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New UC Davis Environmental Health Sciences Center launched to protect communities from unhealthy exposures

New UC Davis Environmental Health Sciences Center launched to protect communities from unhealthy exposures

A cross-disciplinary center focused on identifying connections between environmental toxins and disease has been established at UC Davis Health System with the ultimate goal of developing preventions and policies that protect communities from unhealthy exposures. [More]
UCSF-led team develops new technique to create tiny models of human tissues

UCSF-led team develops new technique to create tiny models of human tissues

A UCSF-led team has developed a technique to build tiny models of human tissues, called organoids, more precisely than ever before using a process that turns human cells into a biological equivalent of LEGO bricks. These mini-tissues in a dish can be used to study how particular structural features of tissue affect normal growth or go awry in cancer. They could be used for therapeutic drug screening and to help teach researchers how to grow whole human organs. [More]
Newly discovered prion causes Multiple System Atrophy

Newly discovered prion causes Multiple System Atrophy

Multiple System Atrophy (MSA), a neurodegenerative disorder with similarities to Parkinson's disease, is caused by a newly discovered type of prion, akin to the misfolded proteins involved in incurable progressive brain diseases such Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD), according to two new research papers led by scientists at UC San Francisco. [More]
Northwestern University receives $11.7 million NCI grant to use nanotechnology for cancer treatments

Northwestern University receives $11.7 million NCI grant to use nanotechnology for cancer treatments

Northwestern University, a leader in cancer nanotechnology research, has received a five-year, $11.7 million grant from the National Cancer Institute to use nanotechnology to develop next-generation cancer treatments. [More]
New $6.25 million NIH grant to help investigators launch research center to slow and stop HIV

New $6.25 million NIH grant to help investigators launch research center to slow and stop HIV

A new five-year, $6.25 million grant from the National Institutes of Health will help investigators from Northwestern University, the University of Chicago and others across the city of Chicago work together to slow and stop HIV. [More]
New book provides authoritative overview of neuroendocrine tumors

New book provides authoritative overview of neuroendocrine tumors

Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) originate from diffuse neuroendocrine cells that are dispersed throughout the body, predominantly in the gastrointestinal tract, islets of Langerhans in the pancreas and the bronchopulmonary system. [More]
Multiple IV administration of adipose-derived MSCs may extend healthy life and lifespan

Multiple IV administration of adipose-derived MSCs may extend healthy life and lifespan

Researchers in Korea have determined the possibility that adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) may extend healthy life and lifespan by intravenous injections. [More]
Adaptive immune system plays active role in guiding development of mammary glands

Adaptive immune system plays active role in guiding development of mammary glands

In experiments with mouse tissue, UC San Francisco researchers have discovered that the adaptive immune system, generally associated with fighting bacterial and viral infections, plays an active role in guiding the normal development of mammary glands, the only organs--in female humans as well as mice--that develop predominately after birth, beginning at puberty. [More]
UAB sleep medicine physician offers tips on insomnia

UAB sleep medicine physician offers tips on insomnia

Have trouble sleeping or waking up? You are not alone. The American Academy of Sleep Medicine estimates 30-35 percent of adults complain of insomnia. It is common in groups such as older adults, women, people under stress, and people with certain medical and mental health problems. [More]
Experimental gene therapy may prevent neuronal degeneration in patients with Alzheimer's disease

Experimental gene therapy may prevent neuronal degeneration in patients with Alzheimer's disease

Degenerating neurons in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) measurably responded to an experimental gene therapy in which nerve growth factor (NGF) was injected into their brains, report researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine in the current issue of JAMA Neurology. [More]
UiO researchers test new nasal spray device for treating mental illness

UiO researchers test new nasal spray device for treating mental illness

Researchers at the University of Oslo have tested a new device for delivering hormone treatments for mental illness through the nose. This method was found to deliver medicine to the brain with few side effects. [More]
New test predicts breast cancer relapse months in advance

New test predicts breast cancer relapse months in advance

UK-based researchers have developed a blood test that can predict whether patients with breast cancer will experience a relapse after receiving treatment, months before tumors are visible using hospital scans. [More]
Automated speech analysis program correctly identifies young people at risk for psychosis

Automated speech analysis program correctly identifies young people at risk for psychosis

An automated speech analysis program correctly differentiated between at-risk young people who developed psychosis over a two-and-a-half year period and those who did not. In a proof-of-principle study, researchers at Columbia University Medical Center, New York State Psychiatric Institute, and the IBM T. J. Watson Research Center found that the computerized analysis provided a more accurate classification than clinical ratings. [More]
Researchers design online database to help researchers identify cancer gene mutations

Researchers design online database to help researchers identify cancer gene mutations

Many clinical trials use genome sequencing to learn which gene mutations are present in a patient's tumor cells. The question is important because targeting the right mutations with the right drugs can stop cancer in its tracks. But it can be difficult to determine whether there is evidence in the medical literature that particular mutations might drive cancer growth and could be targeted by therapy, and which mutations are of no consequence. [More]
Childhood cancer survivors have high risk of suffering stroke at young age

Childhood cancer survivors have high risk of suffering stroke at young age

Most people assume strokes only happen to octogenarians, but recent evidence suggests that survivors of childhood cancer have a high risk of suffering a stroke at a surprisingly young age. [More]
UCSF study reveals molecular timing mechanism of stem cells

UCSF study reveals molecular timing mechanism of stem cells

UC San Francisco researchers have for the first time developed a method to precisely control embryonic stem cell differentiation with beams of light, enabling them to be transformed into neurons in response to a precise external cue. [More]
Pre-birth arsenic exposure associated with early puberty, obesity in mice

Pre-birth arsenic exposure associated with early puberty, obesity in mice

Female mice exposed in utero, or in the womb, to low levels of arsenic through drinking water displayed signs of early puberty and became obese as adults, according to scientists from the National Institutes of Health. [More]
Theresa Alenghat receives 2015 AGA-CCFA-Janssen Research Award in IBD Epigenetics Research

Theresa Alenghat receives 2015 AGA-CCFA-Janssen Research Award in IBD Epigenetics Research

The American Gastroenterological Association, in partnership with the Crohn's & Colitis Foundation of America and Janssen Biotech, Inc., announced today that Theresa Alenghat, VMD, PhD, from Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, OH, was awarded with the 2015 AGA-CCFA-Janssen Research Award in Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) Epigenetics Research. [More]
Cornell study reveals how obesity changes consistency of breast tissue

Cornell study reveals how obesity changes consistency of breast tissue

Women who are obese have a higher risk and a worse prognosis for breast cancer, but the reasons why remain unclear. A Cornell study published this month in Science Translational Medicine explains how obesity changes the consistency of breast tissue in ways that are similar to tumors, thereby promoting disease. [More]
Individuals having high blood levels of two closely related proteins experience few adverse health events

Individuals having high blood levels of two closely related proteins experience few adverse health events

Individuals previously diagnosed with heart disease may be less likely to experience heart failure, heart attacks, or stroke, or to die from these events, if they have higher blood levels of two very closely related proteins, according to a new study led by a UC San Francisco research team. [More]
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