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Experimental vaccine protects monkeys exposed to Ebola virus

Experimental vaccine protects monkeys exposed to Ebola virus

One shot of an experimental vaccine made from two Ebola virus gene segments incorporated into a chimpanzee cold virus vector (called chimp adenovirus type 3 or ChAd3) protected all four macaque monkeys exposed to high levels of Ebola virus 5 weeks after inoculation, report National Institutes of Health (NIH) scientists and their collaborators. [More]
Study ties eating in response to food cues to habit-forming region in obese adults

Study ties eating in response to food cues to habit-forming region in obese adults

People who are obese may be more susceptible to environmental food cues than their lean counterparts due to differences in brain chemistry that make eating more habitual and less rewarding, according to a National Institutes of Health study published in Molecular Psychiatry. [More]
Agents targeting mitochondrial metabolism can have activity in leukemia

Agents targeting mitochondrial metabolism can have activity in leukemia

Results of a Phase I clinical trial showed that a new drug targeting mitochondrial function in human cancer cells was safe and showed some efficacy. [More]
Transparency Life receives SBIR program grant to fund Phase 2a proof-of-concept study for MS

Transparency Life receives SBIR program grant to fund Phase 2a proof-of-concept study for MS

Transparency Life Sciences, LLC (TLS), the world's first clinical-stage drug development company based on open innovation, today announced that it has received a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program grant to fund a Phase 2a proof-of-concept study testing the utility of the ACE inhibitor lisinopril as an adjunctive therapy for multiple sclerosis (MS). [More]
Researchers make important progress in defining new genetic causes of Wilms tumor

Researchers make important progress in defining new genetic causes of Wilms tumor

Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center and the Gill Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders at Children's Medical Center, Dallas, have made significant progress in defining new genetic causes of Wilms tumor, a type of kidney cancer found only in children. [More]
Study compares breast and bottle fed infants

Study compares breast and bottle fed infants

Infant rhesus monkeys receiving different diets early in life develop distinct immune systems that persist months after weaning, a study by researchers from UC Davis, the California National Primate Research Center (CNPRC) at UC Davis and UC San Francisco have shown. [More]
Study finds no association between bra wearing and increased breast cancer risk

Study finds no association between bra wearing and increased breast cancer risk

A population-based case-control study found no association between bra wearing and increased breast cancer risk among postmenopausal women, according to research published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research. [More]
Short-term use of DPP-4 inhibitors does not increase risk for pancreatic cancer

Short-term use of DPP-4 inhibitors does not increase risk for pancreatic cancer

Researchers at the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health and the UNC School of Medicine have found that a popular class of diabetes medications called DPP-4 inhibitors does not increase the short-term risk of pancreatic cancer, as was previously reported by other researchers. [More]
Oncolytics Biotech completes randomized Phase 2 study of ovarian, fallopian tube cancer

Oncolytics Biotech completes randomized Phase 2 study of ovarian, fallopian tube cancer

Oncolytics Biotech Inc. today announced that patient enrollment has been completed in a randomized Phase 2 study of paclitaxel plus REOLYSIN® versus paclitaxel alone in patients with persistent or recurrent ovarian, fallopian tube or primary peritoneal cancer (GOG186H). [More]
New antibody in HIV-infected person binds to virus

New antibody in HIV-infected person binds to virus

An NIH-led team of scientists has discovered a new vulnerability in the armor of HIV that a vaccine, other preventive regimen or treatment could exploit. [More]
Neuroscientist discovers new mechanism that can reverse chronic pain

Neuroscientist discovers new mechanism that can reverse chronic pain

It's in the brain where we perceive the unpleasant sensations of pain, and researchers have long been examining how calcium channels in the brain and peripheral nervous system contribute to the development of chronic pain conditions. [More]
Professional baseball pitchers with poor core stability are more likely to miss more days

Professional baseball pitchers with poor core stability are more likely to miss more days

New research suggests that professional baseball pitchers with poor core stability are more likely to miss 30 or more days in a single season because of injury than are pitchers who have good control of muscles in their lower back and pelvis. [More]
Nasal septum cells can repair human articular cartilage defects

Nasal septum cells can repair human articular cartilage defects

Human articular cartilage defects can be treated with nasal septum cells. Researchers at the University and the University Hospital of Basel report that cells taken from the nasal septum are able to adapt to the environment of the knee joint and can thus repair articular cartilage defects. [More]

Surgical researchers rarely use female animals in medical research

A new study from Northwestern Medicine- has found that surgical researchers rarely use female animals or female cells in their published studies -- despite a huge body of evidence showing that sex differences can play a crucial role in medical research. [More]
NIH to start initial human testing of investigational Ebola vaccine next week

NIH to start initial human testing of investigational Ebola vaccine next week

Initial human testing of an investigational vaccine to prevent Ebola virus disease will begin next week by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health. [More]
Researchers develop potential antibody therapy for Sudan ebolavirus

Researchers develop potential antibody therapy for Sudan ebolavirus

Researchers from Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University and other institutions have developed a potential antibody therapy for Sudan ebolavirus (SUDV), one of the two most lethal strains of Ebola. [More]
TGen to lead first-in-patient clinical trial studies to test novel drugs for glioblastoma

TGen to lead first-in-patient clinical trial studies to test novel drugs for glioblastoma

SIn 2012, The Ben & Catherine Ivy Foundation awarded $10 million in grants for two groundbreaking brain cancer research projects at the Translational Genomics Research Institute. One of those projects has officially received the final regulatory approval from University of California, San Francisco, which means patient enrollment for the trial can begin. [More]
HICCC receives $18 million grant from the National Cancer Institute

HICCC receives $18 million grant from the National Cancer Institute

Outstanding basic research, a growing focus on translating discoveries into treatments, and a dedication to patient care have earned the Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center (HICCC) of Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) and NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital an $18 million, five-year Cancer Center Support Grant from the National Cancer Institute (NCI). [More]
Young adults who experienced depression have hyper-connected networks in the brain

Young adults who experienced depression have hyper-connected networks in the brain

Depression may be better predicted and understood now that University of Illinois at Chicago researchers have discovered that young adults who previously experienced the mental illness have hyper-connected emotional and cognitive networks in the brain. [More]
Study: Many HIV infected African-Americans may not be receiving effective doses of maraviroc drug

Study: Many HIV infected African-Americans may not be receiving effective doses of maraviroc drug

Many African-Americans may not be getting effective doses of the HIV drug maraviroc, a new study from Johns Hopkins suggests. The initial dosing studies, completed before the drug was licensed in 2007, included mostly European-Americans, who generally lack a protein that is key to removing maraviroc from the body. [More]