the world. Of the roughly 50,000 proteins in the human body, researchers have zeroed in on four that appear most likely to contribute this chronic disease. [More]
Bathing critically ill patients with chlorhexidine wipes does not prevent ICU infections

Bathing critically ill patients with chlorhexidine wipes does not prevent ICU infections

Vanderbilt University Medical Center researchers have found that bathing critically ill patients with disposable chlorhexidine cloths did not decrease the incidence of health care-associated infections when compared to less expensive nonantimicrobial cloths, according to a study appearing online in JAMA this week. [More]
Two new drug compounds appear to be effective in treating endometriosis

Two new drug compounds appear to be effective in treating endometriosis

Two new drug compounds - one of which has already proven useful in a mouse model of multiple sclerosis - appear to be effective in treating endometriosis, a disorder that, like MS, is driven by estrogen and inflammation, scientists report in Science Translational Medicine. [More]
Research leads to new, better way to combat drug-resistant cancers

Research leads to new, better way to combat drug-resistant cancers

A team of researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital has developed a new platform that can rapidly identify effective drug combinations for lung cancer patients whose tumors have stopped responding to targeted therapy. The research, which was supported in part by the National Foundation for Cancer Research, is a critical milestone on the road to personalized medicine. [More]
Study: Mutated ATRX gene may serve as much-needed biomarker for rare neuroendocrine tumors

Study: Mutated ATRX gene may serve as much-needed biomarker for rare neuroendocrine tumors

A somatic mutation in the ATRX gene has recently been shown as a potential molecular marker for aggressive brain tumors, such as gliomas, neuroblastomas and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. Now, for the first time, researchers at Penn's Abramson Cancer Center have found that the same mutated gene may serve as a much-needed biomarker for the pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas (PCC/PGL) that become malignant. [More]
Study: ICSI technique no better than conventional IVF

Study: ICSI technique no better than conventional IVF

The use of an assisted reproduction technique known as intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) doubled between 1996 and 2012, although compared with conventional in vitro fertilization (IVF), use of ICSI was not associated with improved reproductive outcomes, according to a study in the January 20 issue of JAMA. [More]
Childhood stress, psychiatric disorders linked to cellular changes that cause aging

Childhood stress, psychiatric disorders linked to cellular changes that cause aging

In a new study published online in Biological Psychiatry on January 16, 2015, researchers from Butler Hospital identify an association between biological changes on the cellular level and both childhood adversity and psychiatric disorders. [More]
UChicago researchers awarded NIH grants to develop novel medications for sleep apnea, asthma

UChicago researchers awarded NIH grants to develop novel medications for sleep apnea, asthma

Two research teams based at the University of Chicago have received prestigious grants from the National Institutes of Health to develop novel medications to treat sleep apnea and asthma. [More]
Researchers reveal key factor in understanding elevated cancer risk linked to gene therapy

Researchers reveal key factor in understanding elevated cancer risk linked to gene therapy

National Institutes of Health researchers have uncovered a key factor in understanding the elevated cancer risk associated with gene therapy. They conducted research on mice with a rare disease similar to one in humans, hoping their findings may eventually help improve gene therapy for humans. Researchers at the National Human Genome Research Institute, part of NIH, published their research in the Jan. 20, 2015, online issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation. [More]
Research opens door to potential new cancer biomarkers

Research opens door to potential new cancer biomarkers

A new analysis opens the door to discovery of thousands of potential new cancer biomarkers. [More]
Brain uses separate pathway to recall old fear memories

Brain uses separate pathway to recall old fear memories

People with anxiety disorders, such as post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), often experience prolonged and exaggerated fearfulness. Now, an animal study suggests that this might involve disruption of a gradual shifting of brain circuitry for retrieving fear memories. Researchers funded by the National Institutes of Health have discovered in rats that an old fear memory is recalled by a separate brain pathway from the one originally used to recall it when it was fresh. [More]
AMRI awarded NIH contract for drug development services

AMRI awarded NIH contract for drug development services

AMRI today announced it received a 10-year federal contract award from the National Institutes of Health for drug development and manufacturing services. This NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke award will support NIH's Drug Manufacturing and Formulation Program (DMFP), which is a component of the Blueprint Neurotherapeutics Network (BPN). [More]
ETH Zurich researchers demonstrate promising method to fabricate cellulose-sheaths for implants

ETH Zurich researchers demonstrate promising method to fabricate cellulose-sheaths for implants

Artificial implants such as pacemakers often cause complications because the body identifies them as foreign objects. Researchers at ETH Zurich have now demonstrated a simple method to fabricate cellulose-sheaths for implants, whose micro-structured surface makes them especially biocompatible. [More]
Tübingen researchers develop new way of labeling T-cells

Tübingen researchers develop new way of labeling T-cells

To better understand what happens during immune reactions in the body, researchers at Tübingen University have developed a new way of labeling T-cells, allowing them to track the T-cell movement in mice using non-invasive positron emission technology (PET). [More]
CNIO researchers identify new mechanism that influences differentiation of keratinocytes

CNIO researchers identify new mechanism that influences differentiation of keratinocytes

The formation of human skin involves a cascade of biochemical signals, which are not well understood. However, they are very important since their failure may cause diseases, such as Atopic Dermatitis and skin cancers, which affect more than 25% of the human population. [More]
NIAID awards contracts to support early-stage human clinical trials of infectious disease treatments

NIAID awards contracts to support early-stage human clinical trials of infectious disease treatments

The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health, has awarded contracts to three organizations to support early-stage human clinical trials of investigational infectious disease treatments. The new awards for the Phase I Clinical Trial Units for Therapeutics increases the number of funded organizations under the program from two to three, expanding capacity for conducting early safety testing of novel investigational drugs. [More]
TSRI scientists identify novel synthetic compound that reduces activity of a cancer-related protein

TSRI scientists identify novel synthetic compound that reduces activity of a cancer-related protein

Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute have identified a novel synthetic compound that sharply inhibits the activity of a protein that plays an important role in in the progression of breast and pancreatic cancers. [More]
UH Case Medical Center, ABL partner to design and validate HIV drug resistance tests

UH Case Medical Center, ABL partner to design and validate HIV drug resistance tests

University Hospitals Case Medical Center has signed an agreement with Advanced Biological Laboratories, an information technology and diagnostic company based in Luxembourg, to join efforts on the designing and validation of an HIV drug resistance and tropism assay based on next-generation sequencing (NGS). [More]