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First-ever vaccine to combat Leishmaniasis under development

First-ever vaccine to combat Leishmaniasis under development

As scientists scramble to get a Zika virus vaccine into human trials by the end of the summer, a team of researchers is working on the first-ever vaccine to prevent another insect-borne disease - Leishmaniasis - from gaining a similar foothold in the Americas. [More]
Study reveals how visceral fat contributes to insulin resistance, inflammation

Study reveals how visceral fat contributes to insulin resistance, inflammation

Researchers have long-known that visceral fat - the kind that wraps around the internal organs - is more dangerous than subcutaneous fat that lies just under the skin around the belly, thighs and rear. But how visceral fat contributes to insulin resistance and inflammation has remained unknown. [More]
Innovative strategy can reverse symptoms in neurodegenerative diseases

Innovative strategy can reverse symptoms in neurodegenerative diseases

Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease are the two most common neurodegenerative disorders worldwide and cause untold suffering to millions of patients and their families. Treatments for these diseases are limited, and no cures exist. Now, a new study describes an innovative strategy that reverses symptoms in these neurodegenerative diseases - at least in fruit flies which had been genetically altered to model the diseases. [More]
Study highlights potential emergence of new swine flu strains

Study highlights potential emergence of new swine flu strains

The wide diversity of flu in pigs across multiple continents, mostly introduced from humans, highlights the significant potential of new swine flu strains emerging, according to a study to be published in eLife. [More]
UK charity Action on Hearing Loss funds new project to develop medicines for hearing loss

UK charity Action on Hearing Loss funds new project to develop medicines for hearing loss

Today, UK charity Action on Hearing Loss announces a major investment to fund a new project to develop medicines to treat age-related hearing loss and noise-induced hearing loss at BioTrinity 2016 – Europe’s Leading Investment and Biopartnering Conference. [More]
Exposure to blue light may lead to eyestrain but does not damage retina

Exposure to blue light may lead to eyestrain but does not damage retina

Nearly 90 percent of adults use digital devices for two or more hours per day, according to The Vision Council's 2016 Digital Eye Strain Report, exposing consumers to blue light that some suggest is dangerous. [More]
New study finds no increase in food-specific IgE levels linked to food allergies

New study finds no increase in food-specific IgE levels linked to food allergies

A new study using 5,000 stored blood samples found no increase in the presence of food-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) — a blood marker associated with food allergy — in children's blood between the 1980s and the 2000s. [More]
Targeted therapy for triple-negative breast cancer may prove beneficial

Targeted therapy for triple-negative breast cancer may prove beneficial

A targeted therapy for triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), the most aggressive form of breast cancer, has shown potential promise in a recently published study. TNBC is the only type of breast cancer for which there are no currently approved targeted therapies. [More]
3-D imaging of fibroblastic foci may help researchers study disease progression in IPF patients

3-D imaging of fibroblastic foci may help researchers study disease progression in IPF patients

Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a fatal disease in which progressive scarring of the lungs leads to respiratory failure. Lung scarring in IPF takes the form of aggregates of proliferating fibroblasts and myofibroblasts, known as "fibroblastic foci", which deposit collagen and other fibrotic components. These foci are thought to form in response to lung injury. [More]
Wellderly study finds link between cognitive decline genes and healthy aging

Wellderly study finds link between cognitive decline genes and healthy aging

An eight-year-long accrual and analysis of the whole genome sequences of healthy elderly people, or "Wellderly," has revealed a higher-than-normal presence of genetic variants offering protection from cognitive decline, researchers from the Scripps Translational Science Institute (STSI) reported today in the journal Cell. [More]
Widowed women have lower frailty risk than married women, study finds

Widowed women have lower frailty risk than married women, study finds

The well-accepted association between marital status, health, and risk of functional impairment in older individuals is generally true, but a new study on frailty found unexpected, gender-specific differences. [More]
Study indicates that resolvin D1 has anti-arthritic properties

Study indicates that resolvin D1 has anti-arthritic properties

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a debilitating autoimmune disorder that is characterized by the accumulation of inflammatory cells within the fluid of the joints. Current therapeutic strategies mostly serve to ease pain and rarely are able to reverse damage or resolve inflammation. [More]
Researchers observe worrisome increase in anaphylaxis rate

Researchers observe worrisome increase in anaphylaxis rate

Anaphylaxis, known to be a sudden and potentially life-threatening allergic reaction, seems to be increasing among children, according to a new study led by a team at the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre. [More]
GSK3β inhibition may be potential therapeutic strategy for treating ACM

GSK3β inhibition may be potential therapeutic strategy for treating ACM

Arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy (ACM) is an inherited heart disease that results from mutations in genes that encode components of the cardiac desmosome, which forms the junction between cardiac muscle and the epithelium. Patients with ACM have an increased risk of sudden death due to the breakdown of the muscle wall of the heart with age. [More]
PPP3CA, calcineurin may be suitable therapeutic targets for multiple myeloma treatment

PPP3CA, calcineurin may be suitable therapeutic targets for multiple myeloma treatment

Multiple myeloma (MM) is a hematological cancer that frequently acquires resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs. Additionally, many patients experience disease relapse, but these patients are difficult to treat as the cancer is often resistant to the previous treatment regimen. [More]
Subtle changes in protein-coding gene may cause different genetic disorders

Subtle changes in protein-coding gene may cause different genetic disorders

It has been disorienting to the scientific and medical community as to why different subtle changes in a protein-coding gene causes many different genetic disorders in different patients -- including premature aging, nerve problems, heart problems and muscle problems. no other gene works like this. According to a new study, co-authored by Binghamton University faculty Eric Hoffman, it has to do with cell "commitment." [More]
Scientists examine PD-1-expressing regulatory T cells in aggressive brain cancer

Scientists examine PD-1-expressing regulatory T cells in aggressive brain cancer

Immunotherapy represents an exciting advance in cancer treatment that harnesses the immune system to seek and destroy cancer cells. [More]
Researchers develop fine-scale global map of Zika virus transmission

Researchers develop fine-scale global map of Zika virus transmission

The southeastern US, including much of Texas through to Florida, have ideal conditions for spread of Zika virus according to a new study published in eLife. [More]
Hippo signaling pathway controls phases of quiescence in fruit fly central nervous system

Hippo signaling pathway controls phases of quiescence in fruit fly central nervous system

Neural stem cells are responsible for the formation of differentiated daughter cells in the developing brain. If no new cells are needed, the stem cells may enter a resting phase called quiescence. Biologists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz have now discovered that the phases of quiescence in the Drosophila fruit fly central nervous system are controlled by the Hippo signaling pathway. Drosophila serves as a model organism that helps geneticists to decode the molecular fundamentals of cellular biology and unravel mechanisms that are conserved in human beings and other vertebrates. [More]
Better way to model human immune system

Better way to model human immune system

Scientists at the University of Minnesota have developed a new way to study mice that better mimics the immune system of adult humans and which could significantly improve ways to test potential therapeutics. Published online today in the journal Nature, the researchers describe the limitations of laboratory mice for immunology research and reveal the benefits of what they are calling "dirty mice." [More]
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