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Pitt researchers awarded new $5.8 million NIH grant to develop microfluidic 3D liver model system

Pitt researchers awarded new $5.8 million NIH grant to develop microfluidic 3D liver model system

With a new $5.8 million, three-year award from the National Institutes of Health, researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine will further develop a state-of-the-art, microfluidic 3D model system that mimics structure and function of the liver to better predict organ physiology, assess drug toxicity and build disease models. [More]
People with memory loss more likely to develop dementia later, study finds

People with memory loss more likely to develop dementia later, study finds

New research suggests that people without dementia who begin reporting memory issues may be more likely to develop dementia later, even if they have no clinical signs of the disease. [More]
NIH awards grants to 11 research groups to establish AMP RA/Lupus Network

NIH awards grants to 11 research groups to establish AMP RA/Lupus Network

The National Institutes of Health has awarded grants to 11 research groups across the United States to establish the Accelerating Medicines Partnership in Rheumatoid Arthritis and Lupus (AMP RA/Lupus) Network. [More]
NIH, CSU scientists provide evidence that supports camels as primary carrier of MERS-CoV

NIH, CSU scientists provide evidence that supports camels as primary carrier of MERS-CoV

National Institutes of Health and Colorado State University scientists have provided experimental evidence supporting dromedary camels as the primary reservoir, or carrier, of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV). [More]
Eurest introduces new food and nutrition concept to promote worksite health, sustainability

Eurest introduces new food and nutrition concept to promote worksite health, sustainability

National Institute of Health's contracted food service partner, Eurest, proudly introduced a new pioneering food and nutrition concept called 'Balance Kitchen' in the ACRF Cafe that is designed to foster and promote worksite health and sustainability. [More]
Brainwave EEG test could be the key to accurate, precise identification of children with autism

Brainwave EEG test could be the key to accurate, precise identification of children with autism

A new study by researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University suggests that measuring how fast the brain responds to sights and sounds could help in objectively classifying people on the autism spectrum and may help diagnose the condition earlier. [More]
Scientists identify way to find proverbial needle in cancer antigen haystack

Scientists identify way to find proverbial needle in cancer antigen haystack

Scientists have found a way to find the proverbial needle in the cancer antigen haystack, according to a report published in The Journal of Experimental Medicine. [More]
NIH awards $10.1 million in supplemental funding to study effects of sex in preclinical, clinical studies

NIH awards $10.1 million in supplemental funding to study effects of sex in preclinical, clinical studies

The National Institutes of Health has awarded $10.1 million in supplemental funding to bolster the research of 82 grantees to explore the effects of sex in preclinical and clinical studies. [More]
UW-Madison and Morgridge researchers are creating tissue chip technology to screen neural toxins

UW-Madison and Morgridge researchers are creating tissue chip technology to screen neural toxins

A multidisciplinary team at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the Morgridge Institute for Research is creating a faster, more affordable way to screen for neural toxins, helping flag chemicals that may harm human development. [More]
DNA sequencing may lead to greater care for patients with ventilator-associated pneumonia

DNA sequencing may lead to greater care for patients with ventilator-associated pneumonia

A patient survives life-threatening trauma, is intubated in the intensive care unit (ICU) to support his or her affected vital functions, starts to recover, and then develops pneumonia. [More]

Young scientists from European member country invited to apply for EFIC-Grünenthal Grant 2014

Young scientists from any European member country of the European Pain Federation EFIC® are invited to apply for the EFIC-Grünenthal Grant (E-G-G) 2014. [More]
Researchers say that environment plays much stronger role than genetics in eosinophilic esophagitis

Researchers say that environment plays much stronger role than genetics in eosinophilic esophagitis

Researchers have found that environment has a much stronger role than genetics in eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), a severe, often painful food allergy that renders children unable to eat a wide variety of foods. [More]
Researchers develop T-MOC device to study complex environment surrounding tumors

Researchers develop T-MOC device to study complex environment surrounding tumors

Researchers have developed a chip capable of simulating a tumor's "microenvironment" and plan to use the new system to test the effectiveness of nanoparticles and drugs that target cancer. [More]
Researchers test novel robotic system to improve prostate cancer biopsies

Researchers test novel robotic system to improve prostate cancer biopsies

A novel robotic system that can operate inside the bore of an MRI scanner is currently being tested as part of a biomedical research partnership program at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston with the aim of determining if the robot, in conjunction with real-time MRI images, can make prostate cancer biopsies faster, more accurate, less costly, and less discomforting for the patient. [More]
Researchers develop protein therapy that may stop cancer growth

Researchers develop protein therapy that may stop cancer growth

A team of Stanford researchers has developed a protein therapy that disrupts the process that causes cancer cells to break away from original tumor sites, travel through the blood stream and start aggressive new growths elsewhere in the body. [More]
Curcumin, cancer-inhibiting peptides show promise in slowing progression of mesothelioma

Curcumin, cancer-inhibiting peptides show promise in slowing progression of mesothelioma

A common Asian spice and cancer-hampering molecules show promise in slowing the progression of mesothelioma, a cancer of the lung's lining often linked to asbestos. Scientists from Case Western Reserve University and the Georg-Speyer-Haus in Frankfurt, Germany, demonstrate that application of curcumin, a derivative of the spice turmeric, and cancer-inhibiting peptides increase levels of a protein inhibitor known to combat the progression of this cancer. [More]
Exercise may have added benefit for cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy: Study

Exercise may have added benefit for cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy: Study

Study after study has proven it true: exercise is good for you. But new research from University of Pennsylvania scientists suggests that exercise may have an added benefit for cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. [More]
Penn Medicine, Wistar Institute awarded NCI grants for four new melanoma research projects

Penn Medicine, Wistar Institute awarded NCI grants for four new melanoma research projects

Penn Medicine and The Wistar Institute have been awarded a prestigious $12.1 million SPORE grant from the National Cancer Institute. The five-year Specialized Programs of Research Excellence, or SPORE, grant will fund four new melanoma research projects that aim to translate fundamental laboratory discoveries into new therapeutics to treat melanoma and other skin cancers. [More]
Common type of hospital-associated infections can be prevented with vaccine

Common type of hospital-associated infections can be prevented with vaccine

The most common type of hospital-associated infection may be preventable with a vaccine, new research in mice suggests. [More]
UAB researchers discover novel mechanism involved in formation of memory, learning

UAB researchers discover novel mechanism involved in formation of memory, learning

Researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham report the discovery of a novel mechanism in the brain involved in the formation of memory and learning. In findings reported online this week in Nature, the research team describes the role of a histone subunit known as H2A.Z. [More]