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NIH-funded study identifies genetic markers associated with eosinophilic esophagitis

NIH-funded study identifies genetic markers associated with eosinophilic esophagitis

Scientists funded by the National Institutes of Health have identified genetic markers associated with eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), an inflammatory disease characterized by high levels of immune cells called eosinophils in the esophagus. [More]
Women experiencing stressful events the day before eating high-fat meal can slow body's metabolism

Women experiencing stressful events the day before eating high-fat meal can slow body's metabolism

A new study in women suggests that experiencing one or more stressful events the day before eating a single high-fat meal can slow the body's metabolism, potentially contributing to weight gain. [More]
Portable, microchip-based test for diagnosing type-1 diabetes

Portable, microchip-based test for diagnosing type-1 diabetes

An inexpensive, portable, microchip-based test for diagnosing type-1 diabetes could improve patient care worldwide and help researchers better understand the disease, according to the device's inventors at the Stanford University School of Medicine. [More]
Computational algorithms provide insight into how gut microbiota respond to infection over time

Computational algorithms provide insight into how gut microbiota respond to infection over time

Being sick due to an infection can make us feel lousy. But what must the ecosystem of bacteria, or microbiota, colonizing our guts be going through when hit with infection? A study from Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) has utilized unique computational models to show how infection can affect bacteria that naturally live in our intestines. [More]
Mississippi baby: Infant seemingly cured of HIV has detectable levels of HIV

Mississippi baby: Infant seemingly cured of HIV has detectable levels of HIV

The child known as the "Mississippi baby"-an infant seemingly cured of HIV that was reported as a case study of a prolonged remission of HIV infection in The New England Journal of Medicine last fall-now has detectable levels of HIV after more than two years of not taking antiretroviral therapy without evidence of virus, according to the pediatric HIV specialist and researchers involved in the case. [More]
MIIR partners with international biosciences to develop potential anti-cancer drugs

MIIR partners with international biosciences to develop potential anti-cancer drugs

The Marshall Institute for Interdisciplinary Research (MIIR) and the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine today announced they will be partnering with an international biosciences company to develop potential anti-cancer drugs. [More]
Baxter International acquires drug candidate developed to treat sickle cell disease

Baxter International acquires drug candidate developed to treat sickle cell disease

A drug candidate developed by researchers at the NIH's National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences and its collaborators to treat sickle cell disease has been acquired by Baxter International's BioScience business. [More]
LA BioMed researchers launch new project to improve diabetes management

LA BioMed researchers launch new project to improve diabetes management

Managing diabetes is a year-round challenge for anyone living with the disease. The challenge is even greater for underserved and uninsured people who often don't have easy access to the care they need to manage their diabetes. [More]
HD Biosciences and MIIR partner to co-develop potential anti-cancer drugs

HD Biosciences and MIIR partner to co-develop potential anti-cancer drugs

HD Biosciences Co., Ltd. (HDB), the Marshall Institute for Interdisciplinary Research (MIIR) and the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine announced the new partnership to co-develop potential anti-cancer drugs. [More]
Parkinson's disease drug could also help people with phobias or PTSD

Parkinson's disease drug could also help people with phobias or PTSD

A drug used to treat Parkinson's disease could also help people with phobias or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Scientists of the Translational Neurosciences Research Center at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz are currently exploring the effects of psychotherapy to extinguish fears in combination with L-dopa. [More]
New findings paint optimistic picture of women's chances of surviving breast cancer

New findings paint optimistic picture of women's chances of surviving breast cancer

New findings from Fox Chase Cancer Center paint a relatively optimistic picture of women's chances of surviving a subset of breast cancers that have spread to the chest wall or skin, but not beyond. [More]
TCGA finds novel mutations in key cancer-causing pathway in lung adenocarcinoma

TCGA finds novel mutations in key cancer-causing pathway in lung adenocarcinoma

Researchers from The Cancer Genome Atlas Research Network have identified novel mutations in a well-known cancer-causing pathway in lung adenocarcinoma, the most common subtype of lung cancer. [More]
Immune marker predicts infection risk in critically ill children with traumatic injuries

Immune marker predicts infection risk in critically ill children with traumatic injuries

Researchers studying critically ill children with traumatic injuries have identified an immune marker that predicts which patients are likely to develop a hospital-acquired infection. [More]
NIAID launches CRS3123 Phase I trial to treat C. difficile infection

NIAID launches CRS3123 Phase I trial to treat C. difficile infection

The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health, has launched an early-stage clinical trial of CRS3123, an investigational oral antibiotic intended to treat Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) infection. [More]
Letrozole drug results in higher birth rates in women with PCOS

Letrozole drug results in higher birth rates in women with PCOS

The drug letrozole results in higher birth rates in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) than the current preferred infertility treatment drug, according to a nationwide study led by Penn State College of Medicine researchers. [More]
Integrated therapies can reduce depression by half among people with low vision due to AMD

Integrated therapies can reduce depression by half among people with low vision due to AMD

The first clinical trial to examine integrated low vision and mental health treatment has shown that the approach can reduce the incidence of depression by half among people with low vision due to age-related macular degeneration (AMD). [More]
Thyroid hormone protects cholinergic neurons in hippocampus of naturally aged mice

Thyroid hormone protects cholinergic neurons in hippocampus of naturally aged mice

Can thyroid hormone protect neuronal function and increase the survival rate of naturally aged animals? Prof. Ailing Fu and her team, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Southwest University, China performed an animal experiment in which aged mice were administered with low dose of levothyroxine for 3 consecutive months. [More]
Neuroprotective effects of lithium are likely related to gene expressions

Neuroprotective effects of lithium are likely related to gene expressions

Lithium, as a neuroprotective agent, benefits for neuronal survival. Recent cDNA array studies have demonstrated that mood stabilizer lithium exhibits neuroprotective effects through multiple targets. [More]
New approach can reduce depression in patients with AMD-related low vision

New approach can reduce depression in patients with AMD-related low vision

Depression is a common risk for people who have lost their vision from age-related macular degeneration (AMD), but a new study shows that a type of rehabilitation therapy can cut this risk in half. The study was funded by the National Eye Institute (NEI), part of the National Institutes of Health. [More]
Research finding offers potential therapeutic avenues for glioblastoma

Research finding offers potential therapeutic avenues for glioblastoma

Invading glioblastoma cells may hijack cerebral blood vessels during early stages of disease progression and damage the brain's protective barrier, a study in mice indicates. This finding could ultimately lead to new ways to bring about the death of the tumor, as therapies may be able to reach these deadly cells at an earlier time point than was previously thought possible. [More]