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Two common antibiotic treatments equally effective against MRSA skin infections

Two common antibiotic treatments equally effective against MRSA skin infections

Researchers funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health, have found that two common antibiotic treatments work equally well against bacterial skin infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) acquired outside of hospital settings. [More]
New approach to improve cardiac regeneration

New approach to improve cardiac regeneration

The heart tissue of mammals has limited capacity to regenerate after an injury such as a heart attack, in part due to the inability to reactivate a cardiac muscle cell and proliferation program. Recent studies have indicated a low level of cardiac muscle cell (cardiomyocytes) proliferation in adult mammals, but it is insufficient to repair damaged hearts. [More]
Cardiovascular researchers identify MG53 protein necessary for repairing injured kidney cells

Cardiovascular researchers identify MG53 protein necessary for repairing injured kidney cells

Cardiovascular researchers at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center have shown that a protein known as MG53 is not only present in kidney cells, but necessary for the organ to repair itself after acute injury. Results from this animal model study are published in the journal Science Translational Medicine. [More]
Study reveals conclusive results in reducing toxicities for Asian patients with mRCC

Study reveals conclusive results in reducing toxicities for Asian patients with mRCC

A study led by the Genitourinary (GU) oncology team at National Cancer Centre Singapore has revealed conclusive results in reducing toxicities for Asian patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) or cancer that has spread beyond the kidney. [More]
Researchers discover new metabolic mechanisms linked to macrophage polarization

Researchers discover new metabolic mechanisms linked to macrophage polarization

A group of researchers from Washington University in St. Louis, Agios Pharmaceuticals and ITMO University has discovered new metabolic mechanisms that regulate macrophage polarization - the unique ability of these immune cells to change their specialization depending on the required task. [More]
Study reveals novel approach to treat breast cancer

Study reveals novel approach to treat breast cancer

A means of reprogramming a flawed immune response into an efficient anti-tumoral one was brought to light by the results of a translational trial relating to breast cancer. Thanks to the innovative combination of mathematical modelisation and experimentation, only 20 tests were necessary, whereas traditional experimentation would have required 596 tests to obtain the same results. [More]
GenomeNext completes whole genome sequencing analysis at unprecedented 1,000 genomes per day

GenomeNext completes whole genome sequencing analysis at unprecedented 1,000 genomes per day

GenomeNext, LLC, a leader in genomic data management and integrated analysis, announced today that, through the "Intel Heads In The Clouds Challenge on Amazon Web Services" with support from JHC Technology, and in conjunction with Nationwide Children's Hospital, has benchmarked whole genome sequencing analysis at an unprecedented 1,000 genomes per day. [More]
Physicians, researchers to discuss advances in cancer immunotherapies at UChicago symposium

Physicians, researchers to discuss advances in cancer immunotherapies at UChicago symposium

The Ben May Department for Cancer Research at the University of Chicago will hold a day-long symposium on cancer immunotherapy for physicians and researchers. [More]
Janssen Pharmaceutical to invest $10 million in global Dementia Discovery Fund

Janssen Pharmaceutical to invest $10 million in global Dementia Discovery Fund

Johnson & Johnson today announced that its Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies will invest $10 million in a new UK government-led global dementia discovery fund that will support innovative research to help find new ways to prevent and treat dementia and Alzheimer's disease. [More]
CUMC researchers identify mechanism of kidney transplant tolerance

CUMC researchers identify mechanism of kidney transplant tolerance

Columbia University Medical Center researchers have pinpointed the immune system mechanism that allows a kidney transplant to be accepted without lifelong immunosuppressive drugs, a significant step toward reducing or eliminating the need for costly and potentially toxic immunosuppressant drugs and improving long-term transplant success. [More]
New hepatitis C drugs to place economic burden on health care system, predicts MD Anderson study

New hepatitis C drugs to place economic burden on health care system, predicts MD Anderson study

The cost of treating people infected with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) with newly approved therapies will likely place a tremendous economic burden on the country's health care system. The prediction comes from a cost-effectiveness analysis led by researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. [More]
Two American scientists receive Paul Ehrlich and Ludwig Darmstaedter Prize

Two American scientists receive Paul Ehrlich and Ludwig Darmstaedter Prize

Two American scientists, James P. Allison and Carl H. June, will today receive the Paul Ehrlich and Ludwig Darmstaedter Prize in the Paulskirche in Frankfurt. Both give the patient's own immune system the lasting ability to fight cancer, Allison against late stage melanoma, June against leukemia. [More]
Max Planck Florida Institute receives NIH grant to study cerebral cortex function and development

Max Planck Florida Institute receives NIH grant to study cerebral cortex function and development

Dr. David Fitzpatrick, Scientific Director and CEO at the Max Planck Florida Institute for Neuroscience, has been awarded a $2.4 million five-year grant from the National Eye Institute (NEI) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to study the functional organization and development of neural circuits in the cerebral cortex, specifically, in the area of brain responsible for processing visual information. [More]
New immunotoxin found to be safe, effective in patients with B-cell malignancies

New immunotoxin found to be safe, effective in patients with B-cell malignancies

Almost all patients with a group of blood cancers called B-cell malignancies have two prominent "fingerprints" on the surface of leukemia and lymphoma cancers, called CD22 and CD19, Vallera explained. [More]
New database on healthy immune system may help design future studies on autoimmune disorders

New database on healthy immune system may help design future studies on autoimmune disorders

An extensive database identifying immune traits, such as how immune cell function is regulated at the genetic level in healthy people, is reported by researchers from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and their collaborators in the journal Cell. [More]
Non-invasive ultrasound technology can treat Alzheimer's disease, restore memory

Non-invasive ultrasound technology can treat Alzheimer's disease, restore memory

Queensland scientists have found that non-invasive ultrasound technology can be used to treat Alzheimer's disease and restore memory. [More]
Study: New gene therapy safe, effective for patients with hemophilia B

Study: New gene therapy safe, effective for patients with hemophilia B

A multi-year, ongoing study suggests that a new kind of gene therapy for hemophilia B could be safe and effective for human patients. Published in the journal Science Translational Medicine, the research showed that a reprogrammed retrovirus could successfully transfer new factor IX (clotting) genes into animals with hemophilia B to dramatically decrease spontaneous bleeding. [More]
Penn researcher named a recipient of 2015 Paul Ehrlich and Ludwig Darmstaedter Prize

Penn researcher named a recipient of 2015 Paul Ehrlich and Ludwig Darmstaedter Prize

University of Pennsylvania cancer and HIV expert Carl June, MD, has been named one of two recipients of the 2015 Paul Ehrlich and Ludwig Darmstaedter Prize for his outstanding work in cancer immunotherapy. Since 1952, the Paul Ehrlich and Ludwig Darmstaedter Prize has been awarded to scientists who have made great advancements in the fields in which Paul Ehrlich worked, in particular immunology, cancer research, microbiology, and chemotherapy. [More]
UTHealth remotely enrolls patients into acute stroke clinical trial with telemedicine method

UTHealth remotely enrolls patients into acute stroke clinical trial with telemedicine method

For the first time in the world, researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston were able to enroll patients at other hospitals into an acute stroke clinical trial. [More]
Early mobility therapy improves outcomes of patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome

Early mobility therapy improves outcomes of patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome

Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a life-threatening lung condition that affects approximately 200,000 people a year in the United States and has a higher mortality rate than breast and prostate cancer combined. The condition most often occurs in people who are critically ill or who have significant injuries; those who do survive it often experience profound skeletal muscle weakness. [More]
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